How To Build A Septic Tank Out Of A 55 Gallon Drum?

  • Use a poly drum and set it up the same way u would a large septic. Lower the 55 gallon plastic barrel into the hole and fit the black pvc leach line pipe. Cover the leach line with black plastic and a thick layer of cinders.

Can you use a 55 gallon drum for a septic tank?

In areas with no zoning or building restrictions, 55-gallon drums or barrels may still be used as a temporary solution before other more permanent methods of waste containment are put in place. Dig a hole in line with the bathroom 10 feet away from the structure that needs a temporary septic tank.

How do you make a dry well out of a 55 gallon drum?

Make Your Own Gray Water Dry Well 55-Gallon Drum

  1. Dig a hole in the ground at the planned location of the dry well.
  2. Drill about a dozen 1-inch holes around the bottom of the 55-gallon drum.
  3. Place about 6 inches of 1-inch gravel in the base of the hole.
  4. Place the drum in the hole.

What is a GREY water dry well?

A drywell, or “seepage pit” is used at some building sites to receive “gray water” from a laundry, sink, or shower. A drywell design may be similar to that of a cesspool, but only gray-water and not sewage is discharged into a drywell.

What size septic tank do I need for a tiny house?

Tiny homes typically require a 500 to 1,000-gallon septic tank. Though, it’s not always possible to implement a tank of this size. In some states, for example, the minimum tank size is 1,000 gallons. There may be exceptions to this rule if your home is on wheels.

What is the smallest septic tank available?

If you’re looking to install a septic system, the smallest tank size you’re likely to find is 750-gallon, which will accommodate one to two bedrooms. You can also opt for a 1,000-gallon system, which will handle two to four bedrooms.

How do RV septic systems work?

A camper septic system works by simply acting as a holding tank for your sewage. It’s not a SEPTIC TANK that works like at a house. With an RV septic system there are no leach fields, no breaking down needed (not really), none of that. It holds your sewage until you dump it.

Can you have a septic tank without a leach field?

The waste from most septic tanks flows to a soakaway system or a drainage field. If your septic tank doesn’t have a drainage field or soakaway system, the waste water will instead flow through a sealed pipe and empty straight into a ditch or a local water course.

How big of a septic tank do I need?

The larger your home, the larger the septic tank you’re going to need. For instance, a house smaller than 1,500 square feet usually requires a 750 to 1,000-gallon tank. On the other hand, a bigger home of approximately 2,500 square feet will need a bigger tank, more than the 1,000-gallon range.

How much does it cost to pump a septic tank?

How much does it cost to pump out a septic tank? The average cost is $300, but can run up to $500, depending on your location. The tank should be pumped out every three to five years.

How to Make a Septic Tank With a 55 Gallon Drum

Home-Diy Temporary septic tanks were formerly constructed from whatever materials were available at the time, such as 55-gallon drums or barrels, according to legend. Despite the fact that these drums or barrels had a limited capacity, they performed well and provided a quick solution to the problem of holding untreated sewage.

  • Home-Diy Temporary septic tanks were once constructed from whatever materials were available at the time, such as 55-gallon drums or barrels, according to tradition. Despite the fact that these drums or barrels had a limited capacity, they performed well and provided a quick solution to the problem of storing raw sewage.

Tip

Invest in a natural septic digester, which can be purchased at any ranch supply store, to supplement your temporary septic tank.

Warning

It is not permitted to drive or park on top of the temporary septic tank. While 55-gallon drums or barrels may still be utilized as a temporary solution in places where there are no zoning or building limitations, they should only be used as a temporary solution until other more permanent measures of waste containment are put in place.

  1. Dig a hole 10 feet away from the structure that requires a temporary septic tank, in line with the bathroom and 10 feet away from the toilet. For optimal gravity flow while flushing the toilet and to avoid sewage backlog, dig down at least 8 feet. To keep the building from being damaged, dig a ditch 2 feet below right in front of the hole. The trench should be a minimum of 10 feet long. This will be the leach line for your system. Take the jigsaw and cut a hole in the side of the plastic barrel 4 inches below the top to accommodate the 10-foot-long leach line, which is made of 3-inch-diameter PVC black pipe. Make certain that the hole is large enough to accommodate the pipe. Drop in the 55-gallon plastic barrel and insert the black PVC leach-line pipe into the hole you just dug. Cover the leach line with a coating of black plastic and a thick covering of cinders to prevent it from leaking. The soil you took from the leach line when excavating it should be used to re-fill it. Attach the other 10-foot length of solid PVC pipe to the structure and insert it into the bung hole at the top of the drum or barrel, if applicable. Place a black plastic sheet over the whole drum or barrel lid and backfill with earth until it reaches ground level.

Homemade Septic Tank 55 Gallon Drum: DIY and Install

“This website has affiliate connections to various items. Purchases bought through these links may result in a commission being paid to us.” Septic tanks for residential use come in a variety of sizes and shapes, so you have plenty of alternatives when making your decision. First and foremost, select a tank with the appropriate volume for your residence. The BioWonder SepticDrain Treatment is what I’m now using. After that, check to see that the tank is durable and will survive for a long time.

Essential Septic Tank Kits and Products We’ve Tested (Recommended)

“It is possible to earn commissions by clicking on affiliate links on this website. Purchases purchased through these links may result in a commission for us.” Septic tanks for residential use come in a variety of sizes and shapes, so you have plenty of alternatives. Pick an aquarium with the appropriate capacity for your needs first and foremost. The BioWonder SepticDrain Treatment is what I’m now experimenting with. Make certain that the tank is dependable and capable of lasting a long time after that.

Homemade Septic Tank 55 Gallon Drum (Step-by-Step Checklist)

Before you begin construction on any septic system, check with the local health department and county government offices to see whether or not the site of your home is suitable for the installation of one. If you have been given permission to proceed, make a note of any prerequisites and get any permissions that would grant you the authority to begin construction. Read, understand, and adhere to the septic system specifications provided before beginning the construction process, or you may wind up having to start over from the beginning if the specifications are not satisfied.

2. Plan your site early

Keep these considerations in mind when deciding where to locate the septic tank and drain field: soil testing may be required to establish the drainage capabilities of the soil as well as the seasonal water tables of the site. The soil for the septic system must be tested and approved by the appropriate health authorities and planning boards. The depth to which the drain field pipes and the septic tank should be installed will be determined by the local health departments and planning boards.

Consider a 55-gallon drum per person every day as an example.

Always err on the side of caution and provide an extra 100 gallons each day to cater for unexpected users and guests. If at all feasible, choose an 800-gallon tank so that the sludge won’t have to be pumped out as frequently as it would if you used a smaller tank.

Mounting Your Homemade Septic Tank Drum (Instructions)

Septic tank installation requires a hole to be dug 10 feet away from the main structure in line with the bathroom. Hire or direct someone to dig the hole. Dig up to 8 feet or more in order to have excellent gravity flow while flushing the toilet and to avoid clogging the toilet.

Step2:

Immediately in front of the hole and away from the building, dig a trench approximately 2 feet depth and 10 feet long, exactly in front of the hole. This will be the leach line for your system.

Step3:

Create an opening 4 inches below the top and in the side of the plastic barrel with a jigsaw so that the leach line, which is a 10-foot-long, 3-inch-diameter PVC black pipe, may be inserted. The hole should be large enough to accommodate the pipe.

Step4:

Place the 55-gallon plastic barrel into the hole carefully and gently, and then insert the black PVC leach-line pipe into the barrel. It is necessary to cover the leach line with plastic and a thick layer of cinders in addition to this. Backfill the leach line with the earth that was taken previously during the digging process.

Step5:

Incorporate the 10-foot segment of solid PVC pipe from the building into the bunghole at the top of the barrel or drum to complete the installation. Cover the barrel or drum lid with plastic wrap, then backfill the leach line with the soil you removed when excavating earlier in the process. (Optional) Whether you are permitted to install this septic system on your property is entirely dependent on where you live and the state building restrictions in effect. It is impossible to tell if you may construct this septic system on your property until all of these conditions are satisfied in each of Colorado’s 63 counties, because laws change on an annual basis and rules and regulations differ from one inspector to another.

General septic system guidelines and various types of waste treatment

Place a bunghole in the top of the barrel or drum and insert the 10-foot segment of solid PVC pipe from the building. Place a piece of plastic on top of the barrel or drum lid, then backfill the leach line with the soil you removed earlier when you were excavating. Is it legal for you to construct this septic system on your property? That depends on where you live and whether or not your state has building codes. It is impossible to tell if you may construct this septic system on your property until all of these conditions are satisfied in each of Colorado’s 63 counties, given the constant change in laws and the fact that rules and regulations differ from one inspection to another.

Leach Pits

Leach Pits are holes in the ground filled with gravel, with a perforated tank in the center for dumping wastewater into. Drywells are a passive solution that does not require the use of a pump for small or irregular lots when a long leach percolation field is not required or practicable. Leach pits have the benefit of having a large surface area surrounding their sides, which allows them to dispose of water in the appropriate soil types. Adding a dry well to your leach pit will increase the capacity of your leach pit, allowing it to handle a large amount of water at one time.

  • Leach Fields are trenches dug in the yard that are filled with a foot of 3/4′′ — 1-1/2′′ gravel and a pipe with a diameter of around four inches.
  • The effluent is delivered to the leach field with at least a 1/8 inch per foot drop and subsequently is dissolved into the soil with all of the leach field pipe being at the same level, according to the specifications.
  • The sewage is discharged into this big open region underneath the yard; the whole bottom of the chamber is now accessible.
  • Pressurized Mound Systems are often powered by an electric pump that forces effluent into raised mound systems and beds or chambers, as well as remote trenches and aeration systems.
  • In the wastewater treatment industry, drip beds (also known as evapotranspiration) are pressured systems with small nozzles or holes for equitable dispersion of wastewater; nevertheless, they are susceptible to blockage due to calcification of the nozzles.
  • Because of their development, plants transpire water, and part of the water inside them evaporates to the surface, with a lesser percentage of the effluent trickling down into the groundwater table.
  • Typically, it is designated for high clay soil regions where percolation is difficult; lagoons are walled to prevent percolation in a vulnerable zone where evaporation is the sole method of disposal; and it is reserved for high clay soil areas where percolation is difficult.

Because of the legal liabilities associated with safety hazards, six-foot fence and a closed gate are the normal procedure for any cesspool or lagoon installation.

Conclusion

When it comes to your 55 gallon drum home-made septic tank, there are a few cautions and suggestions to keep in the back of your mind. Here: It is important to remember to include natural septic digester in your portable toilet and to avoid parking or driving your car over the temporary septic tank.

How to Construct a Small Septic System

Documentation Download Documentation Download Documentation There are two main sections to most private septic systems: the holding and digesting tanks, and the dispersion field or leach field. As the liquid waste in the first holding tank fills up, it will be transferred to the second holding tank. Once the second tank is completely filled with liquid, the liquid will dissipate into the earth underneath it. The system displayed here is a modest system that is intended for limited use by two persons who do not need to do laundry.

  • When compared to a conventional house septic system, this system employs two 55 US gallon (210 L) drums, rather than the 1,000–2,000 US gallon (3,800–7,600 L) tanks that are utilized in a standard home septic system.
  • Property owners considering installing a system similar to this one should be advised that this system would fail inspections by any public health department in the United States, and that the owner may be liable to a fine if the system was discovered in operation by a health official.
  • Toilets that conserve water nowadays utilize less than two litres of water every flush.
  • It might be a lifeline for those who live in areas where septic treatment is not available.

Part 1 of 3: Cutting the Tanks

  1. 1Cut a hole in the center of the top of each drum that is the same size as the outer measurement of the toilet flange. Take the outside diameter of the toilet flange that you’re using and multiply it by two. Place the hole close to the edge of the drum so that you may simply connect them to pipes in the near future. Cut the drums using a saber saw to make them lighter
  2. 2 Each hole should be capped with a 4 in (10 cm) toilet flange. Push the flanges into the top of each tank until they are flush with the surface. As soon as the flanges are in position, tighten them down so they don’t move or shift once they are in place. Advertisement
  3. s3 Cut a hole in the first drum that is 4 in (10 cm) in diameter on the opposite side of the drum from the hole in the top. Placing the hole approximately 4–5 inches (10–13 cm) below the top of the drum and ensuring that it lines up with the hole on the top of the tank are the most important steps. 4 Make a hole in the wall with a saber saw or a hole saw. Cut two holes in the side of the drum at 45-degree angles to the center of the hole on the top, one on each side of the drum. The center line is the line that runs through the middle of the hole on the top of the drum. Make 45-degree angles from either side of the centerline, then mark them on the second drum using a permanent marker. Make your holes in the barrel by cutting through the side with a saber or a hole saw and drilling them out. Advertisement
See also:  How Often Should You Have Your Septic Tank Cleaned? (Question)

Part 2 of 3: Placing the Tanks Underground

  1. 1 Dig a trench that is 4 ft 26 ft 3 ft (1.22 m 7.92 m 0.91 m) in length and width. Excavator or shovel are both good options for digging a hole in the ground where you wish to put your tank. Continue excavating until the hole measures 4 feet (1.2 m) in width, 26 feet (7.9 m) in length, and 3 feet (0.91 m) in depth.
  • 1 A hole of 4 feet 26 feet 3 feet (1.22 meters 7.92 meters 0.91 meters) should be dug. Make a hole in the ground where you want to put the tank, using a shovel or an excavator. Continue excavating until the hole measures 4 feet (1.2 m) in width, 26 feet (7.9 m) in length, and 3 feet (0.91 m) in depth
  1. 2Place the drum at the end of the trench, with one side hole drilled in it. When you place the drum on the floor, make sure it is level. Check to see sure the drum’s top is at least 4 inches (10 cm) below the surface of the water. 3 Dig a hole that is one foot (30 cm) deeper than the first to accommodate the positioning of the second drum in front of the first. In order to ensure a tight fit and prevent the drum from shifting, make your hole the same diameter as the drum you’re inserting in it. 4 The hole should be leveled with gravel until a 90-degree curve can be made to connect the top drum’s hole on one side to the toilet flange on the other. Check the alignment of the holes in the 90-degree bend between the two drums by dry fitting it between the two drums. If you need to improve the alignment of the pipe line, dig the hole a little deeper. 5 To make the bend, cut 31 2in (8.9 cm) pieces of ABS pipe and adhere them to the bend with epoxy or hot glue. With a hacksaw, cut the ABSpipe parts, also known as nipples. 6 Insert the pieces into the bend and hold them in place using PVC adhesive. Check the fit between the two drums to ensure that they are in alignment. Insert the end of the 21 2in (6.4 cm) nipple into the side hole of the first drum and tighten the nut. 7Glue the end of the 31 2in (8.9 cm) nipple into the toilet flange on the second tank, making sure that the nipple on the other end aligns with the hole on the top of the second drum. To hold the bent in place, apply PVC adhesive to the inside of the curve. Don’t be concerned about the link to the first drum just yet
  2. You’ll make that connection later. 8. Glue a Y-bend to a 31 2in (8.9 cm) nipple, and then bend the angled piece of the Y-bend at a 45-degree angle. Using your PVC adhesive, attach a nipple to the end of the Y-bend and let it dry. Assemble the Y-bend and align the angled pipe on it so it meets the incoming waste line, then glue it onto the toilet flange. 9 21 2in (6.4 cm) nipples are cut and glued to one end of the 45-degree bends at the bottom of the lower drum, and they are then inserted into the side of the lower drum. Directional bends are defined as those that are perpendicular to the bottom of the trench at their ends. Advertisement

Part 3 of 3: Connecting the Drain Pipes

  1. Put a stake into the ground and level it with the bottom of each of the 45-degree bends. 2Put a stake into the ground and level it with the top of the 45-degree bends. It doesn’t matter what sort of stakes you use since they all work. Use a mallet or hammer to pound the stakes into the ground. Attach a one-inch-wide block to the end of a four-foot-long (1.2-meter-long) level using duct tape. This will assist you in ensuring that you create sloped drain pipes so that your tanks can empty
  2. 3Place another stake approximately 37 8ft (1.2 m) down the trench from the first one
  3. 4Place another stake approximately 37 8ft (1.2 m) down the trench from the first one
  4. 5Place another stake approximately 37 8ft (1.2 m) down the trench from the first one. Drive the stake down until it is the same height as the first one using your hammer or mallet
  5. 4 Place the end of the level without the block on the first stake and the block on the second stake to complete the level without the block. Continue to pound the second stake into the ground until the level is balanced. 1 inch (2.5 cm) lower than the previous post, or 1 inch (0.64 cm) lower per 1 foot (30 cm)
  6. 5Repeat this method until you have stakes running the whole length of the trench
  7. Continue to place stakes down the rest of the trench every 37 8feet (1.2 m) from the last one, ensuring that the stakes slope away from the drums
  8. 6Place gravel in the trench until the top of the gravel is level with the top of the stakes
  9. 7Place gravel in the trench until the top of the gravel is level with the top of the stakes The gravel will now slope away from the drums at a rate of 1 4 inch (0.64 cm) per 1 foot (30 cm) of horizontal distance
  10. 7Place 20 ft (6.1 m) of perforated drain pipe into each hole on the second drum
  11. 8Place 20 ft (6.1 m) of perforated drain pipe into each hole on the third drum
  12. 9Place 20 ft (6.1 m) of perforated drain pipe into each hole on the fourth drum
  13. 10P Insert the ends of the drain pipes into the 45-degree bends on the lower drum to complete the installation. 9Make certain that the perforations in the pipes are facing down so that liquids may soak back into the earth
  14. 8checking the pipes with a level to ensure that the 1 4in (0.64 cm) slope is consistent throughout the length of the pipe. Fill up any gaps in the slope by adding or removing gravel under the pipe. Seal the 45-degree and 90-degree bends that connect the lower and top drums, respectively, with silicone. For the greatest seal possible on your drain pipes, use a two-part epoxy or silicone caulk. For this purpose, consider utilizing flex pipe, which will yield a little bit if the ground changes. Tenth, fill the lower drum halfway with water to keep it from collapsing under the weight of all the gravel. Place the remaining gravel over the trench and into the bottom drum, covering it completely. 11Lay landscape fabric over the top of the gravel. As a result, the dirt will not be able to seep into the gravel and you will be able to keep proper drainage on your tanks
  15. 12Fill the remaining trench area with soil, compacting it to the original grade. When you have finished filling up the area with your dirt, check to see that the ground is level. 13Fill the upper drum with water, leaving the top pipe from the first tank exposed so that you can readily reach the tanks if you need to drain them later. 14Fill the lower drum with water. Fill the top drum with water and pour it directly down the exposed pipes on the bottom drum. Continue filling the drum until it is completely filled, then secure the top with a cap to keep out the elements. Advertisement

Community Q A

Put a stake into the ground and level it with the bottom of each of the 45-degree bends. 2Put a stake into the ground and level it with the top of the stake. The type of stakes you employ is completely irrelevant. 2Tape a 1 in (2.5 cm) broad block to the end of a 4 ft (1.2 m) level and drive the stakes into the ground with a mallet or a hammer. As a result, you will be able to create sloped drain pipes that will allow your tanks to empty properly; 3Place another stake approximately 37 8ft (1.2 m) down the trench from the first one; 4Place a third stake approximately 37 8ft (1.2 m) down the trench from the first one; 5Place a fourth stake approximately 37 8ft (1.2 m) down the trench from the first one; Drive the stake down until it is the same height as the first one, using your hammer or mallet.

Place the end of the level without the block on the first stake and the block on the second stake to complete the level without using the block.

The second stake is now 1 inch (2.5 cm) lower than the first, or 0.64 inch (0.64 cm) lower every 1 foot (30 cm); 5Repeat this process until you have stakes running the whole length of the trench; Place stakes every 37 8feet (1.2 m) down the rest of the trench so that the stakes slope away from the drums; 6Place gravel in the trench until the top of the gravel is level with or above the top of the stakes; 7Continue to place stakes every 37 8feet (1.2 m) down the rest of the trench so that the stakes slope away from or above the top of the drums As a result, the gravel will now slope away from the drums at a rate of 1 inch (0.64 cm) per 1 foot (30 cm) of horizontal distance; 7Place 20 ft (6.1 m) of perforated drain pipe into each hole on the second drum; and 8Place 1 foot (30 cm) of perforated drain pipe into each hole on the third drum; and 9Place 1 foot (30 cm) of perforated drain pipe into each hole on the fourth drum; and 10Place Slide the drain pipes’ ends into the 45-degree bends on the lower drum, ensuring that they are completely enclosed.

  • 8Check the pipes using a level to verify if the 1 4in (0.64 cm) slope is consistent throughout the length of the pipe; 9Make sure the holes in the pipes face down so that liquids may soak back into the ground; 10 Fill in any gaps in the slope by adding or removing gravel under the pipe.
  • For the finest seal on your drain pipes, use a 2-part epoxy or silicone caulk.
  • 11 11Lay landscape fabric over the gravel and bury the trench up to the top of the bottom drum with the leftover gravel.
  • 13Fill the higher drum halfway with water, leaving the top pipe from the first tank exposed so you may readily reach the tanks if you need to drain them later.

Directly from the top drum, pour the water down the exposed pipes. Pour in the remaining contents of the drum until it is completely filled, then secure the drum with a cap. Advertisement;

  • Question What is considered a low level of use? Low consumption is defined as less than 125 gallons per day. Question Was the ‘y’ elbow on the first tank’s tank for any particular reason? Is it left open or sealed when it has been completed? Isn’t it going to stink if it’s left open? The clean out requires a threaded cap or plug, which is provided. Question What kind of water do you use to fill it? “Fill” is the most important term here. Continue to fill the drum with water until the level does not rise any more
  • Question Suppose I neglected to attach a slip coupler to the perforated pipe and only had 10 feet of it. Is it still possible to use this? Yes, however you will need to raise the depth of the field in order to get the same cubic feet of capacity
  • Nevertheless Question What is the best way to find out if something is legal in my state? This is a quick and easy approach that is unlikely to be appropriate for long-term usage in the majority of states. It is possible that the property owner and/or the installation will be penalized if this is uncovered. Question Is it possible to utilize two or three 275-gallon water totes instead, or a water tote and barrel combination? It doesn’t matter either direction you go. It’s best to utilize a single tote and a barrel as a digestion tank and a distribution box if you have only one tote. Question What is the purpose of filling the higher barrel with water? You fill the top barrel with water so that when sewage waste is introduced into the barrel, it flows into a sufficient amount of water to initiate the anaerobic digestion process. Question What is the best way to clean up this system? If there is enough bacteria in it, it will clean itself with minimal effort. If it starts to fill up, you may call a septic service to have it emptied
  • If it doesn’t, you can do it yourself. Question What is the correct grade slope of the drain field for every ten feet of length of the drain field? It is possible for the field’s bottom to be level. When running away from the drums, the pipe system should be sloped at 2 percent, or 2.5 inches every 10 feet. Question Is it possible for this system to freeze in the winter? And might I use antifreeze in the mix as well? Antifreeze will destroy the beneficial bacteria that are required for the process to function properly. The process is biological, and it will generate some of its own heat as part of the process. It’s always possible to dig a little deeper to gain a little extra insulation above it.

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Warnings

  • This is a system with a relatively limited capacity. This is not intended to suit the demands of a big family or group of people. It is intended for use with a modest travel trailer and two individuals. In order to extend the life of this little septic system, it is recommended that you do not place anything else in it but water, trash, and toilet paper. You may have to pump the upper drum once or twice a year if you don’t do so. During the course of five years, the system depicted here will only require pumping twice. Do not drive through the area where the drums are located. When establishing a septic system, make sure to adhere to all applicable municipal regulations. It is against the law to establish a septic system without first obtaining a permission. In the permission, you can find information on the local regulations for installing a septic system. You should avoid situating a septic system too close to trees since tree roots will grow into your lines, block them, and eventually cause damage to your system.

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Things You’ll Need

  • 3/4 or 1 1/2 crushed rock or blue metal
  • 80 square feet (7.4 m 2) of landscaping fabric
  • 9 cubic yards (6.9 m3) of 3/4 or 1 1/2 crushed rock or blue metal 55 US gal (210 L) plastic drums
  • 10 feet (3.0 m) of ABS plastic pipe with a diameter of 4 in (10 cm)
  • 4 in (10 cm) ABS 90-degree bend
  • 4 in (10 cm) ABS Y-bend
  • 3 ABS 45-degree bends with sizes of 4 in (10 cm)
  • 2 55 US gal (210 L) plastic drums A total of 40 feet (12 meters) of 4 inch (10 cm) perforated drain pipe
  • Two 4 inch (10 cm) diameter drain pipe couplers
  • And two toilet flanges with 4 inch (10 cm) diameters are included. PVC glue, two-part epoxy or silicone sealant, a level, and ten wood stakes are all required. 1 in (2.5 cm) thick wood block
  • Duct tape
  • 4 in (10 cm) ABS detachable cap
  • 1 in (2.5 cm) thick wood block
See also:  Where To Buy Septic Tank Lids?

About This Article

wikiHow Staff Writer contributed to this article. This article was written in part by members of the wikiHow Staff. Our highly skilled staff of editors and researchers checks articles for correctness and completeness before publishing them. The work of our editorial staff is regularly monitored by wikiHow’sContent Management Team to ensure that each article is supported by reliable research and fulfills our high quality standards. It has been seen 2,320,764 times since it was published. Co-authors:53 The most recent update was made on January 15, 2022.

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You read that correctly: this article is about making a handmade DIY septic system out of inexpensive plastic barrels and repurposed tote tanks! Not only is it not thrilling, but it is also not seductive, yet it is really vital. If you’re only going to be camping or staying somewhere for a few weeks, a simple latrine will suffice. However, if you plan on spending months or years in a log cabin that you constructed yourself in an off-grid region, you’ll need something more effective to deal with the normal human waste.

The three ‘Do It Yourself’ house septic systems shown here are all relatively inexpensive to construct — from a small size 55 gallon drum septic system to two bigger tote tank septic systems.

1 – DIY 55 Gallon Drum Septic System

This excellent step-by-step video demonstrates how to rapidly and affordably construct a modest 55-gallon drum septic tank. Only human waste should be used in this handmade plastic barrel septic system; it is not large enough to handle laundry or other household garbage. Although the lesson specifies that this system is designed for two adults, I believe that with cautious use, it may meet the demands of a small family consisting of two adults and two young children. Take a look at it. An inexpensive and straightforward plastic barrel septic system for one to two persons is demonstrated here.

It is unable to deal with washing and other household chores.

2 — DIY Tote Tank Septic System

UnitedStatesofBuild has created an outstanding video instruction, which you can see here. The video demonstrates how to create a low-cost, off-grid tote tank septic system from the ground up. Totes are big plastic liquid containers that are encased in a protective steel or aluminum frame for added strength and durability. For transportation purposes, they are frequently shipped on pallets. Totes may be purchased at a low cost since they are typically considered a waste product once they have been used.

A short search on Google or eBay for ‘old totes for sale’ can give you an idea of what they are like and how much they cost. Tote tanks are also excellent for large-scale rainwater gathering systems. OFF-GRID septic system utilizing totes

3 – A Larger DIY Tank Septic System

Make Science Fun created this video lesson for you. It includes instructions on how to construct a larger-scale above-ground aerated water waste treatment system using totes. However, while this system is a bigger and more expensive version of the DIY tank septic system, it is still less expensive than a properly constructed commercial system. Even though this is a larger and more intricate septic system, it is extremely efficient and has the ability to break down and handle far more waste. TUTORIAL – How to create your own sewage system from the ground up.

With this information, you should be able to make an informed decision on whether to invest in an expensive professional prepared system or to create a more affordable DIY system for yourself.

(Photo from: WikiHow)

If you go purely by the language of the Internet on the matter, it appears that you are not permitted to be a homesteader want tobe until you fantasize about building a septic system out of 55-gallon barrels. I’m not sure how often they’re really constructed compared to how frequently they’re spoken about. In the beginning, I was apprehensive to utilize one since there were so many plans, but so few long-term reviews on the Secret Lair’s website. In any case, when long-time commenter Phssthpok brought it to my attention this morning, it gave me the impetus to accomplish something I’d been intending to do for quite some time.

  • That said, I’ll point you that the instructions, in my opinion, include one significant error.
  • Before you bury the barrels, you should make sure that they are completely filled.
  • Mine has been in operating since sometime in 2011, and has never given me a single problem.
  • My situation is ideal because I’m a single individual with no guests, making me the ideal test subject.
  • I walked outside and dipped my probe into the higher tank, and my probe clunked straight to the bottom with absolutely little resistance.
  • Everything is turning into soup fairly rapidly, and there are no solids accumulating in the pot.
  • I recommend that anyone who is planning to build one of these take some time to learn how to lay out a leach field, because that is really the key to success.

I had to make some impromptu decisions that I now regret, but there isn’t even the slightest indication that anything is wrong. It appears to be draining properly. So, in my not so humble view, this is a good concept to pursue further.

About Joel

You should know better than to ask these kinds of inquiries to a paranoid recluse, you know. It was filed under Uncategorised on this particular day. This entry was posted in Uncategorized.

How to Build a Two-Barrel Septic System

Off-grid life frequently entails residing in rural places where there are few or no amenities accessible. We are left to fend for ourselves, which is generally the intention and not a problem in and of itself. Waste management is one of the most important tasks that the rural off-gridder has to deal with on a daily basis. Some methods exist, such as the Joseph Jenkins Humanure technique of composting waste material, which is quite effective. However, not everyone is on board with the idea of managing their own feces and waste products, and having company can present its own set of issues.

Installing a septic system may be the best option for you in this case.

), but if you are diligent and attentive, you can build a tiny septic system that will manage a small cabin or trailer for one or two people with relative ease.

It is important not to put this in an area where it might contaminate groundwater or any other bodies of water without first consulting with someone who is knowledgeable about this.

No one at or linked with this site will be held liable for any actions made by visitors to this site as a result of reading the information included within this article.

The system displayed here is a tiny one, intended for limited usage by two individuals who do not have access to a laundry facility and who travel in a small travel trailer.

A certified site evaluation is necessary since the tank is significantly smaller than required and because the design is lacking several critical elements such as internal baffles.

In addition, the system we are developing here has a dispersion area that is approximately one-third the size of a big home.

Any property owners contemplating the installation of a system similar to this one should be informed that this system would not pass muster with any public health department in the United States, and that the owner may be liable to a substantial fine if the system was discovered in operation.

  1. Construct a ditch that is 4 feet wide, 26 feet long, and 3 feet deep. Make a complete assembly using all of the materials and pieces. See the “Things You’ll Need” list at the bottom of this page. Drill a hole in the top of each drum the same size as the outer dimension of the toilet flange pipe. It should be at the edge of the table. A saber saw is the most appropriate tool for this job. Each hole should be capped with a 4′′ toilet flange. To make two holes in the top side of the bottom drum, as indicated in the photo, cut them 45 degrees apart along a perpendicular line drawn from one hole on top to another hole on the other side. To make a hole in the upper drum opposite the hole at the top, as shown in the photo, cut one hole in the upper drum. The drum with one hole in the side should be placed at the far end of the trench. Adjust the cymbals’ pitch. There should be at least 4 inches of clearance between the top of the drum and the ground. For the location of the second drum in front of the first, dig a hole about one foot deeper than the first. Drill a little further into the hole specified in step 8 and fill with gravel until the 90-degree angle fits exactly between the hole in the top drum’s side wall and the toilet flange of the bottom drum
  2. 3 1/2′′ piece of 4′′ ABS pipe (nipple) cut to 3 1/2′′ in length and glued into one end of the 90 ell. Cut a second nipple about 2 1/2′′ long and attach it to the opposite end of the first. Check the fit between the two drums to ensure that they are in alignment. The end with the short nipple should be inserted into the upper drum of the drum set. It should resemble the photo in Step 9
  3. However, Glue the end of the 3 1/2′′ nipple into the toilet flange after you are certain that it will fit properly. We’ll take care of sealing the connection to the higher drum later on
  4. For now, just relax. Glue a “Y” to three and a half nipples and bend the left side of the “Y” at a 45-degree angle. Align the “Y” so that it meets the incoming waste line, then glue it into the toilet flange to complete the installation. Cut and glue (2) 2 1/2′′ nipples to the remaining two 45-degree bends at one end only, and insert them into the holes in the side of the bottom drum, as indicated in the photo in step 7
  5. Otherwise, repeat the process. The face of the two 45-degree bends should be perpendicular to the trench
  6. Otherwise, the bends will not work. Take a look at the photo in Step 7
  7. In the ground, pound a stake such that the top of the stake is level with the bottom of the 45-degree curve that emerges from one side of the bottom drum
  8. In the photo to the right, you can see how you tape the end of a 4 foot level with a 1 inch broad block
  9. The second stake should be placed a little more than 4 feet down the ditch from the first. Place the end of the level without the block on the first stake and the block on the second stake to complete the level without the block. When the block is on the second stake, continue to pound the stake down until the level indicates level. This means that the second stake is now 1 inch lower than the first, or 1/4 inch lower every foot. Continue this procedure until you have pegs throughout the whole length of the trench. Placing gravel in the trench until the tops of the stakes and the tops of the gravel are equal
  10. The gravel should now slope away from the drums at a 1/4-inch angle to the foot
  11. Place two sections of 10 foot 4 inch perforated drain pipe linked with a slip coupler in the center of the work area (holes down). Insert one end of the hose into the 45-degree curve of the bottom drum. Repeat the process on the opposite side. Using a level and block, inspect the drain pipes to ensure that the 1/4′′ slope is continuous along the length of the pipe. Make adjustments by adding or removing gravel from beneath the pipe. Lower and upper drums should be joined together by sealing the 45-degree bend and the 90-degree bend, respectively. Consider using a two-part epoxy. You may also use silicone caulk in this situation. For a completed look of the epoxy, go to the photo in step 6. You might want to consider utilizing flex pipe for this purpose, so that it will yield a bit as the earth changes
  12. Fill up the trench all the way up to the top of the bottom drum with the remainder of the gravel. Landscape cloth should be laid on top of the gravel. Thus, dirt will be prevented from soaking into the gravel. Using soil, fill up the remainder of the trench area, compacting it thoroughly to the original grade Fill the larger drum halfway with water.

Tips

  • The digesting tanks are comprised of two 55-gallon polyethylene barrels that are connected together. The first tank is completely filled with waste, with the contents settling to the bottom. Whenever the liquid level exceeds the outfall to the second tank, it is drained into the tank below it. If there are any solids present, they will sink to the bottom. Whenever the liquid from the second tank reaches one of the two outfalls, it is transported to the gravel leaching field for dispersion. Over time, the vast majority of the solids will liquefy and disperse. After a couple of years, the solids may have accumulated to the point that the tank must be emptied
  • However, this is unlikely. After some time has passed, you may notice a settlement where the trench used to be. Fill up the gaps with more soil and compact with the tire of your automobile. Don’t drive over the area where the drums are located
  • It is assumed that you are familiar with working with ABS plastic pipe (plastic ABS pipe). In addition, you must have the necessary tools to dig the trench (or be ready to put in a lot of effort). The depth of the trench is proportional to the depth of the waste source line that it is encircling. If the line is deeper or higher than the one depicted, you will need to dig the trench deeper or shallower to suit the new line depth or height. It’s not that difficult to find out. (Note: If you dig a trench that is too shallow, your septic system may be more susceptible to damage.)
  • In order to pump solids out of the tank when it is entirely filled with solids, the vertical side of the “Y” will be utilized
  • The horizontal side of the “Y” will connect to the waste source and should be fitted with a connection that is compatible with the source supply line

Warnings

  • When installing a septic system, it is important to adhere to the local septic regulations. In the absence of a permission, it is unlawful to install or repair any type of wastewater treatment system. The permit will include any local regulations for the construction or repair of any type of wastewater treatment system. It is important not to position your septic system too close to trees since tree roots will grow into your line and cause it to clog (with roots), which will eventually cause damage to your system. This is a system with a relatively limited capacity. This is not intended to suit the demands of a big family or group of people. It is intended for use with a modest travel trailer and two individuals. Depending on how much you use the upper drum, you may only need to pump it once a year. In the last five years, the system depicted above has been pumped twice.

Things You’ll Need

  • When installing a septic system, it is important to adhere to local septic regulations. If you don’t have a permit, it’s against the law to establish a septic system. The permit will outline the municipal standards for septic system installation. It is important not to position your septic system too close to trees since tree roots will grow into your line and cause it to clog (with roots), which will eventually cause damage to your system
  • As you can see, this system has a very limited capacity. Obviously, this is not intended to accommodate the demands of a big family. Two people may travel in it comfortably, as well as a compact travel trailer. The upper drum may need to be pumped once or twice a year, depending on how often it is used. A total of two pumps have been installed in the system depicted here over the course of five years.
See also:  Where Is The Septic Tank Located? (Best solution)

septic system “homemade” for cabin in General Board

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.Hi, anyone of you installed your own septic system for your cabin? anyone use a 55gallon plastic barrel?Thanks for any help or suggestionSbishopLogged


Yep,I used two barrels.The first barrel is used to separate the solids,inlet is towards the top. Then I installed a pipe half way(this separates any thing that floats) down to feed the outlet tank.Pipe from the outlet tank to the fields comes out towards the top of the second barrel.I have been running this system for five years with no problems.This system is hooked to 40 foot of field.LoggedCase Skid Steer,Ford Backhoe,Allis WD45 and Burg Manual Sawmill


our camp system is 14 years old.Full Bath in camp. sinks and shower are piped out into a grey water dry well. Toilet is piped to a 55 gallon drum for solids and the out pipe runs 35 feet to Splash out/dry well. System works amazingly well. checked tank a couple years ago and only had about 8 inches of solids on the bottom. All was left in place, bacteria was doing its job and didn’t want to mess w/ it.Logged


At our cabin in WV we made our own tank. We dug a pit 6′ deep and abut 8′ round, in that we framed in a 5.5′ square and poured a floor 4″ pad and then built a block container the inside was 4′ square and about 5′ high. Made another concrete pad for the lid, punched in the inlet and outlet, painted the inside with epoxy paint and we have a nice tank that will not crush if someone accidently runs over it.JonLoggedImagine, Me a Tree Farmer. Jon, Appalachian American Wannabe.


We had planned on using a plastic barrel then opted to use a old 200 gallon metal tank that someone offered up along withsome drainfield pipe that was wrapped with packing peanuts and plastic mess to hold the peanuts in for our drainfield at the camp.Still gotta haul water though until we spring for a well.We use a plastic barrel buried on the side of the house for the Clothes Washer discharge because it was messing up our drainfield. No problems with the drainfield since. (2 years)LoggedLane Circle Mill Homemade Bandmill


We did just like weekend sawyer did for the cabin tank. Our out house has a plastic drum half buried in the cement floor with the seat mounted on it. We have a deal that the septic pumper guy that lives down the road swings in on occasion and pumps the barrel for $40 bucks a year.LoggedJust call me the midget doctor.Forestry Forum Founder andChief Cook and Bottle Washer.Commercial circle sawmill sawyer in a past life. Ezekiel 22:30


Make sure you add a baffle (90 degree elbow turned downward)to all pipes going in and out of the tanks.Logged


Our outlet from the tank is a T so if the lower inlet gets clogged the tank will fill up a few more inches and then flow into the top of the T. So far so good.Plumbers need to know 3 things.1. Payday is on Fiday. 2. It all flows down hill.3. Never EVER chew your fingernails!JonLoggedImagine, Me a Tree Farmer. Jon, Appalachian American Wannabe.


WOW you guys are luckyin Maine you have to have a soil scientist design a system. if you get caught BIG fines and you still can’t poop:(” title=”Angry”> the CEO lives next door and likes to snowshoe around “outback” he has 40 acres adjacent to our 50 and he gets lost sometimes. just can’t take a chance. The first little camp now the bunkhouse we had a 55 barrel over head gravity feed to a sink draining out to a 5 gal pail upside down and dug down about one foot under the surface and a 2″ pipe dumping into it. I could drain off about 35 gals of water before it would back up into the sink.System works amazingly well. checked tank a couple years ago and only had about 8 inches of solids on the bottom. All was left in place, bacteria was doing its job and didn’t want to mess w/ it.something I’m gonna try in the out house this year is called “Bio-Clean” promising?Logged”And if we live, we shall go again, for the enchantment which falls upon those who have gone into the woodland is never broken.””Down the Allagash.”by; Henry Withee


Our part of West Virginia is basically rocks with a little dirt mixed in. We do not have a drainage problem.The inspectors don’t come that far off of the paved roads.LoggedImagine, Me a Tree Farmer. Jon, Appalachian American Wannabe.


Around here you get a building permit $20you also have to get a plumbing permit $160 bucks:(” title=”Angry”>.Had to have an soils engineer design a primitive subsurface wastewater system with privy $140.Got a backhoe from a friend, bought a couple loads of gravel, 4 infiltrators some 4″ pipe and elbows, borrowed a transit and got a few friends to help. Built a4 X 4 X 4 cedar tank for the privy. The next door neighbor CEO came down to take pics, look through the transit w/ me holding the rod then signed off the install. all total $800 bucks even before the camp sills were laid. Had to be done though.Some say I got off cheapright. But all legal thoughThe way this system was designed was for a kitchen sink and a shower, 25 gals a day.The water must be hand carried or hand pumped.I haul it from the house (3/4 mile) and pump it up using a $39.9912Volt pump I got from Harbor Freight into a 55 gal barrel up in the loft. I can do this summer and winter.Some day we plan to dig a well and pump up into a 100 gal container over head then set up like the RV’s and camper trailers are. 12 volt on demand water pump, open a faucet and the pump turns on 40 psi. 6 gallon propane water heater and Pex plumbing. Will be styling thenLogged”And if we live, we shall go again, for the enchantment which falls upon those who have gone into the woodland is never broken.””Down the Allagash.”by; Henry Withee


Deer camp septic system

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Deer camp septic system719809406/15/1801:17 AM
OPTHF Trophy HunterJoined:Jun 2008Posts: 7,428 Anyone on here build a DIY septic at deer camp?If so, would you mind sharing any input on design, build details and any lessons learned.Considering building one with a water tote, plastic barrel and leech line at our lease.
Re: Deer camp septic system720040806/17/1809:41 PM
Joined:Oct 2009Posts: 10,484HalfadozenTHF Celebrity
THF CelebrityJoined:Oct 2009Posts: 10,484 We used a 55 gallon black plastic barrel with a screw on lid.I drilled about 30 1″ size holes all around the bottom quarter of the barrel (barrel laying down of course).Unscrewed the lid, cut a hole in the top of the barrel and fastened a pvc flange that accepts the size of my sewer hose from the trailer.Rented a small backhoe and dug a hole twice as deep and wide as the barrel.Threw some gravel in the bottom, a couple of boxes of lime in the hole and set the barrel in the center of the hole.Then glued a riser on the pvc flange so it was about 2″ above ground level.Back filled the dirt.Added another box of lime through the riser.In place 5 years now with no issues. I do have a cap for the riser so in the off season I will just store the septic hose, put the cap on and cover it with a 5 gallon bucket with a large rock on top.


Freedom is a fragile thing.Those who have known freedom, and then lost it, have never known it again.- Ronald Reagan

Re: Deer camp septic system720071006/18/1803:11 AM
Joined:Jan 2008Posts: 1,259CouzinPro Tracker
Pro TrackerJoined:Jan 2008Posts: 1,259 Dig hole, build outhouse, fill it up, move outhouse to new hole.Worked fine for couple hunnert years.More modern would be a five gallon bucket with box of trash bags next to it for liners.Course you gotta pack that out but hey.


�Only at the end do you realize the power of the Dark Side.�

Re: Deer camp septic system720091506/18/1802:09 PM
Joined:Nov 2009Posts: 90,143bill oxnerTHF Celebrity
THF CelebrityJoined:Nov 2009Posts: 90,143 I was on one lease where the rancher simply dug a hole and covered it with plywood.The sewer simply leached into the ground.The hole never filled.He ran the grey water onto into the yard.


Quail hunting is like walking into, and out of a beautiful painting all day long.Gene Hill

Re: Deer camp septic system720147806/18/1811:15 PM
Joined:Apr 2011Posts: 28,173WesternTHF Celebrity
THF CelebrityJoined:Apr 2011Posts: 28,173 Used the 55 drums as well (similar to Halfdozen) with good results. We used 2 drums since we had family members out a lot. We didn’t use the lime, but did throw a bottle of the enzymes in once a month or so.


If at first you dont succeed, then skydiving is not for you.”Don’t trust everything you read on the Internet”- Abraham LincolnDennis

Re: Deer camp septic system720159806/19/1812:59 AM
Joined:Nov 2011Posts: 6,619unclebubbaTHF Trophy Hunter
THF Trophy HunterJoined:Nov 2011Posts: 6,619 I dug a hole about 4 feet deep, 3 feet wide, and 4 feet long. covered it with some tin roof (cause that’s what I had on hand) and reinforced it with 2×4. Covered the whole thing with about a foot of dirt and put a rail around it so nobody would fall in. hose from the RV went in one end, and had a piece of 1″ PVC sticking out of the ground at the other end for venting purposes. ran grey water and black water in there for five years. Never had an issue. If you don’t vent it, the stench will back up into the RV.
Re: Deer camp septic system720457006/22/1812:34 AM
Joined:Nov 2009Posts: 90,143bill oxnerTHF Celebrity
THF CelebrityJoined:Nov 2009Posts: 90,143 Don’t get caught doing the 55 gallon drum.It not a legal septic systemThey can’t see it from city hall.


Quail hunting is like walking into, and out of a beautiful painting all day long.Gene Hill

Re: Deer camp septic system720457306/22/1812:40 AM
Joined:Nov 2010Posts: 5,560scalebusterTHF Trophy Hunter
THF Trophy HunterJoined:Nov 2010Posts: 5,560 I put in a 55gal plastic barrel with 4 holes cut in the bottom sides standing upright in a hole for a barn toilet 30 years ago. It�s still working.No gravel or anything else. This was in caliche.
Re: Deer camp septic system720476206/22/1804:37 AM
Joined:May 2015Posts: 3,838Dalee7892Extreme Tracker
Extreme TrackerJoined:May 2015Posts: 3,838 If I was going to do a Camp site septic. This would be my thought, just like my 2-500 gal regular. Dig hole install 2 plastic barrels, connect the second with PVC pipe about 1/4 The distance from top with holes around bottom sides with gravel around outside. Hook up to first barrel to TT or cabin top of barrel. Just my 2 cts.
Re: Deer camp septic system720658706/23/1810:41 PM
Joined:Jun 2008Posts: 7,428bigjoe8565OPTHF Trophy Hunter
OPTHF Trophy HunterJoined:Jun 2008Posts: 7,428 Thanks for the feedback.I think we�re going with a water tote for solids and connect a 55 gallon plastic barrel for liquids.We�ll run a pipe out of the barrel into a trench and pit filled with gravel and sand.
Re: Deer camp septic system720722106/24/1807:37 PM
Joined:Jul 2008Posts: 19,809Texas DanTHF Celebrity
THF CelebrityJoined:Jul 2008Posts: 19,809 Thanks for the feedback.I think we�re going with a water tote for solids and connect a 55 gallon plastic barrel for liquids.We�ll run a pipe out of the barrel into a trench and pit filled with gravel and sand.Because it’s just me and a friend who each have our own trailers, we use this. Buries easily and includes a protective sock that helps keep the holes working in the pipe. And every once in a while, we’ll drop one of those bacteria packets into the toilet.


“Some people will never like you because your spirit irritates their demons.”

Re: Deer camp septic system720722506/24/1807:42 PM
Joined:Jul 2008Posts: 19,809Texas DanTHF Celebrity
THF CelebrityJoined:Jul 2008Posts: 19,809 Don’t get caught doing the 55 gallon drum.It not a legal septic systemThey can’t see it from city hall.Never understood why it’s such a concern when a lot of deer leases are near pastures covered with cow patties.


“Some people will never like you because your spirit irritates their demons.”

Re: Deer camp septic system720817906/25/1808:31 PM
Joined:Jan 2016Posts: 7,759snake oilTHF Trophy Hunter
THF Trophy HunterJoined:Jan 2016Posts: 7,759 I put in a 55gal plastic barrel with 4 holes cut in the bottom sides standing upright in a hole for a barn toilet 30 years ago. It�s still working.No gravel or anything else. This was in caliche.This is what we had t the deer lease.�.


“You may all go to hell and I will go to Texas”.

Re: Deer camp septic system723382807/24/1806:39 AM
Joined:Aug 2004Posts: 17,438TxduckmanTHF Celebrity
THF CelebrityJoined:Aug 2004Posts: 17,438 We put one in at our place but it was solid rock past 2 feet down so jackhammer was used. 2 plastic barrels burried and a septic pump in second one so guess it is aerobic. When 2nd barrel is full I water the lawn at the breaker and turn off when empty. No smell and clean so far. Probably should put some chemical in first tank to dissolve toilet paper but been fine for 5 years now.
Re: Deer camp septic system724310508/02/1806:27 PM
Joined:Aug 2008Posts: 14,115don kTHF Celebrity
THF CelebrityJoined:Aug 2008Posts: 14,115 Don’t get caught doing the 55 gallon drum.It not a legal septic systemIf they are worried about that then whatever agency they work for has either too many employees or too much time on their hands.
Re: Deer camp septic system727021308/28/1806:18 PM
Joined:Aug 2009Posts: 2,664twinbubbaVeteran Tracker
Veteran TrackerJoined:Aug 2009Posts: 2,664 There are only 2 of us on our lease so we dig a new hole each trip with post hole digger and cover it with our home made port-a-potty I built out of EMT, tarps and ball bungies. We keep it steaked down behind our trailer when we are not there.


2017 Chevy Colorado Z71, 09 Yamaha Rhino 450 Camo,

Re: Deer camp septic system730767110/07/1810:35 PM
Joined:Jan 2013Posts: 296Jon BBird Dog
Bird DogJoined:Jan 2013Posts: 296 If I was going to do a Camp site septic. This would be my thought, just like my 2-500 gal regular. Dig hole install 2 plastic barrels, connect the second with PVC pipe about 1/4 The distance from top with holes around bottom sides with gravel around outside. Hook up to first barrel to TT or cabin top of barrel. Just my 2 cts.I may or may not have done something similar at an undisclosed location. Basically copied the residential septic system using two 55 gallon plastic drums with screw down kayak hatches on top. I have them joined together with 3″ PVC and then I ran 35′ of 3″ perforated drain line. I have heard it has worked great for 5 years and counting. The only thing it service is the commode and sink in the barn.


I wish stupidity was not so handsomly rewarded.

Re: Deer camp septic system733960011/06/1803:52 PM
Joined:Aug 2008Posts: 1,549Ron HPro Tracker
Pro TrackerJoined:Aug 2008Posts: 1,549 Search DIY septic system. One of them uses two barrels and pipes.We did one barrel and two pipes. We’re in sandy soil and it has lasted for several years without attenion. I started dumping grey water on ground.
Re: Deer camp septic system735944111/27/1802:46 PM
Joined:Feb 2007Posts: 599dawgkllrTracker
TrackerJoined:Feb 2007Posts: 599 Ya’ll are way over thinking this!Just dig a pit a couple of feet deep and about 4×4 10-15-20 ft from your RV/ Cabin, etc.Buy a joint or two of thin wall PVC pipe from Home Repo and extend it from the discharge to the pit. Make sure you have a little fall in the pipe from the discharge to the pit and insert the flex hose in the end of the pipe (I use baling wire to secure it in place when the brown nuggets start flowing).Throw a couple of pieces of tin over the top of the pit so no one can watch the brown trout swimming and put a hog panel around the pit to keep you or your buddies from taking a swim.You’re done, now back to relaxing, hunting and telling a few lies around the campfire. I don’t suggest growing any Romaine lettuce or anything around the pit but the grass will always be green around it


That old crackheaded commie (Bernie Sanders) has lost his damn mind. in 1983

Re: Deer camp septic system738518412/23/1806:02 PM
Joined:Oct 2008Posts: 13,475TbarTHF Celebrity
THF CelebrityJoined:Oct 2008Posts: 13,475 I used two blue plastic drums.The first to catch the major solids and the second to catch what the first missed before going to the field line.

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