Where To By Septic Tank? (TOP 5 Tips)

Your septic tank will most certainly be installed along the main sewer line that runs out of your home. Look for the 4-inch sewer that exits the crawl space or basement, and locate the same spot outside the home. Septic tanks are usually located between ten to 25 feet away from the home.

How far does a septic tank have to be from a house?

  • Generally speaking, septic tanks are usually 10 feet to 50 feet from the foundation of the home. This is a question that is usually decided by the engineer and the septic inspector after the perk test has been completed.

Where is the best location for a septic tank?

Northwest is the best direction for installing a septic tank. It doesn’t matter if your house is east or west-facing, as the direction of your house does not take into account the position of the septic tank. Therefore, septic tank location as per Vastu must always be in the northwest part of your home.

What is the cheapest septic tank?

Types of Septic Tank Systems These conventional septic systems are usually the most affordable, with an average cost of around $3,000.

How much does it cost to put in a septic tank Australia?

The septic tank price in Australia can vary depending on the size of the home and the location. The average septic tank cost for a conventional system with absorption trenches for a four-bedroom home is between $11,000 and $13,000, with desludging every three to five years.

How far away from the house should a septic tank be?

Septic tanks are required to be at least 5 feet from the house, although most are between 10 and 25 feet away.

Can a mound system be put anywhere?

It costs a great deal of money to install these systems, but they can be placed anywhere. A mound septic system has no container, and digging too far gets you too close to the water table. This means instead of digging down you have to dig out.

How long do septic tanks last?

A septic system’s lifespan should be anywhere from 15 to 40 years. How long the system lasts depends on a number of factors, including construction material, soil acidity, water table, maintenance practices, and several others.

How often should a septic tank be pumped?

Inspect and Pump Frequently The average household septic system should be inspected at least every three years by a septic service professional. Household septic tanks are typically pumped every three to five years.

How big of a septic tank do I need?

The larger your home, the larger the septic tank you’re going to need. For instance, a house smaller than 1,500 square feet usually requires a 750 to 1,000-gallon tank. On the other hand, a bigger home of approximately 2,500 square feet will need a bigger tank, more than the 1,000-gallon range.

Can you have a septic tank without a leach field?

The waste from most septic tanks flows to a soakaway system or a drainage field. If your septic tank doesn’t have a drainage field or soakaway system, the waste water will instead flow through a sealed pipe and empty straight into a ditch or a local water course.

What is an alternative septic system?

An alternative septic system is a system that is different from the common traditional style septic system. An alternative system is required when the site and soil conditions on a property are limiting, or when the wastewater strength is too strong for the receiving environment (i.e. restaurants).

What size septic tank do I need Australia?

However, Standards Australia has issued guidelines on septic tank sizes. In line with this guidance, a house with between four and six bedrooms must have a tank that is at least 4,500L in capacity. This applies if you are producing “regular” quantities of wastewater.

What is the best septic system in Australia?

AERATED WASTEWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS (AWTS) AWTS are fast becoming the most popular choice of septic system used throughout New South Wales, ACT and Victoria. Garden Master septic systems are AWTS and are the systems that we recommend.

How close can you build to a septic tank Australia?

Setback distances apply for septic system installation where existing farm dams and surface waters are to be considered when designing the layout of the proposed system. 1 Farm Dams – Minimum setback of 60 metres. 2 6 metres on the upslope of any building. 3 3 metres on the down slope of any building.

How To Find Septic Tank Location: A Guide for Property Owners

The majority of individuals prefer to relax on their back patio or porch and take in the scenery rather than worrying about where their septic tank could be. When you know exactly where your septic tank is, it will be much easier to schedule routine sewer line cleanouts and repair appointments. Continue reading to find out more about how to locate your septic tank.

Follow the Main Sewer Line

If you’re like most people, you like relaxing on your back patio or porch and taking in the scenery rather than worrying about where your septic tank could be. When you know exactly where your septic tank is, it will be much easier to schedule routine sewer line cleanouts and repairs. Learn more about how to locate your septic tank by continuing reading this article. 1.

Inspect Your Property

Imperfections in the terrain might sometimes provide clues as to where your septic tank is located. Septic tanks are often placed in such a way that you can scarcely know they are there. However, dips in the soil or tiny hills in the landscape may suggest the presence of a septic tank hidden beneath the ground. You may use your soil probe to find your septic tank if these dips or hills are located between five and twenty-five feet distant from your property line. Because most septic tanks are located between six inches and four feet underground, make sure you probe the soil to a sufficient depth before installing the tank.

While you are inspecting your property, keep a look out for the septic lid that may be missing.

These are often found at or slightly below ground level, depending on the situation.

  • Paved surfaces
  • Unique landscaping
  • Your water well, if you have one
  • And other features.

If you are still having trouble locating your septic system, you might inquire of your neighbors about the location of their septic tank on their land. Finding out how far away their septic systems are will help you figure out where yours might be hidden in your yard or garden.

Check the Property Records

Are you unsure about how to obtain this? Simply contact your county’s health department for further information. Check with your local health agency to see if they have a property survey map and a septic tank map that you can borrow. Perhaps you will be shocked to learn that there are a variety of options to obtain information about your property without ever leaving the comfort of your own residence. Building permits, for example, are frequently found in county records, and they may provide schematics with specifications on how far away from a septic tank a home should be, as well as other important information such as the size of the tank.

Most counties, on the other hand, keep records of septic tank installations for every address. For further information on the placement of your septic tank, you can consult your home inspection documents or the deed to the property.

Don’t Try to Fix Septic Tank Issues Yourself

Septic tank problems should be left to the specialists. The Original Plumber can do routine maintenance on your septic tank and examine any problems you may have once you’ve located the tank. It is not recommended to open the septic tank lid since poisonous vapors might cause major health problems. Getting trapped in an open septic tank might result in serious injury or death. While it is beneficial to know where your septic tank is located, it is also beneficial to be aware of the potential health dangers associated with opening the tank.

Schedule Septic Tank Maintenance

The maintenance of your septic tank on a regular basis helps to avoid sewer backups and costly repairs to your sewer system. You should plan to have your septic tank pumped out every three to five years, depending on the size of your tank and the number of people that reside in your home. The Original Plumber offers skilled septic tank and drain field maintenance and repair services at competitive prices. While it is useful to know where the septic tank is located, it is not required. Our team of skilled plumbers is equipped with all of the tools and equipment necessary to locate your tank, even if you have a vast property.

We are open seven days a week, twenty-four hours a day.

Frequently Asked Questions

A septic system is a system for the management of wastewater. Simply said, wastewater will exit your home through pipes until it reaches your septic tank, which is located outside your home. Septic tanks are normally located beneath the surface of the earth. Solids and liquids will separate in the septic tank as a result of the separation process. Eventually, the solids will fall to the bottom of the tank and the liquids will run out onto your leach field.

How do I know if I have a septic tank?

Even if there are no obvious signs of a septic tank in your yard – such as uneven landscaping – there are a few techniques to assess whether or not your home is equipped with an onsite sewage system. Checking your property records is the most reliable technique to ensure that you are utilizing the correct system. When you acquired your house, you should have received a copy of the septic system map with the property documents as well. Checking your electricity statement is another way to determine this.

If you’re also using well water, it’s possible that you won’t receive one at all.

What do I do once I locate my septic tank?

Once you’ve discovered where your septic tank is, there are a few things you should do. It is critical to clearly mark the position of your septic tank. With our inspection, pumping, and repair services, you can save time whether you need a sewer line cleanout or a septic tank maintenance job completed quickly. Make a note of the location of your tank so that you can find it again if necessary. It should be heavy enough so that it does not fly away in windy conditions. A creative approach to accomplish this without having an unattractive flag or marking in your yard is to use garden décor or a potted plant.

This way, you’ll have it for future reference and will be able to quickly locate the exact position if necessary.

Then contact The Original Plumber to have your septic system maintained on a regular basis. Preventing worse problems and the need for costly repairs down the line may be accomplished via proper septic system maintenance. All of the heavy lifting has been delegated to our team of professionals.

Looking for Your Septic Tank? Here’s How to Find It

“It’s 9 o’clock, do you know where your septic tank is?” says the interrogator. Maybe this is a little over the top, but it’s a question that many of our clients have asked over the years. In particular, new homeowners who are unfamiliar with the inner workings of their home or who haven’t needed septic tank servicing yet should be aware of the risks involved. Knowing where your septic tank is located is essential for routine maintenance and when you wish to add additional landscaping to your property.

Why you need to know where your septic tank is located

If your house does not have access to municipal sewage services, it is almost inevitable that you have a septic tank to redirect and store all of your wastewater someplace on your property’s subterranean drainage system. While a septic system is trustworthy and cost-effective, it does not operate without some kind of upkeep. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, a septic tank should be examined at least once every three years and drained every three to five years at the absolute least.

In either of these scenarios, you’ll need to know the location of your septic tank so that you can arrange for it to be serviced.

How to find your septic tank

  1. Inquire with your neighbors– If you have a septic tank, it’s possible that your neighbors have, too. Perhaps you’ll be fortunate enough to come across someone who knows where your tank is or who can assist you in narrowing down your search
  2. Obtain information from public records– It is possible that your local county or municipality has an existing septic tank map on file, which contains a schematic and the measurements of your property. Examine the home inspection report you received when you purchased your house to see if there is any mention of the presence of a septic tank and the location of the tank before going to your local records office. Start in the basement and discover the sewer pipe that leaves the house if you have to locate the tank by yourself. Pipe with a diameter of four inches is usual for this application. After that, go outside and around to the opposite side of the wall. Then, using a metal soil probe to poke small holes in various locations around your property, trace the pipe’s course until you reach the tank. When you strike the flat top surface of the tank with the probe, you’ll notice a distinct change. Consider your surroundings– If you have a huge property, locating a needle in a haystack might seem like a daunting task. To make your search more efficient, you can eliminate locations near structures, paved surfaces, the water well, and, ideally, regions with extensive trees or landscaping from consideration. Another possibility is that you may notice a patch of grass that is a little greener or that is growing more quickly around the tank. Locate the septic tank lid– Regardless of how you pinpoint the position of the tank, you may need to perform a little digging in order to expose the lid. You may use the soil probe to determine the perimeter of the tank – most tanks will be around 5 7 feet in length and width. As soon as you’ve outlined the edges, start shoveling in the middle and working your way around the perimeter until you reach the lid. However, unless you’re servicing the tank immediately away, there’s no reason to lift the top and let the noxious odors out into the environment.
See also:  How Long Does It Take For A Flooded Septic Tank To Drain? (Solution)

After you’ve located your septic tank, make a note of the position on a map or mark it on your GPS device for future reference. This will assist you in avoiding the construction of structures or the planting of deep-rooted plants in the vicinity of the sewage line and septic tank. When it comes to selling your house, a map or handwritten diagram may also be beneficial. If you want plumbing assistance in New Haven or Fairfield County, Rick’s Plumbing is the brand you can rely on. In order to obtain expert assistance, please send us a message or phone us at (203) 874-6629.

  • The post was published on July 16, 2019 under the category Septic Tank System.

Plastic Septic Tanks

Ace, Norwesco, and Snyder Industries brand septic tanks are available at Tank Depot at competitive prices. Norway-based Norwesco has been manufacturing polyethylene septic tanks since 1980. Norwesco is the world’s biggest maker of polyethylene tanks. Norwesco has a wealth of knowledge and expertise to give you goods that have been tested and proved to provide years of dependable, trouble-free service. State and municipal health officials from coast to coast have certified Norwesco septic tanks, which are covered by a three-year warranty and have been in use for decades.

  1. NORWESCO BELOW GROUND TANKS – Conversion OptionInformation about NORWESCO BELOW GROUND TANKS Choosing a location for the installation of your Plastic Septic Tank When purchasing a septic tank, it is important to examine the following characteristics.
  2. Installation is a breeze.
  3. Any Norwesco septic tank may be delivered to the project site in a pickup truck and handled by just two persons, depending on the model.
  4. Construction is made of a single piece of rotationally molded plastic.
  5. Design for Exceptional Strength The design of the ribs and the location of the ribs give the tank with exceptional structural stability.
  6. Norwesco’s stringent quality control measures ensure that its septic tanks are safe for the environment.
  7. 750, 1000, 1250, and 1500 gallon tanks are offered as single compartment or double compartment tanks (2/3 – 1/3) depending on your needs.
  8. Pre-plumbed / ready to be put into service Norwegian Septic Tanks (750 gallons and greater) are delivered to you fully assembled and ready to be installed.
  9. Tees are measured and cut to meet the requirements of each state code, ensuring that the tank you get is ready for installation.
  10. This upgraded design outperforms existing lid designs in terms of strength and durability.

The gasket ensures a watertight seal around the opening of the lid. Accessory options are available. Manhole extensions and lid-riser combinations are offered to bring tank access up to code standards and to bring tank access up to code standards.

How To Find My Septic Tank

  1. What is a septic tank
  2. How do I know if I have a septic tank
  3. And how do I know if I have a septic tank Identifying the location of your septic tank is critical for several reasons. The Best Way to Find a Septic Tank
  4. What to Do Once You’ve Discovered Your Septic Tank

You may have fallen in love with your new house because of its appealing good looks and characteristics, but there is almost certainly more to your new home than meets the eye. In many cases, the characteristics that make your house run more effectively and allow you to live a pleasant, contemporary life are not readily apparent. Septic tanks, for example, are an important part of your home’s infrastructure. A septic system is responsible for regulating and managing the wastewater generated by your home.

  1. “How can I locate my septic tank?” is one of the most often requested inquiries we receive.
  2. When your tank’s lid is difficult to locate – especially if you are not the original homeowner – you may be at a loss for what to do or where to look for the lid when you need it.
  3. The majority of the time, all of the components of the septic tank are buried between four inches and four feet below ground level.
  4. In order to do so, it is necessary to first comprehend the functions of septic tanks and septic systems and why it is important to know where yours is located.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank

Your septic tank’s location is not a closely guarded secret. There will be a method for you to locate it and make a note of its position for future reference, and below are a few examples of such methods.

What Is a Septic Tank?

Having a functioning septic tank is an important aspect of having an effective septic system. In the United States, around 20% of households utilize a septic system to handle their wastewater. Houses in rural parts of New England are the most likely to have a septic system, with residences in the Eastern United States being the most prevalent location for septic systems. When there are few and far between residences, it is typically more efficient and cost-effective to employ a septic system to manage wastewater rather than relying on a public sewage system to handle waste water.

Typically, a septic tank is a container that is waterproof and composed of a material such as concrete, polyethylene, fiberglass, or a combination of these.

An important function of a septic tank is to hold on to wastewater until any particulates in the water separate themselves from the water.

Any liquid that remains in the tank eventually drains into a leach field or a drainfield, where it is known as “effluent.” The dirt in the leach field aids in the filtering of the water and the removal of bacteria, viruses, and other pollutants that may be present in it.

Septic tanks erected in Onondaga County must contain input and outlet baffles, as well as an effluent filter or sanitary tees, in order to effectively separate particles from liquids during the treatment process.

How Do I Know If I Have a Septic Tank?

Having a functioning septic tank is an important aspect of maintaining an effective septic system. A septic system is used to handle wastewater in around 20% of residences in the United States. Houses in rural parts of New England are the most likely to have a septic system, with residences in the eastern United States being the most prevalent location for septic systems. When there are few and far between residences, it is typically more efficient and cost-effective to employ a septic system to manage wastewater rather than relying on a public sewage system to handle waste water management.

  1. Typically, a septic tank is a container that is waterproof and composed of a material such as concrete, polyethylene, fiberglass, or any combination of these materials.
  2. The purpose of a septic tank is to hold on to wastewater until any particles in the water separate from the water and disappear.
  3. Any liquid that remains in the tank eventually drains into a leach field or a drainfield, where it becomes known as “effluent.” The dirt in the leach field aids in the filtering of the water and the removal of bacteria, viruses, and other pollutants that may have gotten into the system.
  4. For septic tanks erected in Onondaga County, baffles, an effluent filter, or sanitary tees must be installed to separate particles from liquids at the intake and output baffles.

Why It’s Important to Know the Location of Your Septic Tank

You might wonder why you should bother trying to discover out where your septic tank is. There are several important reasons for this:

1. To Be Able to Care for It Properly

You might wonder why you should bother figuring out where your septic tank is located. A few important causes for this include the following:

2. If You Want to Landscape or Remodel Your Property

If you want to build an addition to your home or perform some landscaping around your property, you will need to know where your septic tank is located. Nothing with deep or lengthy roots should be planted on top of or in the area of your tank, since this can cause problems. If roots are allowed to grow into the pipes of your septic system, it is conceivable that your system will get clogged. When you know where the tank is going to be, you may arrange your landscaping such that only shallow-rooted plants, such as grass, are in close proximity to the tank.

For starters, the tank’s weight might lead it to collapse due to the weight of the construction. A second issue is that getting access to the tank becomes more difficult if a permanent building has been constructed on top of it.

3. If a Problem With Your Tank Occurs

Knowing where your tank is buried might also assist you in identifying problems as soon as they arise. Consider the following scenario: you wake up one morning and see that there is flooding or ponding water in the region surrounding your septic tank – a sign that your system is overwhelmed and that an excessive amount of water is being utilized all at once.

4. Ease of Getting It Fixed

Once you have determined the location of your sewer system, you can quickly send a plumber to it in the event that something goes wrong with the system, saving everyone both time and money. Get in Touch With A Plumber Right Away

1. Use a Septic Tank Map

First and foremost, make use of a road map. Using a map is frequently the quickest and most convenient alternative. Most counties keep records of the installation of septic tanks at all of their residents’ residences. These maps should include schematics that illustrate the specific placement of the tank on the land, as well as measurements that allow you to measure and locate the tank’s exact location on the property. Never mind that landmarks may shift over time depending on when the tank was built, so if there are a few more shrubs or a tree nearby, don’t rule out that location as a possibility.

  • If you are unable to locate a map or other paperwork that identifies the location of your septic tank, there are a few locations to try to see if you can obtain a map of the area.
  • The county health department is responsible for keeping track of septic systems.
  • A septic tank’s position could be depicted on a survey map, for example.
  • The creation of your own map and documentation may be worthwhile if you cannot locate a map or blueprint of your property and nothing appears to be on file regarding it at the county health department or another municipal agency.

2. Follow the Pipes to Find Your Septic Tank

Whether or not there is an existing map of your septic tank on file, or whether or not you choose to develop one for future reference or for future homeowners, you will still need to track down and find the tank. One method of accomplishing this is to follow the sewer lines that lead away from your residence. The septic tank is situated along the sewage line that goes from your home and into the yard, as we’re sure you’re aware. Find a four-inch sewer pipe in your basement or crawl space. This is the line that will lead to your septic system and should be accessible from the ground level.

  • In general, though, you’re searching for a pipe with a diameter of four inches or more that leaves your home via a basement wall or ceiling.
  • By inserting a thin metal probe (also known as a soil probe) into the earth near the sewage line, you can track the pipe’s location.
  • The majority of septic tanks are located between 10 and 25 feet away from your home, and they cannot be any closer than five feet.
  • Going via the sewage line itself is another method of locating the septic tank utilizing it.
  • Drain snakes are typically used to unclog clogs in toilets and drains, and they may be used to do the same thing.
  • When the snake comes to a complete halt, it has almost certainly reached the tank.
  • While drawing the snake back, make a note of how far it has been extended and whether it has made any bends or turns.
  • When looking for your septic tank, you may use a transmitter that you flush down the toilet and it will direct you straight to the tank.

If you only want to keep an eye on the condition of your tank and don’t need to dig it up and inspect it, you may thread a pipe camera into the sewer pipe to see what’s happening.

3. Inspect Your Yard

Septic tanks are designed to be as unobtrusive as possible when they are erected. With the passage of time, and the growth of the grass, it might be difficult to discern the visual indications that indicated the exact location of your septic tank’s installation. However, this does not rule out the possibility of finding evidence that will take you to the location of your septic tank in the future. First and foremost, you want to rule out any potential locations for your septic tank, such as:

  • Under a road or similar paved surface, for example. Right up against the house (the tank must be at least five feet away)
  • Directly in front of the home Immediately adjacent to your well (if you have one)
  • In close proximity to trees or densely planted regions
  • In the shadow of a patio, deck, or other building
See also:  How Much Are Inlet And Outlet Baffles For A Septic Tank? (Question)

Once you’ve ruled out any potential locations for your tank, it’s time to start hunting for indications as to where it may be hiding in plain sight. Keep your eyes peeled as you go about your property, looking for any inexplicable high or low points that might suggest the presence of an underground tank. When looking at your property, you could see a hill or mound on the ground, which is frequently an indication that there is a septic tank nearby. One further item to consider while searching for the right septic tank for your home is the amount of grass or other foliage in your yard.

Alternatively, if the tank was not adequately buried, you may observe a “bald patch,” which is an area where the grass is struggling to grow in the vicinity.

4. Talk to Your Neighbors

If your neighbors have septic systems as well, they may be able to assist you in locating your tank. Inquire of your neighbors about the location of their septic tanks in relation to their residences. Having a polite conversation with your neighbors regarding septic systems not only provides you with a means to figure out where yours is, but it may also serve as a friendly introduction to the other residents of your community.

5. Look for Your Septic Tank Lid

It is only the first step in the process to discover where your septic tank is located. After you’ve located your tank, the following step is to locate the lid. You can locate it with the help of your soil probe. The majority of septic tanks are rectangular in shape and measure around five feet by eight feet. The perimeter of the tank should be marked with a probe once it has been probed around. A shallow excavation with a shovel within the tank’s perimeter and near the center (or broken into halves for a two compartment tank) should show the position of the lid or lids if you are unable to feel them by probing.

The tank itself is likely to be filled with foul-smelling vapors, if not potentially hazardous ones.

What to Do After You Find Your Septic Tank

Once you’ve determined where your tank is, it’s time to bring in the specialists. Trust us when we say that opening a septic tank is not something that just anybody wants to undertake. Concrete septic tank lids are extremely heavy and must be lifted using special lifting gear in order to be removed. Since the vapors are potentially dangerous due to the contents of the tank, please respect our advice and refrain from attempting to open the tank yourself. An exposed septic tank can be hazardous to anybody wandering around your property’s perimeter, and if someone were to fall into it, it might be lethal owing to the toxicity of the sewage in the tank.

However, before you send in a team of experienced plumbers, there are a few things you can do to ensure that others do not experience the same difficulty locating the tank and to make locating the tank in the future easier.

1. Mark Its Location

The likelihood is that you will not want to post a large sign in your yard that reads “Septic Tank Here!” but you will want to leave some sort of marking so that you can quickly locate the tank and lid when you need them. In an ideal situation, the marker will be substantial enough that it will not blow away in the wind and will not be readily moved by children who are playing in the yard. A patio paver, a potted plant, or a decorative gnome or rock are just a few of the possibilities. In addition to putting a physical sign beside the septic tank, you may draw a map or layout of the area around it to illustrate its position.

2. Take Care of Your Septic Tank

Taking proper care of your tank may save you hundreds of dollars over the course of its lifetime. The expense of maintaining your system could be a few hundred dollars every few years, but that’s a lot less than the thousands of dollars it might cost to repair or replace a damaged tank or a malfunctioning septic system. Two strategies to take better care of your septic tank and system are to avoid utilizing your drain pipes or toilets as garbage cans and to use less water overall. Things like paper towels, face wipes, and cat litter should not be flushed down the toilet since they are not designed to be flushed.

In addition, installing low-flow faucets and high-efficiency toilets can help you reduce the amount of water used in your home.

For example, you don’t want to be washing load after load of laundry or running your clothes washer at the same time as your dishwasher all at the same time.

Call a Professional Plumber

Maintenance of a septic system is not normally considered a do-it-yourself activity. In the Greater Syracuse region, whether your septic tank requires pumping out or cleaning, or if you want to replace your tank, you should use the services of a reputable plumbing firm to do the job right. If you’ve attempted to locate your septic tank on your own and are still unsure of its position, it may be necessary to enlist the assistance of a professional local plumber. Our team at Mr. Rooter Plumbing of Greater Syracuse can assist you with locating, maintaining, or replacing your home’s sewage tank.

Request an Estimate for the Job

How to Find Your Septic Tank

Over time, all septic tanks become clogged with sediments and must be pumped out in order to continue functioning properly. Septic tank lids are frequently located at ground level. The majority of the time, they have been buried anywhere between four inches and four feet underground. In the event that you have recently purchased a property and are unsure as to where your septic tank is located, this article will give instructions on how to identify your septic tank.

Noteworthy: While every property is unique, septic tanks are usually typically huge and difficult to build. As a result, and due to the fact that it requires constant pumping, you’re very certain to discover it in a location that can be reached by a huge truck while looking for it.

5 Ways to Find Your Septic Tank

1. Check with the municipal records. The most straightforward method of locating your septic tank is to review the building plans for your home that were approved by the local government. You should have received an application from the business that installed the septic tank, which should contain schematics and specifications that will help you to locate the precise location where the septic tank was installed. 2. Look for highs and lows in your data. The majority of septic tanks are constructed in such a way that they are barely noticeable.

  1. 3.
  2. Almost usually, your septic tank will be constructed near where the main sewage line exits your property.
  3. Septic tanks are typically positioned between ten and twenty-five feet away from a home’s foundation.
  4. When you do, that’s when your septic tank comes into play!
  5. Look for the Lid.
  6. You will most likely find two polyethylene or fiberglass covers positioned on opposing sides of the perimeter of your septic tank if it was built after 1975 and installed after 1975.
  7. Those areas should be excavated in order to disclose the lids.

Get in touch with the pros.

Lifting concrete lids will necessitate the use of specialized equipment.

A fall into an unprotected septic tank has the potential to be lethal.

Produce your own diagram of your yard, which you may file away with your other important house paperwork.

That’s all there is to it!

To book a plumbing service in Bastrop County, please contact us now!

How Your Septic System Works

Underground wastewater treatment facilities, known as septic systems, are often employed in rural regions where there are no centralized sewage lines. They clean wastewater from residential plumbing, such as that produced by bathrooms, kitchen drains, and laundry, by combining natural processes with well-established technology. A conventional septic system is comprised of two components: a septic tank and a drainfield, often known as a soil absorption field. It is the septic tank’s job to decompose organic matter and to remove floatable stuff (such as oils and grease) and solids from wastewater.

Alternate treatment systems rely on pumps or gravity to assist septic tank effluent in trickling through a variety of media such as sand, organic matter (e.g., peat and sawdust), constructed wetlands, or other media to remove or neutralize pollutants such as pathogens that cause disease, nitrogen, phosphorus, and other contaminants.

Prior to discharging wastewater into the environment, several alternative systems are designed to evaporate or disinfect the effluent.

Specifically, this is how a typical conventional septic system works:

  1. All of the water that leaves your home drains down a single main drainage pipe and into a septic tank. An underground, water-tight container, often composed of concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene, serves as a septic system’s holding tank. Its function is to retain wastewater for a long enough period of time to allow particles to sink to the bottom and form sludge, while oil and grease float to the surface and produce scum. Sludge and scum are prevented from exiting the tank and moving into the drainfield region by compartments and a T-shaped outlet. After that, the liquid wastewater (effluent) exits the tank and flows into the drainfield. The drainfield is a shallow, covered hole dug in unsaturated soil that serves as a drainage system. Porous surfaces are used to release pretreated wastewater because they allow the wastewater to pass through the soil and into the groundwater. In the process of percolating through the soil, wastewater is accepted, treated, and dispersed by the soil, finally discharging into groundwater. Finally, if the drainfield becomes overburdened with too much liquid, it can flood, causing sewage to flow to the ground surface or resulting in toilet backups and sink backups. Finally, wastewater percolates into the soil, where it is naturally removed of harmful coliform bacteria, viruses, and nutrients. Coliform bacteria are a kind of bacteria that may be found in the intestines of humans and other warm-blooded animals, with humans being the most common host. As a result of human fecal contamination, it is a sign of this.

The Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority has built an animated, interactive model of how a residential septic system works, which you can view here.

Do you have a septic system?

It’s possible that you’re already aware that you have a septic system. If you are not sure, here are some tell-tale symptoms that you most likely are:

  • You make use of well water. In your home, the water pipe that brings water into the house does not have a meter. In the case of a water bill or a property tax bill, you will see “$0.00 Sewer Amount Charged.” It is possible that your neighbors have a septic system

How to find your septic system

You can locate your septic system once you have confirmed that you have one by following these steps:

  • Taking a look at the “as constructed” drawing of your house
  • Making a visual inspection of your yard for lids and manhole covers
  • Getting in touch with a septic system service provider for assistance in locating it

Failure symptoms: Mind the signs!

A bad odor is not necessarily the first indicator of a septic system that is failing to work properly. Any of the following signs should prompt you to seek expert assistance:

  • Water backing up into the drains of homes and businesses
  • It is especially noticeable in dry weather that the drainfield grass is bright green and spongy. The presence of standing water or muddy soil near your septic system or in your basement
  • A strong stench emanating from the area surrounding the septic tank and drainfield

Plastic Septic Tanks

Plastic-Mart.com is one of the nation’s top suppliers of plastic septic tanks, offering a diverse selection of goods from the most dependable manufacturers in the business. When looking for a sewage holding tank for a residential or business installation, rotomolded plastic septic tanks made of polyethylene resins are an excellent choice. Our rotational molding technology creates better, stronger plastic tanks at a far lower cost than our competitors’ processes. We provide ribbed septic tanks for in-ground usage, as well as a large choice of other septic tank accessories.

Septic tanks are used for a variety of purposes, including holding tanks, waste storage tanks, and more.

We even offer plastic septic tanks that can be sent in as little as 48 hours, such as:

  • Plastic Septic Pump Tanks: 200 Gallon Plastic Septic Pump Tank
  • 300 Gallon Sphere Pump Tank
  • 500 Gallon Low Profile Plastic Septic Tank
  • 1000 Gallon 2 Compartment Plastic Septic Tank
  • 200 Gallon Low Profile Plastic Septic Pump Tank
See also:  How Much Does A 1500 Gallon Plastic Septic Tank Cost? (Solved)
As one of America’s leading septic tank suppliers, we have locations spread throughout the U.S. for pick up and we offer direct drop ship straight to your door as well. Email or give us a call toll free at866-310-2556for plastic septic tank selection assistance.NORWESCO BELOW GROUND TANKS – Conversion OptionInformationSelecting an installation site for your Plastic Septic TankPlastic-Mart offers rotationally molded polyethylene septic tanks fromNorwesco, Rotonics,Ace-Roto MoldSnyder Industries. If you have any questions or would like to buy a septic tank you can do so online or call our sales department toll free at866-310-2556.

Septic Tank Installation and Pricing

To process and dispose of waste, a septic system has an underground septic tank constructed of plastic, concrete, fiberglass, or other material that is located beneath the earth. Designed to provide a customized wastewater treatment solution for business and residential locations, this system may be installed anywhere. Although it is possible to construct a septic tank on your own, we recommend that you hire a professional to do it owing to the amount of skill and specific equipment required.

Who Needs a Septic Tank?

For the most part, in densely populated areas of the nation, a home’s plumbing system is directly connected to the municipal sewer system. Because municipal sewer lines are not readily available in more rural regions, sewage must be treated in a septic tank. If you’re moving into a newly constructed house or onto land that doesn’t already have a septic tank, you’ll be responsible for putting in a septic system on your own.

How to Prepare for Your Septic Tank Installation

Here are a few pointers to keep in mind to make sure your septic tank installation goes as smoothly as possible.

Receive Multiple Estimates

Receiving quotations from licensed septic tank installers and reading reviews about each firm using trustworthy, third-party customer evaluations should be done before any excavation or signing of any paperwork is done.

Examine your options for a contractor and make sure they have the appropriate insurance and license, as well as the ability to include critical preparations such as excavation and drain field testing in their quotation.

Test the Soil and Obtain a Permit

For septic systems to function properly, permeable soil surrounding the tank must absorb and naturally handle liquid waste, ensuring that it does not pollute runoff water or seep into the groundwater. The drain or leach field is the name given to this region. Before establishing a septic tank, you are required by law to do a percolation test, sometimes known as a “perc” test. This test indicates that the soil fits the specifications established by the city and the local health agency. In most cases, suitable levels of permeable materials, such as sand or gravel, are necessary in a soil’s composition.

Note: If you wish to install a septic tank on your property, you must first ensure that the ground passes the percolation test.

Plan for Excavation

Excavation of the vast quantity of land required for a septic tank necessitates the use of heavy machinery. If you are presently residing on the property, be careful to account for landscaping fees to repair any damage that may have occurred during the excavation process. Plan the excavation for your new home at a period when it will have the least influence on the construction process if you are constructing a new home. Typically, this occurs before to the paving of roads and walkways, but after the basic structure of the home has been constructed and erected.

The Cost of Installing a Septic Tank

There are a few installation charges and additional expenditures connected with constructing a new septic system, ranging from a percolation test to emptying the septic tank and everything in between.

Percolation Test

A percolation test can range in price from $250 to $1,000, depending on the area of the property and the soil characteristics that are being tested. Ordinarily, specialists will only excavate a small number of holes in the intended leach field region; however, if a land study is required to identify where to excavate, the cost of your test may rise.

Building Permit Application

A permit will be required if you want to install a septic tank on your property. State-by-state variations in permit prices exist, however they are normally priced around $200 and must be renewed every few years on average.

Excavation and Installation

When you have passed a percolation test and obtained a building permit, your septic tank is ready to be professionally placed. The cost of a new septic system is determined by the size of your home, the kind of system you choose, and the material used in your septic tank. The following is a list of the many treatment methods and storage tanks that are now available, as well as the normal pricing associated with each.

Types of Septic Tank Systems

Septic system that is used in the traditional sense Traditionally, a septic system relies on gravity to transport waste from the home into the septic tank. Solid trash settles at the bottom of the sewage treatment plant, while liquid sewage rises to the top. Whenever the amount of liquid sewage increases over the outflow pipe, the liquid waste is discharged into the drain field, where it continues to disintegrate. This type of traditional septic system is generally the most economical, with an average cost of roughly $3,000 on the market today.

Drain fields for alternative systems require less land than conventional systems and discharge cleaner effluent.

Septic system that has been engineered A poorly developed soil or a property placed on an uphill slope need the installation of an engineered septic system, which is the most difficult to install.

It is necessary to pump the liquid waste onto a leach field, rather than depending on gravity to drain it, in order to ensure that it is equally dispersed across the land. The average cost of these systems is roughly $8,000.

Types of Septic Tanks

  • Concrete septic tanks are long-lasting and rust-proof, but they are difficult to repair if they are damaged. It is possible that concrete tanks will cost up to $2,000 depending on their size. Plastic —While plastic tanks are cost-effective, they are also susceptible to damage. They are around $1,200 in price. Fiberglass —While fiberglass septic tanks are more durable than their plastic counterparts, they are susceptible to shifting or displacement if the water table rises to an excessive level. Depending on the model, these tanks may cost up to $2,000

More information may be found at: Septic Warranty Coverage and Costs.

Using Your Septic Tank

It is important to maintain the area around your new septic tank’s drain field and to frequently check your tank using the lids included with it. Never use a trash disposal in conjunction with your septic tank since it might cause the system to clog. Additionally, avoid driving over the land where your septic tank is located or putting heavy gear on top of your septic tank or drain field to prevent damage. Most of the time, after five years of septic system use, you’ll need to arrange a cleaning and pumping of the system.

Send an email to our Reviews Team [email protected] if you have any comments or questions regarding this post.

Above Ground Septic Tanks

Septic holding tanks, job trailer waste tanks, job trailer septic tanks, job shack tanks, waste tanks, trailer waste tanks, camper septic tanks, cottage septic tanks, and motorhome septic tanks are all terms used to describe above-ground septic tanks. Septic tanks have not been certified by the Food and Drug Administration to store or carry drinkable water, and thus should not be utilized for this purpose. Their major function is to hold human waste, sewage, and black water in a contained environment.

  • Recreational vehicles, mobile homes, cottages, campsites, job trailers, and job shacks are all examples of structures where septic tanks are the only available option.
  • The majority of the time, they are employed as portable black water tanks.
  • These plastic trash tanks are made from high-density virgin polyethylene resin that has been rotationally manufactured.
  • The use of UV inhibitors during the manufacture process protects the tank from sun damage, allowing it to be used either indoors or outdoors without deterioration.
  • These advantageous characteristics help to ensure that the tanks have a long and effective lifespan.
  • They do not require any particular equipment to carry, and they may be moved into position by two individuals working together.
  • Above-ground septic tanks are available in a variety of sizes, ranging from 250 gallons to 440 gallons in volume capacity.
  • They are opaque and are available in two colors: black and gray.

There are septic tanks on the market that come with a cover or with ports already attached. Any additional connections, ports, or lids that are required for the tanks can be installed. Every septic tank is also protected by a three-year guarantee provided by the manufacturer.

Septic Tank Repair Atlanta GA – Septic System Repair Near Me

Septic tank or system failure is the last thing that any homeowner or business owner wants to deal with on a daily basis. It does, however, happen from time to time, which is regrettable. It is important to know that the crew you call will be prepared to give you with the highest quality septic tank repair Atlanta has to offer when the time comes. This necessitates contacting Septic Masters. We service and repair septic systems across the Metro region, and you will not find a more dedicated or better-informed customer care team anywhere else in town.

Septic Tank Repair Atlanta GA

All aspects of your septic system, including the pump and drain field, may be repaired by our team of experts at Septic Masters. We recognize that the health of your entire home is dependent on the operation of your septic system. As a matter of fact, we believe it is the very last thing you need be concerned about. Nonetheless, if you are experiencing difficulties, we want to make certain that the situation is rectified as quickly as possible. Some of the warning indications that your septic system is malfunctioning are as follows:

  • If you have sewage backing up inside your home, call an emergency plumber. In your yard, there is a pool of water, particularly near where the septic tank is located
  • A rotten egg stench, whether inside or outside your home
  • There is more sponginess in the grass surrounding the tank compared to the rest of the yard. drainage that is slow or sluggish

In the event that you detect any of these problems, there is no need to be alarmed. Septic Masters provides excellent septic servicing, pumping, and repair, and we are always here to assist you with your needs.

Septic Tank Repair Near Me

Do not put off septic system repairs any longer than absolutely necessary. Emergency service is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week throughout Atlanta and the surrounding metro region. This includes Gwinnett and Hall counties, Barrow and Forsyth counties, and other nearby counties. Contact our professionals immediately to benefit from a first-class client experience as well as the septic system repairs that you require.

Septic Tank Pumping Atlanta GA – Septic Tank Pumping Near Me

Septic tanks may appear to be vast, but the fact is that they must be pumped out on a regular basis in order to function properly. It is possible that your tank will exceed its maximum capacity, resulting in backups and other problems that you do not want or need to deal with. The company Septic Masters steps in to help with this. In the event that you want septic tank pumping in Atlanta or the surrounding region, our crew is prepared to supply you with prompt, efficient, and five-star service.

Septic Tank Pumping Atlanta GA

When septic tanks reach their maximum capacity, they require the services of a professional to pump out the waste and restore them to proper operation. Despite the fact that it is a nasty job, someone has to do it, and you want to be confident that the expert you are depending on will complete the work correctly the first time. In Atlanta, such professionals are the members of the Septic Masters team that specialize in septic tank pumping services.

When Should I Have My Septic Tank Pumped?

A septic tank pumping is recommended every three to five years, depending on the size of your tank. Maintenance costs are incurred in this manner, and we have discovered that they are rather normal for a family of three to five persons. There can be times when you will require your tank to be pumped in between scheduled servicing visits. However, if you are having any problems with your septic system, it is advisable to have them fixed as quickly as possible in order to avoid backups or other septic system concerns.

Additionally, if you have more than five people living in your home, it is wise to get it pumped on a more frequent basis.

Septic Tank Pumping Near Me

Septic Masters offers a comprehensive range of septic tank services in Atlanta for both residential and business customers. What distinguishes Septic Masters as the most reputable septic tank pumping service in Atlanta? What sets us apart from the competition is simply the mix of high-quality septic tank pumping and unparalleled customer service. When you call Septic Masters, you can be assured that your septic system is in good hands. Contact us immediately to set up an appointment for your next septic tank pumping service.

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