How To Decommission A Septic Tank?

Decommission a System

  1. Have a pump out agent pump out the tank, rinse it with water and pump out the rinse water.
  2. Break the tank bottom, collapse the walls and top to below ground level.
  3. Use clean fill to bring area back to level with surround areas.
  4. Complete the Decommissioning a Septic System Form and return to Council.

What are the problems with septic tanks?

  • Common problems with a septic tank are sludge in the drain field and holes, excess water in the drain field, inability of the tank to process solids, compaction of the soil over the septic tank, and plants growing near the septic tank location.

What do you do with a disused septic tank?

Septic Tank Decommissioning

  1. Pump Out The Tank. It is important to pump the wastewater, as it contains bacteria and viruses that could make you or your family ill.
  2. Fill. Fill in the tank with sand or gravel and put the access lid back in place or demolish the tank in situ.
  3. Send Proof.

How do you decommission a concrete septic tank?

It involves safe removal of unused or abandoned septic tanks, soak wells and drain fields by a licensed sewer service provider. The contractor has to pump out the septic tank and fill it with compacted sand, concrete or gravel, before compressing the area back to surface grade.

Should old septic tanks be removed?

It is important to properly abandon un-used septic tanks, cesspools, or drywells. If an old septic tank, cesspool, or drywell is simply “left alone” there may be very serious cave-in or fall-in safety hazards.

How much does it cost to decommission a septic tank in NJ?

The cost to remove a septic tank costs $5,000 -$6,000 on average, including disposal of the tank. Septic tank removal costs can vary a great deal, from as low as a couple thousand dollars to as high as $10,000+. Your tank removal project could be more or less than this average depending on various factors.

Can you leave an old septic tank in the ground?

Tanks can be completely removed or they can be destroyed and buried in place. The decision depends on if you plan to use the land for something else, such as a home addition or pool, and need the remains of the tank out of the way.

Can you sell a house with an old septic tank?

If you’re selling a property with a septic tank, then you must be transparent with buyers about the fact the property uses a one and provide a detailed specification of the system. In fact, You are required by law to inform a buyer in writing about the presence of a septic tank.

Can septic tanks collapse?

Septic tanks can collapse for a variety of reasons. This is one of the most serious septic tank problems that can occur. Once a tank is emptied of water, it is much more prone to collapse. That is because the pressure of the surrounding soil is no longer counter-acted by the water inside the tank.

How were old septic tanks built?

Many of the first septic tanks were concrete tanks that were formed out of wood and poured in place in the ground and covered with a concrete lid or often some type of lumber. In the 1960s, precast concrete tanks became more prevalent as the standard of practice improved.

Can you build over an abandoned leach field?

Overall, it is not recommended to build over your leach filed and you should also not put anything heavy on top of it, such as parking a vehicle.

How long do septic tanks last?

A septic system’s lifespan should be anywhere from 15 to 40 years. How long the system lasts depends on a number of factors, including construction material, soil acidity, water table, maintenance practices, and several others.

What can you put on top of a septic tank?

Plants Safe to Grow Over Septic Tanks and Drain Fields

  1. Dogwood trees.
  2. Japanese maple trees.
  3. Eastern redbud trees.
  4. Cherry trees.
  5. Azalea shrubs.
  6. Boxwood shrubs.
  7. Holly shrubs.

Can septic tanks explode?

A septic tank can explode Septic tank explosions are extremely rare so it might sound farfetched but yes, a septic tank can actually explode. Methane gas is usually produced as a by-product during anaerobic digestion of organic waste in the septic tank. This gas is highly flammable.

Do you have to remove old septic tank NJ?

Even if you have been switched over to sewer, the old cesspool or septic tank must be abandoned with the proper permits and by a septic specialist.

What’s the difference between a cesspool and a septic tank?

A septic tank allows wastewater to flow into a leach field where it undergoes a filtration process. In contrast, a cesspool is a pit lined with cement or stone which lacks the ability to filter the waste, eventually contaminating the surrounding soil.

Septic Tank Decommissioning

What is a septic tank, and how does it work? In order to handle wastewater from the residence, an aseptic tank is comprised of two basic components: the tank and a drain field. T-pipe connections are used to allow waste to flow from the home through the tank and onto the drain field. These connections are formed using a T-pipe, which allows liquid to enter and depart without disturbing the surface above it. Solids and liquids are separated in the septic tank, which holds the wastewater after it has been broken down; the solids stay in the tank, while the liquids flow into the leach field once it has been broken down.

Septic tanks are made of concrete or metal, and they are 5 to 7 feet long and 5 to 7 feet deep.

Having septic tanks placed underground makes them more prone to corrosion, which reduces the structural stability of the structure.

The breakdown of decaying waste in septic tanks produces hazardous gases, and falling into one might result in the chance of being overpowered by toxic vapors.

There are two procedures that may be used to identify if you have a cesspool or septic tank on your property in the Portland Metro area: one is visual inspection and the other is chemical inspection.

  • The term “septic tank” means “sewage treatment system.” This system, which comprises of two major sections, the tank and a drain field, is responsible for the treatment of wastewater from a residence. It consists of a piping connection that allows waste to flow from the home, via the tank, and into the drain field. These connections are formed using a T pipe, which allows liquid to enter and depart without disturbing the surface above the ground. Particles and liquids are separated in the septic tank, which holds the wastewater after it has been broken down
  • The solids stay in the tank, while liquids flow onto a leach field. Septic tanks are typically 5 to 7 feet long and 5 to 7 feet deep, and they are typically positioned 5 to 30 feet away from the residence. Septic tanks can be made of concrete or metal and are 5 to 7 feet long and 5 to 7 feet deep. Abandoned septic tanks may pose a risk to the environment. Having septic tanks placed underground makes them more prone to corrosion, which reduces the structural stability of the tank. The instability of the system has the potential to inflict catastrophic harm or death if the system fails to operate properly. Because septic tanks contain hazardous gases produced by the decomposition of decaying materials, falling into one might result in the chance of being overrun by toxic vapors. In what ways can I tell if I have a cesspool on my land or if I have a septic tank? When it comes to determining whether or not you have a cesspool or a septic tank on your property in the Portland Metro region, there are two ways that may be used:

What is the best way to locate a septic tank? It would be necessary to send out a technician to the property in order to determine the position of the system in question. The technician locates the main plumbing stack that enters the building through the roof and visually stretches a straight line from the outer foundation line to the interior foundation line. Using the foundation as a starting point, the technician would go out to the septic tank, which would be anywhere between 5 and 30 feet away from the house.

Decommissioning of a septic tank

A septic tank might be hard to come by. It would be necessary to send a technician to the property in order to determine the location of the system in question. The technician locates the main plumbing stack that enters the building through the roof and visually stretches a straight line from the outer foundation line to the inside of the structure. The technician would go from the foundation to the septic tank, which would be anywhere between 5 and 30 feet away from the house.

  • Portland, Washington County, and Clackamas County are all located in Oregon.

Septic Decommissioning Permits in Multnomah County

When a septic tank, cesspool, or seepage pit is no longer in operation, you must get a decommissioning permission from the local government. A copy of this document will serve as an official record of the system’s location, materials, and deactivation.

Additionally, a decommissioning permit is necessary in the event that a septic system has been decommissioned without a permission and that future development is contemplated (review the list below). The present yard will have to be excavated as part of the decommissioning process.

Decommissioning permit application and important information

We would like to emphasize that septic decommissioning is not essential for a real estate transaction. Building demolition, building permits, land divisions, property line adjustments, and abatement of a property nuisance caused by a collapsed or open septic feature are all instances in which septic decommissioning permits are required. They may also be required as part of building demolition, building permits, land division, and property line adjustments. If you have a septic system, cesspool, or seepage pit (septic system), you must get a septic decommissioning permission if any of the following conditions exist:

  • A property is connected to a public sanitary sewer system, and the active septic system is removed from operation
  • The source of the sewage is permanently removed from the land. For example, dismantling a structure that was formerly supplied by a septic system
  • There is a proposal for new development within 10 feet of an abandoned septic system. Prior to the approval of a land division on a property with an abandoned septic system, the following steps must be taken: Prior to the approval of a property line modification that will result in an abandoned septic system being placed on a different lot than the structure it serviced or within five feet of a proposed property line, the following requirements must be met: A septic system sink hole must be filled in order to prevent flooding. To have a septic decommissioning permit on file in Multnomah County, the final inspection approval of a City of Portland septic decommissioning permit is necessary.
See also:  How Much Does It Cost To Service A Septic Tank? (Solved)

Apply for a septic decommissioning permit

Please fill out the information in the left-hand column of the Septic Evaluation Application, which includes the following:

  • Detailed job site and location information
  • Property owner information
  • Project/system description
  • And applicant information
  • Check the Decommissioning box in the upper right corner.

In order to submit your application, you are not need to submit a building permit or engineer’s drawings. You may send us your completed application by emailing it to us. The decommissioning permission will be issued within 1-2 business days after receiving the application. We’ll get in touch with the applicant to provide instructions on how to pay the application cost with a credit card. After payment has been received, the decommissioning permission will be granted.

Who can do the work

A variety of firms, including excavation companies, sanitary sewer contractors, specialist home sales businesses, and septic professionals, are qualified to execute septic decommissioning work on a residential or commercial property. Homeowners and others may also be able to assist with the decommissioning process. A decommissioning permit does not need the possession of a trade license.

Get ready for septic decommissioning permit inspections

Visualize a straight line going from the main plumbing vent stack (typically 4 inches in diameter) through the roof and into the external foundation, continuing from the stack through the foundation. Then, by excavating along the 4-6 inch diameter sanitary pipe that is departing the building, you will be able to reach the pipe’s terminus, which will be either at the cesspool/septic tank or the property line.

Search historic plumbing records for septic system locations

On Portland Maps, you might be able to locate information indicating the locations of septic systems. To begin your search, enter the address of a location. Under the “Permits and Zoning” section, choose Permits from the drop-down menu. Here you will be able to access any historical plumbing records that are available.

Cesspools

  • Construction method: The majority of initial cesspools were built directly in line with the main plumbing vent stack, which could be seen from the roof, and 10-15 feet away from the building foundation. Repair and replacement: The majority of repair and replacement cesspools are typically positioned 10 feet straight out from the original cesspool or offset at a 45-degree angle (see illustration).

Step 2 Excavate and remove the top of the cesspool

Construction method: The majority of initial cesspools were built directly in line with the main plumbing vent stack, which could be seen from the roof, and 10-15 feet away from the building foundation; Most replacement cesspools are typically situated 10 feet straight out from the original cesspool or at a 45-degree angle from the original cesspool (see diagram).

Step 3 Pump out any sewage

If there is any remaining solid or liquid sanitary waste in the cesspool, it must be pumped out by a DEQ pumper who is properly licensed.

If a cesspool has been neglected for a number of years, it is likely to be completely dry. Pumping and a pump receipt are not necessary if a cesspool is completely dry. If pumping is required, a copy of the pump receipt will be required for inspection approval before the inspection can be completed.

Step 4 Backfill

In order to backfill the cesspool, use clean crushed rock or gravel that is less than 3/4 inch in size, or use masonry or playground sand, or concrete slurry. It is not permissible to employ native silty or clay soils, trash, or waste. Leave the top 12-18 inches of the cesspool lining exposed, as well as the pipe that enters the cesspool. The inspector will record the kind of plumbing and cesspool construction, such as brick, concrete ring, or unlined soil, in his or her report. If certain elements are not visible during the inspection, you may be needed to remove fill material.

It is possible that the fill will need to be deposited as structural fill with compaction testing by an engineer or testing firm if a new foundation will be installed within 10 feet of the onsite septic system.

Septic tanks

The septic tank may be found by exposing the sanitary pipe that runs from the building to the point where it terminates, which is either at the septic tank or at the property line. The diameter of the sanitary pipes is usually between 4-6 inches. It is possible for septic tanks to have a riser that extends to the ground surface. Many historic homes were built with their septic tanks just above the main plumbing vent stack on the roof and 5-20 feet out from the foundation on one or both sides of the structure.

Step 2 Pump out any sewage if applicable

If there is any remaining solid or liquid waste in the tank, it must be pumped out by a DEQ pumper who is properly licensed. DEQ Link is an acronym for Department of Environmental Quality. Septic tanks are often required to be pumped and are very rarely completely dry. Please preserve a copy of the pump receipt for your records. It is necessary prior to the approval of the inspection.

Step 3 Remove or decommission in-place

It may be feasible to decommission a septic tank that is already in existence by filling the septic tank through an existing riser opening. In some cases, it may be necessary to break open the top of the septic tank in order to fill it. Drainage should be ensured by breaking up, punching, or drilling holes in the bottom of the tank. Backfill the tank with minus 34 inches of material or slurry. Tank construction and depth below grade must be documented, and the top of the tank must be visible during the inspection in order for the tank to pass inspection.

if you are removing a septic tank prior to inspection, please ensure that the tank is left on site for inspection or that images of the empty septic tank are supplied demonstrating the tank before removal.

It is possible that the fill will need to be deposited as structural fill with compaction testing by an engineer or testing firm if a new foundation will be installed within 10 feet of the onsite septic system. For more information, please see your engineer or building inspector.

Schedule a septic decommissioning permit inspection, get inspection results and make corrections

To arrange a septic decommissioning inspection, use the Requests for Inspection phone line, which is an automated system. For the inspection, you’ll need your IVR number as well as the three-digit code. Septic decommissioning has the IVR code 842 assigned to it. Calls will be made between the hours of 7 and 9 a.m. on the day of inspection by our inspection crew. We’ll check to see that the site is accessible and that the work is ready for inspection before moving further. We’ll also schedule a time for you to come in for an inspection.

They will examine the uncovered septic feature location(s), pipe type(s), and measurements, and compare them to the information included in the permit records accessible to them.

If a septic feature could not be identified, excavation attempts will be evaluated and documented in the same way as before.

The pump receipt will be collected by the inspector in order to verify the removal of septage.

  • The automated Requests for Examination phone number can be used to set up a decommissioning inspection of a septic system. For the inspection, you’ll need to know your IVR number as well as the three-digit code. Septic decommissioning is coded as 842 in the IVR database. Calls will be made between the hours of 7 and 9 a.m. on the day of inspection by our inspectors. Checking that the location is accessible and the work is ready for inspection is our first order of business. We’ll also provide you a window of opportunity to see the property upon your return. Upon arriving at the site, the inspector will be prepared with historical septic and plumbing information for the area. They will examine the uncovered septic feature location(s), pipe type(s), and measurements, and compare them to the information included in the permit records provided to the inspector. Septic system feature(s) shall be sketched as-built by the inspector, as well as the measurements of the septic system feature(s) and material used in the backfill. Excavation attempts will be evaluated and documented in the event that there was no septic feature discovered throughout the investigation. Allow for the examination of all excavation works. The pump receipt will be collected by the inspector in order to verify that the septage has been successfully removed. Also:

Contact septic inspectors

Calling Onsite Septic PermitsInspections between the hours of 7 a.m. and 9 a.m. on business days will connect you with an inspector who will answer your questions concerning septic inspections.

See also:  How To Stop Water Leakage In Septic Tank? (TOP 5 Tips)

HOW TO SAFELY ABANDON AN OLD SEPTIC TANK ON YOUR PROPERTY

If you’ve recently purchased an older house, it’s possible that a septic tank is located on the property. This is true even if your home is currently linked to the municipal water and sewer systems. A prior owner may have abandoned the ancient septic system and connected to the city sewage system when it became accessible at some time in the past. Despite the fact that there are standards in place today for properly leaving a septic tank, it was typical practice years ago to just leave the tanks in place and forget about them.

  1. The old tank may either be demolished or filled with water to solve the problem.
  2. It is possible that permits and inspections will be required.
  3. They are dangerous because curious children may pry open the lid and fall into the container.
  4. Falls into a septic tank can be lethal owing to the toxicity of the contents and the fact that concrete can collapse on top of you while falling into a tank.
  5. Eventually, this approach was phased out due to the fact that the steel would corrode and leave the tank susceptible to collapse.
  6. When it comes to ancient septic tanks, they are similar to little caves with a lid that might collapse at any time.
  7. The old tank is crushed and buried, or it is removed from the site.

If it is built of steel, it will very certainly be crushed and buried in its current location.

After that, the tank can be completely filled with sand, gravel, or any other form of rubble and buried.

Tanks can either be entirely dismantled or destroyed and buried in their original location.

The abandonment has been documented and plotted on a map.

It’s possible that you’ll forget about the tank once it’s been abandoned.

As a result, you might wish to sketch a map of the area where the old tank used to stand.

If you can demonstrate that an old septic tank was properly decommissioned, you may be able to increase the value of your property, and the new owners will enjoy knowing that large chunks of concrete are buried underground before they start digging in the yard to put something in it.

It may take some detective work to discover about the history of your land and what may be lying beneath the surface of the earth.

Upon discovering an old septic tank on your property that is no longer in service, contact Total Enviro Services for propertank abandonment procedures that meet with local standards and protect your family, pets, and farm animals from harm or death.

Septic Tank Decommissioning – Earthworks Excavating – Vancouver WA

It is most often necessary to decommission a septic tank when a home or company is switching from septic to sewer, or when an existing tank is in poor condition and must be replaced. When destroying structures and developing a property, it is necessary to decommission existing septic tanks in accordance with municipal regulations. When it comes to decommissioning septic tanks, there are a range of options available. We can figure out which strategy is the most efficient and cost-effective.

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Why do you Decommission a Septic Tank?

There are a variety of reasons why proper septic tank decommissioning is necessary. The most important consideration is safety. Over time, the lids of septic tanks have the potential to collapse, inflicting catastrophic harm or death to anyone within. Decommissioning regulations are imposed by local building and health bodies in order to mitigate this danger. If a property is being developed, all tanks must be decommissioned before construction can begin. These tanks are frequently removed from the site in their entirety.

How is Septic Tank Decommission Performed?

The septic tank has been identified and is protected. A qualified pumper is responsible for removing and disposing of the liquid waste. A copy of the documentation is sent to the local health and building jurisdictions. It is either (a) removed and disposed of and the void left is filled and compacted with structural fill (typically granular material such as sand or crushed rock) or (b) removed and disposed of with structural fill (typically low compressive strength concrete) that is used to fill and compact the void left.

Experts in Septic Tank Decommissioning

Decommissioning a septic tank may be a time-consuming and labor-intensive task. Contact Earthworks if you are connecting to the city sewer system or establishing a new site. We provide septic tank decommissioning services across the state of Washington. Return to Septic Services page.

Septic Tank Decommissioning in Vancouver WA

The following services are provided to clients in the Greater Vancouver WA area:

Salmon Creek | Washougal | East Vancouver | West Vancouver | Hazel Dell | Cascade Park | Mill Plain

Septic tank decommissioning is the process of putting a septic tank out of service and treating the system with chemicals to guarantee that it does not pose a threat to public health and welfare. The existing onsite wastewater treatment system must be decommissioned when the property has been linked to the municipal sewage system or a new system has been constructed.

What happens during septic tank decommissioning?

Decommissioning a septic system is not a simple task, and it is certainly not something that should be attempted on your own. The hazardous substances found in the septic tank are poisonous and might be lethal if they are not removed immediately. It is for this reason that you should seek the assistance of a professional liquid waste contractor. How does the process of decommissioning the septic tank unfold?

  1. There are no longer any plumbing or electrical connections to the septic system, and the system has been capped. The effluent and sludge that has accumulated in the tank are drained out. Chemical agents such as Aglime or Hydrated Lime are used to disinfect and destroy the pollutants in the tanks. Lime also has the additional benefit of reducing undesirable odors emanating from the tank. Making a few holes in the bottom of the tank allows for the tank to be emptied after that. In addition, the leach drains and soak wells are emptied. If it is not possible to remove the tanks, the concrete lids and tanks are cracked and filled with materials such as sand, concrete, and gravel. The tanks then buried below ground level. Because settling might result in a sudden collapse, the tank is buried below ground level and the surface has been compacted to prevent it from happening. The septic contractor will document the entire operation and offer a receipt that will be verified by the city’s inspectors and engineers.

Image courtesy of the Sunshine Coast Council. Septic Tank Decommissioning

Why is decommissioning of septic tank important?

Septic tanks serve as a breeding ground for hazardous gases that are damaging to both human health and the health of the environment. Old septic systems can get weakened over time as a result of corrosion, and they can eventually collapse, causing harm or even death to anyone in the vicinity. It is vital to get your septic system decommissioned as soon as possible in order to avoid any tragic incidents.

If you have a septic system that has been abandoned, call your local wastewater contractors. Is it necessary to decommission your septic system? Allow our septic system professionals to assist you.

When should you decommission the septic system?

  1. In septic tanks, hazardous gases that are dangerous to human health and the environment can grow, reproducing in them. With time, old septic systems can become weakened as a result of corrosion, and they can finally collapse, causing serious damage or death. The decommissioning of your septic system must be done soon in order to avoid any tragic incidents. To report an abandoned septic system, call your local wastewater contractors for assistance. Is it necessary to decommission your septic tank? Make use of the expertise of our septic system technicians.

Septic tanks serve as a breeding ground for hazardous gases that are damaging to both our health and the health of our environment. Old septic systems can get weakened over time as a result of corrosion, and they can eventually collapse, causing harm or even death to those who are within. It is vital to decommission your septic system as soon as possible in order to avoid any unforeseen incidents. If you have an abandoned septic system, you should call your local wastewater contractors. What is the best time to decommission your septic system?

Who can decommission a septic system?

Septic systems must be pumped out and cleaned by a qualified liquid waste professional that is familiar with the process. Our certified and highly qualified crew can decommission your septic system in a safe and effective manner. Express Wastewater is a locally owned and maintained family business that provides services to the South-East Queensland region. Alternatively, you may call us on 1800 722 517 if you have a septic system that has to be deactivated right away. Alternatively, you may fill out our online booking form and we will get back in touch with you.

Learn more about septic systems:

  • What is the operation of a septic system? The DOs and DON’Ts of Septic System Maintenance
  • Exactly what size septic tank do I require
  • What causes septic tanks to smell

What is the process of decommissioning a septic tank? Allow our professionals to assist you.

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More information about septic, sewage, and wastewater systems may be found by using the search box provided below.

See also:  What Is A Septic Tank Baffle? (Solution found)

Why Use Express Wastewater Solutions?

  • More information about septic, sewage, and wastewater systems may be found by using the search box below.

EXPERT TEAM

  • Because we do this on a daily basis, we have built a close-knit experienced team that can handle every step of the process – from blueprints and council paperwork through excavations, electrical, and plumbing – without sacrificing quality. We take care of everything to ensure that the procedure is as stress-free and speedy as possible.

FREE 30 MINUTE WASTEWATER CONSULTATION

  • A free 30-minute phone consultation with one of our specialists will guide you through the process if you have never installed a home sewage treatment plant before
  • Thus, we provide this service to guide you through the process.

STREE FREE INSTALLATIONS

  • The entire wastewater installation process is handled by us
  • We can deal with all of the trades, the municipality, and everything else, so you don’t have to worry about a thing.

QUALIFIED, LICENSED PROFESSIONALS

  • Have confidence in the fact that Express is a team of certified and insured specialists that will do your task correctly the first time

FREE EXPERT ADVICE

  • Not sure which system is best for you, or want to know if your current system is up and running efficiently? Simply give one of our knowledgeable wastewater specialists a call, and they will be more than delighted to assist you

SAVE UP TO $10,000 ON REPAIRING YOUR SEPTIC SYSTEM

  • We will always attempt to fix your system rather than replacing it if it is not necessary to do so, which will normally save you a significant amount of money, often up to and beyond $10,000.

Decommission your septic tank

Unless you live in an area where there is presently a sewer connection, you must decommission your septic system. When opposed to keeping a septic tank, being connected to the sewer is a more cost-effective and low-maintenance choice. In addition, decommissioning your septic tank will free up valuable land space on your property, which is beneficial for our rivers, the environment, and public health in the long run. For further information about connecting to the sewer, please visit Yarra Valley Water.

How much does it cost to connect to sewer?

For information on connection fees, please see Yarra Valley Water.

How to decommission your septic tank?

After you have connected your septic tank to the sewer system, you may decommission the tank. You must do the following:

  • Make arrangements to have the sludge pumped out and the inlet and outlet pipelines sealed by a professional sewage sludge contractor. Punching a hole in the bottom of the tank, the lids, and any sections of the tank walls that are above ground level and have fallen into the tank are all acceptable methods of doing so. Clean dirt or sand should be used to fill the tank.

Because the chlorination pits on the sand filter outputs may have a direct connection to the stormwater drain, the above procedure must be followed for these pits as well.

Notify us of your septic tank decommission

Once you have completed the decommissioning of your septic tank, please tell us. [email protected] or [email protected] with documentation of your decommissioning and information of your septic tank Was this information useful? Thank you for taking the time to provide comments.

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Decommissioning A Septic Tank – Why, Who and How?

Because they are not linked to the public sewer system, the vast majority of houses rely on a sewage treatment plan (also known as a septic tank). If, on the other hand, public sewer systems become available to you, you must link to the public sewers as soon as feasible after they become available.

Your private sewage system will be rendered inoperable as a result of this. If such is the case, you are required by law to decommission the facility. How does decommissioning a septic tank work, and why is it necessary to do so, is a question that many people have.

What Is Septic Tank Decommissioning?

When it comes down to it, decommissioning is simply the act of shutting down your sewage system and ensuring that it is no longer in use. The majority of the time, this will entail either emptying out your septic tank and filling it with sand, gravel, or concrete, or eliminating your septic tank entirely.

Why Do I Need To Decommission My Septic Tank?

For a variety of reasons, unused septic tanks can pose a threat to public health and safety. As a starting point, abandoned drainage systems can become unstable and collapse under pressure or after extended periods of corrosion and abuse. Second, septic tanks can emit hazardous chemicals that can be harmful to the environment as well as your family’s health and well-being. Septic tanks must be appropriately decommissioned if they are no longer in use for any of the reasons listed above, according to the General Binding Rules.

Who Carries Out Septic Tank Decommissioning?

It is recommended that septic tank decommissioning be performed exclusively by a licensed supplier. It is recommended that only individuals who have the necessary equipment and training carry out the procedure, despite its apparent simplicity. A failure to do so may result in your system collapsing, or there may be the possibility of dangerous gases escaping during the decommissioning process. If you need to decommission your sewage treatment system, you will also need to contact the Environmental Agency for assistance.

To ask any concerns about your septic tank or wastewater treatment facility, please contact one of our specialists.

Septic Tank Decommissioning

Our health, safety, and the environment will be better safeguarded if decommissioning procedures are followed correctly. Septic tanks are filled with untreated wastewater that might be infected with bacteria, viruses, parasites, and nitrates, among other contaminants. Eventually, wastewater may seep out of the tank if it is left unattended. This will contaminate the soil, groundwater, and even damage nearby waterways and streams. If an abandoned septic tank is not completely filled with dirt, it has the potential to completely collapse.

Here’s how we go about it: The Tank Should Be Pumped Out Water treatment is necessary because wastewater includes germs and viruses that might make you or your family ill if not properly treated.

Fill You may either fill in the tank with sand or gravel and replace the access lid, or you can dismantle the tank while it is still in place.

Submit ProofWe will prepare a proof-of-pumping receipt with evidence that your tank has been safely decommissioned so that you can send a copy of it to the local council for them to review and approve.

This allows for consideration of the available area for the new treatment tank that will be built later on.

DrainageWastewater Specialists

Our health, safety, and the environment will be better safeguarded if decommissioning procedures are used properly. Bacteria, viruses, parasites, and nitrates may all be found in untreated wastewater, which can be found in septic tanks as well. If the tank is left unattended, wastewater may ultimately leak out, contaminating the land, groundwater, and even polluting nearby water courses. If an abandoned septic tank is not completely filled with earth, it has the potential to collapse completely.

  1. Here’s how we go about it.
  2. The receipt for the pumping service should be kept since it serves as documentation of pumping and will be requested by Public Health as part of the approval procedure.
  3. Because septic tanks are designed to be somewhat above ground level, the soil surrounding them should be slightly elevated above ground level.
  4. The available area for the new treatment tank can then be evaluated for its installation.
  1. It is recommended that when a qualified plumber has completed the installation for the connection to municipal sewer, a permanent cover be fitted on the existing sewer line that supplies the septic tank. The septic tank should next be pumped out by a professional septage transporter. Tank contents left in place may cause the tank to degrade, perhaps leading to the tank collapsing. Finally, the empty tank should either be filled with compacted clean soil or crushed in situ and then filled with clean soil when it has been completely filled. Tank lids have the potential to split and collapse over time if this process is not carried out. This creates a potentially hazardous condition and can result in the property owner becoming liable for the issue. If your septic system included a lift station (pump tank), you should consult with a certified electrician to ensure that the electrical wiring for the system is properly disconnected and secured. It is necessary to leave the pump tank after the wiring has been securely secured, as described in steps 1 through 3 above.

Septic tanks and drain fields are only seldom dug and removed from a location because to the high cost. If it becomes necessary to remove system components, extreme caution must be exercised, and the excavated materials must always be handled and disposed of correctly. Septic tanks that have been improperly abandoned might pose a danger and generate unwanted conditions. Tanks that have collapsed pose a threat to the safety of humans and their pets. Tanks that have not been properly decommissioned may eventually get flooded.

Tanks that have been improperly abandoned may be unable to withstand the weight of automotive traffic, building foundations, or other structures that have been constructed on the site.

The following is a list of phone numbers that may be useful in ensuring that your septic system is properly abandoned: Groundwater and Wastewater Services980-314-1680 Mecklenburg County Building Standards Department704-336-2831 Mecklenburg County Environmental Services980-314-1680

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