Who To Call To Complain About Septic Tank? (TOP 5 Tips)

Should I Call A Plumber Or A Septic Tank Company?

  • If there’s no standing water, that means that there’s an issue between the cleanout and the house, and a plumber should be called. If there’s standing water, it can mean one of two things: there’s a block between the cleanout and the tank (call a plumber) or the septic tank is overflowing (call a septic company).

Who is responsible for maintaining a septic tank?

Homeowners. If you’re an owner-occupier and your property has a septic tank, it’s very straightforward: you are fully responsible for your septic tank. If there are any issues with it, it is up to you to fix them.

Who regulates septic systems in Ontario?

In Ontario, all residential septic systems are regulated by the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing (“MMAH”) under the Building Code Act, 1992, S.O. 1992, c. 23 (the Act).

What are signs of septic tank problems?

7 Warning Signs Your Septic System Is Failing

  • Gurgling Pipes. They would occur when you run water in the house (e.g. when using the sink or shower) or flush the toilet.
  • Bad Odours. It’s never a pleasant experience when this occurs.
  • Water At Ground Level.
  • Green Grass.
  • Slow Drainage.
  • Blocked Pipes.

Do septic tanks need to be registered with the Environment Agency?

Registration is free and you only need to register once. The Environment Agency will inform you in writing if they cannot accept your application for registration of exemption from permit and suggest you apply for a permit. If you require a permit there is a one-off charge.

Are septic tanks still legal?

Septic Tanks Explained… Septic tanks cannot discharge to surface water drains, rivers, canals, ditches, streams or any other type of waterway. you are required to upgrade or replace your septic tank treatment system to a full sewage treatment plant by 2020, or when you sell a property, if it’s prior to this date.

Who pays to empty septic tank?

It is not unusual for the tenant (you) to be responsible for the upkeep of the tank. That is, you will be responsible for ensuring you maintain the septic system and pay for pump-outs. This is, generally speaking, perfectly normal.

Do I need to pump my septic tank before I sell my house in Ontario?

It is standard practice to have your septic tank pumped out before the new owner takes possession of the house. The purchaser may want to contact us to do an inspection of the system.

How long does a septic system last in Ontario?

The 20-30 year period is the national lifespan average of septic systems in Canada. However, it is possible for the tanks to last for even up to 50 years or more depending on the soil conditions and how well the owner takes care of it.

How do I find my septic tank records in Ontario?

Process – Septic Record Search For records for septic systems installed before 1977 contact the Public Health Inspections Branch at 613-580-6744.

Does heavy rain affect septic tank?

It is common to have a septic back up after or even during a heavy rain. Significant rainfall can quickly flood the ground around the soil absorption area (drainfield) leaving it saturated, making it impossible for water to flow out of your septic system.

How do you tell if your septic tank is full?

How to tell your septic tank is full and needs emptying

  1. Pooling water.
  2. Slow drains.
  3. Odours.
  4. An overly healthy lawn.
  5. Sewer backup.
  6. Gurgling Pipes.
  7. Trouble Flushing.

What is the most common cause of septic system failure?

Most septic systems fail because of inappropriate design or poor maintenance. Some soil-based systems (those with a drain field) are installed at sites with inadequate or inappropriate soils, excessive slopes, or high ground water tables.

Can you sell a property with a septic tank?

If you’re selling a property with a septic tank, then you must be transparent with buyers about the fact the property uses a one and provide a detailed specification of the system. In fact, You are required by law to inform a buyer in writing about the presence of a septic tank. The age of the system.

What are the new rules on septic tanks?

According to new regulations passed in 2015, if your septic tank discharges to surface water such as a ditch, stream, canal or river, you will have to upgrade your system to a sewage treatment plant or install a soakaway system by 1 January 2020.

Can I sell my house with a septic tank?

If you currently have a septic tank that discharges to surface water then the sale will trigger the requirement to replace or upgrade the system. Buyers should satisfy themselves that any system is in good working order and does not cause pollution.

Concerns about a neighbor with a leaking septic tank

It is important to note that your local health department has regulatory responsibility over these systems if the leaky sewage treatment system (e.g., septic tank) is connected to a one, two, or three family home. It is not the responsibility of the Ohio EPA to regulate these systems, and they would only become involved with a situation like this if it was having an adverse impact on a nearby receiving stream. Starting with your local health department, you should find out if they are aware of the problem and have ordered repairs to your neighbor’s waste treatment system as a first step.

If you want assistance in locating your local health department, please visit.

Visit the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency’s Web site at for a list of local offices.

You can also make a complaint online.

When phoning, it is beneficial for the district to obtain as many facts about the problem as possible in order to ensure that all of the proper divisions are involved in the follow-up process.

What to Do If Your Septic System Fails

The majority of septic systems fail as a result of faulty design or inadequate maintenance practices. On certain locations with inadequate or unsuitable soils, excessive slopes, or high ground water tables, soil-based systems (those with a drain field) are erected whereas others (those without) are not. Hydraulic failures and pollution of neighboring water sources are possible outcomes of these situations. Regular maintenance, such as pumping the septic tank on a regular basis (usually every three to five years), can prevent sediments in the tank from migrating into the drain field and clogging the system.

Whom to contact if you have problems with your septic system

Contact a local septic system service provider, your local health department, or the regulatory agency in charge of onsite wastewater treatment systems.

You may look up the phone number for your local health department online or in your phone book to find out more information. Find a professional in your region by searching online searchable databases of installers and septic system service providers:

  • The National Onsite Wastewater Recycling Association’s Septic Locator
  • The National Association of Wastewater Technicians
  • And the National Association of Onsite Wastewater Recycling Association

What to do if your home floods

It is important not to come into direct touch with sewage if it has backed up into your home from your plumbing fittings or onsite system since it may contain hazardous bacteria. For further information, speak with your local health department or regulatory body. Personnel involved in cleanup should be outfitted in safety gear (e.g., long rubber gloves, face splash shields). Immediately following the completion of the cleanup, carefully wash all of the equipment, tools, and clothing that were used during the cleanup, as well as the flooded area.

The area should be totally dried out and not utilized for at least 24 hours after it has been entirely dried off.

  • Visit the Environmental Protection Agency’s website. Flooding and Septic Systems: What to Do After the Flood
  • See also The Following Questions and Answers Regarding Septic Systems: What to Do After a Flood

To learn more about the Environmental Protection Agency, go to their website. Flooding and Septic Systems: What to Do After a Flood; see also Questions and Answers about Septic Systems – What to Do After a Flood;

Whom to contact for information on septic systems

Those seeking technical support can contact the National Environmental Services Center’s technical assistance hotline at (800) 624-8301 or (304) 293-4191, which is available toll-free.

Problems with a Neighbor’s Septic System

  • SUBMIT YOUR ASK OR COMMENT about how to deal with septic system odours, odors, or problems on nearby properties.

InspectAPedia does not allow any form of conflict of interest. The sponsors, goods, and services described on this website are not affiliated with us in any way. Problems with the septic system of a neighbor: A guide to researching, diagnosing, and addressing problems caused by odors, seepage, or well pollution that appear to have originated on a neighbor’s property is presented in this article. We also have anARTICLE INDEX for this topic, and you can use the SEARCH BOXes at the top and bottom of the page to obtain the information you need quickly and easily.

Advice for Investigating Septic Odors, Seepage, Failures, on Neighboring Lands

Hi, My next-door neighbor’s house has a septic tank in front of it; the house is around 30 years old. When I go down the street, I can smell her septic system, but my main issue is that it is extremely close to our property line, and their land is around 8 feet higher in elevation, so I believe that the waste is seeping into our yard. Originally, the yards were quite level, but we had to tear away some of the banking in order to build a driveway. What is the best way to detect if that garbage is present in the soil around our driveway?

Thanks, C

Check with your Neighbors First

In most cases, septic effluent must be disposed of on the same site where it was generated or collected. Whenever possible, it is preferable to urge a neighbor to evaluate and remedy an issue before engaging the authorities. However, when a neighbor is hesitant or possibly unable to act, the second step of involving the health department may be essential. The health department would get involved and enforce action when an owner’s property was dumping raw septic effluent onto a neighbor’s land and the offender refused to take responsibility for the situation.

Explain your worries to your neighbors, ask for their aid, and offer them the opportunity to react.

If you have the unfortunate experience of encountering a neighbor who is unable or unwilling to ensure that their septic system is not contaminating a neighbor’s property, you may need to take additional actions.

Check the distances between the neighboring septic system and property boundaries, wells, etc

Perhaps you might begin your investigation by examining atCLEARANCE DISTANCES, SEPTIC SYSTEMand then reviewing the distances between the adjacent septic system and your property borders and whether or not anybody is in compliance with your local health department’s requirements. Clearancedistances from wells, property lines, waterways, and other sources of contamination must all be observed.

Investigate the source of septic odors

When it comes to sniffing out scents on your own property, it can be difficult, and you should avoid going into a neighbor’s property unless you have been invited. Odors might indicate that a neighbor’s system is failing, that their piping and venting are wrongly placed, or that there is another odor source (which is less likely). Most health authorities, in my experience, will compel action if septic effluent is actually entering a neighbor’s property, but they will not need action if smells are present on the property.

See also:  How Often Should You Have To Pump A Septic Tank? (Solved)

Here is the link to our article on how to identify septic odors:

Investigate the source of wet areas that might or might not be due to someone’s septic system failure

Excavation for an above-ground pool revealed sewage wastewater running to the surface at an adjacent property in this photograph. If you see any damp places on your property, or, for that matter, on your neighbor’s property nearby, it is possible that their septic system is failing and needs to be repaired for both health and functional reasons. The following is a list of septic system failure indicators: It is possible that the health department will employ a septic dye to try to determine whether the effluent is from a septic system rather than another groundwater source when effluent is discovered.

This is due to the failure of the septic system.

An explanation of why septic dye may not show even when a septichas has failed may be found at this link.

If there are no wet areas but you still suspect a septic problem

An uphill adjoining septic field, whose effluent ran beneath the earth into the drive drainage system of the property in the foreground of the photograph, is shown in this photograph. This photograph depicts the appearance of septic dye in the area drain basin in the driveway. If there are no wetareas emerging but the ground exhibits signs of close effluent passage, such as scents or warmth in the winter, it is reasonable to predict that effluent will eventually surface and the issue will become unambiguous – repair will be necessary.

The absence of wetareas on your property means that effluent is not accumulating at the groundsurface, which means that there is no visible evidence of septic failure.

In the absence of the clearance distance issue that I mentioned above, I’m not sure your health department would consider the neighbor to be in violation of health codes.

Soil testing for evidence of septic failure

Testing soil for the presence of coliformbacteria or colibacteria, which can indicate that the soil has been contaminated with sewage effluent, can be done by a local water testing laboratory. Instead of testing water or groundwater samples, I’d call the lab and ask them what process they want you to use to test soil samples instead. I’d also inquire about the standards of comparison that are employed. (And I would appreciate it if you could share that information with me.)

Whom Should You Contact For Septic System Failure or Neighbor Encroachment Disputes?

Keep in mind that, in the interest of maintaining good relationships among neighbors, it is usually always preferable to first approach your neighbor personally, calmly, and respectfully to address your complaint before approaching the septic system in question.

Contact your local building and zoning officials about a septic system dispute if:

  • A violation of your property line occurs when your neighbor’s septic system contains components that were placed on your land. An attorney and/or a surveyor may be necessary to help you in confirming the boundaries of your property and reviewing the required septic system setbacks from property lines or other site features.

Contact your local health department officials about a septic system dispute if:

  • Leaving a septic system failure unaddressed: The sewage or sewage effluent from your neighbor’s septic system is being discharged to the ground surface on anyone’s property, including yours. If a neighbor’s septic system is clearly failing and you have not received a satisfactory response from speaking directly with your neighbor, or if doing so would be unsafe in your opinion, contact your local health department and request that a health inspector inspect the properties involved in the failure. Septic systems that are too close to rivers, property boundaries, and other sensitive areas: If you notice a septic system that has been built or is being built in evident violation of the normal clearance distances from community or private wells, lakes, streams, or other bodies of water, please report it toCLEARANCE DISTANCES, SEPTIC SYSTEM.

Reader Q A – also see the FAQs series linked-to below

@Anonymous, The majority of coliform bacteria are not pathogenic. However, some uncommon forms of E. coli, notably the strain 0157:H7, have the potential to cause severe disease. – New York State Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Overall, total coliforms are an unrelated category of bacteria that are not dangerous to humans (with a few notable exceptions). Pathogens are bacteria, parasites, and viruses that have the potential to cause health issues in people if they are ingested by them.

  • It is necessary to measure total coliforms in order to assess the effectiveness of water treatment and the integrity of the distribution system.
  • Environmental Protection Agency – Revised Total Coliform Rule See the REVISED TOTAL COLIFORM RULE SUMMARY SHEET for further information.
  • E.Coli is a pathogen.
  • @Chuck, It’s understandable that what you’ve reported has been upsetting and frustrating.
  • “My (sewage effluent) spray head is virtually at the bottom of this creek,” a new neighbor says on the conversation: “I just moved in next door.” That stream then flows over my 5 acres of land in Oklahoma, where I’ve resided for the past 30 years.
  • There’s nothing he can do about it.
  • Obviously, this isn’t the case.

The E.coli count in this stream has reached as high as 24,190 bacteria per 100 milliliters of water at times.

That is 120 times the maximum permissible level of skin contact.

Those who should be concerned as well as those who don’t want to be concerned have all been contacted by me.

I can only hear crickets at this point.

What a tragedy!

@Debbie, Make a phone call to your local health department.

Thank you for taking the time to check through it and please do not hesitate to contact me if you have any questions or comments.

It stinks when the neighbors come on, and it has been stinking for over 10 years, and I am tired of smelling it when I sit outside.

I believe they should as well, so please let me know who I may report them to in order to get them repaired.

We moved into our house in North Carolina nearly 6 months ago and noticed the odor almost immediately after moving in.

We’ve attempted to communicate with the neighbor, but they don’t appear to be interested in addressing the issue of raw sewage in their yard, which is caused by both a damaged tank and a broken leech line.

Is there anyone in North Carolina who can give me some advice?

Additionally, check with your local health agency.

There are seven apartments hooked up to this system, is it legal for them to put drain fill lines in the front of my property?

@Justin, your department of health has confirmed that they crossed the creek with the septic lines and that their drain fill lines are in the front of your property.

My neighbor is pumping septic sewage into their yard, and it smells terrible.

In your situation, it appears that you should seek assistance from your local health department.

There is a strong odor of fecal excrement coming from the building across the street from me.

Hoarders are people we’ve met.

@Jo, if the landowner is unwilling to fix the raw sewage discharge into the ground, you will need to seek assistance from your local health authority.

It is, of course, a health hazard as well.

We have continual running water into our driveway and yard (we are on a small slant), causing it to become filthy and muddy.

For the time being, it does not smell.

What can I do to help?

It’s difficult to tell where you’re coming from when you’re properly situated.

Perhaps you might elaborate a little more on your description.

Ocn This is a question for your attorney: what happens if you just exercise your power over your own property by stopping the septic lines of a neighbor who is located on your land after warning the neighbor in writing in advance?

We acquired a building lot and were unaware that the neighbor was connected to a septic tank at the time of purchase.

On my property, several of the leach lines are located.

Our Home Builder is ready to begin construction, but he will be unable to do so until the City issues the necessary permits.

However, although the Health Department is aware of the situation, it will not compel the neighbor to connect to the sewer system.

I’ve attempted to communicate with the neighbor, but he has refused to open his door.

Is there anything I can do legally to compel this individual to connect to the sewer system so that I may begin construction?

Do you have any suggestions?

Alternatively, view theNEIGHBORING SEPTIC SYSTEM FAQs- questions and answers that were originally provided at this article. Alternatively, consider the following:

Articles on Site Plumbing or Mechanical System Clearances

  • THE FINDING OF BURIED OIL TANKS
  • CLEARANCE DISTANCES, SEPTIC SYSTEM
  • NEIGHBORHOOD SEPTIC SYSTEM PROBLEMS
  • PLANTSTREES OVER SEPTIC SYSTEMS
  • SEPTIC COMPONENT LOCATIONS
  • SEPTIC DRAINFIELD LOCATION
  • SEPTIC VIDEOS
  • SEPTIC TO POOL DISTANCE
  • WELLS CISTERNSSPRINGS-

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AtInspect A pedia.com, an online encyclopedia of building and environmental inspection, testing, diagnosis, repair, and issue avoidance information, you may learn about NEIGHBORING SEPTIC SYSTEM PROBLEMS. Alternatively, have a look at this.

INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES:ARTICLE INDEX to SEPTIC SYSTEMS

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See also:  How Much Is It To Have My Septic Tank Pumped? (Perfect answer)

We encourage you to use the search box just below, or if you prefer, you may make a question or remark in theCommentsbox below and we will get back to you as soon as possible. InspectApedia is a website that allows you to search for things. Please keep in mind that the publication of your remark below may be delayed if it contains an image, a web link, or text that seems to the program to be a web link. Your submission will appear when it has been reviewed by a moderator. We sincerely apologize for the inconvenience.

Your Legal Responsibility

If the Department of Health and Human Services receives a complaint about a failing septic system or links a pollution problem to a failing septic system, the owner will be served with a notice informing them that they are in violation of Regulation 61-56, Onsite Wastewater Systems, and that they must repair their failing septic tank system immediately. For individual households, the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) does not provide any funding or financing alternatives to assist with the repair or replacement of failing septic systems or the construction of new residential septic systems.

Save Money

Regular inspections and pumping (by DHEC-licensed septic tank contractors or pumpers) of your septic system are the most effective and least expensive methods of keeping your septic system in good functioning condition.

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Septic Tank Alerts Septic Tank Alerts

Sewage Complaints

sewage discharges from septic systems (leach lines or leach bed) and mound systems are not permitted under any circumstances. Because these are non-dispcharging systems, the presence of a discharge indicates that the system has failed. HSTSs that are not functioning properly must be fixed or replaced. Overflow lines from septic systems (bleeder lines) are not permitted, and if they are discovered, the Clermont County Public Health Department will require their removal. Septic systems and mound systems that do not discharge sewage to the surface of the earth are not considered to be a public health nuisance in most cases.

  1. The transport of treated wastewater through the soil and subsoil is not regulated by the Department of Health and Human Services (Public Health).
  2. It is permissible to discharge waste from a sand filter or an aerobic treatment unit (ATU).
  3. The presence of a septic odor and/or grey discoloration is a sign of a malfunction and a potential health hazard.
  4. Even if an ATU is operating as intended, it may emit smells as a result of temperature fluctuations, overloading, or other undesirable situations.
  5. The Department of Public Health cannot mandate the removal of discharge pipes linked with existing systems that are inappropriately situated.
  6. Homeowners who have a collection line crossing their property are not permitted to remove the line or cause a health hazard by obstructing the passage of the collector line.
  7. Each and every gray water system must be connected to an existing HSTS or a sanitary sewer system.

Clermont County Public Health must first approve any changes to, repairs to, or replacements to a HSTS before they may be carried out.

Repairs to the system are broken down into more manageable portions by following this step-by-step approach, which allows the homeowner to make repairs as needed until the system is completely replaced.

Public Health will collaborate with a homeowner to determine the best course of action during repairs; nevertheless, in some circumstances, replacement is the only viable alternative for the homeowner.

A septic tank must first be drained out by a licensed septic hauler before it can be used.

It is not necessary to remove the existing leach lines.

In Clermont County, any privy, cesspool, or septic tank that has been emptied must be hauled away in a permitted manner by a septic hauling company that has been licensed.

Municipal treatment systems are not under the jurisdiction of the Department of Public Health. Complaints concerning public sewage treatment plants should be addressed to the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Complaints can be lodged online.

Septic (Onsite Sewage) Systems

A safe alternative to municipal sewer service for disposing of home wastewater generated by showers, sinks, toilets, and washing machines where municipal sewer service is not available. Septic systems (also known as on-site sewage systems) are becoming increasingly popular in rural areas. During appropriate operation, a septic system eliminates the hazardous bacteria contained in wastewater and disperses it safely into the soil of your yard. In the event of a malfunctioning septic system, raw sewage can be discharged into surrounding yards, local creeks, and ditches, posing serious health dangers to humans, pets, and the environment.

  • There’s also the annoyance of costly repair or replacement expenses to consider.
  • Sites are also analyzed to determine whether or not they are suitable for the installation of sewage treatment systems.
  • There are a variety of factors that might influence whether a system will function on a certain parcel, including soil characteristics, topography, and available space.
  • You will find information on state and municipal rules, permit applications, septic system maintenance, and other useful resources in the sections below.

Rules/Ordinances

A safe alternative to municipal sewer service for disposing of home wastewater generated by showers, sinks, toilets, and washing machines when municipal sewer service is not available. Septic systems (also known as on-site sewage systems) are increasingly more commonly found. An effective septic system cleanses the potentially hazardous bacteria contained in wastewater before dispersing it securely inside the soil of your yard. In the event of a malfunctioning septic system, raw sewage can be discharged into surrounding yards, local creeks, and ditches, posing serious health dangers to humans, pets, and the environment.

There’s also the aggravation of costly repair or replacement prices.

Sites are also analyzed to see whether or not they are suitable for the construction of septic tanks.

There are a variety of factors that might influence whether a system will function on a particular parcel, including soil characteristics, topography, and available space.

In the sections below, you can find information on state and municipal rules, permit applications, septic system maintenance, and other useful resources. Please contact us at (260) 449-7530 for further information or to report a septic system problem.

  • Residential On-Site Sewage Systems Rule 410 IAC 6-8.3
  • Indiana Department of Health Bulletin S.E. 11 for Sanitary Vault Privies
  • Commercial On-Site Sewage Systems Rule 410 IAC 6-10.1
  • On-Site Sewage Systems Rule 410 IAC 6-10.1
  • On-Site Sewage Systems Rule 410 IAC

Ordinances of the County of Allen

  • Title 17 Article 1 Allen County On-Site Waste Water Management District Creation
  • Title 17 Article 2 Allen County On-Site Waste Water Management District Fees Ordinance
  • Title 17 Article 3 Allen County On-Site Waste Water Management District Provider Qualification Ordinance
  • Title 17 Article 4 Allen County On-Site Waste Water Management District Provider Qualification Ordinance
  • Title 17 Article 5 Allen County On-Site Waste Water Management District Provider Qualification Ordinance

Permit ApplicationsResources

On-Site Wastewater Management District Creation; Title 17 Article 2 Allen County On-Site Wastewater Management District Fees Ordinance; Title 17 Article 3 Allen County On-Site Wastewater Management District Provider Qualification Ordinance; Title 17 Article 4 Allen County On-Site Wastewater Management District Provider Qualification Ordinance; Title 17 Article 5 Allen County On-Site Wastewater Management District Provider Qualification Ordinance

  • Application for a Residential On-Site Sewage System Construction Permit
  • Application for a Commercial On-Site Sewage System Construction Permit
  • Instructions for Obtaining a Permit
  • Application for the Allen County On-Site Wastewater Management District
  • Allen County On-Site Wastewater Management District Fee Schedule
  • Allen County On-Site Wastewater Management District Fee Schedule List of Soil Scientists
  • List of Septic System Designers
  • Recessional Moraine Soil Notice
  • ISDH Recessional Moraine Protocol
  • Recessional Moraine Protocol
  • Re A list of Certified Evaluators, Installers, and Service Providers is available. Notice of Onsite Sewage SystemBedroom Affidavit Residential
  • Notice of Onsite Sewage System Use Affidavit Commercial
  • Notice of Onsite Sewage SystemBedroom Affidavit Residential
  • Application for an On-Site Sewage System Abandonment Permit
  • Notice of Replacement of an On-Site Sewage System
  • IDEM-Licensed Wastewater Haulers List

Signs that your septic system is failing If the toilets flush correctly and there is no stench in the yard or neighboring ditches, homeowners may be led to assume that their septic systems are in good operating order. Septic systems, on the other hand, can fail in other, less evident ways, making it critical to understand the frequent indicators of septic system failures in order to prevent further damage. These are some of the warning signs:

  • Sinks and toilets that are draining slowly
  • The plumbing is making gurgling noises
  • Back-ups in the plumbing system House or yard aromas that smell like sewage
  • If the ground is damp or mushy above the absorption field of your septic system
  • Above your absorption field, the grass appears to be greener or to be growing more quickly. Bacterial tests have revealed the presence of germs in surrounding streams or wells.

Tips for Maintaining Your Septic System

It is important to follow the maintenance procedures outlined below to ensure that your septic system lasts as long as possible:

  • Keep your septic tank pumped on a regular basis. Sludge and scum can accumulate in a tank over time, causing it to smell bad. Make a point of cleaning the tank every three years, including the effluent filter
  • Keep an eye on your water use. Excessive water use might cause the system to become overloaded. Install a water meter to keep track of your water consumption, and avoid doing all of your clothes at once. Be cautious with what you flush down the toilet. It is best not to flush any objects or chemicals down the toilet that are difficult to breakdown. Septic tank additives should not be used since they may do more damage than good. Maintain the system’s integrity. Avoid driving or parking heavy equipment over the absorption field, as well as planting trees and plants in its vicinity. Join the Allen County On-Site Wastewater Management District to help protect the environment. Regular inspections and preventative maintenance are some of the advantages. In order to obtain further information, call (260) 449-4181 or send an email to [email protected]

Educational Materials

  • Before You Become a Buyer Brochure (Department of Health and Human Services)
  • Ownership and Maintenance of Septic Systems (Department of Health and Human Services)

The video below serves as an instructional tool for homeowners, explaining what a septic system is, what it accomplishes, and how to avoid any possible problems by performing regular maintenance. Send your request, along with a check for $7 made out to the Allen County Department of Health, 200 E. Berry St., Suite 360, Fort Wayne, IN 46802, or drop it off at the department’s office. For pricing information on numerous copies of the movie, please email [email protected] or call (260) 449-4181.

  • Maintaining and operating an on-site sewage system
  • Preparing and serving food. Avoid allowing the “Dirty Dozen” to enter your on-site sewage system (septic tank)
  • Maintenance and cleaning of an on-site sewage system
  • In this section you will learn about Septic System Performance, Swelling Clays and Septic Systems, High Water Table and Septic System Perimeter Drains, Conventional Septic System Construction Guidelines, and more.
See also:  What Happens If Your Septic Tank Overfills? (Solution found)

Certification Study Materials

  • Maintaining and operating an on-site sewage system
  • Preparing and serving meals. Avoid allowing the “Dirty Dozen” to enter your on-site sewage system (septic tank)
  • And Maintenance and cleaning of an on-site sewage system In this section you will learn about Septic System Performance, Swelling Clays and Septic Systems, High Water Table and Septic System Perimeter Drains, Conventional Septic System Design Guidelines, and more.

Additional Resources

  • On-Site Sewage Systems Programs (ISDH)
  • On-Site Wastewater Systems (CDC)
  • Septic Systems (EPA)
  • On-Site Sewage Systems Programs (ISDH)
  • It is important to maintain your septic system (EPA). What to Do If Your Septic System Fails (EPA)
  • What to Do If Your Septic System Fails The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) describes how a failing septic system might have an impact on nearby water sources. Preparing Seasonal Septic Systems for Winter (On-Site Installer)
  • Preparing Seasonal Septic Systems for Spring (On-Site Installer)
  • Instructions for Winterizing On-Site Systems (For the On-Site Installer)

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On- Mississippi State Department of Health

In light of COVID-19, we have decided to postpone our Certified InstallerPumper training until further notice. When we are able to provide classes, we will post an update on this page. A major purpose of the On-Site Wastewater program is to limit the possibility of illness spreading on the premises as a result of inappropriate handling and disposal of human waste. Ground and surface water pollution poses a threat to both the environment and public health because of the potential for contamination.

The proper disposal of wastewater is becoming increasingly important as the population of rural regions in our state continues to grow. A complaint concerning an Individual On-site Wastewater Disposal System can be submitted online or by calling the On-Site Wastewater Call Center at (855) 220-0192.

  • More information
  • A list of approved installers, pumpers, and manufacturers
  • Information on real estate and subdivisions

Appy for a New Wastewater System, Water Meter, or Well

For use with on-site wastewater systems in residential and commercial buildings, agricultural water meters, and private water well sampling. Step 1: Submit an application in its entirety. Our application forms for new onsite wastewater systems are now available for download on our website. Online applications can be submitted by clicking on the button below: Now is the time to apply online. Our printable PDF application forms are also available for usage. Step 2: Send us your papers by email, fax, or regular mail to our physical address (seecontact informationand map below).

Step 3: Make payment for the fees.

Pay your charge by clicking on the link provided.

  • Environmental fees will not be accepted at the county offices in the form of cash or cheques. With the use of this online payment option, a modest processing fee is charged. It is expected that you will get an invoice for payment through email.

Step 4: Once your payment has been processed successfully, you will get an email receipt. Please refer to the receipt for further information if necessary. Within 24 hours of the property tour, you will get the necessary papers. Use our Licensed Installer/Pumper Database to identify a licensed installer or plumber if you have submitted an application for a Notice of Intent or if you need to repair your currently installed system.

Getting assistance

Alternatively, you can call the toll-free Wastewater Call Center at 1-855-220-0192 if you want assistance with the application process. Our call center staff will answer your inquiries, aid you with the completion of paperwork, and assist you with our new on-line payment system, if you have one.

On-Site Wastewater Program Activities

It is the responsibility of the On-site Wastewater Program to develop policy and regulations, as well as to provide technical assistance to regional environmentalists in the design and inspection of Individual On-site Wastewater Disposal Systems (IOWDS), recreational vehicle campgrounds/lodging parks, septage pumpers/haulers, and personal water supplies. The program is funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Environmentalists perform Soil and Site Evaluations that give property owners with a Permit/Recommendation (which is necessary in order to get a water meter) that is acceptable for placement on their land.

Engineers and Program Specialists are on hand to provide technical help and training to customers.

Certificate programs are offered for those wishing to become Certified Installers, Certified Pumpers, or Professional Evaluators.

Program specialists inspect manufacturer’s products, certify Environmentalists, perform Quality Assurance, teach continuing education courses, and provide technical assistance.

Wastewater Law

The Wastewater Advisory Board was established in April 2011 under Section 24 of the Mississippi Code of 1972, subsection 41-67-101, for the purpose of advising the Mississippi State Department of Health on individual on-site wastewater disposal systems. As on July 1, 2013, this board will be referred to as the Wastewater Advisory Council in accordance with Section 41-67-41 of the Code of Virginia.

  • A law requiring the installation of an individual on-site wastewater disposal system in Mississippi
  • Mississippi Legislature Bills now pending in the House and Senate status

Wastewater Ordinances

  • Map County rules governing on-site wastewater disposal are depicted on a state map.

Wastewater Regulations

  • Regulations governing residential individual on-site wastewater disposal systems, as well as construction specifications

Wastewater Advisory Council (WAC)

The Wastewater Advisory Board was established in April 2011 under Section 24 of the Mississippi Code of 1972, subsection 41-67-101, for the purpose of advising the Mississippi State Department of Health on individual on-site wastewater disposal systems. As on July 1, 2013, this board will be referred to as the Wastewater Advisory Council in accordance with Section 41-67-41 of the Code of Virginia.

Consumer Information and Notices

  • Published by the Mississippi Secretary of State, the Mississippi Administrative Bulletin
  • Obtaining On-Site Wastewater Information and Management Searching for Certified Installers, Pumpers, and Manufacturers, as well as property information, among other things

Registered Products

All of the goods included in each of these lists have been vetted and approved for usage in the State of Mississippi before being published. As a property owner, you must engage a professional who has been qualified by the registered manufacturer to install and/or service any of the goods on this list.

  • Septic Tanks
  • Advanced Treatment Systems
  • Aggregate Replacement
  • Disinfection
  • Fibers
  • Filters

Property Owners

Individual onsite wastewater systems, both new and old, require documentation.

Environmental Regions

Wastewater Customer Service: 1-855-220-0192

North Region

Counties include: Alcorn, Benton, Calhoun, Chickasaw-Choctow-Clay-Coahoma-Desoto-Grenada-Itawamba-Lee-Lowndes-Marshall-Montgomery-Noxubee-Oktibbeha-Pontotoc-Prentiss-Quitman-Tallahatchie-Tishomingo-Tunica-Union-

Central Region

Alabama counties include Attala, Bolivar and Carroll; Claiborne and Clarke; Copiah; Hinds; Holmes; Humphreys; Jasper; Kemper; Lauderdale; Leake; Leflore; Madison; Montgomery; Neshoba; Newton; Rankin; Scott; Sharkey; Simpson; Smith; Sunflower; Warren; Washington; Yazoo.

South Region

Williamson County consists of the following counties: Adams (Amite), Covington (Forrest), Franklin (George), Greene (Hancock), Harrison (Jackson) Jefferson Davis (Jones), Lamar (Lamar County), Lincoln (Lincoln Davis), Marion (Marion County), Pearl River (Perry), Pike (Stone), Walthall (Wayne) and Wilkinson (Wayne).

For Professionals

In partnership with the Mississippi State Department of Health’s Division of On-site Wastewater, the Mississippi State Department of Health offers certification for the following on-site wastewater-related professions:

  • Certified Installer
  • Certified Pumper
  • Certified Professional Evaluator
  • Certified Manufacturer

Continuing Education Units (CEU)/ Professional Development Hours (PDH)

Certified Installer; Certified Pumper; Certified Professional Evaluator; Certified Manufacturer; and Certified Professional Evaluator.

  • Certified Installer
  • Certified Pumper
  • Certified Professional Evaluator

Resources and Links

  • Links to additional organizations, professional associations, and other information

Onsite (Septic) Complaints

To safeguard public health, drinking water, and the environment, it is critical to dispose of sewage in an appropriate manner. Septic systems that are not working correctly are investigated by Clallam County Environmental Health Services (EH), which is part of the Washington Department of Health. EH responds to all complaints in a timely way, taking into consideration the subject of the complaint rather than the date on which the complaint was received. An investigation often include visiting the site, analyzing the problem, collaborating with the owner to solve the problem, and teaching the owner to avoid future problems from occurring.

All County documents, on the other hand, are open to the public, and anybody may obtain a copy of the investigation’s conclusions.

Anyone who submits a complaint, however, should be aware that the property owner may go through legal proceedings and may eventually learn who filed the complaint. If you have a complaint, you can contact Environmental Health at 360-417-2506.

Septic Systems

In order to build, replace, or repair a septic system in St. Joseph County, a permit from the Department of Health must be obtained first. To safeguard groundwater, surface water, and people’ health in St. Joseph County, on-site septic systems must be designed, built, and maintained according to industry standards. The Department of Health also reviews complaints about septic systems that have failed, as well as concerns about inappropriate installation and maintenance of systems. Septic permit applications, permit fees, and a soil assessment from a qualified soil scientist must all be submitted to the Department of Health in order to be considered for approval.

The specs will then be provided to a professional septic installer who will construct the system according to the standards.

The Department of Health will then evaluate and approve the design submitted by the contractor who has been selected for the job.

Design flaws are reported to the septic contractor, who then makes necessary corrections.

After the system has been installed in accordance with the permit and all applicable State and County regulations, the septic contractor contacts the Department of Health to schedule a final inspection of the system.

After the Department of Health has passed the final examination, the system will be ready for usage.

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