How Big Is My Septic Tank? (Solution)

The only way to know for certain the size of your septic tank is to hire a septic maintenance provider to locate, open, and pump the tank. At that time he or she will be able to tell you its exact size and if it’s in good shape or needs maintenance.

  • A typical residential septic tank is usually about 4.5 feet wide x 8.0 feet long x 6 feet tall. Your septic tank may be a different size however. Best practice is to find and measure your septic tank for accurate calculations. Tanks are typically buried 4 inches to 4 feet deep depending on local site conditions, shape, slope, and other factors.

How do I know the size of my septic tank?

Consider the Size of Your Property The larger your home, the larger the septic tank you’re going to need. For instance, a house smaller than 1,500 square feet usually requires a 750 to 1,000-gallon tank.

What is the standard size of a septic tank?

Most residential septic tanks range in size from 750 gallons to 1,250 gallons. An average 3-bedroom home, less than 2500 square feet will probably require a 1000 gallon tank.

How often does a 1000 gallon septic tank need to be pumped?

For example, a 1,000 gallon septic tank, which is used by two people, should be pumped every 5.9 years. If there are eight people using a 1,000-gallon septic tank, it should be pumped every year.

How do I calculate the size of my septic drain field?

Drainfield Size

  1. The size of the drainfield is based on the number of bedrooms and soil characteristics, and is given as square feet.
  2. For example, the minimum required for a three bedroom house with a mid range percolation rate of 25 minutes per inch is 750 square feet.

How often should a septic tank be pumped?

Inspect and Pump Frequently The average household septic system should be inspected at least every three years by a septic service professional. Household septic tanks are typically pumped every three to five years.

How long do septic tanks last?

A septic system’s lifespan should be anywhere from 15 to 40 years. How long the system lasts depends on a number of factors, including construction material, soil acidity, water table, maintenance practices, and several others.

How much does it cost to pump a septic tank?

How much does it cost to pump out a septic tank? The average cost is $300, but can run up to $500, depending on your location. The tank should be pumped out every three to five years.

Are there different size septic tanks?

Septic tank sizes are measured in gallons, based on the amount of sewage the tank can hold. Standard tank sizes are typically 1,000, 1,250 and 1,500 gallons, and these suit most homes. Typically, the minimum tank liquid capacity of a one- to three-bedroom home is 1,000 gallons.

How do I clean my septic tank naturally?

You can mix about a 1/4 cup of baking soda with 1/2 cup of vinegar and 2 tablespoons lemon to make your own natural cleaning agent. The baking soda will fizz up to help get the dirt and grime in your tub and drains. It’s a great cleaner and your septic system will thank you!

Can a septic tank never be pumped?

What Are the Consequences of Not Pumping Your Tank? If the tank is not pumped, the solids will build up in the tank and the holding capacity of the tank will be diminished. Eventually, the solids will reach the pipe that feeds into the drain field, causing a clog. Waste water backing up into the house.

Can I shower if my septic tank is full?

Unless the toilet’s overflowing or the bath spigot is filling the tub with blood, plumbers and exorcists aren’t usually on our minds. When the waste water from your toilet, shower, sinks and washing machine leave your house, it’s combined. When it hits the septic tank, however, it begins to separate.

How to Determine Your Septic Tank Size

The size of a septic tank is something that every septic system owner should be aware of. If you know the size of your tank, what difference does it make? It’s critical to understand the size of your septic tank so that you can determine how frequently it needs to be pumped in order to maintain it working at top performance. Preventative maintenance is the only type of maintenance that septic systems require, and it is quite inexpensive when compared to the cost of a new system. As a result, it is critical to be aware of when your septic tank will require pumping in order to avoid missing a scheduled repair appointment.

Eventually, if the accumulation of particles in the tank gets too great and sediments begin to flow into the drainfield, the system may become clogged and overburdened to the point where a new drainfield will be required.

Determine Your Septic Tank Size

Having a good understanding of your septic tank’s capacity is essential. The size of your tank isn’t important, so why should it be? It’s critical to understand the capacity of your septic tank so that you can determine how frequently it should be pumped in order to maintain it working at top performance. When compared to the expense of a new system, the small amount of preventative maintenance that septic systems require is quite affordable. In order to avoid missing a maintenance service, it is critical to be aware of when your septic tank will require pumping.

Eventually, if the accumulation of particles in the tank gets too great and sediments begin to flow into the drainfield, the system may become clogged and overburdened to the point where a new drainfield is required.

Septic Pumping Experts

The services we provide at Front Range Septic include both septic and grease trap maintenance. Our organization delivers fairly cost services to customers throughout Northern Colorado and the surrounding areas. We provide high-quality septic tank and grease trap cleaning, pumping, and maintenance services to guarantee that you are getting the most out of your system.

How Can I Tell the Size of My Septic Tank?

In accordance with the size of your home, septic tanks are available in a number of different sizes. Nevertheless, most homeowners are unaware of the size of their tank, particularly if it was not constructed by a professional contractor. In order to determine how frequently a septic tank should be maintained, the size of the tank is an important piece of information. It is possible to incur unpleasant and expensive repercussions if you do not properly maintain your septic system.

Tips for Determining Your Septic Tank Size

First, check through your belongings for any paperwork that could show the size of your septic tank. It’s a good idea to call the company who installed your septic system to see if they have any information about your system. The business that performed the most recent maintenance work on your septic tank may also be able to supply you with information on the size of the tank. If at all feasible, seek to verify any information you come across. Additionally, the Environmental Health Department of your local county may potentially have some documents on file in their possession.

The suitable size of the tank is determined by the size of the house.

The square footage of a home, as well as the number of bedrooms, rise as the property’s size expands.

Septic tanks with capacity of 1,000 gallons or less should be installed in three-bedroom homes, whereas tanks with capacities of 1,250 gallons or more should be installed in four- and five-bedroom homes, respectively.

Find Accurate Information

To begin, check through your belongings for any documentation that may show the size of your septic tank or leach field. Whether you know the name of the business who installed your septic system, you may inquire with them to see if they have this information on file for you. In addition, the firm that performed the most recent maintenance on your septic tank may be able to supply you with information on the size of your tank. If at all feasible, get confirmation for any information you obtain.

The size of your home allows you to make an accurate approximation.

Houses with one or two bedrooms should typically have a tank that holds 750 gal.

Septic tanks with capacity of 1,000 gallons or less should be installed in three-bedroom homes, whereas tanks with capacities of 1,250 gallons or more should be installed in four- and five-bedroom homes.

Septic Tank Size: What Size Septic Tank Do You Need?

Septic tanks are used for wastewater disposal and are located directly outside your home. Private wastewater management is becoming increasingly popular in the United States, with more than 30 percent of newly constructed residences incorporating on-site wastewater management. Do you require septic tank installation and are unsure of the amount of septic tank you require? When establishing a septic tank, the most important element to consider is the type and size of septic tank that you will be installing.

A number of factors influence the size of a septic tank, which are discussed in this article.

Basics of Septic Tanks

Your septic system is a self-contained chamber that is designed to retain the wastewater generated by your home. A septic system is comprised of two major components: the soil absorption area or drain, and the holding tank. Septic tanks absorb solid waste when wastewater is discharged into them, resulting in the formation of an asludge layer at the septic tank’s base. A layer of soap residue, grease, and oil forms on the top of the water. The effluent or wastewater is contained within the intermediate layer.

To discover more about how a septic tank works, check out our page that goes into further detail on how a septic tank functions.

The Main Types of Septic Tanks

Before you start thinking about septic tank sizes, it’s important to understand the many types of septic tanks that exist.

  • Septic tanks made of fiberglass
  • Septic tanks made of plastic
  • Septic tanks made of concrete

Concrete septic tanks are the most prevalent variety, but since they are so massive, you will need big and expensive equipment to build them. Fiberglass and plastic septic tanks are lighter than concrete and are therefore more suited for difficult-to-reach and distant locations.

Before purchasing a septic tank, you should check with your local building department to learn about the rules and guidelines governing private wastewater management. You may also be interested in:Do you have a septic tank?

Why Septic Tank Sizes is Important

If the capacity of your home’s septic tank is insufficient to satisfy your requirements, it will be unable to handle the volume of wastewater generated by your home. As a result, a wide range of annoying difficulties can arise, including bad smells, floods, and clogs. Nonetheless, the most common consequence of a septic tank that is too small is that the pressure that builds up will cause the water to be released before it has had a chance to be properly cleaned. This suggests that the solid waste in the septic tank will not be sufficiently broken down, and will thus accumulate more quickly, increasing the likelihood of overflows and blockages in the system.

A septic tank that is too large will not function properly if it does not get the required volume of wastewater to operate.

What Determines Septic Sizes?

A septic tank that is too small for your home’s requirements will not be able to handle the volume of wastewater generated by your residence. This can result in a variety of annoying situations, including bad smells, floods, and clogs. While a septic tank that is too small can have some negative consequences, the most common one is that the rising pressure will force the water to be released before it has had a chance to be properly cleaned. Therefore, the solid waste in the septic tank will not be sufficiently broken down and will accumulate more quickly, increasing the likelihood of overflows and blockages.

Septic tanks that are too large will not function properly unless they are supplied with an adequate volume of wastewater to operate on.

Bacteria aid in the breakdown of solid waste in septic tanks and are produced by the bacteria in your septic tank.

Consider Your Water Usage

The most accurate and practical method of estimating the appropriate septic tank size for your property is to calculate the quantity of water you use on a regular basis. The size of the septic tank required is determined by the amount of water that can be held in it before being drained into the soil absorption field. In many places of the United States, the smallest capacity of septic tank that may be installed is 1,000 gallons or less. The following are the suggested septic tank sizes for your household, which are based on your household’s entire water use.

  • A septic tank with a capacity of 1,900 gallons will handle less than 1,240 gallons per day
  • A septic tank with a capacity of 1,500 gallons will handle less than 900 gallons per day. A septic tank with a capacity of 1,200 gallons is required for less than 700 gallons per day
  • A septic tank with a capacity of 900 gallons is required for less than 500 gallons per day.

Consider the Size of Your Property

Another factor to consider when determining the most appropriate septic tank size for your home is the square footage of your home. The size of your home will determine the size of the septic tank you will require.

For example, a dwelling with less than 1,500 square feet typically requires a tank that holds 750 to 1,000 gallons. On the other side, a larger home of around 2,500 square feet will require a larger tank, one that is more than the 1,000-gallon capacity.

The Number of Bedrooms Your Property Has

An additional issue to consider is the amount of bedrooms in your home, which will influence the size of your septic tank. The size of your septic tank is proportional to the number of bedrooms on your home. The following table lists the appropriate septic tank sizes based on the number of bedrooms.

  • In general, a 1-2 bedroom house will require a 500 gallon septic tank
  • A 3 bedroom house will demand 1000 gallon septic tank
  • A 4 bedroom house will require 1200 gallon septic tank
  • And a 5-6 bedroom house would require a 1500 gallon septic tank.
See also:  How Do I Locate My Septic Tank? (TOP 5 Tips)

The Number of Occupants

In general, the greater the number of people that live in your home, the larger your septic tank must be. In the case of a two-person household, a modest septic tank will be necessary. If your house has more than five tenants, on the other hand, you will want a larger septic tank in order to handle your wastewater more effectively and hygienically. When determining what size septic tank to purchase, it is important to remember that the size of your septic tank determines the overall effectiveness of your septic system.

As a result, it is critical that you examine septic tank sizes in order to pick the most appropriate alternative for your property in order to avoid these difficulties.

What size of septic tank do I need?

Probably one of the last things on your mind when you are constructing a new house is the location of your septic system. After all, shopping for tanks isn’t nearly as entertaining as shopping for cabinetry, appliances, and floor coverings. Although you would never brag about it, your guests will be aware if you do not have the proper septic tank placed in your home or business.

septic tanks for new home construction

The exact size of the septic tank is determined mostly by the square footage of the house and the number of people who will be living in it. The majority of home septic tanks have capacities ranging from 750 to 1,250 gallons. A 1000 gallon tank will most likely be required for a typical 3-bedroom home that is smaller than 2500 square feet in size. Of course, all of this is dependent on the number of people who live in the house as well as the amount of water and waste that will be disposed of through the plumbing system.

For the most accurate assessment of your septic tank needs, you should speak with an experienced and trustworthy sewer business representative.

planning your drainfield

Here are some helpful hints for deciding where to locate your drainfield when you’re designing it.

  • Vehicles should not be allowed on or around the drainfield. Planting trees or anything else with deep roots along the bed of the drain field is not recommended. The roots jam the pipes on a regular basis. Downspouts and sump pumps should not be discharged into the septic system. Do not tamper with or change natural drainage features without first researching and evaluating the consequences of your actions on the drainage field. Do not construct extensions on top of the drain field or cover it with concrete, asphalt, or other materials. Create easy access to your septic tank cover by placing it near the entrance. Easy maintenance and inspection are made possible as a result. To aid with evaporation and erosion prevention, plant grass in the area.

a home addition may mean a new septic tank

Do not make any big additions or renovations to your house or company until you have had the size of your septic system assessed.

If you want to build a house addition that is more than 10% of your total floor space, increases the number of rooms, or necessitates the installation of new plumbing, you will almost certainly need to expand your septic tank.

  • For a home addition that will result in increased use of your septic system, your local health department will require a letter from you that has been signed and authorized by a representative of your local health department confirming that your new septic system is capable of accommodating the increase in wastewater. It is not recommended that you replace your septic system without the assistance of a certified and competent contractor.

how to maintain your new septic system

Septic tank cleaning and septic tank pumping services are provided by Norway Septic Inc., a service-oriented company devoted to delivering outstanding septic tank cleaning and septic tank pumping services to households and business owners throughout the Michiana area. “We take great delight in finishing the task that others have left unfinished.” “They pump, we clean!” says our company’s motto. Septic systems are something we are familiar with from our 40 years of expertise, and we propose the following:

  • Septic tank cleaning and septic tank pumping services are provided by Norway Septic Inc., a service-oriented company devoted to delivering outstanding septic tank cleaning and septic tank pumping services to residents and business owners throughout the Michiana area. When others fail to complete a task, we take great delight in completing it. “They pump, we clean!” is our company motto. Given our extensive septic system knowledge and over 40 years of expertise, we suggest the following:

common septic questions

Here are some of the most frequently asked questions by our septic customers.

How do I determine the size of my septic tank?

If you have a rectangular tank, multiply the inner height by the length to get the overall height of the tank. In order to find out how many gallons your septic tank contains, divide the number by.1337.1337

How many bedrooms does a 500-gallon septic tank support?

The exact size of the septic tank is determined mostly by the square footage of the house and the number of people who will be living in it. The majority of home septic tanks have capacities ranging from 750 to 1,250 gallons. A 1000 gallon tank will most likely be required for a typical 3-bedroom home that is smaller than 2500 square feet in size.

How deep in the ground is a septic tank?

Your septic system is normally buried between four inches and four feet underground, depending on the climate.

How to Calculate Septic Tank Size

Riverside, California 92504-17333 Van Buren Boulevard Call us right now at (951) 780-5922. Every septic system owner should be familiar with the process of calculating the size of their septic tank so that they can plan for how often their tank will need to be pumped to maintain it working at top performance. It is significantly less expensive to do even a little amount of preventative maintenance than it is to install a whole new system. As a result, it is critical to be aware of when your septic tank will require pumping in order to avoid missing a maintenance appointment.

Eventually, if the accumulation of particles in the tank gets too great and sediments begin to flow into the drainfield, the system may become clogged and overburdened to the point where a new drainfield will be required.

Types of Septic Tanks

Septic tanks are commonly utilized in residential construction and can be classified into three categories.

  • When it comes to residential building, there are three types of septic tanks to consider.

Construction of concrete septic tanks is the most popular, but because of their weight, they must be installed with heavy gear. Polyethylene and fiberglass are one-piece products that are significantly lighter than steel. This makes them particularly well suited for isolated and difficult-to-reach locations. In order to determine whether or not you need a septic tank system, check with your local building department to see what laws and requirements apply to onsite wastewater treatment.

Why Choosing the Right Septic Tank Size Matters

sewage can back up into your home if a septic tank is installed that is too small and does not have enough holding capacity. When installing a septic tank, it is critical that you determine the proper size.

The majority of towns require even the smallest septic tanks to carry a minimum of 1,000 gallons of wastewater. As the number of bedrooms, occupants, bathrooms, and fixtures that will be serviced by the septic system rises, the needed capacity for the system increases accordingly.

How Much Water Do You Use?

There are a variety of calculations that may be used to calculate the size of the septic tank that is required for your residence. The most precise and dependable method is to measure water consumption. The size of the septic tank that is required is determined by the amount of water that will be handled and then dispersed into the field lines of the property. It should be noted that the minimum capacity tank permitted in many regions of the nation is 1,000 gallons. The average individual consumes 50-100 gallons of water each day.

Try to keep these things in mind when you’re putting together your estimate.

As your water use increases, the distance between you and the rest of the world narrows.

Calculations by House Size

Various techniques of computation are available to calculate the size of the septic tank that is required for your residence. When it comes to water consumption, there is no more exact and dependable method. According to the quantity of water that will be handled and then dispersed into the field lines, the size of the septic tank that is necessary is calculated. It should be noted that in many places of the country, the smallest size tank permitted is 1,000 gallons in capacity. The average individual consumes 50-100 gallons of water per day.

A number of additional items such as swimming pools, water softeners, and lawn irrigation systems are not covered by this policy.

Homes with minimal water use will require a reservoir that holds around double the amount of water used.

  • Three bedrooms under 2,500 square feet: 1,000 gallon tank
  • Four bedrooms under 3,500 square feet: 1,200 gallon tank
  • And five or six bedrooms under 5,500 square feet: 1,500 gallon tank
  • One or two bedrooms under 1,500 square feet: 750 gallon tank
  • Three bedrooms under 2,500 square feet: 1,000 gallon tank

Septic Tank Size Affects Pumping Schedule

The size of your septic tank is important because it determines how frequently it has to be pumped in order to stay working at top performance. As a general rule, we recommend that you pump your septic tank every three to five years; however, the smaller the tank, the more frequently it must be pumped. Tanks that are not maintained properly over an extended period of time are more likely to get clogged or fail, necessitating costly repairs or replacement.

Planning Your Drainfield

Here are some helpful hints for deciding where to locate your drainfield when you’re designing it.

  • Vehicles should not be allowed on or around the drainfield. It is not recommended to put trees or anything else with deep roots along the bed of the drain field since the roots of these plants frequently clog the pipes. Downspouts and sump pumps should not be discharged into the septic system. Do not tamper with or change natural drainage features without first researching and evaluating the consequences of your actions on the drainage field. Do not construct extensions on top of the drain field or cover it with concrete, asphalt, or other materials. Make your septic tank lid as accessible as possible so that maintenance and inspection may be performed without difficulty. To aid with evaporation and erosion prevention, plant grass in the area.

Get Help Choosing the Right Septic Tank Size

Obviously, these figures are just intended to be used as a broad guideline, and the operation of the complete system is contingent on you getting your numbers exactly correct. It is important not to leave anything to chance. Make a phone call to West Coast Sanitation. Our professionals understand that you don’t have time to cope with septic system issues.

If you believe that your system has reached its maximum capacity, please contact us immediately to discuss your options. If you have any questions, we have specialists standing by to help you resolve them and get your system back up and running.

What Size Septic Tank Do I Need

The size of an underground septic tank is referred to as its total volume handling capacity in this article, and it will be discussed in further detail later in this article. For additional information on above-ground septic tanks and systems, see our page on above-ground septic tanks. The minimum septic tank capacity requirements are determined by a variety of variables. State, county, and/or city regulations may specify permitted tank sizes, as well as tank materials and installation.

The size of the septic tank will vary depending on whether it is intended for domestic or commercial usage; in this section, we will cover residential use.

See also:  Where Do Septic Tank Trucks Dump? (TOP 5 Tips)

Shortly stated, the required size of a septic tank will be determined by the following factors: (1) the specific septic system type; (2) local government requirements; (3) the compatibility of the ground geology; and (4) the anticipated volume of wastewater depending on the size of the residence.

However, this is not true.

Furthermore, plastic septic tanks will not corrode, are weatherproof, are waterproof, are less expensive, are lighter, and are easier to build.

1) The Specific Septic System Type

The size of an underground septic tank is referred to as its total volume handling capacity in this text, and it will be discussed in detail later. For additional information on these tanks and systems, please see our page on above-ground septic tanks. Minimum septic tank capacity requirements are determined by a variety of variables. State, county, and/or city regulations may specify acceptable tank sizes, as well as tank materials and location. Because of the importance of soil characteristics and geography in system efficacy, the size of drain fields and septic tanks can be influenced by the soil conditions.

Septic tank systems in existence or to be installed might also influence the size of the tank that is necessary.

Some people believe that polyethylene (also known as plastic) septic tanks are inferior to other types of septic tanks.

When compared to concrete septic tanks, plastic septic tanks have far greater resistance to breaking.

Furthermore, plastic septic tanks will not corrode, are weatherproof, are waterproof, are less expensive, are lighter, and are easier to build. They will also not float if they are constructed properly.

  1. The following systems are available: conventional, gravity-fed, anaerobic systems
  2. Above-ground septic systems
  3. Pressure systems
  4. Anaerobic systems
  5. Mound systems
  6. Recirculating sand or gravel filters systems
  7. Bottomless sand filters systems

If your septic tank system is anything other than a traditional, anaerobic system, the instructions in this page may not be applicable in their entirety to your situation.

2) Local Government Regulations

The laws for septic tanks imposed by local governments vary greatly across the United States. In part, this is due to the significantly diverse soil geography and water features that exist from state to state and can even differ by a few miles in some cases. In order to determine the appropriate septic tank size and the best position on the land for installation, it is essential to consult with local government rules first. Take, for example, theWastewater Treatment Standards – Residential Onsite Systemsdocument from the New York State Department of Health, which provides a comprehensive informational overview of codes, rules, and regulations frequently promulgated by governing bodies, as well as common terminology and definitions in the industry.

3) Suitability of the Ground Geology

The subterranean soil type has a significant impact on the efficacy of the system and, consequently, the size of the septic tank. This topic is highly tied to the rules of the local government. In most cases, it is related to the standards and recommendations of a designated authority that regulates septic tank installations, which is typically the department of health. In order to determine whether or not the ground is suitable for a septic tank system, a trained specialist must come out to the prospective installation site and conduct a series of tests.

A perc test will assess whether or not the subterranean soil is capable of handling and filtering septic tank effluent in an appropriate manner.

Whether you are hiring an experienced professional or doing it yourself, it is your obligation to contact your local oversight agency and arrange for perc tests and/or ground area evaluations to be performed.

4) The Expected Volume of Wastewater

The typical amount of wastewater that will be generated and that the septic tank will be able to manage is the most essential factor in determining the size of the septic tank that is required. In a home with simply a septic system, all wastewater is disposed of in the septic tank unless a separate system for managing greywater is in place to handle the waste. In order to calculate and approximate these values for residential dwellings, business structures, and facilities, extensive study has been carried out.

Starting with a 1000-gallon septic tank for residential usage, the advice is to go from there.

Some experts propose adding an additional 250 gallons of septic tank capacity for each additional bedroom over three bedrooms.

This is frequently the case when considering the situation collectively for the entire household rather than individually.

This article has demonstrated that septic tank recommendations are extremely diverse and depend on a variety of factors like where you reside, local government rules, subterranean soil type, house size, and the amount of wastewater that your unique home is predicted to produce.

Minimum Septic Tank Capacity Table

For further information on the minimum septic tank capacity dependent on the number of residential bedrooms, please see the following table:

Number of Bedrooms Minimum Septic Tank Size Minimum Liquid Surface Area Drainfield Size
2 or less 1000 – 1500 Gallons 27 Sq. Ft. 800 – 2500 Sq. Ft.
3 1000 – 2000 Gallons 27 Sq. Ft. 1000 – 2880 Sq. Ft.
4 1250 – 2500 Gallons 34 Sq. Ft. 1200 – 3200 Sq. Ft.
5 1500 – 3000 Gallons 40 Sq. Ft. 1600 – 3400 Sq. Ft.
6 1750 – 3500 Gallons 47 Sq. Ft. 2000 – 3800 Sq. Ft.

Take note of the following in relation to the table above:

  • As defined by the State of New York, the Minimum Liquid Surface Area is the surface area given for the liquid by the tank’s width and length measurements. The range of Drainfield Sizes is depending on the kind of groundwater present. The State of Michigan provides the above-mentioned drainfield recommendations, which might vary greatly depending on local standards and terrain.

Additional Thought: Can a Septic Tank Be Too Big?

In the absence of consideration for cost, it is reasonable to ask: “Can a septic tank be too large?” The answer is a resounding nay. As long as the septic tank is placed appropriately, it is impossible for a septic tank to be too large; the only thing that can happen is that it is too little. According to the majority of suggestions, constructing a larger-capacity septic tank is frequently the safer and more preferable solution. The following are the reasons behind this:

  1. With a bigger septic tank, you can adapt for changes in household consumption, such as those caused by parties or long-term guests. In the event that your family grows in size or you want to make improvements to your house, such as adding more bedrooms and bathrooms or installing new plumbing fixtures, having a bigger septic tank can save you the expense of installing a new tank.

Takeaways | What Size Septic Tank Do I Need

The septic tank size recommendations offered here are merely that: suggestions. They are built on a foundation of information gathered from government and academic sources. The actual size of the septic tank you require will vary depending on the factors discussed in this article. There is no “one-size-fits-all” solution when it comes to determining the appropriate septic tank size for your property. There is a great deal of variation depending on where you reside. With addition to providing a basic insight into the septic tank and system size that may be most suited to your application, the providedMinimum Septic Tank Capacity Tablecan also assist in cost estimations.

Before beginning any septic tank installation project, check and double-check with the state, city, or local county’s agency that is in charge of septic tanks, soil testing, and permissions.

If you’re searching for a chart of tank sizes, have a look at our page on the many sizes and quantities of septic tanks available.

They are available in both single chamber and double chamber designs.

How do I know what size septic tank I have? (how much, front loader) – House -remodeling, decorating, construction, energy use, kitchen, bathroom, bedroom, building, rooms

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I am fairly new to having a septic tank. We bought our house over a year ago and it has one. The house was built in 1994. 2000 sft, 3 bedrooms, 3 baths. We had a pretty horrible purchase experience with hostile sellers and a bad realtor. A lot of things were not explained and when our septic inspection took place we were told after the fact. The report states very little information. Just that the system is working and it needed to be emptied.Before moving in I had the system pumped and was told by the company that the previous owners did not take care of the system. There was no gray water on top and when he inserted the shovel, it stood up on its own. Yuck. The company told me that since the system was old and that most septics only last 20 yrs, I should really baby it because its near the end of its lifespan. The people we bought our house from only lived in the house 14 months. The owners before them were the original owners that built the home and from what neighbors have told me they were very meticulous. So I am thinking the septic was only abused for the 14 months the second owners had it. I hoping with my taking care of it, we will be okay for a lot longer than 5 more years. But I am worried because in my sub, I have seen 3 homes get new septics this past summer. All the houses in the sub were built around the same time, about 14-16 yrs ago.I was talking to my neighbor about septics and he used to pump them for living while in college. He told me that he was friends with the original owner of my house and that they paid extra to have a larger tank installed when the house was built. He said the original owner was at the house every day when the house was being built and he did not cut corners on anything. My neighbor told me that I did not need to empty the tank once a year. He feels the company is just trying to rip me off. He said I could go up to 5 yrs since there are only 3 of us living in the house.So with this new info about my house from the neighbor, how do you know what size tank you have? From what I read on line, it seems a 3 bedroom house would have a 1,000 gallon tank. So how much more would someone bump up on size? Does it even really matter? I do not intend to go up to 5 yrs but it would be nice to go about 2-3 if possible. Or should I just do the yearly pump to be safe? If so then I am 4 months over due. Thoughts?
Location: Johns Creek, GA15,802 posts, read58,860,895timesReputation: 19919
Check with the planning/building department of the convening authority. All records are public. They should have a record of the septic system that was installed. It should tell you the size of the tank, the runs of the leach field, and their location.They may charge a few bucks for a copy of that record- if you require it.
Location: The Raider Nation._ Our band kicks brass1,854 posts, read9,277,391timesReputation: 2328
Only a 20 year lifespan? I would say that is a load of crap.As long as the solids never reach the leach field, it should last forever.Solids stay in the tank, and water evaporates from the leach field. It doesn’t drain into the ground like people think. If the laterals get plugged with solids from neglect, you are then screwed.The next size up from 1000 gallons should be 1500 gallons.It all depends on where you live, and what your health department mandates.My County goes by the number of bedrooms. I have 5 bedrooms. I had to install two 1500 gallon tanks, and 1500 feet of laterals.I’ve had it pumped once in 10 years, and I’m probably due for another one. Pumping fees in this part of Ohio run about $150 for that size of tank.
Quote:Originally Posted byK’ledgeBldrCheck with the planning/building department of the convening authority. All records are public. They should have a record of the septic system that was installed. It should tell you the size of the tank, the runs of the leach field, and their location.They may charge a few bucks for a copy of that record- if you require it.Okay, I should have thought of that. Thank you! Now I just have to figure out where. Its an odd set up here. They call my area a city but its not a city. Nor a township. We have no government so I have to make some calls to see if the neighboring cities have that information.
Location: Ridgewood302 posts, read2,128,816timesReputation: 197
Quote:Originally Posted bySouth Range FamilyAs long as the solids never reach the leach field, it should last forever. Solids stay in the tank, and water evaporates from the leach field. It doesn’t drain into the ground like people think. If the laterals get plugged with solids from neglect, you are then screwed.The leach field doesn’t last forever. Honestly, that’s just stupid to say that. A biomat forms in the leach field, which clogs things up. And very little water evaporates from the leach field. There’s a reason a perk test is done to size the leach field. It percolates down through the soil.
Location: Johns Creek, GA15,802 posts, read58,860,895timesReputation: 19919
Quote:Originally Posted bySouth Range FamilyOnly a 20 year lifespan? I would say that is a load of crap.As long as the solids never reach the leach field, it should last forever. Solids stay in the tank, andwater evaporates from the leach field. It doesn’t drain into the ground like people think. If the laterals get plugged with solids from neglect, you are then screwed.What the.? I find it truely amazing that one would “think” that way.Quote:Originally Posted byBergeniteThe leach field doesn’t last forever. Honestly, that’s just stupid to say that. A biomat forms in the leach field, which clogs things up. And very little water evaporates from the leach field.There’s a reason a perk test is done to size the leach field. It percolates down through the soil.Thank you! Somebody said it without me going on a tangent!
Location: Eastern Washington15,887 posts, read51,501,363timesReputation: 15737
In our experience (parents in GA and DWI in WA) if you keep the amount of raw water going into a septic to a minimum, don’t run a sprinkler all day over the leach field, and stick with white TP, don’t flush any plastics into it, etc – a septic will work way over 20 years with no attention at all.I want to say my parent’s septic has been working fine for over 50 years without any attention or maintenance.Of course if you ask a septic service if it needs to be pumped periodically, this is like asking a barber if he thinks you need a haircut – they are almost obliged to say yes.Not strictly according to code everywhere, but if you can run your washing machine drain to a French drain, instead of to the septic, that removes one thing the septic deals with worst.Failing that, maybe a “green” type of detergent would help? (speculating, I don’t know one way or the other).
Location: The Raider Nation._ Our band kicks brass1,854 posts, read9,277,391timesReputation: 2328
[quote=M3 Mitch;16435687I want to say my parent’s septic has been working fine for over 50 years without any attention or maintenance.Exactly. My Mother’s has been going strong for 45 years. My brother across the street has the original from 1948, and another brother has the original from 1930. My area is loaded with ancient houses. The only ones that get replaced are the ones that don’t get pumped.The health department in our area keeps an eye on that stuff, and mandates that they get pumped every time a house is sold.Maybe you other guys have crappy soil, but that’s not the case here.
Thanks for the replies. I am probably being extra careful in how I use it but I am fine with that verses replacing the system by doing stupid stuff. In fact, a friend of mine lives down south and told me about 6 months ago I was babying mine too much and not living.I only do one load of laundry, sometimes two a day but I always space them out. One in the morning, one at night. We also upgraded to front loaders. So anyway, my friend called me this morning in fact and was upset because the neighbor behind her found poo in his yard. He followed the trail and its from her yard.She ruined her leach fieldI think that is what its called. She does back to back loads every day and hasn’t emptied it in 5 yrs. She also has 8 people in her household. So.Im good with being over cautious. But would like to know how big it is. I will look at finding this out soon.
Location: Johns Creek, GA15,802 posts, read58,860,895timesReputation: 19919
Is your house on a basement or crawl?If it is, I suggest you look into having your waste system divided. Re-plumb so that only black water goes to the septic system and gray water can either feed directly into the yard, or you could (if room and budget allow) install a cistern to hold the gray water and pump for yard, garden, or landscape irrigation.
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Choosing the appropriate size for your Prior Lake, MN septic tank is one of the most critical questions you should ask yourself while designing your septic system. Choosing the incorrect size might result in a variety of problems down the line, so it is critical to get this component of the project right the first time. Before you purchase and install a septic system, follow the guidelines in this section to establish the size of your tank.

Measure your square footage

The square footage of your property is one of the most significant elements to consider when selecting a septic tank. Houses with one to two bedrooms and fewer than 1,500 square feet, on average, require a modest tank of around 750 gallons of storage space.

An average 1,000-gallon water tank is required for homes between 1,500 and 2,500 square feet (which is normally a three-bedroom house). It is quite likely that you will want a 1,250-gallon tank if you have a larger, four-bedroom home that is up to 3,500 square feet in size.

Count your household

How many people will be living in the house and utilizing the septic system at the time of construction? This is the second most important consideration when determining the appropriate septic tank capacity in Prior Lake, Minnesota. Obviously, the size of the septic tank should increase in proportion to the number of people that live in the house. You may need to install a larger tank than would otherwise be recommended for a house of that size if you have three bedrooms but multiple children in each bedroom.

Check the codes

The local building codes must also be taken into consideration, regardless of the type or size of septic tank you believe you require. Materials utilized in system construction, tank size, and position of the drain field are all factors that may be limiting factors for you. Be important to verify all local construction requirements before purchasing or installing a septic tank to ensure that your options are compliant with current building rules before proceeding.

Consult with professionals

The local building codes must be taken into consideration regardless of the type or size of septic tank you believe you require. Materials utilized in system construction, tank size, and position of the drain field are all factors that may be restricted. Be essential to verify all local construction codes before purchasing or installing a septic tank to ensure that your options are compliant with current building laws before proceeding.

Get the job done right

Contact the professionals at Mike’s SepticMcKinley Sewer Services to guarantee that your septic system is precisely suited to your requirements. Tank and system design and installation, as well as repairs, cleaning, pumping, and normal maintenance, are all areas of expertise for our team of highly trained personnel. In addition, we do tank and system compliance checks and system certification. If you have any questions or would want to get started on your custom design and installation, please contact us at 952-440-1800.

How to Calculate Septic Tank Size

If you find yourself on the verge of needing a larger septic tank than you anticipated, be liberal with your calculations and purchase a little larger septic tank. When it comes to septic tanks, having a little excess space is preferable to not having enough. sewage can back up into your home if a septic tank is installed that is too small for the job. When installing a septic tank, it is critical that you determine the proper size for the job. The majority of towns require even the smallest septic tanks to carry a minimum of 1,000 gallons of wastewater.

Step 1

Calculate the number of inhabitants who will be utilizing your septic system on a regular basis.

The majority of towns believe that a two-bedroom house will have four regular inhabitants, even though the property only has two bedrooms. A three-bedroom residence may accommodate up to six people.

Step 2

The number of bathrooms that will be served by the septic tank should be counted. If you just have one bathroom but want to add another in the future, make sure to include the second bathroom in your count to avoid having to replace your tank further down the line.

Step 3

In your home, make a list of all of the plumbing fittings you have. This figure includes all faucets, toilets, showers, dishwashers, laundry washers, and any other fixture that will drain into your septic tank. It does not include your water heater.

Step 4

Take your calculations to your local permit office, where they will be checked against your local rules in order to establish the acceptable septic tank sizing for your home or business. The guidelines for clothing sizing differ somewhat from one place to the next. As an example, in Arizona, a three-bedroom house with two bathrooms and around 20 fixtures requires a tank that holds approximately 1,250 gallons. A 2,000-gallon water tank is required for a structure with 14 residents and three to five bathrooms.

How Often I Need To Get My Septic Tank Pumped?

What is the recommended frequency of septic tank pumping? How often does a septic tank need to be drained and cleaned? A septic tank should be pumped and emptied once every three to five years, as a general rule of thumb. Septic-disposal tanks are often used by houses located outside of urban areas since they do not have access to city sewer connections. A septic tank is an ecologically beneficial, safe, and natural solution to handle waste generated by a home or other building. A septic tank system may endure for many years if it is cared for, maintained, and pumped on a regular basis.

Because the solids (or sludge) are far heavier than water, they will sink to the bottom of the tank, where germs and bacteria will consume and dissolve them.

The intermediate layer of watery effluent will be discharged from the tank by way of perforated subterranean tubes to a drain or leach field, respectively.

Over time, an excessive amount of sludge will reduce the bacteria’s capacity to break down waste and will cause it to overflow into the drain field.

The question is, how often should you have your septic system pump out?

In general, the majority of sewage-disposal tanks have capacities ranging between 1,000 and 2,000 gallons.

The size of the tank has a role in deciding how frequently it should be pumped, among other things.

The size of a household is important.

In order to accommodate a 3-bedroom house, the size of the tank must be bigger than that required for a 2-bedroom house.

Consider chatting with them and enquiring about the size of their septic tank in relation to the number of people that live in their residences.

Generally speaking, increasing the number of people living in a home results in increased waste production, which affects the frequency with which a septic tank must be cleaned.

Take into consideration the whole amount of wastewater generated, which includes laundry, dishwashing, and showers.

Water consumption that is efficient can help to lengthen the life of a septic system and reduce the likelihood of blocking, supporting, and leaking.

To save time, it is preferable to spread out washing machine use over the week rather than performing many loads in one day.

Make your septic tank last longer by using environmentally friendly detergents around your house, purchasing an energy-efficient cleaning gadget that uses less water, and installing a filter to collect artificial fibers that the bacterial bacteria in your septic tank are unable to break down.

The food will not be broken down into tiny enough pieces to pass through the septic tank filter if the disposal is used.

Other strategies to assist the septic tank include taking shorter showers and installing low-flow shower heads or shower circulation restrictors to lower the amount of water entering the septic tank and allowing it to function more efficiently.

Even while maintaining a septic tank system isn’t that expensive, the expense of collecting and repairing or replacing a system that has ceased operating as a result of negligence is significantly higher.

In some cases, other systems may be capable of waiting up to 5 years between septic pumpings.

The frequency with which the tank must be cleaned is determined by the amount of waste present in the tank, rather than by a fixed time period.

South End Plumbing specializes in a wide range of plumbing services, so keep in mind that we are only a mouse click away.

We also specialize in leak detection; please contact us for more information. South End Plumbing is one of the few organizations that will provide you with a no-obligation quote. To book a visit, please call us at 704-919-1722 or complete the online form.

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