Where Do I Put A Septic Tank On My Property? (Correct answer)

Often septic tanks are located close to buildings (perhaps 10 feet away) in areas where there appears to be space for the tank and adequate soil depth, but at a problem site such as a house built on a rock cliff or on a steep slope, the tank may have been located at some distance.

  • Well, when it comes to having either a septic tank or field, you need to have it placed at least five feet away from your home. However, most tanks are placed even farther, commonly around 10 feet away in most cases and the leach fields are placed at around twenty feet away from the home.

How do I decide where to put my septic tank?

Ideally, a septic tank should be placed on level ground. If possible, the tank should be placed on high ground in order to avoid flooding and seeping. It will be important that you look around and avoid steep slopes or areas of dense tree roots that can damage your entire system.

How far away should a septic tank be from the house?

Local codes and regulations that stipulate the distance of the septic tank from the house vary depending on the locale, but the typical minimum distance is 10 feet.

Can a mound system be put anywhere?

It costs a great deal of money to install these systems, but they can be placed anywhere. A mound septic system has no container, and digging too far gets you too close to the water table. This means instead of digging down you have to dig out.

Can you build a deck over a septic tank?

You should never build a deck over a septic field; doing so will prevent the natural draining and dissipation of the effluent. This can ruin the septic system, not to mention releasing foul smells into the air all around your deck. The dissipating effluent can also rot the deck from underneath.

Are septic tanks still legal?

Septic Tanks Explained… Septic tanks cannot discharge to surface water drains, rivers, canals, ditches, streams or any other type of waterway. you are required to upgrade or replace your septic tank treatment system to a full sewage treatment plant by 2020, or when you sell a property, if it’s prior to this date.

How deep is the septic tank outlet pipe?

After the solids settle out, effluent leaves the septic tank through the outlet pipe and flows to the drain field. The outlet pipe should be approximately 3 inches below the inlet pipe.

What are the signs that your septic tank is full?

Here are some of the most common warning signs that you have a full septic tank:

  • Your Drains Are Taking Forever.
  • Standing Water Over Your Septic Tank.
  • Bad Smells Coming From Your Yard.
  • You Hear Gurgling Water.
  • You Have A Sewage Backup.
  • How often should you empty your septic tank?

What is the difference between a mound system and a septic system?

Mound systems are an alternative to the traditional rural septic system drain field. They are used in areas where septic systems are prone to failure from extremely permeable or impermeable soils, soil with the shallow cover over porous bedrock, and terrain that features a high water table.

Can you have a septic tank without a leach field?

The waste from most septic tanks flows to a soakaway system or a drainage field. If your septic tank doesn’t have a drainage field or soakaway system, the waste water will instead flow through a sealed pipe and empty straight into a ditch or a local water course.

Can you walk on a septic mound?

Low-maintenance perennial plants that minimize the need to walk on the mound are ideal. Walking compacts the soil and may interfere with the evaporation of effluents. Do as little digging as possible when planting to avoid disturbing the mound and be sure to wear gloves to minimize your physical contact with the soil.

Can I put pavers over septic tank?

You can’t build a paver patio on top of a septic tank, and doing so could be against the planning laws of your state or local area. Septic tanks can take very little weight without getting damaged, and you’ll also need access to the tank in the future too. You shouldn’t build a deck on one either.

How close to a septic tank can I build a patio?

It is usually not a good idea to build a deck near or on top of a septic tank. Most zoning ordinances will require that you maintain at least a 5′ setback from an underground septic system.

Can I pour concrete over a septic tank?

Paving Over Your Septic Tank You should never pave over your septic tank. Although soil compaction is not a major issue for septic tanks, there are other dangers presented by placing an insecure septic tank underneath concrete and heavy vehicles. This is particularly the case for old, reused septic tanks.

Septic Tank Installation and Pricing

To process and dispose of waste, a septic system has an underground septic tank constructed of plastic, concrete, fiberglass, or other material that is located beneath the earth. Designed to provide a customized wastewater treatment solution for business and residential locations, this system may be installed anywhere. Although it is possible to construct a septic tank on your own, we recommend that you hire a professional to do it owing to the amount of skill and specific equipment required.

Who Needs a Septic Tank?

For the most part, in densely populated areas of the nation, a home’s plumbing system is directly connected to the municipal sewer system. Because municipal sewer lines are not readily available in more rural regions, sewage must be treated in a septic tank. If you’re moving into a newly constructed house or onto land that doesn’t already have a septic tank, you’ll be responsible for putting in a septic system on your own.

How to Prepare for Your Septic Tank Installation

Here are a few pointers to keep in mind to make sure your septic tank installation goes as smoothly as possible.

Receive Multiple Estimates

Receiving quotations from licensed septic tank installers and reading reviews about each firm using trustworthy, third-party customer evaluations should be done before any excavation or signing of any paperwork is done. Examine your options for a contractor and make sure they have the appropriate insurance and license, as well as the ability to include critical preparations such as excavation and drain field testing in their quotation.

Test the Soil and Obtain a Permit

For septic systems to function properly, permeable soil surrounding the tank must absorb and naturally handle liquid waste, ensuring that it does not pollute runoff water or seep into the groundwater. The drain or leach field is the name given to this region. Before establishing a septic tank, you are required by law to do a percolation test, sometimes known as a “perc” test. This test indicates that the soil fits the specifications established by the city and the local health agency. In most cases, suitable levels of permeable materials, such as sand or gravel, are necessary in a soil’s composition.

Note: If you wish to install a septic tank on your property, you must first ensure that the ground passes the percolation test.

Plan for Excavation

Excavation of the vast quantity of land required for a septic tank necessitates the use of heavy machinery. If you are presently residing on the property, be careful to account for landscaping fees to repair any damage that may have occurred during the excavation process. Plan the excavation for your new home at a period when it will have the least influence on the construction process if you are constructing a new home.

Typically, this occurs before to the paving of roads and walkways, but after the basic structure of the home has been constructed and erected. Adobe Licensed (Adobe Licensed)

The Cost of Installing a Septic Tank

There are a few installation charges and additional expenditures connected with constructing a new septic system, ranging from a percolation test to emptying the septic tank and everything in between.

Percolation Test

The cost of constructing a new septic system includes a variety of fees and expenditures ranging from a percolation test to emptying the septic tank, among other things.

Building Permit Application

A permit will be required if you want to install a septic tank on your property. State-by-state variations in permit prices exist, however they are normally priced around $200 and must be renewed every few years on average.

Excavation and Installation

It is necessary to get a permission in order to construct a septic tank on your site. State-by-state variations in permit prices exist, although they are normally priced around $200 and must be renewed every few years at the very least.

Types of Septic Tank Systems

Septic system that is used in the traditional sense Traditionally, a septic system relies on gravity to transport waste from the home into the septic tank. Solid trash settles at the bottom of the sewage treatment plant, while liquid sewage rises to the top. Whenever the amount of liquid sewage increases over the outflow pipe, the liquid waste is discharged into the drain field, where it continues to disintegrate. This type of traditional septic system is generally the most economical, with an average cost of roughly $3,000 on the market today.

Drain fields for alternative systems require less land than conventional systems and discharge cleaner effluent.

Septic system that has been engineered A poorly developed soil or a property placed on an uphill slope need the installation of an engineered septic system, which is the most difficult to install.

It is necessary to pump the liquid waste onto a leach field, rather than depending on gravity to drain it, in order to ensure that it is equally dispersed across the land.

Types of Septic Tanks

  • Septic system that is conventional Traditionally, a septic system relies on gravity to transport waste from the home to a holding tank. From there, the sewage is divided into layers, with solid waste settling at the bottom and liquid sewage rising to the top of the separation process. When liquid sewage reaches to the level of the outflow pipe, the liquid waste goes into the drain field, where it decomposes even more quickly than before. Standard septic systems are often the most economical, with an average cost of roughly $3,000 to install. Septic system alternatives Instead of employing naturally existing bacteria to break down waste, alternative septic systems use oxygen to accomplish so. An alternative septic system collects sewage in the same manner as a conventional system. When using alternate technologies, drain fields typically take up less space and discharge cleaner effluent. But this advantage comes at the expense of a higher price, with systems typically costing approximately $12,000 to purchase. Septic system that has been engineered. A poorly developed soil or a property placed on an uphill slope need the installation of an engineered septic system, which is the most difficult of the three. Engineered systems collect and segregate waste in a tank in the same way as alternative and traditional septic systems do. Instead of depending on gravity to drain the liquid waste, it is necessary to pump the waste into the leach field in order for it to be equally dispersed over the land surface. The average cost of these systems is around $8,000.

More information may be found at: Septic Warranty Coverage and Costs.

Using Your Septic Tank

It is important to maintain the area around your new septic tank’s drain field and to frequently check your tank using the lids included with it. Never use a trash disposal in conjunction with your septic tank since it might cause the system to clog. Additionally, avoid driving over the land where your septic tank is located or putting heavy gear on top of your septic tank or drain field to prevent damage. Most of the time, after five years of septic system use, you’ll need to arrange a cleaning and pumping of the system.

Consequently, there will be no accumulation of solid waste that will leach into the surrounding soil or groundwater. Send an email to our Reviews Team [email protected] if you have any comments or questions regarding this post.

Buying Vacant Land: Will You Need a Septic System?

Have you discovered the ideal plot of land on which to construct your dream home? Great! Although you may be satisfied to use an outhouse, you should investigate if a sewer system is already in place on the land, or whether you will be required to establish a sewer system. The response will have an impact on not just your overall plans for the property, but also on your building timetable and budget, among other things.

Is the Property Served by a Sewer?

The first question to ask is whether or not the property is already served by a sewer system. A septic system will be required in this case. The simplest approach to find out is to speak with the seller of the land or, if there is a real estate agent involved, ask them. If no one is immediately accessible to inquire, you can hunt for hints on your own if no one else is. Given that municipal water is readily available on the property, it’s likely that the property is also served by a sewage collection and treatment system.

Consequently, if the property is located in a city, township, or a densely populated region, a public sewer system is most likely available.

Aside from that, if the property is huge and spread out over many acres (for example, land suited for a ranch or a farm), it will almost certainly require its own septic system.

Costs of Connecting to and Using an Existing Sewer System

Whether or not the property is already served by a sewer system is the first question to be addressed. Septic systems are required in this case. To discover out, the simplest method is to inquire with the land’s seller or, if one is involved, with a local real estate agent. Alternatively, if there isn’t somebody accessible to inquire right away, you can search for clues on your own. Given that municipal water is readily available on the property, it’s likely that the property is also served by a sewage collection and treatment facility.

For this reason and since public sewer systems are more likely to exist in urban and suburban areas than rural areas, the property in question should be considered urban or suburban in character.

In addition, if it is a big, multi-acre property (for example, land appropriate for a ranch or a farm), it will almost certainly require its own septic system to function properly.

If the Property Isn’t Served by a Sewer: Regulations on Septic Systems

If you are required to establish a septic system (since there is no sewer system available on the property), this will take more time and money than just connecting to a sewage system. The construction and maintenance of septic systems are governed by state and municipal legislation in nearly every jurisdiction since failed septic systems are a major source of water contamination (as a result of germs invading adjacent water supplies). Before you can establish a septic system, you must first verify that you are in compliance with all applicable regulations.

See also:  How Much Is It To Convert A Septic Tank To Sewer? (Correct answer)

A site evaluation is typically necessary prior to the issuance of a septic permit.

A professional site evaluator or engineering company may do them for you, or the local health agency can do it for you.

What the Site Evaluation Will Tell You

It will be determined by the findings of the site evaluation whether you will be able to construct a conventional (gravity-fed) septic system or whether an alternative system will be necessary. Alternative septic systems are basically modified versions of conventional septic systems that are particularly designed to operate with the soils and terrain present on a particular site. Alternative septic systems are also known as bioretention systems. As a consequence of the site evaluation, if the results indicate that your property is inappropriate for a traditional septic system, an engineer or an expert in septic design will need to develop an alternate system.

It is possible that alternative systems will be many times more expensive than a traditional system.

Make Sure You Have Enough Room Left for the Home

Septic rules also dictate where a septic system may be placed on a property and how large the system can be. It is required that septic systems be placed back a specific amount of distance from wells and other sources of water as well as from roads, driveways, buildings, and other structures as well as from property borders. These limitations might have a significant influence on where you can build your house. You must guarantee that there will be enough space to put the septic system in a good place, as well as a well (if necessary), and that there will be enough space to build the size of home you wish in an acceptable location when all of this is completed.

Protecting Your Interests Within the Purchase Contract

A site evaluation may have a significant influence on how much money a property is worth, thus it is smart to condition the acquisition of any unoccupied land without sewage connection on having an approved site report. Having the option to negotiate the purchase price or even cancel the contract if the findings of the site evaluation are unsatisfactory will be important to your success.

The inclusion of such a contingency in your purchase contract should be made possible by the assistance of an expert real estate attorney.

How Far Should You Put the Septic Tank From the House?

Image courtesy of Kwangmoozaa/iStock/Getty Images.

In This Article

  • Amount of distance from the home
  • Basic safety concerns
  • Suggestions for a successful installation

For those who don’t have access to a municipal sewage system, an alternate solution, such as a septic tank and field lines, will be required. The design and operation of these systems are fairly straightforward. When designing a septic system, you must keep in mind the requirements of local construction codes as well as public health concerns.

Tip

Depending on where you live, local ordinances and regulations that specify the distance between the septic tank and the home vary. However, the normal minimum distance is 10 feet between the two structures. Consult your local ordinances and regulations for a detailed answer as to how far your septic tank must be installed from your home. Requirements differ from one location to the next, although the standard minimum distance from the home is 10 feet in most cases. In the case of a private well for drinking water, however, keep in mind that many state departments of health demand a minimum distance of 50 feet between a new septic tank and a well.

It is possible that the septic tank will be placed considerably closer to the structure since it will be easier and require less plumbing in some cases.

Basic Safety Considerations

If you’re the type of person who prefers to do things on their own, there are certain important measures you should take before starting this endeavor. Before you start digging the hole for the tank, call your local utility providers to find out where the service lines are located. A gas line, water line, phone line, or electrical connection that has been severed is not only potentially dangerous, but it may also be extremely expensive to repair. Once you have finished excavating the hole, proceed with caution.

It’s also important to understand that a concrete septic tank can weigh up to 5 tons.

Make sure the hole is available when the tank is delivered so that it can be installed straight in the desired location.

Tips for a Successful Installation

Plan ahead of time to get your water supply switched on prior to installing your septic tank. You must fill the tank with water as soon as it is placed in its final position for this to be possible. This has absolutely nothing to do with the septic system itself, but it is a prudent precaution. In the event of a heavy downpour, the groundwater may swell and a septic tank may float out of the ground, even if it has been buried. If this occurs, contact a qualified professional immediately. Repairing any damage done to the lines or to the tank itself, as well as putting the tank back in its original location, may be a costly and time-consuming endeavor.

Initially, you may be confident that you will remember the exact location of the marker when it is time to top up the tank — which is generally every three to five years — but your memory may fade over time.

In the absence of a marker, you may end up digging holes in the wrong place when it is time to service the tank.

How to Tell If You Can Install a Septic System

Before acquiring a lot, take into consideration if the property has access to a sewer system – or whether it does not. Identifying whether or not the site will require a septic system or other wastewater treatment can make a significant impact in the kind of activities you can carry out on the property. The following are a few methods for determining whether or not your property will require a septic system or an alternate wastewater management system:

Does the Property Have Any Access to Municipal Sewer Lines?

If your property does not have access to municipal sewer services, you will be required to install a septic system. You can find out if this is the case by speaking with the vendor about the situation. Obtaining drawings, blueprints, or property documents can also assist you in determining whether or not the property has connection to the city sewer system. If your property is bordered by other buildings or houses, you may be able to inquire as to whether or not they are using a septic system or the sewer system for disposal.

In contrast, if the lot has a significant amount of land, is located outside of the town borders, or is located in an unpopulated location, you will almost certainly require a septic system.

Does the Property Have Public or Private Road Access Issues?

Is it possible to get to the unoccupied land through a public road? Is the land bordered by property that is held by another person? In some cases, access concerns might prevent you from connecting to public utilities. For example, if you have to travel via private roads to get to the property, sewer lines must likewise travel through private roads. When the majority of the lines must pass through private land, towns are less likely to expand their boundaries. Similarly, expanding out too far from the lot in order to try to reach the municipal boundaries might result in high construction costs and significant construction challenges.

It is possible that you may have to arrange an easement with your neighbor if your property is landlocked.

In contrast, requesting permission from a neighbor to lay a sewage line across their property will result in far more red tape, contractual duties, and other complications.

Septic systems may be required in some cases because to public and private access difficulties, rather than just being an option in other cases.

Does the Property Have the Permissions for Septic System Installation?

There are many different types of septic systems available, but many jurisdictions have rigorous laws and regulations in place surrounding them. For example, the state of Pennsylvania has septic system restrictions that apply across the whole state. In addition, local governments such as municipalities, boroughs, and townships have their own set of rules and laws. According to local ordinances, the type of septic system you may use, the location in which it can be installed, and the method by which you can install it on your land may all be restricted.

It is possible that the property may not be able to support a septic system at all and will require an alternate solution. Some scenarios that may result in an outright rejection to allow for the construction of a septic system are as follows:

  • There is insufficient room to fit the system. There are no suitable areas that are not too near to water supplies or other properties
  • Land fails soil testing, and there is no way to remediate the soil
  • Site conditions are deplorable, and there is no way to improve them

When soil testing results in a negative result, obtaining a permit to construct a septic system is almost always impossible. The soil drainage rate will be determined by the test, which is also known as a perc test. In order to function properly, septic systems must have adequate leech field drainage. If the drainage rate of your land does not satisfy the criteria of the town, you will be unable to establish a septic system. This does not rule out the possibility of building anything on the site at all, but it does rule out anything that may be used as a residence or place of business.

In rare situations, it may be possible to have the soil tested in a different location on the property.

If you find the information supplied by the municipality to be unintelligible, you can seek more clarification by doing web searches and posing questions to the municipality.

In addition to excavation, Walters Environmental Services also provides professional septic system services such as perc testing, system design, and other services.

How Your Septic System Works

Underground wastewater treatment facilities, known as septic systems, are often employed in rural regions where there are no centralized sewage lines. They clean wastewater from residential plumbing, such as that produced by bathrooms, kitchen drains, and laundry, by combining natural processes with well-established technology. A conventional septic system is comprised of two components: a septic tank and a drainfield, often known as a soil absorption field. It is the septic tank’s job to decompose organic matter and to remove floatable stuff (such as oils and grease) and solids from wastewater.

Alternate treatment systems rely on pumps or gravity to assist septic tank effluent in trickling through a variety of media such as sand, organic matter (e.g., peat and sawdust), constructed wetlands, or other media to remove or neutralize pollutants such as pathogens that cause disease, nitrogen, phosphorus, and other contaminants.

Specifically, this is how a typical conventional septic system works:

  1. All of the water that leaves your home drains down a single main drainage pipe and into a septic tank. An underground, water-tight container, often composed of concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene, serves as a septic system’s holding tank. Its function is to retain wastewater for a long enough period of time to allow particles to sink to the bottom and form sludge, while oil and grease float to the surface and produce scum. Sludge and scum are prevented from exiting the tank and moving into the drainfield region by compartments and a T-shaped outlet. After that, the liquid wastewater (effluent) exits the tank and flows into the drainfield. The drainfield is a shallow, covered hole dug in unsaturated soil that serves as a drainage system. Porous surfaces are used to release pretreated wastewater because they allow the wastewater to pass through the soil and into the groundwater. In the process of percolating through the soil, wastewater is accepted, treated, and dispersed by the soil, finally discharging into groundwater. Finally, if the drainfield becomes overburdened with too much liquid, it can flood, causing sewage to flow to the ground surface or resulting in toilet backups and sink backups. Finally, wastewater percolates into the soil, where it is naturally removed of harmful coliform bacteria, viruses, and nutrients. Coliform bacteria are a kind of bacteria that may be found in the intestines of humans and other warm-blooded animals, with humans being the most common host. As a result of human fecal contamination, it is a sign of this.

A septic tank is where all of the water drains from your home through a single main drainage line. An underground, watertight container, often built of concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene, serves as a septic system’s holding tank. Its role is to retain wastewater for a long enough period of time to allow particles to settle to the bottom and form sludge, while oil and grease float to the surface and produce scum. It is also known as a settling tank. T-shaped outlets and compartments prevent sludge and scum from exiting the tank and migrating into the drainfield region.

An excavation built in unsaturated soil, the drainfield is shallow and covered.

As wastewater percolates through the soil and eventually discharges into groundwater, the soil takes, processes, and disperses it.

Finally, wastewater percolates into the soil, where it is naturally removed of harmful coliform bacteria, viruses, and nutrients.

When it comes to bacteria, the term “coliform” refers to those that live in the digestive tracts of humans and other warm-blooded animals. As a result of human fecal contamination, it is an indicator of contamination.

Do you have a septic system?

It’s possible that you’re already aware that you have a septic system. If you are not sure, here are some tell-tale symptoms that you most likely are:

  • You make use of well water. In your home, the water pipe that brings water into the house does not have a meter. In the case of a water bill or a property tax bill, you will see “$0.00 Sewer Amount Charged.” It is possible that your neighbors have a septic system
See also:  How Big Does A Septic Tank Have To Be For 3 Bathrooms? (TOP 5 Tips)

How to find your septic system

You can locate your septic system once you have confirmed that you have one by following these steps:

  • Taking a look at the “as constructed” drawing of your house
  • Making a visual inspection of your yard for lids and manhole covers
  • Getting in touch with a septic system service provider for assistance in locating it

Failure symptoms: Mind the signs!

A bad odor is not necessarily the first indicator of a septic system that is failing to work properly. Any of the following signs should prompt you to seek expert assistance:

  • Water backing up into the drains of homes and businesses
  • It is especially noticeable in dry weather that the drainfield grass is bright green and spongy. The presence of standing water or muddy soil near your septic system or in your basement
  • A strong stench emanating from the area surrounding the septic tank and drainfield

Can Your Septic Tank Be Under the House?

Do you want to know if it is possible to put a septic tank below a house? The answer is a resounding nay. The following are three reasons why septic tanks should never be built beneath residential structures:

  1. Your house will smell like rotten eggs: Septic tanks are meant to collect and handle waste after it has been discharged from your residence. It is possible to have a tank full of trash beneath your home, which can result in a variety of problems, including severe smells. Septic services will be difficult to come by, as follows: Septic tanks must be examined and pumped on a regular basis by licensed plumbers. During the course of these services, your plumber will have to dig up the earth. It is necessary to excavate the foundation of the home and the land underneath it in order to reach the septic tank if it is located under the house. Your health might be jeopardized if you don’t act quickly: Despite the fact that septic tanks are durable and long-lasting systems, it is possible for them to be compromised. In the event that your system gets broken and begins to seep waste into the ground beneath your house, you and your family may find yourself unexpectedly living in a very poisonous environment. If this occurs, you should seek immediate medical attention.

How Far Away Should a Septic Tank Be from the House?

However, the minimum distance required between a house and its septic tank can vary depending on where you live. Generally speaking, septic tanks should be between 10 and 20 feet away from a residence (at least). If you are utilizing a well or if you reside near a stream, lake, road, swimming pool, or reservoir, you will need to take additional precautionary measures. If you have a well on your property, your septic tank will most likely need to be at least 50 feet away from it in order to function properly.

Call The Plumbing Experts for All Things Septic Tanks!

When it comes to septic tank services, no one is more qualified than The Plumbing Experts to do the task. As the most trusted brand in plumbing, we have a wealth of knowledge and expertise in septic tank maintenance and repair, and we are here to ensure that yours is operating properly and effectively. Our highly trained plumbers have received thorough training and are committed to doing the task correctly on the first attempt. The following are some of our septic tank services:

  • Septic tank inspections, septic tank pumping, septic tank installs, septic tank repairs, and septic tank replacements are all services that are provided by our company.

The Plumbing Experts is the company to call when you want trustworthy service you can count on. Please contact us by phone at (864) 210-3127 or by email to find out more about how we can help you with your septic tank. We look forward to being of service to you!

How to Locate Your Septic Tank

It may seem impossible to imagine that one of the largest and most visible elements of your whole plumbing system is also one of the most difficult to locate, but when your property is served by a septic system, this is perfectly true. A strong explanation for this is because septic tanks are huge, unattractive, stink horrible and give off an unwarranted impression of dirt. Not only does burying them underground assist to prevent them from harm, but it also provides you with additional useable space on your property and conceals what would otherwise be a blight on your landscape.

This site is dedicated to assisting you in locating your septic system without the need for any time-consuming digging.

How To Find A Septic Tank: Step By Step

It is critical to maintain the health of your septic tank since it is responsible for securely storing and handling the wastewater that drains from your house. It is necessary to pump your septic tank once every 1-3 years, depending on the number of people living in your household and the size of your tank, in order to avoid septic tank repairs or early failure, which means you must be familiar with the location of your tank. It’s not often simple to identify your septic tank, and many plumbers charge extra for this service, which is especially true if your tank’s lid is buried beneath.

The Plumbing Experts have put out all you need to know about locating the septic tank on your property in this blog post for your convenience.

1. Gather Some Helpful Tools

Septic tank location may be made much easier with the use of several simple instruments and techniques. To locate your septic tank, you only need to know the following information: A soil probe is one of the most useful instruments for locating a septic tank. It is a tiny piece of metal that is used to puncture through the earth and detect anything that could be buried underneath. Start at the point where your sewage line exits your home and work your way straight out, inserting your soil probe every two feet along the way.

Using this method, you may also locate the cover for your septic tank.

While we highly advise keeping your cover clean and exposed in the event that you require emergency septic service, we recognize that this is not always the case.

2. Use a Septic Tank Map

If you are a new homeowner who is trying to figure out where your septic tank is, a septic tank map should be included in your inspection documentation. You can use this information to assist you in pinpointing the exact position of your storage tank. If you don’t have access to this map, there are a few of additional strategies you might employ.

3. Start Ruling Areas Out

The location of a septic tank cannot be constructed in specific areas due to the risk of causing major damage to your property or tank, as specified by local rules. Your septic tank will not be affected by the following:

  • Immediately adjacent to your well
  • Beneath your home
  • Directly against your home
  • For example, underneath your driveway
  • Under trees
  • And other locations. Structures like a patio or deck are good examples of this.

4. Inspect Your Property

If you take a hard look around your land, there’s a high possibility you’ll be able to locate your septic tank without having to do any probing whatsoever. In many circumstances, a septic tank may be identified by a slight dip or slope on your land that cannot be explained by any other means. Due to the fact that the hole that your contractors excavated for your septic tank may not have been exactly the proper size, they proceeded to install the tank anyhow. This is a rather regular occurrence.

When there is a minor divot or depression, it indicates that the hole was too large and that your contractors simply did not fill the depression to level the hole.

The likelihood of your septic tank being discovered in a few specific locations is quite high.

  • Your water well, if you have one (for a variety of reasons that are rather clear)
  • Any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a patio, sidewalk, or driveway unless they were added after the home was built and no one performed a proper inspection before it was built)
  • Any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a driveway, sidewalk, or patio unless they were added after the home was built and no one conducted a proper inspection before it was built)
  • Any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a patio, sidewalk, or driveway unless they were added after the home was built If there is any particular landscaping

5. Inspect Your Yard

Your water well, if you have one (for a variety of reasons that are quite self-explanatory); Any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a patio, sidewalk, or driveway unless they were added after the home was built and no one performed a proper inspection before it was built); any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a driveway unless it was added after the home was built and no one performed a proper inspection before it was built); any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a patio, sidewalk, or driveway unless they were added after the home was built and no one conducted Landscaping that is distinctive;

  • If your septic tank is overfilled, sewage can leak out into the ground and function as fertilizer for your lawn, resulting in lush green grass. A area of grass that is very lush and green is a good sign that your septic tank is just beneath it
  • Puddles that don’t make sense: If your septic tank is seriously overfilled, it is possible that water will pool on your grass. Another telltale indicator that your septic tank is below ground level is an unexplainable pool of water. Ground that is uneven: When installing septic tanks, it is possible that the contractors will mistakenly create high or low patches on your grass. If you come across any uneven terrain, it’s possible that your septic tank is right there.

The metal soil probe can let you find out for certain whether or not your septic tank is located in a certain area of your yard or not. As soon as your metal soil probe makes contact with the tank, you may use your shovel to dig out the grass surrounding it and discover the septic tank lid.

6. Follow Your Sewer Main/Sewer Pipes

Following your sewage lines is one of the most straightforward methods of locating your septic tank. These pipes have a diameter of roughly 4 inches and are commonly found in the basement or crawlspace of your house. They are not dangerous. Following the pipes from your house out into your yard, using your metal soil probe every 2 feet or so until you reach the tank, is a simple process once they are located. Aside from that, every drain in your home is connected to your sewage main, which in turn is connected to your septic tank.

The likelihood that one of your major sewer lines is located in your basement or crawlspace is high if you have exposed plumbing lines in your basement or crawlspace.

If the line is labeled, it is usually made of plastic or rubber.

7. Check Your Property Records

Following the path of your sewage lines is one of the most straightforward methods of locating your septic tank. These pipes have a diameter of roughly 4 inches and are typically found in the basement or crawlspace of your home. They are not dangerous. Following the pipes from your house out into your yard, using your metal soil probe every 2 feet or so until you reach the tank, is a simple process once they are discovered. Apart from that, your home’s drainage system includes a septic tank, which is connected to your sewer main through a pipe.

If you have exposed plumbing lines in your basement or crawlspace, there’s a good possibility that one of them is your main sewer line, which may be dangerous.

If the line is identified, it is usually made of plastic.

What to Do Once You Find Your Septic Tank

One of the most straightforward methods of locating your septic tank is to follow your sewage pipes. These pipes have a diameter of roughly 4 inches and are commonly found in the basement or crawlspace of your home. Following the pipe out of your house, you may use your metal soil probe every 2 feet or so to track it through your yard until you reach the tank. Additionally, every drain in your home is connected to your sewer main, which is connected to your septic tank. As a result, following the sewage main will take you right to your septic tank.

Many times, this line will be identified, but if it isn’t, it is normally a metal line with a diameter of around four inches or less. It is important to determine where this line exits your property and in which direction it is moving, as it normally travels straight out to the septic tank.

How To Find Septic Tank Location: A Guide for Property Owners

The majority of individuals prefer to relax on their back patio or porch and take in the scenery rather than worrying about where their septic tank could be. When you know exactly where your septic tank is, it will be much easier to schedule routine sewer line cleanouts and repair appointments. Continue reading to find out more about how to locate your septic tank.

Follow the Main Sewer Line

Purchase a soil probe that you may use to probe into the earth in order to locate the underground sewage line and septic tank in your property. Find the main sewage line that leads to your septic tank by going to your basement or crawl space and digging about down there. Look for a pipe with a diameter of around four inches that is leading away from your home or building. Keep a note of the position of the sewer pipe and the point at which the line exits your home so that you can locate it outdoors.

See also:  How To Tell When Septic Tank Needs To Be Cleaned? (Solution found)

If you have a drain snake, you may use it to try to follow the approximate course of the pipes in your home.

Since the majority of states require at least five feet between a home’s septic tank and its foundation, with many tanks located between 10 and 25 feet away, you may have to probe a bit further out before striking the tank.

Inspect Your Property

Purchase a soil probe that you may use to probe into the earth in order to locate the underground sewage line and septic tank in your yard. Find the main sewage line that leads to your septic tank by going to your basement or crawl space and digging about in it. Look for a pipe with a diameter of around four inches that is leading away from your home or business. Recall where your sewer pipe is located, as well as where it exits your home, in order to locate it while you are out in the field.

If you have a drain snake, you may use it to try to follow the approximate course of the pipes in your house.

Since the majority of states require at least five feet between a home’s septic tank and its foundation, with many tanks located between 10 and 25 feet away, you may need to probe a bit further out before striking the tank.

  • Paved surfaces
  • Unique landscaping
  • Your water well, if you have one
  • And other features.

If you are still having trouble locating your septic system, you might inquire of your neighbors about the location of their septic tank on their land. Finding out how far away their septic systems are will help you figure out where yours might be hidden in your yard or garden.

Check the Property Records

Are you unsure about how to obtain this? Simply contact your county’s health department for further information. Check with your local health agency to see if they have a property survey map and a septic tank map that you can borrow. Perhaps you will be shocked to learn that there are a variety of options to obtain information about your property without ever leaving the comfort of your own residence. Building permits, for example, are frequently found in county records, and they may provide schematics with specifications on how far away from a septic tank a home should be, as well as other important information such as the size of the tank.

Most counties, on the other hand, keep records of septic tank installations for every address. For further information on the placement of your septic tank, you can consult your home inspection documents or the deed to the property.

Don’t Try to Fix Septic Tank Issues Yourself

Having trouble getting this? We can help. Simply contact your county’s health department for further information. Check with your local health agency to see if they have a property survey map and a septic tank map that you can use. – Perhaps you will be shocked to learn that there are several ways to obtain information on your property without ever leaving the comfort of your own residence. Structure permits, for example, are frequently found in county records, and they may include schematics with specifications on how far away from a septic tank a building should be, as well as other valuable information such as the size of the tank.

Yet the majority of counties continue to keep track of septic tank installations at all locations.

Schedule Septic Tank Maintenance

Are you unsure about how to acquire this? Simply contact your local health agency! Check with your local health agency to see if they have a property survey map as well as a septic tank map. You may be shocked to learn that there are several ways to obtain information on your property without ever having to leave the comfort of your own residence. Building permits, for example, are frequently found in county records, and they may provide schematics with specifications on how far away from a septic tank a home should be, as well as other useful information such as the size of the tank.

Most counties, on the other hand, keep records of septic tank installations for all addresses.

Frequently Asked Questions

A septic system is a system for the management of wastewater. Simply said, wastewater will exit your home through pipes until it reaches your septic tank, which is located outside your home. Septic tanks are normally located beneath the surface of the earth. Solids and liquids will separate in the septic tank as a result of the separation process. Eventually, the solids will fall to the bottom of the tank and the liquids will run out onto your leach field.

How do I know if I have a septic tank?

Even if there are no obvious signs of a septic tank in your yard – such as uneven landscaping – there are a few techniques to assess whether or not your home is equipped with an onsite sewage system. Checking your property records is the most reliable technique to ensure that you are utilizing the correct system. When you acquired your house, you should have received a copy of the septic system map with the property documents as well. Checking your electricity statement is another way to determine this.

If you’re also using well water, it’s possible that you won’t receive one at all. If you do not have a meter installed, it is likely that you are connected to a private well rather than the public sewage network.

What do I do once I locate my septic tank?

Once you’ve discovered where your septic tank is, there are a few things you should do. It is critical to clearly mark the position of your septic tank. With our inspection, pumping, and repair services, you can save time whether you need a sewer line cleanout or a septic tank maintenance job completed quickly. Make a note of the location of your tank so that you can find it again if necessary. It should be heavy enough so that it does not fly away in windy conditions. A creative approach to accomplish this without having an unattractive flag or marking in your yard is to use garden décor or a potted plant.

This way, you’ll have it for future reference and will be able to quickly locate the exact position if necessary.

Then contact The Original Plumber to have your septic system maintained on a regular basis.

All of the heavy lifting has been delegated to our team of professionals.

HOW TO SAFELY ABANDON AN OLD SEPTIC TANK ON YOUR PROPERTY

Once you’ve located your septic tank, there are a few things you should do. It’s critical to mark the position of your septic tank. Using our inspection, pumping, and repair services, you can save time if you ever require a sewer line cleanout or septic tank maintenance. Clearly mark the location of your tank so that you can easily locate it again. In windy conditions, it should be heavy enough to prevent it from blowing away. It is possible to accomplish this without having an unattractive flag or marking in your yard by utilizing garden décor or a potted plant.

As a result, you’ll have it for future reference and will be able to locate the specific area more readily in the future.

To keep your sewage system in good working order, contact The Original Plumber.

All of the heavy lifting has been delegated to our team of experts.

Buying a Home With a Septic Tank? What You Need to Know

Published in February of this year A septic tank is one of those property features that might make prospective purchasers feel uneasy. A septic tank is a component of a home’s wastewater system that is often found in homes that are not served by municipal sewers. Instead, according to the Environmental Protection Agency, these stand-alone systems are meant to dispose of and treat the wastewater generated by a residence on their own (EPA). For anyone contemplating purchasing a property with a septic system, here are some often asked questions and answers to consider:

COUNT ON QUALITY COVERAGE.

Protect your assets and enjoy the peace of mind that comes with having Allstate insurance coverage. Request a quote Locate a representative.

How Does a Septic System Work?

With Allstate insurance, you may get the coverage you need and the peace of mind you deserve. Consult for a price Locate a real estate professional.

Is the Septic System Related to the Drinking Water System?

No. Many homes that have septic systems also have a private well to provide water. The septic system, on the other hand, is completely separate from the well. Rather of treating wastewater so that it may be consumed, its objective is to safely distribute it in a manner that prevents pollution.

What Differentiates One Septic System from Another?

According to the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the size of the drainfield and the quality of the soil are the primary factors that distinguish one septic system from another. In addition, the drainfield must be large enough to accommodate the volume of liquid generated by a family. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, do not use a home’s toilet, sink, or disposal as a wastebasket for dental floss, coffee grinds, kitty litter, paint, or chemicals to avoid the chance of blocking the system.

How Often Should You Get Your Septic Tank Emptied?

To remove the sludge and scum from the septic tank, it is necessary to hire a professional to pump it. The frequency is decided by the size of the tank and the degree of activity in the home (how much wastewater is generated). According to the Environmental Protection Agency, most septic tanks should be emptied every three to five years. However, certain systems may require more frequent pumping – perhaps once a year if necessary.

What Are the Signs of a Failing Septic Tank?

In order to remove the sludge and scum from the septic tank, a professional must pump it. This is influenced by the size of the tank and the amount of activity in the house (how much wastewater is generated). The Environmental Protection Agency recommends that most septic tanks be drained every three to five years. It is possible that certain systems will require more frequent pumping than others, possibly as frequently as every 12 months.

What About Maintenance Costs?

The size of the tank and drainfield, the accessibility of the tank, and the distance that waste must be taken for disposal all influence the cost of septic system upkeep. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, pumping a tank might cost between $250 and $500.

What Should I Do Before Buying a Home With a Septic System?

Tank and drainfield sizes, as well as tank access and how far away waste must be taken for disposal, all influence the expense of septic tank and drainfield upkeep. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, pumping a tank might cost anywhere from $250 to $500.

Related Resources:

Articles on Septic Systems Testing of the Soil and Perc What a Septic System Is and How It Works Septic System Upkeep and Repair NEW! Septic Systems that are not conventional See Also: Septic System Frequently Asked Questions See all of our LAND BUYING articles In order to buy land in the country if you’re from an urban or suburban region, you’ll need to become familiar with wells and septic systems. For city dwellers, water arrives out of nowhere at the faucet, and wastewater travels off to a distant location just as effortlessly.

Problems with either the well or septic systems can result in serious health consequences as well as significant repair costs. It is the homeowner’s responsibility to guarantee that there is an appropriate supply of clean drinking water and that the septic system is in proper working order.

HOW A SEPTIC SYSTEM WORKS

In locations where there are no municipal sewage systems, each residence is responsible for treating its own sewage on its own property, which is known as a “on-site sewage disposal system,” sometimes known as a septic system. Septic systems are typically comprised of a waste pipe from the home, a big concrete, fiberglass, or plastic septic tank, and an aleach field, among other components. One of the most frequent types of leach fields is composed of a succession of perforated distribution pipes that are placed one after another in a gravel-filled absorption trenches.

SEPTIC SYSTEM CAREMAINTENANCE

Many individuals don’t pay attention to their septic system until they experience difficulties, such as slow drains or backups of sewage. If the drain field is entirely blocked by that time, it may be beyond repair and may require replacement. Fortunately, basic care and affordable maintenance may keep your system functioning for decades without requiring any major repairs. click here to find out more

SOIL AND PERC TESTING

Traditional septic systems can only function properly if the soil in the leach area is sufficiently porous to allow the liquid effluent flowing into it to be absorbed by the soil. There must also be at least a few feet of decent soil between the bottom of the leach pipes and the rock or impermeable hardpan below, or from the bottom of the leach pipes to the water table. Depending on the municipality, particular criteria may differ, however any of these qualities may exclude the installation of a basic gravity-fed septic system.

ALTERNATIVE SEPTIC SYSTEMS

If your lot does not pass the perc test, some towns may enable you to construct an engineered system as a backup plan if the perc test fails. Because a “mound” system functions similarly to a normal system, with the exception of the fact that the leach field is elevated, it is frequently used when the issue soil is too thick (or, in certain situations, too permeable), too shallow (over bedrock or hardpan), or the water table is too high. The mound is comprised of a network of tiny distribution pipes that are embedded in a layer of gravel on top of a layer of sand that is normally one to two feet deep.

Whether or not alternative septic systems are permitted.

How Much Slope Do You Need for a Septic Line?

Should I use a Sand Filter with my existing septic system?

Reader Interactions

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *