Who To Call To Remover Septic Tank? (Best solution)

Follow this regimen, and the system should last at least 25 years. If you have been taking proper care of your septic system and it’s not very old, your best bet is to call a plumber. If your tank has fallen into disrepair or is reaching the 25-year milestone, you may need septic service.

  • You should call a plumber. But standing water in the main drain pipe at the bottom of the cleanout riser indicates that you have either an overflowing septic tank or a clog between the cleanout and the tank.

Should old septic tanks be removed?

Septic tanks are decommissioned for safety reasons. If a tank is not going to be used any longer, the best decision is to render it inoperable. Tanks that were well constructed, as well as those that are surrounded by excellent soil for the drain field, can have a lifespan of 50 years.

Can you leave an old septic tank in the ground?

Tanks can be completely removed or they can be destroyed and buried in place. The decision depends on if you plan to use the land for something else, such as a home addition or pool, and need the remains of the tank out of the way.

How much does emptying septic tank cost?

The typical costs for septic pumping are as follows: National average cost for a septic tank pump out: $295-$610. Up to 750-gallon tank: $175-$300. Up to 1,000-gallon tank: $225-$400.

How do you dispose of an old septic tank?

Abandoning Septic Tanks and Soil Treatment Areas

  1. Remove and dispose of the tank at an approved site (normally a landfill).
  2. Crush the tank completely and backfill. The bottom must be broken to ensure it will drain water.
  3. Fill the tank with granular material or some other inert, flowable material such as concrete.

How do you crush an old septic tank?

Usually an old septic tank is broken up in-place using a backhoe. The backhoe operator may pull in the tank sides, crush them, and push the whole steel tank to the bottom then back-fill with soil and rubble. In a DIY project we might use a heavy steel wrecking bar to just punch holes in the old steel tank bottom.

Can you sell a house with an old septic tank?

If you’re selling a property with a septic tank, then you must be transparent with buyers about the fact the property uses a one and provide a detailed specification of the system. In fact, You are required by law to inform a buyer in writing about the presence of a septic tank.

How long do septic tanks last?

A septic system’s lifespan should be anywhere from 15 to 40 years. How long the system lasts depends on a number of factors, including construction material, soil acidity, water table, maintenance practices, and several others.

Can septic tanks collapse?

Collapse of a septic tank Septic tanks can collapse for a variety of reasons. This is one of the most serious septic tank problems that can occur. That is why never place a driveway, building, or swimming pool above a septic tank. Once a tank is emptied of water, it is much more prone to collapse.

What does a buried septic tank look like?

Septic tanks are typically rectangular in shape and measure approximately 5 feet by 8 feet. In most cases, septic tank components including the lid, are buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underground. You can use a metal probe to locate its edges and mark the perimeter.

Can you build a deck over a septic tank?

You should never build a deck over a septic field; doing so will prevent the natural draining and dissipation of the effluent. This can ruin the septic system, not to mention releasing foul smells into the air all around your deck. The dissipating effluent can also rot the deck from underneath.

How do I know if my septic tank is failing?

8 Signs of Septic System Failure

  1. Septic System Backup.
  2. Slow Drains.
  3. Gurgling Sounds.
  4. Pool of Water or Dampness Near Drainfield.
  5. Nasty Odors.
  6. Unusual, Bright Green Grass Above Drainfield.
  7. Blooms of Algae in Nearby Water.
  8. High Levels of Coliform in Water Well.

What are the signs that your septic tank is full?

Here are some of the most common warning signs that you have a full septic tank:

  • Your Drains Are Taking Forever.
  • Standing Water Over Your Septic Tank.
  • Bad Smells Coming From Your Yard.
  • You Hear Gurgling Water.
  • You Have A Sewage Backup.
  • How often should you empty your septic tank?

Do I have to replace my septic tank by 2020?

Under the new rules, if you have a specific septic tank that discharges to surface water (river, stream, ditch, etc.) you are required to upgrade or replace your septic tank treatment system to a full sewage treatment plant by 2020, or when you sell a property, if it’s prior to this date.

How often should a septic tank be emptied?

How Often Should I Empty My Septic Tank? To keep your sewage system running correctly, your septic tank needs to be pumped out or desludged every 1 -2 years. It is extremely important to keep your septic tank maintained.

HOW TO SAFELY ABANDON AN OLD SEPTIC TANK ON YOUR PROPERTY

If you’ve recently purchased an older house, it’s possible that a septic tank is located on the property. This is true even if your home is currently linked to the municipal water and sewer systems. A prior owner may have abandoned the ancient septic system and connected to the city sewage system when it became accessible at some time in the past. Despite the fact that there are standards in place today for properly leaving a septic tank, it was typical practice years ago to just leave the tanks in place and forget about them.

The old tank may either be demolished or filled with water to solve the problem.

It is possible that permits and inspections will be required.

They are dangerous because curious children may pry open the lid and fall into the container.

  • Falls into a septic tank can be lethal owing to the toxicity of the contents and the fact that concrete can collapse on top of you while falling into a tank.
  • Eventually, this approach was phased out due to the fact that the steel would corrode and leave the tank susceptible to collapse.
  • When it comes to ancient septic tanks, they are similar to little caves with a lid that might collapse at any time.
  • The old tank is crushed and buried, or it is removed from the site.
  • If it is built of steel, it will very certainly be crushed and buried in its current location.
  • After that, the tank can be completely filled with sand, gravel, or any other form of rubble and buried.
  • Tanks can either be entirely dismantled or destroyed and buried in their original location.

The abandonment has been documented and plotted on a map.

It’s possible that you’ll forget about the tank once it’s been abandoned.

As a result, you might wish to sketch a map of the area where the old tank used to stand.

If you can demonstrate that an old septic tank was properly decommissioned, you may be able to increase the value of your property, and the new owners will enjoy knowing that large chunks of concrete are buried underground before they start digging in the yard to put something in it.

It may take some detective work to discover about the history of your land and what may be lying beneath the surface of the earth.

Upon discovering an old septic tank on your property that is no longer in service, contact Total Enviro Services for propertank abandonment procedures that meet with local standards and protect your family, pets, and farm animals from harm or death.

How to Remove a Septic Tank

  • Find the location of the septic tank. The majority of new tanks will have access or inspection openings on the surface, which will make this work quite straightforward. If the tank is more than a decade old, this process may be a little more difficult. Make a mark on the ground where the main drain line departs the house and draw an imaginary line out roughly 15 feet. If possible, this should be exactly above the tank. Dig a test hole to ensure that the placement is correct. Locate the tank and mark its location with the little marker flags after it has been located. if (sources.length) then this.parentNode.removeChild(sources)
  • If (sources.length) then alternatively, if this.onerror = null, this.src = fallback
  • )(, arguments.target.currentSrc.replace(), ‘/public/images/logo-fallback.png’), ‘/public/images/logo-fallback.png’) otherwise ” loading=”lazy”>
  • ” loading=”lazy”> Using the backhoe, dig all the way down to the septic tank. Remove the whole top of the tank, including the access hatch, and set it aside for later. Discontinue the excavation and arrange for the tank to be pumped out by a certified expert who will have the necessary equipment as well as the necessary licenses to properly dispose of the waste materials Dig around the tank’s perimeter on all four sides. Backhoe bucket width or less will suffice for this project. The hole must be dug to a depth sufficient to allow for the excavation of the septic tank’s bottom. In order to prevent breaking the pipes, the backhoe operator will need to use extreme caution when excavating around the inlet and outlet pipes. Remove both pipes as far as possible from the septic tank. Cap each of these lines as soon as possible to prevent any water or garbage that may have remained in the lines from draining into the pit in which you will be working. The two portions of pipe should be removed from the septic tank and thrown away. Feed the log chains into the tank through the inlet hole and guide them out through the outlet port to complete the cycle. Bring the chains up over the septic tank and tie them to the bucket of the backhoe or the crane, if one is available. Then, after the chains are in place, go to a safe distance and wait for the backhoe to raise and remove it from within the hole. Following the removal of the septic tank, backfill the hole or replace the tank as soon as possible to avoid further damage. You should make sure that the hole’s border is barricaded to prevent someone from accidently falling in if it will be kept open for an extended period of time.

Septic Tank Removal Cost Guide: Pricing Information You Should Know

The need to have your septic tank removed might be for a variety of reasons, and no matter why you’re considering having it removed, the expense of doing so is something you’re sure to be concerned about. We at Hometown recognize that receiving the greatest pricing and excellent customer service for your tank removal is vital to you, and we want to do everything we can to guarantee that you receive exactly what you want. This expense guide will cover the following topics:

  • The average cost of septic tank removal
  • The factors that influence the pricing of septic tank removal
  • How to Select the Most Appropriate Septic Tank Removal Contractor

Find septic tank removal experts in your hometown

Typically, the cost to remove and dispose of a septic tank ranges between $5,000 and $6,000, including disposal fees. Depending on the situation, septic tank removal expenses might range from a few thousand dollars to more than ten thousand dollars or more. Depending on a variety of circumstances, the cost of your tank removal process might be higher or less than this average. More information may be found at:

  • Is it necessary to remove an oil tank? Begin by visiting this page. Keep an eye out for these five signs of an impending oil tank disaster.

Factors That Affect Septic Tank Removal Pricing

The cost of removing a septic tank varies greatly depending on the numerous aspects that are taken into consideration. There are several elements taken into consideration when a contractor prepares an estimate for septic tank removal. The following are the most prevalent factors that influence the overall cost of septic tank removal:

  • Since there are so many variables involved with septic tank removal, the cost can be quite variable. Septic tank removal estimates are prepared by contractors after a number of elements have been considered by them. The following are the most often encountered elements that influence the overall cost of septic tank removal:

Natural law dictates that the larger and heavier your tank is, the higher the expense of removing it will be. In the same way, if your tank is underground, it will cost more to remove it than it would to remove a tank that is above ground. Underground tank removal takes far more effort in order to be done properly, and the additional labor costs more money. Septic tanks that have been damaged or compromised must be emptied and properly prepped for excavation before they may be excavated. Similarly, the fees charged by your municipality for disposal and pumping will have an impact on your costs.

Each contractor provides a unique degree of customer care as well as a unique set of pricing, and not all contractors are made equal.

This will assist you in receiving a competitive pricing for your septic tank removal process, as well as excellent customer service.

How to Find the Right Septic Tank Removal Contractor

Changing the location of storage tanks is quite risky, and you should always hire a trained contractor to conduct the job. A qualified expert should be recruited to properly remove the septic tank and dispose of any residual liquids. This is necessary since septic tanks and the improper treatment of them can cause environmental damage. Hiring an expert tank removal contractor to handle your septic tank removal job is critical for a variety of reasons, but most importantly, it is necessary for your own safety as well as the protection of the surrounding environment.

A skilled tank removal contractor will carefully assess the best technique to remove the tank without causing any harm to the surrounding area and surroundings.

This is why we recommend that you use a septic tank removal company that you are familiar with and that is licensed and insured.

This enables you to have a better understanding of what constitutes a good deal and who is the most qualified contractor for the work.

Hometown makes it simple to locate contractors in your neighborhood, check customer reviews, and obtain quotations from as many contractors as you’d like without having to leave your house.

Find tank removal experts in you town

  • Choosing a Demolition Contractor: 7 Steps to a Successful Hire
  • How to Save Money on Demolition Projects by Using Two Contractors Instead of One
  • The Reasons Why You Should Never Pay Your Contractor in Full Up Front When hiring a contractor, be aware of these five red flags:

Why Your Old Septic Tank Needs to be Removed, Now

An ancient, collapsing septic tank has caused a sinkhole in the backyard. Abandoned mobile homes are one of the things we encounter around our area. Those homes that were built before our community was established are about 60 years old, and so are the septic systems that served them. In truth, the old mobile house has been demolished just a few yards away, but the septic tank, which is in dire need of replacement, remains in the ground. These outdated septic tanks are a health hazard! To avoid a possibly dangerous situation if a loved one or a pet falls into an unattended septic tank in your yard, you must take immediate action to remedy the issue.

The age and type of tank will determine whether or not you should fill it with water or whether or not you should remove it altogether.

See also:  How Do You Install A Septic Tank In Cold Weather Applications? (TOP 5 Tips)

To be clear, this information also applies to anybody who has an old cesspool on their land).

Why Are Old Septic Tanks Dangerous?

You could assume that an outdated septic tank isn’t a health hazard. At the end of the day, it’s just an underground tank, right? Is it true that out of sight, out of mind? That may be true for a short period of time. Even over a lengthy period of time. years and years. However, ancient septic tanks that are no longer in use (or even old tanks that are still in use!) can pose a serious threat to the health of your family and pets in your yard. Someone walking over the sinkhole faces the risk of being sucked into a disgusting and potentially fatal tangle of sewage and choking methane fumes, which may result in their death.

  • An all-steel box with a stainless steel cover.
  • And what do we know about metal that has been buried for a long period of time and has been regularly exposed to water?
  • Steel septic tanks are subjected to the same fate.
  • until one day you or your child is walking through it and the lid and the ground above it give way.
  • A decaying septic tank top gives way, resulting in a sinkhole and a potentially perilous situation for anyone around it.
  • But it gets worse.
  • Septic tanks made of steel typically last for 25 years or more in most cases.
  • It is necessary to remove a steel septic tank from a house in Door County, Wisconsin.
  • However, up to 90 percent of steel septic tanks are now in need of replacement.

The covers on these tanks are susceptible to crumbling and collapsing, which might result in a septic sinkhole in your yard.

What Are My Options with an Old Septic Tank?

No matter whether you’re legally leaving your own operating septic tank because you’re being connected up to a sewer line, or if you discover an old septic tank on your land, you basically have two options: you can either fill it with water or you may dig it out. The specific regulations for abandoning your septic tank will be established by the county or state in which you live, however the following is the general procedure: 1. Hire a septic pumping firm to pump out and properly dispose of the contents of your septic tank.

  1. Disconnect and remove any electrical or mechanical components, such as a pump or an alarm system, from the system (if applicable) Cutting the septic sewage line from the home to the tank is the third step to take.
  2. A possible explanation is that the home was changed from septic to sewer during the conversion process).
  3. Removing the tank involves digging a trench around it or crushing and collapsing it into the earth.
  4. Backfill the hole with the proper material.
  5. Crush and collapse the tank, leaving the debris on the ground, then backfill with gravel and fill dirt.

What About the Leach Field?

Even when a septic tank is being abandoned, the leach lines and drain field are not necessarily required to be removed. Once again, this is something that should be confirmed with your county.

How Much Does it Cost to Abandon an Old Septic Tank?

The cost of removing or filling an old septic tank will vary depending on a variety of factors, as it will with most things:

  • Geographical location
  • Ease of access to the tank
  • Size of the tank
  • Whether you can do the most of the deconstruction and filling yourself or if you must employ a contractor removing an old tank from the site or deconstructing it in place The type and cost of fill materials
  • Who is responsible for filling the hole

Here are some very preliminary estimations, which may vary significantly depending on the above-mentioned conditions, but they should give you a general sense.

  • For a normal 1,000 – 1,500 gallon septic tank, the cost is $300 – $400
  • Fill dirt is $225 based on 15 yards at $15/yd
  • And installation of a new septic tank costs $300 – $400. Backhoe and operator – $500, based on a rate of $250 per hour for two hours (including travel and other expenses)
  • TOTAL VERY BRIEF ESTIMATE:$1225 to properly abandon your septic tank and obtain certification of such from your county
  • (this will increase if your leach field lines need to be removed as well)
  • TOTAL VERY BRIEF ESTIMATE:$1225 to properly abandon your septic tank and receive certification of such from your county

Concrete septic demolition is carried out with the use of (small) heavy equipment.

Can I Remove a Septic Tank Myself?

It’s probable that you’ll be able to do everything alone, with the exception of pumping out the tank. Septic pumping should be conducted by an appropriately certified septic pumping business, and you will need to provide proof of this pumping to your county in order to receive your certification of abandonment. Please check with your county to see whether or not you are legally permitted to remove or refill your tank yourself. You may be able to complete the filling in or removal yourself, after which you may call the county to examine and provide you with the required paperwork of the abandoned property.

That being said, many individuals out there would sneer and scoff at the prospect of paying $1000 or more merely to remove an old septic tank, and they are determined to finish the project on their own time and with their own resources.

If you are a “DIY Dave” and want to undertake your own septic tank removal or filling, keep the following factors in mind:.

  1. Methane gas can be found in sewage treatment plants. Being trapped inside a tank filled with methane gas will kill you – how quickly it will kill you will depend on the amount of methane present and the length of time you are exposed to it. Old steel septic tanks are rusted and have sharp edges, which should be avoided. Consider tetanus. Septic tanks hold biological waste that is teeming with bacteria. Keep an eye out for any open wounds you may have.

Financial Help – Loans for Septic Tank Repair, Replacement and Removal

We understand that money is limited for many families, and that paying to have your septic tank abandoned may not be a viable financial option. The good news is that there are loans and other financial programs available to help with septic system repair, replacement, and removal costs. Because these loans are dependent on geography, the terms and conditions will differ from county to county and state to state. Try searching for “Septic System Loans” or “Septic Tank Financing” on the internet, making sure to include your state or county in the search, and you should be able to discover at least one option that works for you.

Final Thoughts

A decaying septic tank may cost anywhere from $1000 to $3000 or more to repair or replace, and this is especially true if you haven’t had any difficulties with it in the past. However, there is a very real danger hiding underground that is becoming more severe by the day. It is possible that you will not even be aware of a threat until it is too late. Homeowners may see a depression in their yard beginning to form, which might be a sign of a septic sinkhole forming, or it could be fill from a prior fill-in that has settled in.

Don’t let the expense of resolving the problem before it becomes a problem deter you from taking action.

Everything You Need to Know About Septic Tanks and Who to Call for Septic Tank Pumping

When it comes to drainage systems, not every Cleveland, Tennessee, home is designed the same way, but it’s crucial to understand what you’re dealing with in your own home. It’s possible that you’ll have a septic system instead of a regular sewer system if there is enough of space between the residences where you live. As is the case with anything, you must be knowledgeable about how to properly manage your septic system, which in most cases entails regular septic tank pumping. If you have no idea what you’re talking about when it comes to your septic system at home, here are some fundamentals to get you started.

How Do Septic Systems Work?

Your house’s sewer system transports waste water from your Cleveland, Tennessee, home to a centralized point where it is treated before being redistributed back into the environment. It is not need to worry about things such as septic tank pumping because this water continually left your property and travels to a treatment center located a long distance away. Septic systems are a viable alternative to traditional sewage systems since they break down waste on your property rather than in a sewer system’s collection system.

Three levels of waste water collect in a septic tank, the majority of which can contain around 1,000 gallons of waste water.

The heaviest material sinks to the bottom of the tank, resulting in the formation of the sludge layer.

This accumulation of waste is the primary reason that many individuals require septic tank pumping systems to be put in their tanks.

This gas is evacuated through vents in your roof, which create gas with each influx of waste water into your home or office building. The water that is dumped into drain fields each time you flush your septic system also goes into the environment.

Why Choose a Septic System?

The most common reason for consumers to install a septic system is because of their living situation. There are some scenarios when it may be preferable to have a septic system installed in your house rather than connecting to the city’s sewer system, and this is the case in some cases. Even if your configuration necessitates the use of septic tank pumping, it may be a more cost-effective alternative. When it comes to connecting to the sewer system, the distance between residences in your neighborhood is one of the most significant difficulties.

An alternative to this is that a septic system can simply be placed directly next to your home in the yard.

Another reason why some individuals choose septic systems is that they are more environmentally conscious.

What Is Septic Tank Pumping?

In the majority of circumstances, your septic tank is capable of performing its functions on its own. Some people, on the other hand, may require the purchase of a septic tank pump in order to remove waste from their septic tank that would otherwise be impossible to remove. If you’re not sure whether or not you require a septic tank pump, the following information can help you decide. Due to the fact that septic tanks are meant to dispose of waste on their own, septic tank pumping is not usually required as part of the procedure.

One of the most difficult situations is a septic tank where the last waste disposal point is located on an incline, making it impossible for gravity to assist in draining the tank.

Because septic tank pumping entails the use of a submersible pump to remove excess waste from the tank, you won’t have to worry about anything else except paying for the necessary installation.

Things to Note

Taking good care of your septic system is essential if you want to avoid having to spend thousands of dollars on repairs or deal with nasty conditions in your yard. Even with that in mind, it’s critical that you understand a few fundamental concepts concerning your septic system. For starters, be certain that your septic system has been properly built. If you want to limit pumping to a bare minimum, you should also avoid flushing things that take a long time to degrade down the drain. Speaking of which, you should have your septic tank emptied at least once every three to five years.

One error that many individuals do is to get negligent when working on chores in the yard. When excavating, keep in mind that you’ll be digging up the bottom of a septic system, so proceed with extreme caution to prevent damage.

Here to Help

Taking good care of your septic system is essential if you want to avoid having to spend thousands of dollars on repairs or suffer with horrible odors in your backyard. That being stated, it is critical that you be familiar with the fundamentals of your septic system. To begin, check to see that your septic system was properly built. Additionally, if you want to minimize the amount of pumping to a minimum, avoid flushing materials that degrade slowly down the drain. If we’re talking about septic tanks, you should have them pumped out at least every three to five years.

When excavating, keep in mind that you’ll be digging up the bottom of a septic system, so proceed with extreme caution.

Septic Tank Abandonment

“Whenever the use of an onsite sewage treatment and disposal system is discontinued as a result of connection to a sanitary sewer, as a result of condemnation or demolition, as a result of removal or destruction of a building or property, as a result of discontinuing use of a septic tank and replacement with another septic tank, the system shall be abandoned within 90 days and any subsequent use of the system for any purpose shall be prohibited.” THE ABANDONMENT OF THE SEPTIC TANK MUST BE COMPLETED WITHIN 90 DAYS OF THE CONNECTION TO THE PUBLIC sewage system.

The following are the procedures that homeowners must complete in order to abandon their system:

  • The requirements of Chapter 64E-6.011 (Florida Administrative Code) state that “Whenever the use of an onsite sewage treatment and disposal system is discontinued following connection to a sanitary sewer, following condemnation or demolition, removal or destruction of a building or property, or discontinuing use of a septic tank and replacement with another septic tank, the system shall be abandoned within 90 days and any further use of the system for any purpose shall be prohibited.” After the connection to public sewer is made, the abandonment of the septic tank must be completed within 90 days. To get rid of their system, homeowners must complete the following steps:
  • STEP 2: Submit an application for an abandonment permission and wait for approval. There is a fee of $100.00 for the permission. It is possible to mail us the check for $100.00 in addition to the completed application for processing
  • We will call you by phone when it is available for pickup.
  • Staging the tank for pumping out by a licensed septage hauler and posting a copy of the receipt for this service along with the permit board in a protective plastic bag is the third step to taking care of the tank. The receipt will be collected by the Environmental Health Specialist at the time of the inspection.
  • STEP 4: Crush or collapse the tank in such a way that it will not be able to contain water any more, such as by punching a hole in the bottom of the tank or collapsing the tank’s sides. Owners (if they are still living in the house), certified septic installers, and licensed plumbing contractors are the only ones who may perform this service.
  • To avoid a safety danger, fill the leftover hole with clean sand or other acceptable material. Then grade and stake the tank location.
  • STEP 6: Once all of the above steps have been completed, please contact Environmental Health at 690-2100 to schedule an inspection or for further information about the procedures.

STEP 6: Once all of the above steps have been completed, please contact Environmental Health at 690-2100 to schedule an inspection or for further information about the process.

See also:  1500 Gal Septic Tank Can Accommodate What Size House? (Solved)

Abandoning Septic Tanks and Soil Treatment Areas

A steel tank that has been abandoned while a system repair is being carried out.

Interested in Septic Tanks?

Receive articles, stories, and videos about septic tanks delivered directly to your email! Now is the time to sign up. Septic Tanks and More Receive Notifications When a septic tank is no longer in use (for example, due to a new connection to the city sewer system, tank replacement during a system upgrade or repair, or other reasons), the tank must be properly abandoned. Specifically, this includes ancient cesspools, leaching pits, dry wells, seepage pits, vault privies, and pit privies that are no longer in use.

In order to do this, the piping must be removed or the end of the supply pipe must be filled with grout.

It is advised that the following processes be followed if there are no explicit code requirements.

A vacuum truck driven by a suitably licensed expert who will properly dispose of the septage must first be used to thoroughly empty the tank of its contents, which must then be refilled with fresh water. The following are three popular procedures for coping with an empty tank:

  1. Remove the tank and dispose of it at a location that has been permitted (often a landfill). Backfill the tank when it has been totally crushed. It is necessary to break the bottom in order for the water to drain
  2. The tank should be completely filled with granular material or with any other inert, flowable material, such as concrete. No collapse or confined-space danger should exist in the abandoned tank.

Discard the tank at a permitted location (usually a landfill) when it has been removed. Fully crush and re-fill the tank with water. In order for it to drain water properly, the bottom must be shattered. The tank should be completely filled with granular material or with any other inert, flowable substance such as concrete. No collapse or confined-space danger must exist in the abandoned tank.

Septic System Abandonment

Remove the tank and dispose of it in a location that has been permitted (often a landfill); Backfill the tank when it has been crushed entirely. It is necessary to break the bottom in order for it to drain water; The tank should be completely filled with granular material or with any other inert, flowable material such as concrete. No collapse or confined-space hazard should be present in the abandoned tank.

  1. It is recommended that when a qualified plumber has completed the installation for the connection to municipal sewer, a permanent cover be fitted on the existing sewer line that supplies the septic tank. The septic tank should next be pumped out by a professional septage transporter. Tank contents left in place may cause the tank to degrade, perhaps leading to the tank collapsing. Finally, the empty tank should either be filled with compacted clean soil or crushed in situ and then filled with clean soil when it has been completely filled. Tank lids have the potential to split and collapse over time if this process is not carried out. This creates a potentially hazardous condition and can result in the property owner becoming liable for the issue. If your septic system included a lift station (pump tank), you should consult with a certified electrician to ensure that the electrical wiring for the system is properly disconnected and secured. It is necessary to leave the pump tank after the wiring has been securely secured, as described in steps 1 through 3 above.

It is recommended that when a qualified plumber has completed the installation for the connection to municipal sewer, a permanent cap be fitted on the previous sewer line that supplied the septic tank. The septic tank should next be pumped out by a professional septage transporter who is licensed. Tank contents left in place may cause the tank to degrade, perhaps leading to the tank collapsing; Finally, the empty tank should either be filled with compacted clean soil or crushed in situ and then filled with clean dirt when it has been completely filled with soil.

This creates a potentially hazardous scenario and can result in the property owner becoming liable for the consequences.

It is necessary to leave the pump tank following steps 1 through 3 once the wiring has been securely secured.

How to Care for Your Septic System

Once a competent plumber has completed the installation for the connection to municipal sewer, a permanent cover should be fitted on the existing sewer line that supplies the septic tank. The septic tank should next be pumped out by a qualified septage transporter. If the tank contents are not emptied, the tank’s condition may worsen, and the tank may collapse. Finally, the empty tank should either be filled with compacted clean soil or crushed in situ and then filled with clean soil. Tank lids may fracture and collapse over time if this process is not carried out.

It is necessary to leave the pump tank when the wiring has been securely secured, as outlined in stages 1 through 3;

  • Inspect and pump your drainfield on a regular basis
  • Conserve water
  • Dispose of waste properly
  • And keep your drainfield in good condition.

Inspect and Pump Frequently

Inspection of the ordinary residential septic system should be performed by a septic service specialist at least once every three years. Household septic tanks are normally pumped every three to five years, depending on how often they are used. Alternative systems that use electrical float switches, pumps, or mechanical components should be examined more frequently, typically once a year, to ensure that they are in proper working order.

Because alternative systems contain mechanical components, it is essential to have a service contract. The frequency with which a septic tank is pumped is influenced by four key factors:

  • The size of the household
  • The total amount of wastewater produced
  • The amount of solids present in wastewater
  • The size of the septic tank

Service provider coming? Here is what you need to know.

When you contact a septic service provider, he or she will inspect your septic tank for leaks as well as the scum and sludge layers that have built up over time. Maintain detailed records of any maintenance work conducted on your septic system. Because of the T-shaped outlet on the side of your tank, sludge and scum will not be able to escape from the tank and travel to the drainfield region. A pumping is required when the bottom of the scum layer or the top of the sludge layer is within six inches of the bottom of the outlet, or if the top of the sludge layer is within 12 inches of the bottom of the outlet.

In the service report for your system, the service provider should mention the completion of repairs as well as the condition of the tank.

An online septic finder from the National Onsite Wastewater Recycling Association (NOWRA) makes it simple to identify service specialists in your region.

Use Water Efficiently

In a normal single-family house, the average indoor water consumption is about 70 gallons per person, per day, on average. A single leaking or running toilet can waste as much as 200 gallons of water each day, depending on the situation. The septic system is responsible for disposing of all of the water that a residence sends down its pipes. The more water that is conserved in a household, the less water that enters the sewage system. A septic system that is operated efficiently will operate more efficiently and will have a lower chance of failure.

  • Toilets with a high level of efficiency. The usage of toilets accounts for 25 to 30% of total home water use. Many older homes have toilets with reservoirs that hold 3.5 to 5 gallons of water, but contemporary, high-efficiency toilets consume 1.6 gallons or less of water for each flush. Changing out your old toilets for high-efficiency versions is a simple approach to lessen the amount of household water that gets into your septic system. Aerators for faucets and high-efficiency showerheads are also available. Reduce water use and the volume of water entering your septic system by using faucet aerators, high-efficiency showerheads, and shower flow restriction devices. Machines for washing clothes. Water and energy are wasted when little loads of laundry are washed on the large-load cycle of your washing machine. By selecting the appropriate load size, you may limit the amount of water wasted. If you are unable to specify a load size, only complete loads of washing should be performed. Washing machine use should be spread throughout the week if at all possible. Doing all of your household laundry in one day may appear to be a time-saving strategy
  • Nevertheless, it can cause damage to your septic system by denying your septic tank adequate time to handle waste and may even cause your drainfield to overflow. Machines that have earned theENERGY STARlabel consume 35 percent less energy and 50 percent less water than ordinary ones, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Other Energy Star appliances can save you a lot of money on your energy and water bills.

Properly Dispose of Waste

Everything that goes down your drains, whether it’s flushed down the toilet, ground up in the trash disposal, or poured down the sink, shower, or bath, ends up in your septic system, which is where it belongs. What you flush down the toilet has an impact on how effectively your septic system functions.

Toilets aren’t trash cans!

Your septic system is not a garbage disposal system. A simple rule of thumb is to never flush anything other than human waste and toilet paper down the toilet. Never flush a toilet:

  • Septic systems are not meant to be used as garbage disposal systems. A simple rule of thumb is that you should not flush anything other than human waste and toilet paper down the toilet. Never flush a toilet if you can help it

Toilet Paper Needs to Be Flushed! Check out this video, which demonstrates why the only item you should flush down your toilet are toilet paper rolls.

Think at the sink!

Your septic system is made up of a collection of living organisms that digest and treat the waste generated by your household. Pouring pollutants down your drain can kill these organisms and cause damage to your septic system as well as other things. Whether you’re at the kitchen sink, the bathtub, or the utility sink, remember the following:

  • If you have a clogged drain, avoid using chemical drain openers. To prevent this from happening, use hot water or a drain snake
  • Never dump cooking oil or grease down the sink or toilet. It is never a good idea to flush oil-based paints, solvents, or huge quantities of harmful cleansers down the toilet. Even latex paint waste should be kept to a bare minimum. Disposal of rubbish should be avoided or limited to a minimum. Fats, grease, and particles will be considerably reduced in your septic tank, reducing the likelihood of your drainfield being clogged.

Own a recreational vehicle (RV), boat or mobile home?

If you have ever spent any time in an RV or boat, you are undoubtedly familiar with the issue of aromas emanating from sewage holding tanks.

  • The National Small Flows Clearinghouse’s Septic System Care hotline, which may be reached toll-free at 800-624-8301, has a factsheet on safe wastewater disposal for RV, boat, and mobile home owners and operators.

Maintain Your Drainfield

It is critical that you maintain the integrity of your drainfield, which is a component of your septic system that filters impurities from the liquid that emerges from your septic tank once it has been installed.

Here are some things you should do to keep it in good condition:

  • It is critical that you maintain the integrity of your drainfield, which is a component of your septic system that filters impurities from the liquid that exits your septic tank. You should perform the following to keep it in good condition:

The Advantages and Disadvantages of a Septic Tank System

When it comes to dealing with waste water in your house, there are two options. One method is through the use of municipal sewage lines, which convey waste water from your property to a treatment plant in the area. A septic tank is the second type of source of sewage. In light of the above, the specialists at Steve Mull Plumbing would like to discuss with all of our valued clients the different pros and disadvantages of a septic tank system, as well as some alternatives. A septic tank is a tank that is built beneath the earth and away from your home.

The water itself is pushed out of the septic tank and into the earth, and the waste is collected separately until it is time for periodic maintenance, at which point it is pumped out once again.

The Advantages of a Septic Tank System

Because massive underground sewer lines are extremely expensive to construct, install, and operate, a septic tank is often the most cost-effective option. A septic tank, on the other hand, is far less expensive to build and does not need homeowners to pay monthly maintenance fees. Another advantage of a septic tank is that they are extremely long-lasting and, when properly kept, need very little maintenance. The fact that septic tanks are ecologically friendly is a last advantage of using one.

Furthermore, because all of the recycled water is absorbed by various sorts of plant life in the surrounding area, it is extremely ecologically beneficial.

Disadvantages of a Septic Tank System

Because broad underground sewer lines are extremely expensive to construct, install, and maintain, a septic tank is typically more cost effective. On the other hand, installing a septic tank is far less expensive than replacing a toilet and does not need homeowners to pay monthly maintenance fees. Additionally, septic tanks are extremely robust and, when properly maintained, require little to no replacement over the course of their lifetime. The fact that a septic tank is ecologically beneficial is a last advantage of using them.

The recycled water is also absorbed by many sorts of plant life in the surrounding area, making it a highly ecologically beneficial practice.

Septic System Cleanout Service — Waste Away Systems

SERVICING YOUR SEPTIC TANK COULD COST AS LITTLE AS $255.00! Septic tanks are required for homes and business properties that are not linked to municipal sewage systems in order to securely store solid waste and raw sewage. All types of septic systems require frequent cleaning and maintenance to ensure that they continue to operate properly. The efficient operation of your septic system is critical to the overall function of your property. Septic tank cleanouts are necessary when there are problems with your septic system, such as plumbing backing up into the home or bad aromas emanating from the system.

You won’t have to be concerned about these types of septic concerns if you prioritize expert septic cleanout services, which will keep your property safe and hygienic at all times.

One of our disposal specialists will be able to examine any issues and will be able to pump and clean out your septic tank if necessary.

There is no need to be concerned about septic tank difficulties if you use our septic cleanout services, which are available for both residential and commercial buildings.

Our Types of Septic System Services

GET YOUR SEPTIC TANK SERVICED FOR AS CHEAP AS $250.00! Septic tanks are required for all residential and commercial premises that are not linked to municipal sewage systems in order to securely store solid waste and raw sewage. Regular cleaning and maintenance are required for all types of septic systems in order for them to continue to operate properly. Keep your septic system in good working order so that your property can run smoothly. Septic tank cleanouts are necessary when there are problems with your septic system, such as plumbing backing up into the home or bad odors.

See also:  What Makes A Septic Tank Fall In? (TOP 5 Tips)

You won’t have to be concerned about these types of septic concerns if you prioritize expert septic cleanout services, which will keep your property safe and clean.

We will send out one of our trash specialists who will be able to analyze the situation and perform septic tank pumping and cleaning services.

  • The size of the septic tank
  • The size of the household
  • What much of wastewater is produced
  • The amount of solids present in the wastewater
  • And It is necessary to have electrically operated float switches, pumps, or other mechanical components. Using a septic tank

Maintenance on different types of septic systems will be required in the future. Larger homes tend to generate more waste, which means the septic tank will fill up more quickly. Additionally, households who use their garbage disposals on a regular basis will have their septic tank fill up more quickly. It is advised that you get your septic tank examined and pumped every two to three years, at the absolute least, and every three to five years, at the most.

Septic System Maintenance

Regular maintenance, in addition to septic tank pumping, may assist you in avoiding septic system servicing concerns. We at Waste Away Systems specialize in septic system services, so you won’t have to be concerned about more serious issues that might arise from your septic system. Keep your septic tank in excellent functioning order between pumpings is critical to its longevity and effectiveness. Here are a few indicators that you may require septic tank maintenance: You may notice the scent of bad smells coming from your septic tank when it is approaching capacity.

  • When the tank is full, sewage might overflow and back up into your house or place of business, causing damage.
  • The septic tank may be overflowing, which may cause drainage to be slower.
  • Concerning septic system flushing: If you want to maintain your septic system working properly, you should never flush some dangerous products.
  • Water Pooling Around Drain Fields: If you find water pooling around drain fields, it is possible that your septic tank has spilled and backed up.

We encourage you to contact us if you have had any of these problems or want to guarantee that your septic system is properly maintained. In order for your property to continue working properly, Waste Away Systems is pleased to take care of any septic tank needs you may have.

Commercial Septic Services

Providing septic tank services to both residential and commercial sites is something that Waste Away Systems is proud to do. Waste management at your company may be handled through the use of a septic system. Make an appointment with a professional for regular maintenance and cleaning to ensure that your system continues to operate effectively. Companies that use septic systems do not want to be burdened with the expense of dealing with septic tanks that are not operating properly. When you rely on Waste Away Systems, you can be assured that your business property will remain productive and safe.

Your Go-To for All Solid Waste Services and Recycling

Garbage Away Systems has been providing waste removal services to the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors since 1976, and we have refined our processes over the years. It is our pleasure to provide industry-leading, dependable garbage removal services as a family-owned and run solid waste and recycling company in the greater Philadelphia area. Our clients know they can count on us to deliver on our promises every time. We also make an effort to raise environmental awareness in each service area, because our neighborhoods and commercial spaces must be maintained clean in order to function properly.

  • The following services are available: a full-service transfer station, residential waste recycling services, commercial waste recycling services, roll-off large-scale disposal, aggregates, storage solutions, affordable portables, recycling, and septic cleanout services.

Whether you want garbage collection or a septic tank cleanout, the staff at Waste Away Systems is here to assist you. Contact us now. Our septic cleanout services ensure that your septic system will continue to operate securely and effectively, without experiencing any severe complications in the process. By arranging for regular septic treatment with Waste Away, you can keep your home free of any unpleasant septic problems in future. Give us a call now if you have any questions regarding our septic services or any of our other services.

How Does a Septic Tank Work?

Mr. Fix-It-Up-For-The-Family You may save a lot of money if you understand how a sewage treatment system works—and what can go wrong—so that you can handle your own septic system maintenance.

How does a septic tank work?

Pumping the tank on a regular basis eliminates sludge and scum, which helps to keep a septic system in good working order. It is possible for a well-designed and well built septic system to last for decades, or it might collapse in a matter of years. It is entirely up to you as long as you can answer the question of how do septic tanks function. Healthy septic systems are very inexpensive to maintain, but digging up and replacing a septic system that has completely collapsed may easily cost tens of thousands in labor and material costs.

It’s critical to understand how a septic tank works in order to maintain one.

Let’s take a look below ground and observe what happens in a properly operating septic system, shall we? After that, I’ll explain why things go wrong and offer you some tips on how to keep your system in peak operating condition.

Understand that a septic system is a cafeteria for bacteria

Bacteria are responsible for the proper operation of a septic system. They decompose garbage, resulting in water that is clean enough to safely trickle down into the earth’s surface. The entire system is set up to keep bacteria healthy and busy at all times. Some of them reside in the tank, but the majority of them are found in the drain field. 1. The septic tank is the final destination for all waste. 2. The majority of the tank is filled with watery waste, referred to as “effluent.” Anaerobic bacteria begin to break down the organic matter in the effluent as soon as it enters the system.

  1. A layer of sludge settles to the bottom of the container.
  2. 4.
  3. Scum is mostly constituted of fats, greases, and oils, among other substances.
  4. Grease and oils float to the surface of the water.
  5. (5) A filter stops the majority of particles from reaching the exit pipe.
  6. The effluent is discharged into the drain field.
  7. Effluent is allowed to leak into the surrounding gravel because of holes in the drain septic field pipe.
  8. The garbage is completely decomposed by aerobic bacteria found in gravel and dirt.
  9. Potable water seeps into the groundwater and aquifer system from the surface.

Septic Tank Clean Out: Don’t abuse the system

Septic systems that have been correctly planned and constructed require just occasional ‘pumping’ to remove the sludge and scum that has built up inside the tank. However, if you don’t understand how a septic tank works, you may unintentionally hurt or even destroy the system.

  • Drains are used to dispose of waste that decomposes slowly (or not at all). Cigarette butts, diapers, and coffee grounds are all known to cause issues. Garbage disposers, if utilized excessively, can introduce an excessive amount of solid waste into the system. Lint from synthetic fibers is emitted from washing machine lint traps. This substance is not degraded by bacteria in the tank and drain septic field. Bacteria are killed by chemicals found in the home, such as disinfecting cleansers and antibacterial soaps. The majority of systems are capable of withstanding limited usage of these goods, but the less you use them, the better. When a large amount of wastewater is produced in a short period of time, the tank is flushed away too quickly. When there is too much sludge, bacteria’s capacity to break down waste is reduced. Sludge can also overflow into the drain field if there is too much of it. Sludge or scum obstructs the flow of water via a pipe. It is possible for tree and shrub roots to obstruct and cause harm to a drain field. Compacted soil and gravel prevent wastewater from seeping into the ground and deprive germs of oxygen. Most of the time, this is caused by vehicles driving or parking on the drain field.

Get your tank pumped…

Your tank must be emptied on a regular basis by a professional. Pumping eliminates the accumulation of sludge and scum that has accumulated in the tank, which has caused the bacterial action to be slowed. If you have a large tank, it may be necessary to pump it once a year; but, depending on the size of your tank and the quantity of waste you send through the system, you may go two or three years between pumpings. Inquire with your inspector about an approximate guideline for how frequently your tank should be pumped.

…but don’t hire a pumper until you need it

Inspections and pumping should be performed on a regular basis. However, if you’re not afraid of getting your hands dirty, you may verify the sludge level yourself with a gadget known as The Sludge Judge. It ranges in price from $100 to $125 and is commonly accessible on the internet. Once you’ve verified that your tank is one-third full with sludge, you should contact a professional to come out and pump it out completely.

Install an effluent filter in your septic system

Garbage from your home accumulates into three distinct strata.

The septic filter is responsible for preventing blockage of the drain field pipes.

Septic tank filter close-up

The septic tank filter is responsible for capturing suspended particles that may otherwise block the drain field pipes. Obtain an effluent filter for your tank from your contractor and place it on the outflow pipe of your tank. (It will most likely cost between $50 and $100, plus labor.) This device, which helps to prevent sediments from entering the drain field, will need to be cleaned out on a regular basis by a contractor to maintain its effectiveness.

Solution for a clogged septic system

If your septic system becomes clogged and you find yourself having to clean the filter on a regular basis, you might be tempted to simply remove the filter altogether. Hold on to it. Solids, wastewater, and scum are separated into three levels in septic tanks, which allows them to function properly (see illustration above). Solids sink to the bottom of the container, where microbes breakdown them. The scum, which is made up of trash that is lighter than water, rises to the surface. In the drainage field, the middle layer of effluent leaves the tank and goes through an underground network of perforated pipes to the drainage field.

  1. Keep the effluent filter in place since it is required by your state’s health law.
  2. Waste particles might flow through the filter and clog the perforated pipes if the filter is not used.
  3. Your filter, on the other hand, should not require cleaning every six months.
  4. A good chance is high that you’re flushing filter-clogging things down the toilet, such as grease, fat, or food scraps.
  5. A garbage disposal will not be able to break down food particles sufficiently to allow them to flow through the septic tank filtration system.
  6. Plastic items, disposable diapers, paper towels, nonbiodegradable goods, and tobacco products will clog the system if they are flushed through it.
  7. More information on removing lint from your laundry may be found here.

Get an inspection

Following a comprehensive first check performed by an expert, regular inspections will cost less than $100 each inspection for the next year. Your professional will be able to inform you how often you should get your system inspected as well as how a septic tank functions. As straightforward as a septic system appears, determining its overall condition necessitates the services of a professional. There are a plethora of contractors who would gladly pump the sludge out of your tank, but many, in my experience, are unable to explain how a septic system works or how it should be maintained.

A certification scheme for septic contractors has been established in certain states; check with your state’s Secretary of State’s office to see whether yours is one of them.

Also, a qualified inspector will be able to tell you whether or not your tank is large enough to accommodate your household’s needs, as well as the maximum amount of water that can be passed through it in a single day.

You may be able to boost the performance of your system by using a product such as RID-X to introduce bacteria into the system. As you learn more about how a septic tank works, your professional should be able to tell you whether or not your system will benefit from this treatment.

Alternatives to a new drain field

If an examination or a sewage backup indicate that your drain field is in need of replacement, the only option is to replace it completely. As a result, it’s important to talk with a contractor about other possibilities before proceeding with the project.

  • Pipes should be cleaned. A rotating pressure washer, used by a contractor, may be used to clean out the drain septic field pipes. The cost of “jetting” the pipes is generally around $200. Chemicals should be used to clean the system. A commercial solution (not a home-made one) that enhances the quantity of oxygen in the drain field should be discussed with your contractor before installing your new system. Septic-Scrub is a product that I suggest. A normal treatment will cost between $500 and $1,000. Make the soil more pliable. The practice of “terra-lifting,” which involves pumping high-pressure air into several spots surrounding the drain field, is authorized in some regions. Some contractors use it to shatter compacted dirt around the pipes. Depending on the circumstances, this might cost less than $1,000 or as much as $4,000 or more.

Protect your drain septic field from lint

When this device is in place, it inhibits lint from entering the system, especially synthetic fibers that bacteria are unable to digest. One of these filters, which I’ve designed and termed theSeptic Protector, was invented by me. An additional filter is included in the price of around $150 plus delivery. Learn more about how to filter out laundry lint in this article.

Don’t overload the septic system

Reduce the amount of water you use. The volume of water that flows into your tank, particularly over a short period of time, can be reduced to avoid untreated waste from being flushed into your drain field. Replace outdated toilets with low-flow ones, install low-flow showerheads, and, perhaps most importantly, wash laundry throughout the week rather than just on Saturday mornings to save water.

Meet the Expert

Septic systems, according to Jim vonMeier, are the solution to America’s water deficit because they supply cleaned water to depleted aquifers, according to vonMeier. He travels the country lobbying for septic systems, giving lectures, and giving testimony. For septic system inquiries, as well as information on the operation of the septic tank, contact him by email.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *