What Kind Of Septic Tank Do We Need? (Solution)

The larger your home, the larger the septic tank you’re going to need. For instance, a house smaller than 1,500 square feet usually requires a 750 to 1,000-gallon tank. On the other hand, a bigger home of approximately 2,500 square feet will need a bigger tank, more than the 1,000-gallon range.

What are the different types of septic tank systems?

  • Basically, there are two septic tank system types: conventional and alternative. The location and soil conditions of the home or business property will generally determine the type of septic tank system that is required for installation.

How do I choose a septic tank?

Size. There are many differently-sized septic tanks to choose from. The right tank size should be determined by the amount of water your family uses each day. If your family uses minimal water, less than 500 gallons, a septic tank with a 900-gallon capacity is needed to ensure that the sewage is properly processed.

What type of septic tank is best?

The best choice is a precast concrete septic tank. Precast septic tanks hold many advantages over plastic, steel, or fiberglass tanks. This is why so many cities and towns actually require the use of concrete septic tanks.

What are the 3 types of septic systems?

Types of Septic Systems

  • Septic Tank.
  • Conventional System.
  • Chamber System.
  • Drip Distribution System.
  • Aerobic Treatment Unit.
  • Mound Systems.
  • Recirculating Sand Filter System.
  • Evapotranspiration System.

Can you have a septic tank without a leach field?

The waste from most septic tanks flows to a soakaway system or a drainage field. If your septic tank doesn’t have a drainage field or soakaway system, the waste water will instead flow through a sealed pipe and empty straight into a ditch or a local water course.

How big of a septic tank do I need?

The larger your home, the larger the septic tank you’re going to need. For instance, a house smaller than 1,500 square feet usually requires a 750 to 1,000-gallon tank. On the other hand, a bigger home of approximately 2,500 square feet will need a bigger tank, more than the 1,000-gallon range.

What is the cheapest septic system?

Conventional septic system These conventional septic systems are usually the most affordable, with an average cost of around $3,000.

How often should a 1000 gallon septic tank be cleaned?

For example, a 1,000 gallon septic tank, which is used by two people, should be pumped every 5.9 years. If there are eight people using a 1,000-gallon septic tank, it should be pumped every year.

How much does it cost to pump a septic tank?

How much does it cost to pump out a septic tank? The average cost is $300, but can run up to $500, depending on your location. The tank should be pumped out every three to five years.

What is the difference between a septic tank and a septic field?

The septic tank is a buried, water-tight container usually made of concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene. The liquid wastewater (effluent) then exits the tank into the drainfield. The drainfield is a shallow, covered, excavation made in unsaturated soil.

How long do septic tanks last?

A septic system’s lifespan should be anywhere from 15 to 40 years. How long the system lasts depends on a number of factors, including construction material, soil acidity, water table, maintenance practices, and several others.

How often should you pump your septic tank?

Inspect and Pump Frequently The average household septic system should be inspected at least every three years by a septic service professional. Household septic tanks are typically pumped every three to five years.

What is the smallest septic tank you can buy?

If you’re looking to install a septic system, the smallest tank size you’re likely to find is 750-gallon, which will accommodate one to two bedrooms. You can also opt for a 1,000-gallon system, which will handle two to four bedrooms.

Is a 500 gallon septic tank big enough?

The minimum tank size for a three bedroom house is 1200 gallons. 500 or 750 gallon tanks used to be quite common in old houses, but they are not large enough for modern households, and are from a time without automatic washers, large spa tub, dishwashers, or multiple daily showers.

Septic Tank Size: What Size Septic Tank Do You Need?

Septic tanks are used for wastewater disposal and are located directly outside your home. Private wastewater management is becoming increasingly popular in the United States, with more than 30 percent of newly constructed residences incorporating on-site wastewater management. Do you require septic tank installation and are unsure of the amount of septic tank you require? When establishing a septic tank, the most important element to consider is the type and size of septic tank that you will be installing.

A number of factors influence the size of a septic tank, which are discussed in this article.

Basics of Septic Tanks

Your septic system is a self-contained chamber that is designed to retain the wastewater generated by your home. A septic system is comprised of two major components: the soil absorption area or drain, and the holding tank. Septic tanks absorb solid waste when wastewater is discharged into them, resulting in the formation of an asludge layer at the septic tank’s base. A layer of soap residue, grease, and oil forms on the top of the water. The effluent or wastewater is contained within the intermediate layer.

To discover more about how a septic tank works, check out our page that goes into further detail on how a septic tank functions.

The Main Types of Septic Tanks

Before you start thinking about septic tank sizes, it’s important to understand the many types of septic tanks that exist.

  • Septic tanks made of fiberglass
  • Septic tanks made of plastic
  • Septic tanks made of concrete

Concrete septic tanks are the most prevalent variety, but since they are so massive, you will need big and expensive equipment to build them. Fiberglass and plastic septic tanks are lighter than concrete and are therefore more suited for difficult-to-reach and distant locations. Before purchasing a septic tank, you should check with your local building department to learn about the rules and guidelines governing private wastewater management. You may also be interested in:Do you have a septic tank?

Why Septic Tank Sizes is Important

If the capacity of your home’s septic tank is insufficient to satisfy your requirements, it will be unable to handle the volume of wastewater generated by your home. As a result, a wide range of annoying difficulties can arise, including bad smells, floods, and clogs. Nonetheless, the most common consequence of a septic tank that is too small is that the pressure that builds up will cause the water to be released before it has had a chance to be properly cleaned. This suggests that the solid waste in the septic tank will not be sufficiently broken down, and will thus accumulate more quickly, increasing the likelihood of overflows and blockages in the system.

A septic tank that is too large will not function properly if it does not get the required volume of wastewater to operate.

If your septic tank is too large for your home, there will not be enough collected liquid to support the growth of the bacteria that aids in the breakdown of solid waste in the septic tank if the tank is too large.

What Determines Septic Sizes?

Here are some of the elements that influence septic tank sizes; keep them in mind when making your purchase to ensure that you get the most appropriate septic tank for your property.

Consider Your Water Usage

The most accurate and practical method of estimating the appropriate septic tank size for your property is to calculate the quantity of water you use on a regular basis. The size of the septic tank required is determined by the amount of water that can be held in it before being drained into the soil absorption field. In many places of the United States, the smallest capacity of septic tank that may be installed is 1,000 gallons or less. The following are the suggested septic tank sizes for your household, which are based on your household’s entire water use.

  • A septic tank with a capacity of 1,900 gallons will handle less than 1,240 gallons per day
  • A septic tank with a capacity of 1,500 gallons will handle less than 900 gallons per day. A septic tank with a capacity of 1,200 gallons is required for less than 700 gallons per day
  • A septic tank with a capacity of 900 gallons is required for less than 500 gallons per day.

Consider the Size of Your Property

Another factor to consider when determining the most appropriate septic tank size for your home is the square footage of your home. The size of your home will determine the size of the septic tank you will require. For example, a dwelling with less than 1,500 square feet typically requires a tank that holds 750 to 1,000 gallons. On the other side, a larger home of around 2,500 square feet will require a larger tank, one that is more than the 1,000-gallon capacity.

The Number of Bedrooms Your Property Has

An additional issue to consider is the amount of bedrooms in your home, which will influence the size of your septic tank. The size of your septic tank is proportional to the number of bedrooms on your home. The following table lists the appropriate septic tank sizes based on the number of bedrooms.

  • In general, a 1-2 bedroom house will require a 500 gallon septic tank
  • A 3 bedroom house will demand 1000 gallon septic tank
  • A 4 bedroom house will require 1200 gallon septic tank
  • And a 5-6 bedroom house would require a 1500 gallon septic tank.

The Number of Occupants

In general, the greater the number of people that live in your home, the larger your septic tank must be. In the case of a two-person household, a modest septic tank will be necessary. If your house has more than five tenants, on the other hand, you will want a larger septic tank in order to handle your wastewater more effectively and hygienically. When determining what size septic tank to purchase, it is important to remember that the size of your septic tank determines the overall effectiveness of your septic system.

As a result, it is critical that you examine septic tank sizes in order to pick the most appropriate alternative for your property in order to avoid these difficulties.

How Big of a Septic Tank Do I Need?

The size and kind of tank required for a new septic system are the two most important considerations to make before beginning the installation process. Private sewage disposal is becoming increasingly popular in the United States, with 33 percent of newly constructed residences choosing for on-site wastewater treatment as part of their construction. Septic tank systems, in conjunction with a soil absorption system, or a drain field, are the least costly way of treating residential wastewater currently available on the market.

  • The typical size of a home septic tank is from 750 gallons to 1,250 gallons in capacity.
  • The system is made up of two major components: the tank and the drain, often known as the soil absorption field or drain field.
  • Oil, grease, and soap residue combine to form the scum layer on the surface of the water.
  • With each filling of the tank, the effluent drains out of the tank and into the drain field, where it is absorbed by the earth.
  • Septic tanks are commonly utilized in residential construction and can be classified into three categories.
  • Polyethylene and fiberglass are one-piece products that are significantly lighter than steel.
  • In order to determine whether or not you need a septic tank system, check with your local building department to see what laws and requirements apply to onsite wastewater treatment.
  • The square footage of the property, the number of bedrooms, and the number of people who will be living there are all important considerations.
  • Septic tanks for one and two bedroom homes that are less than 1,500 square feet and 1,000 gallon septic tanks for three bedroom homes that are less than 2,500 square feet are recommended.
  • The figures listed above are only estimates.
  • Before acquiring a septic tank system, speak with a professional plumbing contractor who is licensed in your region about the many septic tank alternatives that are available to you.

Get in touch with the Pink Plumber right away if you have any queries or concerns about your septic tank. Image courtesy of Flickr OUR EXPERT PLUMBERS ARE AVAILABLE TO HELP YOU.

Types of Septic Systems

Septic system design and size can differ significantly from one neighborhood to the next, as well as throughout the country, due to a variety of variables. Household size, soil type, slope of the site, lot size, closeness to sensitive water bodies, weather conditions, and even municipal ordinances are all considerations to take into consideration. The following are 10 of the most often encountered septic system configurations. It should be noted that this is not an exhaustive list; there are several additional types of septic systems.

  • Septic Tank, Conventional System, Chamber System, Drip Distribution System, Aerobic Treatment Unit, Mound Systems, Recirculating Sand Filter System, Evapotranspiration System, Constructed Wetland System, Cluster / Community System, etc.

Septic Tank

This tank is underground and waterproof, and it was designed and built specifically for receiving and partially treating raw home sanitary wastewater. Generally speaking, heavy materials settle at or near the bottom of the tank, whereas greases and lighter solids float to the surface. The sediments are retained in the tank, while the wastewater is sent to the drainfield for further treatment and dispersion once it has been treated.

Conventional System

Septic tanks and trench or bed subsurface wastewater infiltration systems are two types of decentralized wastewater treatment systems (drainfield). When it comes to single-family homes and small businesses, a traditional septic system is the most common type of system. For decades, people have used a gravel/stone drainfield as a method of water drainage. The term is derived from the process of constructing the drainfield. A short underground trench made of stone or gravel collects wastewater from the septic tank in this configuration, which is commonly used.

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Effluent filters through the stone and is further cleaned by microorganisms once it reaches the soil below the gravel/stone trench, which is located below the trench.

Chamber System

Gravelless drainfields have been regularly utilized in various states for more than 30 years and have evolved into a standard technology that has mostly replaced gravel systems. Various configurations are possible, including open-bottom chambers, pipe that has been clothed, and synthetic materials such as expanded polystyrene media. Gravelless systems can be constructed entirely of recycled materials, resulting in considerable reductions in carbon dioxide emissions during their lifetime. The chamber system is a type of gravelless system that can be used as an example.

The key advantage of the chamber system is the enhanced simplicity with which it can be delivered and built.

This sort of system is made up of a number of chambers that are connected to one another.

Wastewater is transported from the septic tank to the chambers through pipes. The wastewater comes into touch with the earth when it is contained within the chambers. The wastewater is treated by microbes that live on or near the soil.

Drip Distribution System

An effluent dispersal system such as the drip distribution system may be employed in a variety of drainfield configurations and is very versatile. In comparison to other distribution systems, the drip distribution system does not require a vast mound of dirt because the drip laterals are only placed into the top 6 to 12 inches of soil. In addition to requiring a big dosage tank after the sewage treatment plant to handle scheduled dose delivery of wastewater to drip absorption areas, the drip distribution system has one major disadvantage: it is more expensive.

Aerobic Treatment Unit

Aerobic Treatment Units (ATUs) are small-scale wastewater treatment facilities that employ many of the same procedures as a municipal sewage plant. An aerobic system adds oxygen to the treatment tank using a pump. When there is an increase in oxygen in the system, there is an increase in natural bacterial activity, which then offers extra treatment for nutrients in the effluent. It is possible that certain aerobic systems may additionally include a pretreatment tank as well as a final treatment tank that will include disinfection in order to further lower pathogen levels.

ATUs should be maintained on a regular basis during their service life.

Mound Systems

Using mound systems in regions with short soil depth, high groundwater levels, or shallow bedrock might be a good alternative. A drainfield trench has been dug through the sand mound that was erected. The effluent from the septic tank runs into a pump chamber, where it is pumped to the mound in the amounts recommended. During its release to the trench, the effluent filters through the sand and is dispersed into the native soil, where it continues to be treated. However, while mound systems can be an effective solution for some soil conditions, they demand a significant amount of land and require regular care.

Recirculating Sand Filter System

Sand filter systems can be built either above or below ground, depending on the use. The effluent is discharged from the septic tank into a pump compartment. Afterwards, it is pushed into the sand filter. The sand filter is often made of PVC or a concrete box that is filled with a sand-like substance. The effluent is pushed through the pipes at the top of the filter under low pressure to the drain. As the effluent exits the pipelines, it is treated as it passes through the sand filtering system.

However, sand filters are more costly than a standard septic system because they provide a higher level of nutrient treatment and are thus better suited for areas with high water tables or that are adjacent to bodies of water.

Evapotranspiration System

Sand filtration systems can be built either above or below ground, depending on the circumstances. Drainage from the septic tank is directed to a pump chamber. A sand filter is then used to filter the water. The sand filter is often made of PVC or a concrete box that is filled with a sand-like substance. Under low pressure, effluent is pushed via pipes that run up to the top of the filter. While passing through the sand filter, the effluent is treated as it exits the pipes and enters the environment.

However, sand filters are more costly than a standard septic system since they provide a higher level of nutrient treatment and are thus suitable for areas with high water tables or that are adjacent to water bodies.

Constructed Wetland System

Construction of sand filter systems can take place either above or below ground. The effluent is discharged from the septic tank into a pump chamber. After that, it is pushed to the sand filter. The sand filter is often made of PVC or a concrete box that is filled with a sand substance. The effluent is pushed through the pipes at the top of the filter at low pressure. As the effluent exits the pipelines, it is treated as it passes through the sand filters. After that, the treated wastewater is dumped into the drain field.

Cluster / Community System

In certain cases, a decentralized wastewater treatment system is owned by a group of people and is responsible for collecting wastewater from two or more residences or buildings and transporting it to a treatment and dispersal system placed on a suitable location near the dwellings or buildings. Cluster systems are widespread in settings like rural subdivisions, where they may be found in large numbers.

What size of septic tank do I need?

Probably one of the last things on your mind when you are constructing a new house is the location of your septic system. After all, shopping for tanks isn’t nearly as entertaining as shopping for cabinetry, appliances, and floor coverings. Although you would never brag about it, your guests will be aware if you do not have the proper septic tank placed in your home or business.

septic tanks for new home construction

The exact size of the septic tank is determined mostly by the square footage of the house and the number of people who will be living in it. The majority of home septic tanks have capacities ranging from 750 to 1,250 gallons. A 1000 gallon tank will most likely be required for a typical 3-bedroom home that is smaller than 2500 square feet in size. Of course, all of this is dependent on the number of people who live in the house as well as the amount of water and waste that will be disposed of through the plumbing system.

For the most accurate assessment of your septic tank needs, you should speak with an experienced and trustworthy sewer business representative. They can assist you in planning the intricacies of your septic system, including which sort of septic system will be most beneficial to you.

planning your drainfield

Here are some helpful hints for deciding where to locate your drainfield when you’re designing it.

  • For those of you who are considering the site of your drainfield, the following are some helpful hints:

a home addition may mean a new septic tank

Do not make any big additions or renovations to your house or company until you have had the size of your septic system assessed. If you want to build a house addition that is more than 10% of your total floor space, increases the number of rooms, or necessitates the installation of new plumbing, you will almost certainly need to expand your septic tank.

  • For a home addition that will result in increased use of your septic system, your local health department will require a letter from you that has been signed and authorized by a representative of your local health department confirming that your new septic system is capable of accommodating the increase in wastewater. It is not recommended that you replace your septic system without the assistance of a certified and competent contractor.

how to maintain your new septic system

Septic tank cleaning and septic tank pumping services are provided by Norway Septic Inc., a service-oriented company devoted to delivering outstanding septic tank cleaning and septic tank pumping services to households and business owners throughout the Michiana area. “We take great delight in finishing the task that others have left unfinished.” “They pump, we clean!” says our company’s motto. Septic systems are something we are familiar with from our 40 years of expertise, and we propose the following:

  • Make use of the services of a qualified specialist to develop a maintenance strategy. Make an appointment for an annual examination of your septic system. Utilize the services of an effluent filter to limit the amount of particles that exit the tank, so extending the life of your septic system. Waste items should be disposed of properly, and energy-efficient appliances should be used. Make sure you get your septic system professionally cleaned every 2 to 3 years, or more frequently if necessary, by an experienced and qualified expert
  • If you have any reason to believe that there is an issue with your system, contact a professional. It is far preferable to catch anything early than than pay the price later. Maintain a record of all septic system repairs, inspections, and other activities

common septic questions

Here are some of the most frequently asked questions by our septic customers.

How do I determine the size of my septic tank?

Our septic clients frequently ask us the following questions:

How many bedrooms does a 500-gallon septic tank support?

The exact size of the septic tank is determined mostly by the square footage of the house and the number of people who will be living in it. The majority of home septic tanks have capacities ranging from 750 to 1,250 gallons. A 1000 gallon tank will most likely be required for a typical 3-bedroom home that is smaller than 2500 square feet in size.

How deep in the ground is a septic tank?

Your septic system is normally buried between four inches and four feet underground, depending on the climate.

Standard Septic Systems

When it comes to treating residential wastewater, a regular wastewater system combined with a soil absorption system is the most cost-effective technique currently available. However, in order for it to function correctly, you must select the appropriate septic system for your home size and soil type, and you must keep it in good working order on a regular basis.

What size septic tank do I need?

In terms of economic efficiency, the most cost-effective technology available for treating residential wastewater is a basic wastewater system with a soil absorption system. If you want your septic system to function correctly, you must select the appropriate kind for your household’s size and soil type, and you must do regular maintenance on it.

Bedrooms Home Square Footage Tank Capacity
1 or 2 Less than 1,500 750
3 Less than 2,500 1,000
4 Less than 3,500 1,250
5 Less than 4,500 1,250
6 Less than 5,500 1,315

How often should my tank be pumped?

A regular pumping of the tank is required to maintain your system operating properly and treating sewage efficiently. Sludge collects at the bottom of the septic tank as a result of the usage of the septic system. Because of the rise in sludge level, wastewater spends less time in the tank and solids have a greater chance of escaping into the absorption region. If sludge collects for an excessive amount of time, there is no settling and the sewage is directed directly to the soil absorption region, with no treatment.

You can find out how often you should get your tank pumped by looking at the table below.

If you fail to maintain the tank for an extended period of time, you may be forced to replace the soil absorption field.

Solids can enter the field if the tank is not pumped on a regular basis.

Wet soils that have been saturated by rains are incapable of receiving wastewater. Planting cool-season grasses over the soil absorption field in the winter can aid in the removal of water from the soil and the maintenance of the system’s appropriate operation and performance.

Other maintenance

A regular pumping of the tank is required to maintain your system operating properly and efficiently processing sewage. At addition to the normal usage of the septic system, sludge builds up in the bottom of the tank. Because of the rise in sludge level, wastewater spends less time in the tank and solids have a greater chance of escaping into the absorption region. Because there is no settling when sludge builds for an extended period of time, sewage flows directly into the soil absorption region with minimum treatment.

  • Make use of the table below to determine how frequently you should get your tank emptied.
  • The soil absorption field, on the other hand, is no longer protected from particles by the septic tank.
  • Protecting soil absorption fields from solids and rainwater is essential for their long-term effectiveness.
  • Rainwater runoff from rooftops or concrete surfaces should be diverted away from the soil absorption field to avoid the field becoming overflowing with liquid.
  • Planting cool-season grasses over the soil absorption field in the winter can aid in the removal of water from the soil and the maintenance of the system’s correct operation and functionality.
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Two critical components

Pumping the tank on a regular basis is necessary to maintain your system operating properly and treating sewage effectively. As a result of the usage of the septic system, sludge builds at the bottom of the tank. As the sludge level in the tank rises, wastewater spends less time in the tank and solids are more likely to escape into the absorption area. If sludge collects for an extended period of time, there is no settling and the sewage flows directly to the soil absorption area, with no treatment.

  • Make use of the information below to determine how frequently you should get your tank emptied.
  • The septic tank, on the other hand, is no longer sheltering the soil absorption area from solid waste.
  • Solids and rainwater must be kept away from soil absorption fields.
  • Rainwater runoff from rooftops or concrete surfaces should be diverted away from the soil absorption field to avoid the field becoming overflowing with water.

Soaked rainwater-soaked fields are unable to receive effluent. Planting cool-season grasses over the soil absorption field in the winter can aid in the removal of water from the soil and the correct functioning of the system.

Tank

The septic tank is an enclosed, waterproof container that collects and treats wastewater, separating the particles from the liquid. It is used for primary treatment of wastewater. It works by retaining wastewater in the tank and letting the heavier particles (such as oil and greases) to settle to the bottom of the tank while the floatable solids (such as water and sewage) rise to the surface. The tank should be able to store the wastewater for at least 24 hours in order to provide time for the sediments to settle.

Up to 50% of the particles stored in the tank decompose, with the remainder accumulating as sludge at the tank bottom, which must be cleaned on a regular basis by pumping the tank out.

Drainfield

Ultimately, the soil absorption field is responsible for the final treatment and distribution of wastewater. Traditional systems consist of perforated pipes surrounded by media such as gravel and chipped tires, which are then coated with geo-textile fabric and loamy soil to create a permeable barrier. This method depends mainly on the soil to treat wastewater, where microorganisms assist in the removal of organic debris, sediments, and nutrients that have been left in the water after it has been treated.

As the water moves through the soil, the mat slows its passage and helps to prevent the soil below the mat from being saturated.

The grass that grows on top of the soil absorption system takes use of the nutrients and water to flourish as well.

Septic tank types

There are three primary types of septic tanks used for on-site wastewater treatment: cisterns, septic tanks, and septic tanks with a pump.

  • Concrete septic tanks are the most popular type of septic tank. Fiberglass tanks – Because they are lightweight and portable, they are frequently used in remote or difficult-to-reach sites. Lightweight polyethylene/plastic tanks, similar to fiberglass tanks, may be transported to “difficult-to-reach” sites since they are one-piece constructions.

It is necessary for all tanks to be waterproof in order to prevent water from entering as well as exiting the system.

Factors in septic maintenance

A critical consideration in the construction of a septic tank is the link between the amount of surface area it has, the amount of sewage it can hold, the amount of wastewater that is discharged, and the rate at which it escapes. All of these factors influence the effectiveness of the tank as well as the quantity of sludge it retains. The bigger the liquid surface area of the tank, the greater the amount of sewage it can hold. As more particles accumulate in the tank, the water level in the tank grows shallower, necessitating a slower discharge rate in order to give the sludge and scum more time to separate from one another.

An aperture must be utilized on the tank lid if it is more than 12 inches below the soil surface, and a riser must be used on the openings in order to bring the lid to within 6 inches of the soil surface.

In most cases, the riser may be extended all the way to the ground surface and covered by a sturdy lid. It is quite simple to do maintenance on the tank thanks to these risers.

Soil types

There are three types of soil textures: sand, silt, and clay, and each has an impact on how quickly wastewater filters into the soil (a property known as hydraulic conductivity) and how large an absorption field is required. Sand transports water more quickly than silt, which transfers water more quickly than clay. According to Texas laws, these three soil textures are subdivided into five soil kinds (Ia, Ib, II, III, IV). Sandy soils are classified as soil type I, whereas clay soils are classified as soil type IV.

  • The Hydraulic Loading, which is the quantity of effluent applied per square foot of trench surface, is also significant in the design.
  • For this reason, only nonstandard drain fields are suitable for use in clay soils due to the poor conductivity of clay soils.
  • The Texas A&M University System’s Agricultural Communications department.
  • L-5227 was published on April 10, 2000.

The 6 Septic Systems You Must Know — Build With a Bang

Unacquainted with the many types of septic systems available? If this is the case, you are not alone. Unless your property is directly linked to the sewer system, you most certainly have a septic system in place. Sewage treatment on site is accomplished by the use of natural processes in a septic system, which is a linked system of components residing under ground. Typically, a septic system is located in the yard of a homeowner. The most typical location for septic systems is in rural locations, where there is no access to a centralized town or city waste treatment facility or sewage treatment system.

Why Concrete Septic Tanks May Be Your Best Option

First and foremost, the septic system collects and dumps the waste generated by the home in the septic tank. The septic tank then separates and pre-treats the solid waste and oils from the wastewater before releasing them into the environment. Following that, most systems direct liquid wastewater from the septic tank onto a distribution network of porous pipes that branch out from the residence and septic tank and gradually discharge the wastewater into the soil. Some septic systems, rather than just discharging wastewater into the soil, employ pumps, disinfection products, an evaporation mechanism, or simply rely on gravity to funnel wastewater through sand or other organic material before releasing the effluent into the soil.

  • The total square feet of drain field area required is determined by the number of bedrooms in the house and the soil type (arid or saturated), among other factors.
  • Septic tanks are intended to serve as the initial stop in the wastewater treatment process, and they are constructed to do so.
  • The sediments remain in the tank, while the wastewater is sent to the drain field for further treatment and dispersal when it has been treated.
  • Concrete, plastic (polyethylene), and fiberglass are the three most common materials used in construction.
  • Drain fields are plots of land that have been particularly engineered to assist in the filtering and removal of pollutants from wastewater.

Perforated pipes, which are buried within the trenches, are used to disseminate the wastewater from the home in a methodical manner. A standard septic system is comprised of a septic drain field, its associated pipe system, and a septic tank.

Conventional System

Initially, waste from the household is collected by the septic system, which then dumps it into the septic tank for treatment. In the septic tank, solid waste and oils are separated from wastewater and pre-treated before being released into the environment. Following that, the liquid wastewater from the septic tank is sent into a distribution network of porous pipes that branch out from the residence and septic tank and gently discharge the wastewater into the soil. Instead of relying on simply releasing wastewater into the soil, other types of septic systems use pumps, disinfecting products, an evaporation technique, or simply rely on gravity to help funnel wastewater through sand or other organic material before releasing the wastewater into the soil, as described above.

  1. In order to calculate the total amount of drain field space required, the number of bedrooms and the soil type (arid or saturated) are taken into consideration.
  2. In the wastewater treatment process, septic tanks are intended to be the first stop.
  3. In contrast, the wastewater is sent to a drain field for additional treatment and dispersion, while the solids remain in the tank.
  4. Concrete, plastic (polyethylene), and fiberglass are the three most prevalent materials.
  5. Land that has been intentionally created to filter and remove impurities from wastewater is known as a drain field.
  6. Perforated pipes, which are buried within the trenches, are used to disseminate the wastewater from the home in a methodical fashion.

Chamber System

First and foremost, the septic system collects and dumps the waste generated by a home in a septic tank. In the meantime, the septic tank separates and pre-treats the solid waste as well as the oils in the wastewater. Most systems then pump the liquid wastewater from the septic tank onto a distribution network of porous pipes that branch out from the residence and septic tank and gently discharge the wastewater into the soil. Instead of merely discharging wastewater into the soil, alternative types of septic systems employ pumps, disinfection products, an evaporation process, or simply rely on gravity to assist funnel the wastewater through sand or other organic material before releasing the effluent into the soil.

  1. The overall amount of drain field space required is determined by the number of bedrooms and the soil type (arid or saturated).
  2. In the wastewater treatment process, septic tanks are intended to serve as the first stop.
  3. In contrast, the wastewater is released to a drain field for additional treatment and dispersal, while the solids remain in the tank.
  4. Concrete, plastic (polyethylene), and fiberglass are the three most commonly used materials.
  5. Drain fields are plots of land that have been particularly engineered to assist in the filtering and removal of impurities from wastewater.

Within the trenches are also perforated pipes, which are utilized to disseminate the wastewater from the residence in a methodical manner. A standard septic system is comprised of a septic drain field, its pipe system, and a septic tank.

Aerobic Treatment System

Aeration of wastewater in a septic treatment tank is accomplished by the use of aerobic treatment equipment. The infused oxygen in the wastewater aids in the addition of nutrients to the wastewater as well as the efficient start of the treatment process itself. Aerobic systems are available with tanks that may be used for both pretreatment and final treatment, as well as systems with two distinct tanks for pretreatment and final treatment, among other options. The ultimate objective is to treat and disinfect in a safe and efficient manner, without causing harm.

The disadvantage of using an aerobic system is that, like the drip distribution system, it requires regular maintenance.

Drip Distribution System

It is not necessary to install a standard gravel-based drain field since the Drip Distribution system makes use of an underground snaking system of distribution pipes that are installed near the surface of the soil. Pipe laterals for the drip distribution system are buried in shallow ground soil, generally 6 to 12 inches below the surface of the ground. Because it eliminates the requirement for a standard drain field, this technique reduces the amount of digging required and makes it easier to reach plumbing within the drain field.

A second tank, referred to as a dosage tank, is required to take wastewater after it has passed through the septic tank in order to handle this technique.

However, in order for this to happen, the dosage tank must be connected to power.

Sand Filter System

Sand filter systems allow waste water to travel from a septic tank to a pump chamber, and then from the pump chamber to the sand filtering system. Sand filter systems are used in conjunction with septic tanks. The sand filtration system is essentially a big concrete box that is filled with sand to filter out contaminants. Following a leisurely pumping operation to the top of the box, the waste water is filtered through the sand, which treats the water prior to its discharge into the soil absorption region (see illustration).

Cons: Frequent maintenance is required.

Evapotranspiration System

In contrast to septic tanks, sand filter systems enable waste water to travel from the septic tank to a pump chamber and then from the pump chamber to the sand filtering system (or vice versa). It is essentially a big concrete box that is filled with sand that serves as the filtering system. Following a leisurely pumping operation to the top of the box, the waste water is filtered by the sand, which purifies the water before releasing it into the soil absorption region.

Good for places with high water tables, as a result of the aforementioned benefit Maintenance is required on a regular basis.

Mound System

The mound system consists of the construction of a big sand mound that serves as a drain field. A controlled flow of wastewater is maintained throughout its journey from the septic tank to a chamber where it is pushed through to the mound. After flowing through a mound trench and percolating through the sand, the wastewater eventually trickles into the ground. Among those who live in rural locations where there is a lot of land but little absorbent soil, the mound system is a popular alternative.

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Cons: It takes up a lot of room and requires a lot of upkeep.

Solid waste matter can block the pump and cause damage to the drain field if it is not pumped on a regular basis.

Garbage Disposal With Septic

Unless you reside in a septic-equipped home, it is better not to have a trash disposal. The increased volume of solid waste material will necessitate more frequent septic tank pumping and may erode the drain field, resulting in sewage back-ups in the future. Those who live in homes with septic systems may find that they must be extra cautious about what they flush down the toilet. Certain common home objects, when flushed down a toilet connected to a septic system, can create clogs, backups, and even damage to the system, resulting in not only discomfort and aggravation, but also a significant financial burden.

Chemicals may cause significant damage to and contamination of surface and groundwater, which can result in disease or even death in animals and people who consume the water.

Pesticides Oils Chemicals used in photography

4 Types of Septic Tanks – HomeAdvisor

Garbage disposals are not recommended for those who reside in septic tanks. It is likely that more frequent septic tank pumping would be required, and that the extra solid waste material may erode the drain field, perhaps resulting in sewage back ups. Because septic systems are installed in certain homes, you may need to be more selective about what you flush down the toilet. Clogging, backups, and even system damage can occur when certain common household objects are flushed down the toilet of a home with a septic system.

Make sure to exercise caution when handling the following everyday home items: Products for female genital hygiene Wipes that may be disposed of in the toilet Paper towels are a type of paper that is used for wiping surfaces such as countertops and tables.

Water surface and groundwater can be badly harmed or contaminated by chemicals, resulting in disease or even death in animals and humans.

Care should be taken to ensure that the compounds mentioned below are disposed of at designated hazardous waste depositories. The following are examples of painting materials: colors, varnishes, thinners, and so on. Pesticides Oils Chemicals for use in photography.

  • Unless you reside in a septic-system home, it is better not to have a trash disposal. The increased volume of solid waste material will necessitate more frequent septic tank pumping and may erode the drain field, resulting in sewage backups. Because septic systems are installed in certain homes, you may need to be more cautious about what you flush down the toilet. Certain common home objects, when flushed down a toilet connected to a septic system, can create clogs, backups, and even system damage, resulting in not only discomfort and stress, but also a significant financial outlay. Precaution should be exercised while using the following common home items: sanitary goods for women Wipes that are flushable Paper towels are a type of paper that is used to clean up after yourself. Tissues Bandages grinds from a coffee machine DiapersCigarettes Never flush chemicals down the toilet if you’re utilizing a septic system! Chemicals may cause significant damage and contamination to surface and groundwater, resulting in disease or even death in animals and humans. Take care to dispose of the compounds mentioned below in certified hazardous waste depositories: Thinners, stains, and varnishes are all types of paint. Pesticides Oils Chemicals for photography
  • In spite of the fact that plastic septic tanks are more resistant to the chemical processes that occur naturally in a septic system, their lower weight makes them more prone to structural damage. It is necessary to install the tank with care in order to avoid damage to the tank. It is important to take careful notice of the land above the tank. Avoid driving any vehicles over the tank’s filling station. During periods of wet soil, the lighter can also cause the tank to shift in its position in the ground. Occasionally, a plastic septic tank may emerge from the earth, destroying pipes along the way.
  • Using oxygen to help in the degradation of the effluent is what aerobic septic tanks are all about, according to the manufacturer. They also necessitate the use of power. When a septic system fails, aerobic septic tanks are most frequently utilized to replace it. They can also, on occasion, minimize the amount of space necessary for their drain field. Aerobic septic tanks are generally two to three times more expensive than conventional septic tanks, but their high efficiency can result in significant savings in terms of reclaimed land in the drain field and a longer tank life. The capacity of an aerobic septic tank to function has nothing to do with its long-term dependability. A more regular and more thorough maintenance schedule is required for an aerobic septic system. Because of its more intricate breakdown structure, there is a greater possibility that something may go wrong. However, if the system is properly maintained, its effectiveness will allow you to keep your effluent under control for an almost unlimited period of time.
  • Important Caution: Exercise extra caution when in the vicinity of open or uncovered sewage tanks. Falling into a sewage tank will almost always result in death due to asphyxiation. The simple act of leaning over a septic tank might lead you to pass out.

Attention: Be exceedingly cautious when in the vicinity of an open or unprotected sewage treatment plant. The asphyxiation that results from falling into a sewage tank is common. Collapse can occur even while you are leaning over a septic tank.

Identify My Septic System

Identify the Septic System in My Home wpadmin2016-12-26T 12:15:08-08:00 Septic systems are generally classified into four categories. Not all homeowners have the option of selecting from all four types since municipal rules may prohibit the installation of traditional systems in areas where soil absorption or drain field space is restricted, for example. Furthermore, each has its own set of benefits and drawbacks to consider. The majority of municipalities need a designer to do a site review.

There are several types of systems, each requiring a different level of attention from the property owner; some need more frequent maintenance from septic system specialists.

Conventional Systems

Traditional septic systems may be divided into two categories: those that employ gravel in the drain field and those that use some sort of chamber system. The older style graveled system, as the name implies, has a coating of gravel in the drain field to facilitate drainage. In the course of the building, a drain field ditch is dug that is 1 to 3 feet below ground level. Its length is decided by the amount of wastewater that will be discharged into the system from the house or rural office, as well as the soil’s ability to absorb water during the winter months.

  • In order to prevent backfill soil from filtering between the rocks and reducing the field’s ability to absorb water, additional gravel is poured around and over the pipe.
  • Despite the fact that some waste is treated in septic tanks by bacteria that live within the tank, the majority of waste is treated when wastewater released from the tank enters the drain field and is filtered via the gravel and dirt under the surface.
  • These organisms grow and produce a layer known as a biomat, which sits on top of the soil layer and protects it.
  • When the drain field is in balance, these organisms prevent the biomat from getting so thick that it prevents wastewater from passing through to the soil underneath the drain field.
  • In the first place, the use of gravel instantly reduces the amount of wastewater that may reach the soil, which is where the majority of filtration takes place.
  • Apart from that, even when competent contractors utilize solely cleaned gravel, a certain quantity of particles is certain to stay and eventually reach the soil level, further lowering the possibility of filtering.
  • This can happen when the water table rises above the drain pipe, essentially cutting off the drain field’s capacity to release water and causing it to back up.

In addition, when there are more visitors in the house for extended periods of time, or when taps or toilets are left running for extended periods of time, there is the chance of a drain field overflow, which can develop.

Gravel-less conventional systems have the advantage of overcoming some of the disadvantages of graveled systems.

Typically, these chambers are made of molded high-density plastic and are available in lengths ranging from 4 to 5 feet.

When the system is put into service, waste water is transported via pipe from the septic tank to the chamber run, where it flows directly against the earth.

One significant advantage of the chambered system is its capacity to accommodate significantly greater volumes of water.

Shock loading over extended periods of time will, without a doubt, have a negative impact on the biomat since oxygen will not be accessible to parasites during these durations.

Low-Pressure Dose Systems

Low-pressure dosing systems (also known as low-pressure pipe systems) may be a viable option in situations when soil and topographical factors do not allow for the installation of a typical septic system, such as urban areas. This is especially true in cases where the geography necessitates the installation of a drain field uphill from the septic tanks or when there is uneven terrain that would otherwise impede the installation of an ordinary system. Low-Pressure Dose Systems (LPDs) are designed to function in the following ways: A pumping chamber is placed in addition to the typical septic tank, which is a type of holding tank.

  1. When using an LPD application, the drain field is made up of small perforated pipes that are placed in shallow, gravel-lined trenches that are 6 to 24 inches deep and 36 inches wide.
  2. After then, the field is allowed to drain.
  3. Low-lying placement also encourages evapo-transpiration, in which evaporation, as well as grass and other shallow-rooted plants, aid in the removal of wastewater from the soil.
  4. Alarms will be activated if there is a significant increase in flow.
  5. In addition to the previously noted topographical site benefits of LPDs, there is a considerable reduction in the amount of land area required by the absorption field when compared to traditional systems.
  6. Furthermore, narrow, shallow ditches help to mitigate some of the unavoidable soil compaction that occurs during the building of typical drain fields.
  7. The risk of wastewater accumulating in the trenches should also be considered.
  8. The inclusion of power, a pump, and a narrower drain field all raise the likelihood of system failure.

Aerobic Wastewater Treatment Systems

At this point, aerobic septic systems stand out as the only system that can be used in virtually all case where septic systems are needed. In essence, when you own an aerobic system, you are the owner of a miniature version of a municipal sewage treatment facility. In other words, your aerobic system closely resembles many of the stages and operations carried out by an urban waste treatment facility. Aerobic systems and septic systems are similar in that they both treat wastewater via the use of natural processes.

  1. The natural bacterial consumption of waste inside the system is increased as a result of the increase in oxygen.
  2. The way aerobic systems function is as follows: Pre-treatment tanks are used to catch grease, oils, toilet paper, and other solids and foreign items that are present in wastewater and effluent.
  3. Solids can clog the system and create difficulties if there are too many of them.
  4. Following that, the treated water is sent to a pumping chamber, where it undergoes a final disinfection treatment.
  5. Water is then pumped into the field and distributed through a drainfield.
  6. Systems are specifically constructed with alarms and control boxes to ensure that they are always in correct working order at any given moment.

This maintenance contract will ensure that your plant operates in accordance with specifications at all times, regardless of the weather.

Drip System

Under the majority of circumstances, conventional septic systems are sufficient for treating and disposing of domestic wastewater. However, when soil conditions or the surrounding region are not suitable for handling the volume of effluent generated by a standard septic system, an alternate system, such as a drip system, may be the best solution. A typical system relies on gravity to carry wastewater, and as a result, the effluent is not distributed uniformly over the drain field as effectively as it may be.

It is possible for the soil in the drain field to become saturated during periods of excessive water consumption by the home, reducing the ability of the drain field to process the wastewater produced.

The use of a drip system eliminates these two disadvantages of the traditional gravity-fed system.

The dosing chamber is a separate tank that accepts wastewater from the septic tank and processes it.

A pressure dosage system is what this is referred to as.

When effluent is applied consistently and at predetermined intervals, the soil is less likely to get saturated, which allows the soil to perform more efficiently while also lasting for a longer duration of time.

Homeowners should not wait until the alarm system detects a problem; instead, they should routinely follow suggested maintenance methods to ensure that the system continues to function properly for the longest period of time feasible.

It is in the best interests of the homeowner to ensure that the septic system is properly maintained.

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