How Far Is Septic Tank From House? (Solution)

Septic tanks are required to be at least 5 feet from the house, although most are between 10 and 25 feet away.

  • How Far Does a Septic Tank/Field Need to Be From a House? Well, when it comes to having either a septic tank or field, you need to have it placed at least five feet away from your home. However, most tanks are placed even farther, commonly around 10 feet away in most cases and the leach fields are placed at around twenty feet away from the home.

How close to the house can a septic tank be?

Local codes and regulations that stipulate the distance of the septic tank from the house vary depending on the locale, but the typical minimum distance is 10 feet.

How far from a property should a septic tank be?

Septic tank regulations Most importantly, a septic tank must be at least seven metres from a house, defined as a ‘habitable property’. Septic tanks are built underground and release wastewater slowly into the surrounding environment. For this reason, they must be a set distance away from a home.

How do I find out where my septic tank is?

Most septic tanks are around 10-25 feet away from your home, and cannot be closer than five feet. Once you feel the probe striking flat concrete, fiberglass or polyethylene, you will have located your tank. Another way to find the septic tank using the sewer pipe is to go through the pipe itself.

How close can you build next to a septic tank?

– A full foundation must be 10 feet from the septic tank and 20 feet from the leaching area. – A slab foundation such as a garage must be 10 feet from the septic tank and 10 feet from the leaching area.

Can I build a deck over a septic tank?

You should never build a deck over a septic field; doing so will prevent the natural draining and dissipation of the effluent. This can ruin the septic system, not to mention releasing foul smells into the air all around your deck. The dissipating effluent can also rot the deck from underneath.

How far should sewage treatment be from house?

At least 10 meters away from any habitable building.

Do you need planning permission for a septic tank?

The short answer is yes. You will need planning permission from a local authority in order to have a septic tank installed, no matter if it’s at your own home or on a business site.

How deep is a septic tank usually buried?

Often, septic tank lids are at ground level. In most cases, they have buried anywhere from four inches to four feet underground. If you’ve just bought the home and you don’t know where your septic tank is located, this guide will provide information on how to find your septic tank.

Are septic tank locations public record?

Contact your local health department for public records. These permits should come with a diagram of the location where the septic system is buried. Depending on the age of your septic system, you may be able to find information regarding the location of your septic system by making a public records request.

How long do septic tanks last?

A septic system’s lifespan should be anywhere from 15 to 40 years. How long the system lasts depends on a number of factors, including construction material, soil acidity, water table, maintenance practices, and several others.

Can you put a garden over a septic field?

Planting over a septic leach field (drain field) is possible if it is done with care. If you have limited space on your property where you can garden, the leach field may be the only spot for landscaping. Vegetable gardening over a leach field is not recommended.

How far should a pool be from a septic tank?

Installing an inground pool has greater restrictions and will probably need to be installed at least 15 to 25 feet away from the septic tank or leach lines, depending on your county’s code requirements.

Can you put a patio over a leach field?

You can’t build a paver patio on top of a septic tank, and doing so could be against the planning laws of your state or local area. Septic tanks can take very little weight without getting damaged, and you’ll also need access to the tank in the future too. You shouldn’t build a deck on one either.

How Far Should You Put the Septic Tank From the House?

Image courtesy of Kwangmoozaa/iStock/Getty Images.

In This Article

  • Amount of distance from the home
  • Basic safety concerns
  • Suggestions for a successful installation

For those who don’t have access to a municipal sewage system, an alternate solution, such as a septic tank and field lines, will be required. The design and operation of these systems are fairly straightforward. When designing a septic system, you must keep in mind the requirements of local construction codes as well as public health concerns.

Tip

Depending on where you live, local ordinances and regulations that specify the distance between the septic tank and the home vary. However, the normal minimum distance is 10 feet between the two structures. Consult your local ordinances and regulations for a detailed answer as to how far your septic tank must be installed from your home. Requirements differ from one location to the next, although the standard minimum distance from the home is 10 feet in most cases. In the case of a private well for drinking water, however, keep in mind that many state departments of health demand a minimum distance of 50 feet between a new septic tank and a well.

It is possible that the septic tank will be placed considerably closer to the structure since it will be easier and require less plumbing in some cases.

Basic Safety Considerations

If you’re the type of person who prefers to do things on their own, there are certain important measures you should take before starting this endeavor. Before you start digging the hole for the tank, call your local utility providers to find out where the service lines are located. A gas line, water line, phone line, or electrical connection that has been severed is not only potentially dangerous, but it may also be extremely expensive to repair. Once you have finished excavating the hole, proceed with caution.

It’s also important to understand that a concrete septic tank can weigh up to 5 tons.

Make sure the hole is available when the tank is delivered so that it can be installed straight in the desired location.

Tips for a Successful Installation

Plan ahead of time to get your water supply switched on prior to installing your septic tank. You must fill the tank with water as soon as it is placed in its final position for this to be possible. This has absolutely nothing to do with the septic system itself, but it is a prudent precaution. In the event of a heavy downpour, the groundwater may swell and a septic tank may float out of the ground, even if it has been buried. If this occurs, contact a qualified professional immediately. Repairing any damage done to the lines or to the tank itself, as well as putting the tank back in its original location, may be a costly and time-consuming endeavor.

Initially, you may be confident that you will remember the exact location of the marker when it is time to top up the tank — which is generally every three to five years — but your memory may fade over time.

In the absence of a marker, you may end up digging holes in the wrong place when it is time to service the tank.

Septic Tank Location – DISTANCE TO SEPTIC TANK

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SUBMIT your question or comment on the topic of utilizing measures to locate the septic tank or cleanout access cover.

DISTANCE TO TANK – How To Measure The Possible Distance From House to Tank

SEPTIC VIDEOS has videos that demonstrate how to locate the septic system, septic tank, and septic drainfield. Also read SEPTIC DRAINFIELD LOCATION—how to locate the leach fields—for more information. In our sketch at left, we marked the location of waste lines exiting the building and then took accurate one-inch measurements to locate the septic tank center as well as the onsite seepage pits. We measured from the centers of each of these to prominent site features in order to determine how far the septic tank is from the building.

The steps outlined below deal with measuring the placement of a septic tank after it has already been erected.

  • Step 1: If there is a main waste line cleanout access opening and IF you are unable to find any clues to the location of the tank by looking outside, open the cleanout (this should be done by your plumber) and insert a plumbing snake (a plumbing line cleaning tool, not the slithering animal) into the line to determine the distance between the tank and the cleanout. A plumbing snake is nothing more than a flexible steel or fiberglass rod that is inserted into the main drain line in order to clear obstructions in the main drain line and remove them. However, as you’ll see in the next section, creative use of this tool may pinpoint the exact position of a septic tank. Step 2: Measure the distance between the septic tank and the house. Push the snake all the way into the waste line until it comes to a halt. It will come to a halt either when it reaches the interior of the septic tank (which is frequently the entrance baffle) or if it runs into an impediment such as a collapsed line between the home and the tank (which is not uncommon). To avoid this, it is possible that the line will simply run out of snake length and coil within the septic tank until the entire length of the available snake length has been entered. (Unfortunate circumstances.)
  • How to estimate the distance between your septic tank and your building, step 3: By watching how far the plumbing snake goes into the waste line until it stops, you may determine the maximum distance that the tank is likely to be away from your home. It is possible that the tank will be closer to the house since the line will bend or run at an angle – it will not go away from the house at a straight 90 degrees from the house wall
  • Obstructions in the drain line from the house to the septic tank: The difficulty is that if you run into an obstacle instead of the tank, you must locate, excavate, and fix the problem regardless of where the tank is located.
  • In terms of distance: The septic tank will be positioned outside the building on an arc created with its radius distance from the building equal to the length of a snake that was fed into the home drain until it was stopped by an obstruction until it is filled with water. Typically, the septic tank is around 10 feet away from the structure. By means of an electronic sensor: The septic tank may be pinpointed with pinpoint accuracy using technological means: Some plumbing contractors can locate the precise position of the septic tank at this stage by inserting a special plumbing snake into the main home drain pipe and running it through the house. The metal plumbing snake receives an electrical signal that is supplied into it. The signal from the plumbing snake may be detected by a receiver located outside. The precise course of the snake in the underground drain line may be traced all the way to the tank by passing the receiver, which functions as a type of electronic metal detector, over the surface of the land. Equipment for Locating Septic Tanks is also available. EQUIPMENT FOR LOCATING SEPTIC TANKS in this particular article

Whenever this specialized electronic plumbing snake equipment is not accessible, we rely on visual cues found in the home, at the site, and outside in the vicinity of possible septic tank placements, as well as some judicious digging to locate the septic tank. No, we don’t have to dig up the entire land to do this. Finding the septic tank involves a combination of visual inspection and excavation techniques, which are detailed below.

Reader CommentsQ A

(11th of April, 2015) Is it possible to have a sewage pipe running from the house to the septic tank that is longer than 150 feet? Are there any restrictions on the maximum distance that may be traveled between a septic system and a house? Thank you very much.

Reply:

Yes, however you would need to pay close attention to the pipe slope, minimize needless bends, use the right connections (not 90’s), and it would be wise to include inspection and cleanout holes every 50-75 feet enroute to avoid clogging the system. Doris Which vent do you want to use – a rooftop vent? building? or a vent in a foundation wall, for that matter? Alternatively, do you have a vent line protruding from your yard? For those who believe the latter, the tank may still be found anywhere the site permits – normally it’s as near to the structure as possible without compromising structural integrity – frequently only 10 ft – In other words, sorry, no one knows without seeing the tank on-site.

  • Keep an eye out: if no one knows where the septic tank is, we may assume that it hasn’t been pumped in a long time, which gives us reason to be gloomy about the drainfield’s remaining life.
  • The risk of a tragic fall into a septic tank when crossing a decaying home-made wood cover or rusted out steel cover cannot be overstated.
  • According to Secoh, the following pipe requirements are necessary for their air pumps: PIPINGSelect tube sizes, lengths, and attachments to minimize pressure loss to the greatest extent feasible.
  • Using tubing with a diameter that is greater than the port on the device (inside diameter min.
  • There are no elbows and the bends are of great radius.
  • EasyPump, 50 West Drive, Melbourne, Florida 32904 United States Tel: 321-253-1999 1-800-225-4498 Email: [email protected] Low-loss diffusers for aeration are available from Secoh EasyPump at the address above.
  • or What is the maximum length or distance of tubing that may be used with an aerobic septic aerator pump?
  • The pump is rated as Air Flow: 80LPM or 2.83 CFM to 4.23 CFM Open Flow.
  • Pump ratings are expressed in terms of “open flow” rate.
See also:  How Long Does It Take To Replace A Septic Tank? (Perfect answer)

Increases in tubing length, the number of elbows, bends, or fittings, as well as any increase in the depth to which the pump must push air, will all result in a reduction in the actual measured air delivery volume at the aerator in the aerobic septic tank, according to the American Society of Civil Engineers.

If we are to presume that the size and installation of your aerobic septic system were adequate in the first place, you should not relocate it more than 50 feet away without first speaking with Secoh or the firm who developed and built your aerobic septic system.

Take caution, because if an aerobic septic tank’s air flow rate, volume, duration, or CFM/LPM are not sufficient, it could result in a financially ruinous situation: failure to adequately treat the septic waste can result in early failure of the septic drainfield and contamination of the surrounding environment.

  • Call 1-877-925-5132 or email [email protected] to get in touch with the provider, septicsolutions.
  • in Dieterich, Illinois 62424, USA.
  • If you are able, please re-post the photograph.
  • Mod.
  • I have 50 feet of 1/2-inch PVC tubing as well as the electricity to run the air pump.
  • Do you have any difficulties or concerns?
  • Is there any reason why I cannot add a 50-foot air hose to the system to eliminate the noise?

However, there are practical distance limitations, such as the requirement to slope effluent lines in order for them to drain from tank to field by gravity; if the distance is exceeded, an effluent pumping system would be required.

We appreciate you sharing your thoughts, and we welcome your questions, critiques, and recommendations.

It aided me much in completing my 2018 EGD PAT.

I needed information about septic tanks for a project I was working on, and this was quite useful.

However, if the drain line is going to be running for a long distance, you’ll want to make sure there are access points for cleaning and inspection.

What is the maximum distance between the septic tank and the house? Read on to learn how to FIND THE MAIN WASTE LINE EXIT Alternatively, choose a topic from the closely related articles listed below, or browse the entireARTICLE INDEX. Alternatively, consider the following:

Septic Tank Location Articles

  • SIZE AND LOCATION OF THE SEPTIC DRAINFIELD
  • SEPTIC TANK COVERS
  • HOW TO FIND THE SEPTIC TANK
  • THE DISTANCE TO THE SEPTIC TANK
  • FINDING THE MAIN WASTE LINE EXIT
  • POSITIVE SEPTIC TANK LOCATIONS
  • SEPTIC TANK COVERS
  • SEPTIC TANK DEPTH
  • SEPTIC TANK DESIGN DEPTH
  • SEPTIC TANK LOCATING EQUIPMENT
  • SEPTIC TANK RISERS
  • SEPTIC TANK GRASS OR SNOWMELT
  • SEP

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How To Find My Septic Tank

  1. What is a septic tank
  2. How do I know if I have a septic tank
  3. And how do I know if I have a septic tank Identifying the location of your septic tank is critical for several reasons. The Best Way to Find a Septic Tank
  4. What to Do Once You’ve Discovered Your Septic Tank

You may have fallen in love with your new house because of its appealing good looks and characteristics, but there is almost certainly more to your new home than meets the eye. In many cases, the characteristics that make your house run more effectively and allow you to live a pleasant, contemporary life are not readily apparent. Septic tanks, for example, are an important part of your home’s infrastructure. A septic system is responsible for regulating and managing the wastewater generated by your home.

  • “How can I locate my septic tank?” is one of the most often requested inquiries we receive.
  • When your tank’s lid is difficult to locate – especially if you are not the original homeowner – you may be at a loss for what to do or where to look for the lid when you need it.
  • The majority of the time, all of the components of the septic tank are buried between four inches and four feet below ground level.
  • In order to do so, it is necessary to first comprehend the functions of septic tanks and septic systems and why it is important to know where yours is located.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank

Your septic tank’s location is not a closely guarded secret. There will be a method for you to locate it and make a note of its position for future reference, and below are a few examples of such methods.

What Is a Septic Tank?

Having a functioning septic tank is an important aspect of having an effective septic system. In the United States, around 20% of households utilize a septic system to handle their wastewater. Houses in rural parts of New England are the most likely to have a septic system, with residences in the Eastern United States being the most prevalent location for septic systems. When there are few and far between residences, it is typically more efficient and cost-effective to employ a septic system to manage wastewater rather than relying on a public sewage system to handle waste water.

Typically, a septic tank is a container that is waterproof and composed of a material such as concrete, polyethylene, fiberglass, or a combination of these.

An important function of a septic tank is to hold on to wastewater until any particulates in the water separate themselves from the water.

Any liquid that remains in the tank eventually drains into a leach field or a drainfield, where it is known as “effluent.” The dirt in the leach field aids in the filtering of the water and the removal of bacteria, viruses, and other pollutants that may be present in it.

Septic tanks erected in Onondaga County must contain input and outlet baffles, as well as an effluent filter or sanitary tees, in order to effectively separate particles from liquids during the treatment process.

How Do I Know If I Have a Septic Tank?

What is the best way to tell if your home has a septic tank? There are generally a few of different methods to tell. Examining your water bill might help you identify whether or not your house is served by a septic system or is part of the public sewage system in your neighborhood. If you have a septic system for wastewater management, you are likely to receive a charge from the utility provider for wastewater or sewer services of zero dollars. In the case of those who are fortunate enough to have a septic system, it is likely that they may not receive any water bills at all.

  • A lack of a meter on the water line that enters your property is typically indicative of the fact that you are utilizing well water rather than public utility water, according to the National Association of Realtors.
  • A septic system is likely to be installed in your home if you reside in a rather rural location.
  • Septic systems are likely to be installed in all of these buildings, which means your home is likely to be as well.
  • When a septic tank is present, it is common to find a mound or tiny hill on the property that is not a natural structure.
  • Checking your property records is a foolproof method of determining whether or not your home is equipped with a septic system.

Why It’s Important to Know the Location of Your Septic Tank

You might wonder why you should bother trying to discover out where your septic tank is. There are several important reasons for this:

1. To Be Able to Care for It Properly

The first reason you should try to locate your septic tank is that knowing where it is will help you to properly repair and care for it in the future. The standard guideline is to avoid erecting structures or placing heavy objects on top of the septic tank. It’s possible that you don’t want to park your car or truck on top of it, and you don’t want visitors to your house to park their cars on top of it, either. Due to the weight of the automobiles, there is a possibility that the tank would collapse due to excessive pressure.

2. If You Want to Landscape or Remodel Your Property

If you want to build an addition to your home or perform some landscaping around your property, you will need to know where your septic tank is located. Nothing with deep or lengthy roots should be planted on top of or in the area of your tank, since this can cause problems. If roots are allowed to grow into the pipes of your septic system, it is conceivable that your system will get clogged. When you know where the tank is going to be, you may arrange your landscaping such that only shallow-rooted plants, such as grass, are in close proximity to the tank.

For starters, the tank’s weight might lead it to collapse due to the weight of the construction. A second issue is that getting access to the tank becomes more difficult if a permanent building has been constructed on top of it.

3. If a Problem With Your Tank Occurs

Knowing where your tank is buried might also assist you in identifying problems as soon as they arise. Consider the following scenario: you wake up one morning and see that there is flooding or ponding water in the region surrounding your septic tank – a sign that your system is overwhelmed and that an excessive amount of water is being utilized all at once.

4. Ease of Getting It Fixed

Once you have determined the location of your sewer system, you can quickly send a plumber to it in the event that something goes wrong with the system, saving everyone both time and money. Get in Touch With A Plumber Right Away

1. Use a Septic Tank Map

First and foremost, make use of a road map. Using a map is frequently the quickest and most convenient alternative. Most counties keep records of the installation of septic tanks at all of their residents’ residences. These maps should include schematics that illustrate the specific placement of the tank on the land, as well as measurements that allow you to measure and locate the tank’s exact location on the property. Never mind that landmarks may shift over time depending on when the tank was built, so if there are a few more shrubs or a tree nearby, don’t rule out that location as a possibility.

  • If you are unable to locate a map or other paperwork that identifies the location of your septic tank, there are a few locations to try to see if you can obtain a map of the area.
  • The county health department is responsible for keeping track of septic systems.
  • A septic tank’s position could be depicted on a survey map, for example.
  • The creation of your own map and documentation may be worthwhile if you cannot locate a map or blueprint of your property and nothing appears to be on file regarding it at the county health department or another municipal agency.
See also:  How Do You Inspect A Septic Tank? (Solution found)

2. Follow the Pipes to Find Your Septic Tank

Whether or not there is an existing map of your septic tank on file, or whether or not you choose to develop one for future reference or for future homeowners, you will still need to track down and find the tank. One method of accomplishing this is to follow the sewer lines that lead away from your residence. The septic tank is situated along the sewage line that goes from your home and into the yard, as we’re sure you’re aware. Find a four-inch sewer pipe in your basement or crawl space. This is the line that will lead to your septic system and should be accessible from the ground level.

  1. In general, though, you’re searching for a pipe with a diameter of four inches or more that leaves your home via a basement wall or ceiling.
  2. By inserting a thin metal probe (also known as a soil probe) into the earth near the sewage line, you can track the pipe’s location.
  3. The majority of septic tanks are located between 10 and 25 feet away from your home, and they cannot be any closer than five feet.
  4. Going via the sewage line itself is another method of locating the septic tank utilizing it.
  5. Drain snakes are typically used to unclog clogs in toilets and drains, and they may be used to do the same thing.
  6. When the snake comes to a complete halt, it has almost certainly reached the tank.
  7. While drawing the snake back, make a note of how far it has been extended and whether it has made any bends or turns.
  8. When looking for your septic tank, you may use a transmitter that you flush down the toilet and it will direct you straight to the tank.

If you only want to keep an eye on the condition of your tank and don’t need to dig it up and inspect it, you may thread a pipe camera into the sewer pipe to see what’s happening.

3. Inspect Your Yard

Septic tanks are designed to be as unobtrusive as possible when they are erected. With the passage of time, and the growth of the grass, it might be difficult to discern the visual indications that indicated the exact location of your septic tank’s installation. However, this does not rule out the possibility of finding evidence that will take you to the location of your septic tank in the future. First and foremost, you want to rule out any potential locations for your septic tank, such as:

  • Under a road or similar paved surface, for example. Right up against the house (the tank must be at least five feet away)
  • Directly in front of the home Immediately adjacent to your well (if you have one)
  • In close proximity to trees or densely planted regions
  • In the shadow of a patio, deck, or other building

Once you’ve ruled out any potential locations for your tank, it’s time to start hunting for indications as to where it may be hiding in plain sight. Keep your eyes peeled as you go about your property, looking for any inexplicable high or low points that might suggest the presence of an underground tank. When looking at your property, you could see a hill or mound on the ground, which is frequently an indication that there is a septic tank nearby. One further item to consider while searching for the right septic tank for your home is the amount of grass or other foliage in your yard.

Alternatively, if the tank was not adequately buried, you may observe a “bald patch,” which is an area where the grass is struggling to grow in the vicinity.

4. Talk to Your Neighbors

If your neighbors have septic systems as well, they may be able to assist you in locating your tank. Inquire of your neighbors about the location of their septic tanks in relation to their residences. Having a polite conversation with your neighbors regarding septic systems not only provides you with a means to figure out where yours is, but it may also serve as a friendly introduction to the other residents of your community.

5. Look for Your Septic Tank Lid

It is only the first step in the process to discover where your septic tank is located. After you’ve located your tank, the following step is to locate the lid. You can locate it with the help of your soil probe. The majority of septic tanks are rectangular in shape and measure around five feet by eight feet. The perimeter of the tank should be marked with a probe once it has been probed around. A shallow excavation with a shovel within the tank’s perimeter and near the center (or broken into halves for a two compartment tank) should show the position of the lid or lids if you are unable to feel them by probing.

The tank itself is likely to be filled with foul-smelling vapors, if not potentially hazardous ones.

What to Do After You Find Your Septic Tank

Once you’ve determined where your tank is, it’s time to bring in the specialists. Trust us when we say that opening a septic tank is not something that just anybody wants to undertake. Concrete septic tank lids are extremely heavy and must be lifted using special lifting gear in order to be removed. Since the vapors are potentially dangerous due to the contents of the tank, please respect our advice and refrain from attempting to open the tank yourself. An exposed septic tank can be hazardous to anybody wandering around your property’s perimeter, and if someone were to fall into it, it might be lethal owing to the toxicity of the sewage in the tank.

However, before you send in a team of experienced plumbers, there are a few things you can do to ensure that others do not experience the same difficulty locating the tank and to make locating the tank in the future easier.

1. Mark Its Location

The likelihood is that you will not want to post a large sign in your yard that reads “Septic Tank Here!” but you will want to leave some sort of marking so that you can quickly locate the tank and lid when you need them. In an ideal situation, the marker will be substantial enough that it will not blow away in the wind and will not be readily moved by children who are playing in the yard. A patio paver, a potted plant, or a decorative gnome or rock are just a few of the possibilities. In addition to putting a physical sign beside the septic tank, you may draw a map or layout of the area around it to illustrate its position.

2. Take Care of Your Septic Tank

Taking proper care of your tank may save you hundreds of dollars over the course of its lifetime. The expense of maintaining your system could be a few hundred dollars every few years, but that’s a lot less than the thousands of dollars it might cost to repair or replace a damaged tank or a malfunctioning septic system. Two strategies to take better care of your septic tank and system are to avoid utilizing your drain pipes or toilets as garbage cans and to use less water overall. Things like paper towels, face wipes, and cat litter should not be flushed down the toilet since they are not designed to be flushed.

In addition, installing low-flow faucets and high-efficiency toilets can help you reduce the amount of water used in your home.

For example, you don’t want to be washing load after load of laundry or running your clothes washer at the same time as your dishwasher all at the same time.

Call a Professional Plumber

Maintenance of a septic system is not normally considered a do-it-yourself activity. In the Greater Syracuse region, whether your septic tank requires pumping out or cleaning, or if you want to replace your tank, you should use the services of a reputable plumbing firm to do the job right. If you’ve attempted to locate your septic tank on your own and are still unsure of its position, it may be necessary to enlist the assistance of a professional local plumber. Our team at Mr. Rooter Plumbing of Greater Syracuse can assist you with locating, maintaining, or replacing your home’s sewage tank.

Request an Estimate for the Job

How to Locate Your Septic Tank

It may seem impossible to imagine that one of the largest and most visible elements of your whole plumbing system is also one of the most difficult to locate, but when your property is served by a septic system, this is perfectly true. A strong explanation for this is because septic tanks are huge, unattractive, stink horrible and give off an unwarranted impression of dirt. Not only does burying them underground assist to prevent them from harm, but it also provides you with additional useable space on your property and conceals what would otherwise be a blight on your landscape.

This site is dedicated to assisting you in locating your septic system without the need for any time-consuming digging.

How To Find A Septic Tank: Step By Step

It is critical to maintain the health of your septic tank since it is responsible for securely storing and handling the wastewater that drains from your house. It is necessary to pump your septic tank once every 1-3 years, depending on the number of people living in your household and the size of your tank, in order to avoid septic tank repairs or early failure, which means you must be familiar with the location of your tank. It’s not often simple to identify your septic tank, and many plumbers charge extra for this service, which is especially true if your tank’s lid is buried beneath.

1. Gather Some Helpful Tools

Septic tank location may be made much easier with the use of several simple instruments and techniques. To locate your septic tank, you only need to know the following information: A soil probe is one of the most useful instruments for locating a septic tank. It is a tiny piece of metal that is used to puncture through the earth and detect anything that could be buried underneath. Start at the point where your sewage line exits your home and work your way straight out, inserting your soil probe every two feet along the way.

Using this method, you may also locate the cover for your septic tank.

While we highly advise keeping your cover clean and exposed in the event that you require emergency septic service, we recognize that this is not always the case.

2. Use a Septic Tank Map

If you are a new homeowner who is trying to figure out where your septic tank is, a septic tank map should be included in your inspection documentation. You can use this information to assist you in pinpointing the exact position of your storage tank. If you don’t have access to this map, there are a few of additional strategies you might employ.

3. Start Ruling Areas Out

The location of a septic tank cannot be constructed in specific areas due to the risk of causing major damage to your property or tank, as specified by local rules. Your septic tank will not be affected by the following:

  • Immediately adjacent to your well
  • Beneath your home
  • Directly against your home
  • For example, underneath your driveway
  • Under trees
  • And other locations. Structures like a patio or deck are good examples of this.

4. Inspect Your Property

If you take a hard look around your land, there’s a high possibility you’ll be able to locate your septic tank without having to do any probing whatsoever. In many circumstances, a septic tank may be identified by a slight dip or slope on your land that cannot be explained by any other means. Due to the fact that the hole that your contractors excavated for your septic tank may not have been exactly the proper size, they proceeded to install the tank anyhow. This is a rather regular occurrence.

When there is a minor divot or depression, it indicates that the hole was too large and that your contractors simply did not fill the depression to level the hole.

The likelihood of your septic tank being discovered in a few specific locations is quite high. Because of code issues or just because it doesn’t make sense, it’s highly unlikely that your septic tank will be located near any of the following locations:

  • Your water well, if you have one (for a variety of reasons that are rather clear)
  • Any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a patio, sidewalk, or driveway unless they were added after the home was built and no one performed a proper inspection before it was built)
  • Any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a driveway, sidewalk, or patio unless they were added after the home was built and no one conducted a proper inspection before it was built)
  • Any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a patio, sidewalk, or driveway unless they were added after the home was built If there is any particular landscaping
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5. Inspect Your Yard

A comprehensive investigation of your yard may be necessary to discover your septic tank considerably more quickly in some cases. The following are important items to check for in your yard:

  • If your septic tank is overfilled, sewage can leak out into the ground and function as fertilizer for your lawn, resulting in lush green grass. A area of grass that is very lush and green is a good sign that your septic tank is just beneath it
  • Puddles that don’t make sense: If your septic tank is seriously overfilled, it is possible that water will pool on your grass. Another telltale indicator that your septic tank is below ground level is an unexplainable pool of water. Ground that is uneven: When installing septic tanks, it is possible that the contractors will mistakenly create high or low patches on your grass. If you come across any uneven terrain, it’s possible that your septic tank is right there.

The metal soil probe can let you find out for certain whether or not your septic tank is located in a certain area of your yard or not. As soon as your metal soil probe makes contact with the tank, you may use your shovel to dig out the grass surrounding it and discover the septic tank lid.

6. Follow Your Sewer Main/Sewer Pipes

Following your sewage lines is one of the most straightforward methods of locating your septic tank. These pipes have a diameter of roughly 4 inches and are commonly found in the basement or crawlspace of your house. They are not dangerous. Following the pipes from your house out into your yard, using your metal soil probe every 2 feet or so until you reach the tank, is a simple process once they are located. Aside from that, every drain in your home is connected to your sewage main, which in turn is connected to your septic tank.

The likelihood that one of your major sewer lines is located in your basement or crawlspace is high if you have exposed plumbing lines in your basement or crawlspace.

If the line is labeled, it is usually made of plastic or rubber.

7. Check Your Property Records

Lastly, if all else fails, a search of your property’s public records will almost certainly reveal the location of the tank you’re looking for. Your builders most likely secured a permit for your property because septic systems are required to be installed by law in every state. In order to do so, they had to develop a thorough plan that depicted your property as well as the exact location where they intended to construct the tank. This is done to ensure that the local health department is aware of the tank and is prepared to deal with any issues that may arise as a result of its presence.

If you look hard enough, you may be able to locate the original building records for your home without ever having to get in your car or visit your local records center.

What to Do Once You Find Your Septic Tank

Upon discovering the position of your septic tank, you should mark its location on a map of your property. Use something to indicate the location of your lid, such as an attractive garden item that can’t be changed, to help you locate it. A birdbath, a rock, or a potted plant are just a few of the possibilities.

You are now ready to arrange your septic tank inspection and pumping service. Contact us now! If you have any more concerns regarding how to locate your septic tank, or if you want septic tank servicing, please contact The Plumbing Experts at (864) 210-3127 right now!

How Deep Are Septic Tanks Buried? (And How Do You Find It?)

It is possible that this content contains affiliate links. It is possible that I will receive a commission if you make a purchase after clicking on an affiliate link. In addition, as an Amazon Associate, I receive a commission from qualifying purchases.- Septic tanks, for example, might become a requirement in more remote places where some services are not readily available or easily accessible. After all, we rely on contemporary conveniences such as adequate plumbing to make our lives more comfortable and easy.

Discovering the location of your septic tank in your yard, as well as what may be grown near or on top of it, will help you determine how much of your yard is suitable for regular gardening.

You May Not Know

Despite the fact that it appears to be something that every homeowner should be aware of, understanding how deep a septic tank is buried can be difficult to determine. Perhaps you forgot about the septic tank after it was installed years ago, or perhaps you are moving into a house that already has a septic tank constructed in previously. Whatever the situation, determining the depth of your septic tank can be a challenging task under the circumstances, especially if you are unsure of the location of the lids.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank

Perhaps you’re unsure of the location of your septic tank on your property and are attempting to identify it on your own. There are really quite a few quick and simple methods for determining the location of your tank without having to go through a lengthy process. The first method is to follow the path laid out by your sewer lines. Typically, the tank and your drain field will be placed along a line parallel to the sewage line that goes from your property out to the street. Your home’s crawl area or basement may even have a four-inch sewage line that leads away from the structure of the building.

  • Follow the pipe all the way across the yard, checking every few of feet to make sure you’re still on the right track, and then turn around.
  • When you don’t feel like digging around in your yard, you can always look up your house’s address in the county records database.
  • Diagrams with measurements and even the particular location of where the septic tank is located should be included in this document.
  • You can also choose to dig your lid out from under it.
  • This is what will tell you how many lids are on your septic tank and how many are missing.
  • The majority of septic tanks are rectangular in shape and measure around in the neighborhood of 5′ x 8′ in size.
  • If you are unable to determine the position of your septic tank using a probe, you will need to do a shallow excavation around the perimeter of the tank using a shovel in order to finally locate the lid.
  • First, look for visual cues to help you.
  • There is no doubt about it, this will tell you exactly where the tank is located beneath.
  • Take a look at the plumbing in your structure, as well as the overall state of the property, to get a good sense of where the tank is situated.

It will be full to just a few inches below the underside of your tank lid when your tank is fully charged to its regular level of filling capacity. If the lid is constructed of plastic, fiberglass, or steel, the upper surface of the lid may have some variation in color or texture.

Where Should the Septic Tank Be Located?

If your property does not presently have a septic tank, but you are interested in the possibility of installing one, it is critical that you understand where it should be installed. Ordinarily speaking, most septic tanks will be situated between 10 and 25 feet away from the house. You should bear in mind that septic tanks cannot and should not be located any closer than five feet from your residence. Using a probe, you may search for flat concrete to determine whether or not a tank has previously been put on a property that you have recently purchased.

Planting Above a Septic Tank

Even though it may not appear to be the finest idea in the world, putting vegetation over a septic tank may really be perfectly acceptable as long as you choose the appropriate plants to grow. Not only is it perfectly OK to do so, but it may also be rather helpful depending on what you are planting and harvesting. It is possible to avoid erosion in your tank with the correct sort of vegetation, and it is even possible to absorb some of the additional moisture that might accumulate in your drain field.

  • Perennial plants and grasses (as previously indicated) are the ideal kind of plants to use in and around your drain field and septic tank.
  • You can use non-woody ground covers for a similar purpose as you do with woody ground covers.
  • Take, for example, the expanding environment.
  • If you don’t have access to enough sunshine, you might want to choose a shade garden plant instead.
  • Keep in mind that the soil that surrounds the septic tank drain field will typically be wetter than the surrounding soil in the rest of the yard.
  • As a result, choose a perennial such as a hollyhock, wild violet, or bee balm to ensure that you cover all of those bases when planting.
  • A septic system beneath these plants does not imply that deer will avoid the area because of its presence on your property.
  • Something like a spring bulb or an attractive grass that the deer aren’t generally interested in eating.

Plants That You Don’t Want to Grow

Just because you have the option of planting over your septic tank does not mean that everything is appropriate for this situation. A few plants should be avoided at all costs while landscaping around your septic tank, particularly huge trees that are known for their rapid growth. On the same vein, shrubs and trees with aggressive root systems are some of the worst plants to grow around your home. These roots will shoot out in quest of water, and they will not be concerned with where they locate it.

The infiltration of those roots into your septic drain field might result in catastrophic damage to your septic tank and drain field.

It’s possible that you’ll need a complete replacement.

Many other plants have strong root systems that you should avoid growing anywhere near your septic tank or drain field, and there are lots of them.

How Your Septic System Works

It is possible that understanding how your septic system operates may help you better manage, maintain, and care for it. Aside from that, it is just a large tank buried in the ground that collects your waste (which is true, but still). In remote locations, there may be a deficiency in sewage infrastructure. Because not every rural location is the same, it is not a given that septic systems will be required in your local rural area. The septic tank, in any case, serves as a form of wastewater treatment facility when there are no sewage lines available.

  1. The tank is designed to be waterproof, ensuring that your wastewater does not leech into the surrounding environment.
  2. Solids sink to the bottom of the container, scum rises to the top of the container, and liquids sit in the center of the three levels described above.
  3. The wastewater that is being discharged from your home is the cause of the exit.
  4. This liquid is carried out of your home through a pipe and into a bigger portion of your sanitary sewer system.
  5. Your drain is typically comprised of a network of perforated PVC pipes that are put underground in trenches to collect water and waste.
  6. Because the drains are perforated, the wastewater is allowed to seep out into the crushed gravel or stone, and then eventually into the surrounding soil.
  7. The natural evaporation process will then take care of any surplus moisture in the soil, unless you do something to prevent the water from flowing out of the pipes.

How to Plan a Septic Field

The tank is only one component of the whole equation. You’ll also need a drain field to catch all of the liquid waste that will be generated. When you are planting around your septic tank, the drain pipes are the most significant source of worry. Having those aggressive roots infiltrate and ruin your septic drain system is the very last thing you want. When this occurs, it can prevent your septic tank from emptying correctly and potentially cause it to get contaminated by groundwater. According to a solid rule of thumb, the less horticultural labor you have to do in close proximity to your septic tank, the better.

Just remember that they must be planted every year, so keep that in mind while planting them.

The first step is to fill in the septic drain field with earth.

In the second instance, too much mulch is being applied to the area in question. The third issue is that you may be watering your plants more than you should be. All three of these factors can impair the capacity of your drain field to evaporate in a typical manner.

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