What Is The Average Depth Of A Septic Tank? (Best solution)

Design of Septic Tanks The maximum liquid depth of a septic tank shall be 60 inches with a minimum depth of 30 inches. The preferred depth is 48 inches. The total depth shall be at least 8” greater than the liquid depth to allow for air space at the top.

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  • On average, septic tanks are 4.5 feet wide, 8 feet long, and 6 feet tall. Tanks are buried underground 4 inches to 4 feet deep depending on the site conditions, shape of the tank, and slope. Source: Wikipedia Table of Contents [ show] What Is a Septic Tank? A septic system is a sewerage treatment and disposal system.

How deep is a normal septic tank?

Depending on your septic tank setup, your system may include two or three lids. Septic tanks are typically rectangular in shape and measure approximately 5 feet by 8 feet. In most cases, septic tank components including the lid, are buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underground.

How deep are most septic tanks buried?

Over time, all septic tanks fill up with solids and require pumping to continue working as they should. Often, septic tank lids are at ground level. In most cases, they have buried anywhere from four inches to four feet underground.

What is standard size of septic tank?

Length of septic tank (L) should be taken as 9feet 9 inches or 9.75 feet. Breadth of septic tank (B) should be taken as 6 feet 3 inches or 6.25 feet. The standard height (D) of septic tank should be taken as 5 feet 9 inches or 5.75 feet.

How deep should a septic drain be?

A typical drainfield trench is 18 to 30 inches in depth, with a maximum soil cover over the disposal field of 36 inches.

How deep are drain fields buried?

A typical drainfield trench is 18 to 30 inches in depth, with a maximum soil cover over the disposal field of 36 inches.

What is the minimum depth of a sewer line?

Building sewers that connect to private sewage disposal systems shall be a minimum of 36 inches (914 mm) below finished grade at the point of septic tank connection. Building sewers shall be a minimum of 36 inches (914 mm) below grade.

How long do septic tanks last?

A septic system’s lifespan should be anywhere from 15 to 40 years. How long the system lasts depends on a number of factors, including construction material, soil acidity, water table, maintenance practices, and several others.

How much does it cost to pump a septic tank?

How much does it cost to pump out a septic tank? The average cost is $300, but can run up to $500, depending on your location. The tank should be pumped out every three to five years.

How often should a septic tank be pumped?

Inspect and Pump Frequently The average household septic system should be inspected at least every three years by a septic service professional. Household septic tanks are typically pumped every three to five years.

How often does a 1000 gallon septic tank need to be pumped?

For example, a 1,000 gallon septic tank, which is used by two people, should be pumped every 5.9 years. If there are eight people using a 1,000-gallon septic tank, it should be pumped every year.

How do I size a septic tank for my house?

Consider the Size of Your Property The larger your home, the larger the septic tank you’re going to need. For instance, a house smaller than 1,500 square feet usually requires a 750 to 1,000-gallon tank.

How many lids are on a septic tank?

A septic tank installed before 1975 will have a single 24-inch concrete lid in the center of the rectangle. A two-compartment tank installed after 1975 will have two lids of either fiberglass or polyethylene, centered at opposite ends of the rectangle.

How do I calculate the size of my septic drain field?

Drainfield Size

  1. The size of the drainfield is based on the number of bedrooms and soil characteristics, and is given as square feet.
  2. For example, the minimum required for a three bedroom house with a mid range percolation rate of 25 minutes per inch is 750 square feet.

How much soil should be on top of a septic tank?

the depth of soil backfill over the septic tank lid or septic tank riser lid, ranging from 0″ (which means you should see it) to just a few inches (which means grass may be dead in this area) to 6-12″ or even more.

Septic Tank Design Depth – how deep should the septic tank be located

  • When establishing a septic tank, you may ask a QUESTION or make a COMMENT regarding how deep the septic tank should be located.

InspectAPedia does not allow any form of conflict of interest. The sponsors, goods, and services described on this website are not affiliated with us in any way. Design depth for a septic tank: What are the most frequent depths to which septic tanks, cesspools, seepage pits, and drywells are buried? Is it necessary to locate the septic tank below the frost line in order to prevent it from freezing? Septic tanks are placed at a certain depth, and there are various elements that impact the actual depth to which a septic tank (or cesspool, drywell, or soak-pit) will be sunk, which are discussed below.

For this topic, we also have anARTICLE INDEX available, or you may check the top or bottom of the page.

Septic Tank Installation Depth

Table of Contents for the Article Series

  • SEPTIC TANK DESIGN DEPTH- this article
  • SEPTIC TANK DESIGN DEPTH
  • SEPTIC TANKDRAINFIELDFREEZE PROTECTION

How Deep Should WePutthe Septic Tank at Original Installation?

Septic tanks may be built almost anywhere in the soil, regardless of its depth. When operating in a freezing climate, even in uninhabited homes, it is unlikely that the septic tank serving an occupied home or even an unoccupied one will freeze. This is due in part to latent heat received by the septic tank’s bottom from earth, in part to heat generated by bacteria in the septic tank, and in part to warm wastewater entering from a building served by the septic system, and in part to warm wastewater entering from the building served by the septic system.

You’ll kill the bacteria, damage the drainfield, and taint the surrounding ecosystem as a result of this.

Factors Determining Septic Tank Depth

The following are the primary elements that influence the actual depth at which a septic tank is likely to be buried (and, consequently, the depth to which you may have to dig to locate the septic tank) at a specific site:

  • The depth to which the lowest sewage line departs the structure that the septic tank serves is referred to as the sewer line depth. Given that we often rely on gravity to transport sewage from a building to a septic tank, the tank will be lower than the waste line that exits the building that it serves. a spot where the contractor discovered site characteristics suited for burying a septic tank because of its form, rocks, and impediments If a location has bedrock or huge rocks that are near to the surface, the tank may be relocated
  • The greater the distance between the tank and the structure, and the greater the depth of the tank if the system relies on gravity to carry sewage, the deeper the tank will be. We don’t place septic tanks any deeper than they need to be since we are normally transporting effluent from the septic tank to the drainfield by gravity as well as by pumping it out. Plumbers often build sewage lines to slope down from the inlet to the outlet at a rate of 1/8″ per foot to 1/4″ per foot of linear run of the waste pipe, depending on the kind of waste pipe. In order to avoid septic drainfield burial at an excessive depth, we must ensure that there is sufficient air in the soil, since the absence of oxygen deep in the soil will inhibit certain desired bacterial action (the aerobic bacteria) that is required to break down and process sewage. It is certainly possible to locate and position the septic tank anywhere, including uphill from the building, if a sewer ejector pump or grinder pump system is utilized to transport sewage from a structure to an underground storage tank. If a sewage effluent pump is used to transport septic effluent from the septic tank to the drainfield, we may, of course, locate the tank “downhill” from the drainfield as well
  • But, if a sewage effluent pump is not utilized, we cannot. Growing grass: If the septic tank is just 2 or 3 inches below the surface of the earth, you might as well have left the top of the tank visible, because grass will not grow in such thin soil as you would expect. Adding 6″ to 12″ of backfill may be sufficient to allow grass to grow over the septic system
  • However, this is a purely aesthetic issue and does not affect the system’s functionality. See SEPTIC SYSTEMS, OVERHAULED PLANTS
  • Recommendations from the manufacturer: Some modern septic treatment system designs need the use of a skilled system operator to perform highly specified inspection and maintenance intervals. According to the information provided atBAT MEDIA SEPTIC PLANTS, BAT septic systems (biologically accelerated treatment) are maintained or examined at 6-month intervals, among other things. According to the maker of that technology (Jet Inc.), it is extremely critical that the finishing grade slope away from the facility when completed. In addition, the grade must be at least 1″ below the bottom of the access covers to be considered. (Jet retired in 2016)

A service riser should be put in deep septic tanks to provide access to the tank. Plungers are large-diameter “wells” that are installed over the entrance and/or outlet ports of a septic tank in order to provide simple access for tank pumping, inspection, and baffle repair. Plungers are also used for septic tank pumping, inspection, and baffle repair. If the septic tank is sunk more than a few inches below the surface of the earth, good practice calls for the installation of a septic riser, which is a high diameter pipe that allows for easy access to the septic tank for inspection and cleaning.

Continue reading atSEPTIC TANK DEPTH to learn how to determine the depth of a septic tank’s cover, or choose a topic from the closely-related articles listed below, or see the completeARTICLE INDEX for more information.

Alternatively, view the FAQs on SEPTIC TANK DESIGN DEPTH – questions and answers that were originally posted on this page. Alternatively, consider the following:

Septic Tank Articles

  • The following topics are covered: SEPTIC DRAINFIELD LOCATION
  • SEPTIC DRAINFIELD SIZE
  • SEPTIC SYSTEM INSPECTION LEVELS
  • SEPTIC TANK COVERS
  • SEPTIC TANK DESIGN STRENGTH SPECS
  • SEPTIC TANKDRAINFIELDFREEZE PROTECTION
  • SEPTIC TANK, HOW TO FIND
  • SEPTIC
  • THE DISTANCE TO THE SEPTIC TANK
  • FINDING THE MAIN WASTE LINE EXIT
  • POSITIVE SEPTIC TANK LOCATIONS
  • SEPTIC TANK COVERS
  • SEPTIC TANK DEPTH
  • SEPTIC TANK DESIGN DEPTH
  • SEPTIC TANK LOCATING EQUIPMENT
  • SEPTIC TANK RISERS
  • SEPTIC TANK GRASS OR SNOWMELT
  • SEP
  • THE MISTAKES MADE IN SEPTIC TANK PUMPING
  • THE SEPTIC TANK PUMPING PROCEDURE
  • THE SEPTIC TANK PUMPING SCHEDULE
  • THE SEPTIC TANK RISERS
  • THE U.S. SEPTIC AUTHORITIESDESIGN SPECIFICATIONS
  • THE MISTAKES MADE IN SEPTIC TANK PUMPING

Suggested citation for this web page

DEPTH AT INSPECTION OF SEPTIC TANK DESIGN An online encyclopedia of building environmental inspection, testing, diagnosis, repair, and issue preventive information is available at Apedia.com. Alternatively, have a look at this.

See also:  How To Prolong Septic Tank Cleaning? (Question)

INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES:ARTICLE INDEX to SEPTIC SYSTEMS

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Citations can be shown or hidden by selecting Show or Hide Citations. InspectApedia.com is a publisher that provides references. Daniel Friedman is an American journalist and author.

How Deep Are Septic Tanks Buried? (And How Do You Find It?)

It is possible that this content contains affiliate links. It is possible that I will receive a commission if you make a purchase after clicking on an affiliate link. In addition, as an Amazon Associate, I receive a commission from qualifying purchases.- Septic tanks, for example, might become a requirement in more remote places where some services are not readily available or easily accessible. After all, we rely on contemporary conveniences such as adequate plumbing to make our lives more comfortable and easy.

Discovering the location of your septic tank in your yard, as well as what may be grown near or on top of it, will help you determine how much of your yard is suitable for regular gardening.

You May Not Know

Despite the fact that it appears to be something that every homeowner should be aware of, understanding how deep a septic tank is buried can be difficult to determine. Perhaps you forgot about the septic tank after it was installed years ago, or perhaps you are moving into a house that already has a septic tank constructed in previously. Whatever the situation, determining the depth of your septic tank can be a challenging task under the circumstances, especially if you are unsure of the location of the lids.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank

Perhaps you’re unsure of the location of your septic tank on your property and are attempting to identify it on your own. There are really quite a few quick and simple methods for determining the location of your tank without having to go through a lengthy process. The first method is to follow the path laid out by your sewer lines. Typically, the tank and your drain field will be placed along a line parallel to the sewage line that goes from your property out to the street. Your home’s crawl area or basement may even have a four-inch sewage line that leads away from the structure of the building.

  • Follow the pipe all the way across the yard, checking every few of feet to make sure you’re still on the right track, and then turn around.
  • When you don’t feel like digging around in your yard, you can always look up your house’s address in the county records database.
  • Diagrams with measurements and even the particular location of where the septic tank is located should be included in this document.
  • You can also choose to dig your lid out from under it.
  • This is what will tell you how many lids are on your septic tank and how many are missing.
  • The majority of septic tanks are rectangular in shape and measure around in the neighborhood of 5′ x 8′ in size.
  • If you are unable to determine the position of your septic tank using a probe, you will need to do a shallow excavation around the perimeter of the tank using a shovel in order to finally locate the lid.
  • First, look for visual cues to help you.
  • There is no doubt about it, this will tell you exactly where the tank is located beneath.
  • Take a look at the plumbing in your structure, as well as the overall state of the property, to get a good sense of where the tank is situated.

It will be full to just a few inches below the underside of your tank lid when your tank is fully charged to its regular level of filling capacity. If the lid is constructed of plastic, fiberglass, or steel, the upper surface of the lid may have some variation in color or texture.

Where Should the Septic Tank Be Located?

Should your property not currently have a septic tank, but you are interested in the prospect of adding one, it is important to know where it should go. Generally speaking, most septic tanks will be located in a range of 10 to 25 feet from the home. Please keep in mind that septic tanks cannot and should not be closer than five feet to your home. If you are trying to locate a tank that has already been installed on a property you just bought, you can use a probe to strike for flat concrete. This will indicate to you where the tank is.

Planting Above a Septic Tank

Even though it may not appear to be the finest idea in the world, putting vegetation over a septic tank may really be perfectly acceptable as long as you choose the appropriate plants to grow. Not only is it perfectly acceptable to do so, but it can also be quite beneficial depending on what you are planting and harvesting. It is possible to avoid erosion in your tank with the correct sort of vegetation, and it is even possible to absorb some of the additional moisture that might accumulate in your drain field.

  • Perennial plants and grasses (as previously indicated) are the ideal kind of plants to use in and around your drain field and septic tank.
  • You can use non-woody ground covers for a similar purpose as you do with woody ground covers.
  • Take, for example, the expanding environment.
  • If you don’t have access to enough sunshine, you might want to choose a shade garden plant instead.
  • Keep in mind that the soil that surrounds the septic tank drain field will typically be wetter than the surrounding soil in the rest of the yard.
  • As a result, choose a perennial such as a hollyhock, wild violet, or bee balm to ensure that you cover all of those bases when planting.
  • A septic system beneath these plants does not imply that deer will avoid the area because of its presence on your property.
  • Something like a spring bulb or an attractive grass that the deer aren’t generally interested in eating.

Plants That You Don’t Want to Grow

Just because you have the option of planting over your septic tank does not mean that everything is appropriate for this situation. A few plants should be avoided at all costs while landscaping around your septic tank, particularly huge trees that are known for their rapid growth. On the same vein, shrubs and trees with aggressive root systems are some of the worst plants to grow around your home. These roots will shoot out in quest of water, and they will not be concerned with where they locate it.

The infiltration of those roots into your septic drain field might result in catastrophic damage to your septic tank and drain field.

It’s possible that you’ll need a complete replacement.

Many other plants have strong root systems that you should avoid growing anywhere near your septic tank or drain field, and there are lots of them.

How Your Septic System Works

It is possible that understanding how your septic system operates may help you better manage, maintain, and care for it. Aside from that, it is just a large tank buried in the ground that collects your waste (which is true, but still). In remote locations, there may be a deficiency in sewage infrastructure. Because not every rural location is the same, it is not a given that septic systems will be required in your local rural area. The septic tank, in any case, serves as a form of wastewater treatment facility when there are no sewage lines available.

  1. The tank is designed to be waterproof, ensuring that your wastewater does not leech into the surrounding environment.
  2. Solids sink to the bottom of the container, scum rises to the top of the container, and liquids sit in the center of the three levels described above.
  3. The wastewater that is being discharged from your home is the cause of the exit.
  4. This liquid is carried out of your home through a pipe and into a bigger portion of your sanitary sewer system.
  5. Your drain is typically comprised of a network of perforated PVC pipes that are put underground in trenches to collect water and waste.
  6. Because the drains are perforated, the wastewater is allowed to seep out into the crushed gravel or stone, and then eventually into the surrounding soil.
  7. The natural evaporation process will then take care of any surplus moisture in the soil, unless you do something to prevent the water from flowing out of the pipes.

How to Plan a Septic Field

The tank is only one component of the whole equation. You’ll also need a drain field to catch all of the liquid waste that will be generated. When you are planting around your septic tank, the drain pipes are the most significant source of worry. Having those aggressive roots infiltrate and ruin your septic drain system is the very last thing you want. When this occurs, it can prevent your septic tank from emptying correctly and potentially cause it to get contaminated by groundwater. According to a solid rule of thumb, the less horticultural labor you have to do in close proximity to your septic tank, the better.

Just remember that they must be planted every year, so keep that in mind while planting them.

The first step is to fill in the septic drain field with earth.

In the second instance, too much mulch is being applied to the area in question. The third issue is that you may be watering your plants more than you should be. All three of these factors can impair the capacity of your drain field to evaporate in a typical manner.

What size of septic tank do I need?

Probably one of the last things on your mind when you are constructing a new house is the location of your septic system. After all, shopping for tanks isn’t nearly as entertaining as shopping for cabinetry, appliances, and floor coverings. Although you would never brag about it, your guests will be aware if you do not have the proper septic tank placed in your home or business.

septic tanks for new home construction

The exact size of the septic tank is determined mostly by the square footage of the house and the number of people who will be living in it. The majority of home septic tanks have capacities ranging from 750 to 1,250 gallons. A 1000 gallon tank will most likely be required for a typical 3-bedroom home that is smaller than 2500 square feet in size. Of course, all of this is dependent on the number of people who live in the house as well as the amount of water and waste that will be disposed of through the plumbing system.

See also:  What To Put In Shower With Septic Tank? (Solved)

For the most accurate assessment of your septic tank needs, you should speak with an experienced and trustworthy sewer business representative.

planning your drainfield

Here are some helpful hints for deciding where to locate your drainfield when you’re designing it.

  • Vehicles should not be allowed on or around the drainfield. Planting trees or anything else with deep roots along the bed of the drain field is not recommended. The roots jam the pipes on a regular basis. Downspouts and sump pumps should not be discharged into the septic system. Do not tamper with or change natural drainage features without first researching and evaluating the consequences of your actions on the drainage field. Do not construct extensions on top of the drain field or cover it with concrete, asphalt, or other materials. Create easy access to your septic tank cover by placing it near the entrance. Easy maintenance and inspection are made possible as a result. To aid with evaporation and erosion prevention, plant grass in the area.

a home addition may mean a new septic tank

Do not make any big additions or renovations to your house or company until you have had the size of your septic system assessed. If you want to build a house addition that is more than 10% of your total floor space, increases the number of rooms, or necessitates the installation of new plumbing, you will almost certainly need to expand your septic tank.

  • For a home addition that will result in increased use of your septic system, your local health department will require a letter from you that has been signed and authorized by a representative of your local health department confirming that your new septic system is capable of accommodating the increase in wastewater. It is not recommended that you replace your septic system without the assistance of a certified and competent contractor.

how to maintain your new septic system

Septic tank cleaning and septic tank pumping services are provided by Norway Septic Inc., a service-oriented company devoted to delivering outstanding septic tank cleaning and septic tank pumping services to households and business owners throughout the Michiana area. “We take great delight in finishing the task that others have left unfinished.” “They pump, we clean!” says our company’s motto. Septic systems are something we are familiar with from our 40 years of expertise, and we propose the following:

  • Make use of the services of a qualified specialist to develop a maintenance strategy. Make an appointment for an annual examination of your septic system. Utilize the services of an effluent filter to limit the amount of particles that exit the tank, so extending the life of your septic system. Waste items should be disposed of properly, and energy-efficient appliances should be used. Make sure you get your septic system professionally cleaned every 2 to 3 years, or more frequently if necessary, by an experienced and qualified expert
  • If you have any reason to believe that there is an issue with your system, contact a professional. It is far preferable to catch anything early than than pay the price later. Maintain a record of all septic system repairs, inspections, and other activities

common septic questions

Here are some of the most frequently asked questions by our septic customers.

How do I determine the size of my septic tank?

If you have a rectangular tank, multiply the inner height by the length to get the overall height of the tank. In order to find out how many gallons your septic tank contains, divide the number by.1337.1337

How many bedrooms does a 500-gallon septic tank support?

The exact size of the septic tank is determined mostly by the square footage of the house and the number of people who will be living in it. The majority of home septic tanks have capacities ranging from 750 to 1,250 gallons. A 1000 gallon tank will most likely be required for a typical 3-bedroom home that is smaller than 2500 square feet in size.

How deep in the ground is a septic tank?

Your septic system is normally buried between four inches and four feet underground, depending on the climate.

How deep are septic tank lines buried?

Depth. According to the Clemson Cooperative Extension, the pipes should be placed in the leach field at a depth of at least 6 inches and most likely between 18 and 36 inches deep. Because soil and water tables differ from state to state and even within states, each leach field must be designed specifically for that location. 4 feet and 8 inches Furthermore, how deep is a 1000-gallon septic-tank excavation?

Steel Septic Tank Typical Dimensions
Steel Septic Tank Size (Gallons Capacity) Tank Length (Inches) Tank Depth (Height) (Inches)
750 58 73
1000 58 96
1250 58 120

Is it possible for a septic tank to be excessively deep in this regard? The depth of the septic tank should not be more than is necessary, because effluent is normally transported from the septic tank to the drainfield by gravity as well as by pumping or suction. Plumbers often build sewage lines to slope down from the inlet to the outlet at a rate of 1/8″ per foot to 1/4″ per foot of linear run of the waste pipe, depending on the kind of waste pipe. Should the lids of septic tanks be buried?

You’ll have to dig for it unless the septic tank has special risers that keep the lid at ground level.

How to Find Your Septic Tank

Over time, all septic tanks become clogged with sediments and must be pumped out in order to continue functioning properly. Septic tank lids are frequently located at ground level. The majority of the time, they have been buried anywhere between four inches and four feet underground. In the event that you have recently purchased a property and are unsure as to where your septic tank is located, this article will give instructions on how to identify your septic tank. Noteworthy: While every property is unique, septic tanks are usually typically huge and difficult to build.

5 Ways to Find Your Septic Tank

1. Check with the municipal records. The most straightforward method of locating your septic tank is to review the building plans for your home that were approved by the local government. You should have received an application from the business that installed the septic tank, which should contain schematics and specifications that will help you to locate the precise location where the septic tank was installed. 2. Look for highs and lows in your data. The majority of septic tanks are constructed in such a way that they are barely noticeable.

  1. 3.
  2. Almost usually, your septic tank will be constructed near where the main sewage line exits your property.
  3. Septic tanks are typically positioned between ten and twenty-five feet away from a home’s foundation.
  4. When you do, that’s when your septic tank comes into play!
  5. Look for the Lid.
  6. You will most likely find two polyethylene or fiberglass covers positioned on opposing sides of the perimeter of your septic tank if it was built after 1975 and installed after 1975.
  7. Those areas should be excavated in order to disclose the lids.
  8. Get in touch with the pros.
  9. Lifting concrete lids will necessitate the use of specialized equipment.
  10. A fall into an unprotected septic tank has the potential to be lethal.
  11. Produce your own diagram of your yard, which you may file away with your other important house paperwork.

That’s all there is to it! If you’ve been wondering where your septic tank is, you now have five alternatives to choose from, which should make finding it easier than ever. To book a plumbing service in Bastrop County, please contact us now!

How Deep Should a Septic Leach Field Be?

Photograph courtesy of Valerie Loiseleux/E+/Getty Images.

In This Article

  • Drain Field Operation
  • Drain Field Depth
  • Drain Field Width and Length
  • How the Drain Field Works

It is critical to appropriately size a septic system’s drain or leach field, as an inadequately sized field might result in serious complications. Waste puddles appearing on your lawn are just one of the issues that might arise, therefore it’s crucial to grasp the fundamentals of how a drain field works. Although you are not required to become an expert in septic systems, a little information may go a long way toward ensuring that your drain field is in good operating condition.

Tip

The final depth of a septic system’s drain field is determined by a variety of factors. Drain fields, on the other hand, are typically between 2 and 5 feet deep.

How the Drain Field Works

Solid waste is contained in your septic tank until it is pumped out, which is the final step in the process. The bacteria found in that trash, on the other hand, is far more mobile in nature. As part of the septic process, solid waste is removed from your tank and deposited at the bottom of your tank, while wastewater (together with the bacteria it contains) is discharged from your tank and into your drain field. Once there, the water percolates through the soil and eventually joins the local groundwater supply system.

  • In the long run, bacteria are eaten by microbes in the soil.
  • This is a significant project that necessitates the establishment of correct soil conditions, including the selection of the appropriate drain fieldsize and depth.
  • Typically, a completed bed comprises 12 inches of gravel below the pipe and additional 2 inches of gravel on top of the pipe.
  • The end product is a drain field that is approximately 3 to 4 feet deep.
  • This type of circumstance might be caused by underground impediments.
  • High groundwater tables have the potential to accomplish the same thing, necessitating the installation of a drain field capable of filtering germs at a deeper depth in order to avoid pollution.

Occasionally, this is accomplished by making the drain field shallower, but wider or longer in length. In other cases, a mounded or elevated drain field will be required to prevent flooding.

Drain Field Width and Length

If you have more than one bedroom in your house, your septic system designer will figure out what size drain field you’ll need based on the number of bedrooms you have. In addition, the designer will take into consideration the zoning regulations, soil conditions, and the peculiarities of your lot while designing your home. According to many towns’ regulations, for example, your drain field must be at least a set distance away from your property line. The setbacks from streams, marshes, water supply lines (including local water wells), and other possible barriers are also defined by municipal construction standards.

In addition, pipes are frequently spaced 6 feet apart from one another.

The fact that they are spaced 6 feet apart, on the other hand, provides for the addition of more pipes at a 3-foot spacing if necessary in the future without enlarging the total footprint of the drain field.

It is then decided how this pipe should be laid out in relation to the amount of land available for the leach field to be used.

See also:  What Are The Repprcussions Of Buying A Unpermitted Septic Tank? (Solved)

How to Run a Septic Tank Line From Your House

A septic system is made up of two lengths of pipe that are connected together. Initially, it runs from the house, where the system services are located, to a tank, where the waste is separated and solids settle out. The second section runs from the tank to the drainage field, where fluids from the tank are dispersed into the earth underneath the tank. The process of installing the first run of pipe is quite similar to that of installing a traditional sewage line. It is necessary to maintain a downhill slope to the storage tank.

Locating the Septic Tank

The tank serves as the nerve center of the septic system. It is required to be situated between the residence and the drainage field. Each and every septic installation must begin with a soil test, and depending on the results, soil conditions may necessitate the placement of the tank in a less-than-ideal site for digging sewer lines. Also required are minimum setback distances from property borders, functioning wells, surface water and other obstructions to provide a safe working environment.

Tank Depth

A standard septic tank has a 4-inch intake at the top, which is positioned towards the bottom. Ideally, a 1/4-inch-per-foot slope toward the pipe from the house should be maintained by the pipe connecting to it. To put it another way, for every 10 feet of distance between a tank and a home, the inlet must be 2 1/2 inches lower than where the pipe departs the house at its lowest point.

The pipe usually exits at ground level, although it may need to pass beneath a foundation footing or concrete pad in rare cases. Because the pipe can never be reversed in its slope, the depth of the footing or pad at the bottom defines the depth of the tank below the surface.

Digging the Trench

The trench for the septic pipe should be dug before the hole for the tank since you will need a backhoe to complete the work and the tank will get in your way if it is already in the ground. To allow rainfall to drain properly, the pipe should be placed on a 2- or 3-inch bed of drain rock, so remember to account for this extra depth when digging. It is normal to use a four-inch pipe, and it should be installed far enough down to link with the main soil stack, which is a three-inch pipe that runs vertically past the main bathroom and through the roof of the home.

Precautions

Local building and health agencies will demand permits for a septic tank installation. You will also be required to submit a design plan before the permits will be provided, so prepare ahead of time. This layout should be developed in collaboration with a local builder who is familiar with the unique characteristics of the topography in your neighborhood. Stay away from planting trees or plants near the tank, drainage field, or any of the pipe systems. They will be drawn to the pipes in their hunt for nutrition, and their roots will be able to successfully block them.

Removal may be both expensive and time-consuming.

How to design a septic tank

septic tanks are designed to offer first treatment of sewage so that it may be safely disposed of in a sealed borehole or sand filter at the end of its useful life. Compared to cesspits, this sort of on-site sewage disposal system is a superior solution in environmentally sensitive locations and in projects with high sewage flow rates. The following are examples of scenarios in which septic tanks, or a greater level of treatment, is likely to be required: Agricultural operations

  • The following are prohibited: caves
  • Wastewater disposal less than 40 feet away from inshore waterways
  • Wastewater disposal less than 4 feet above the mean high water (MHW) level. The cesspit should also be constructed to have a minimum depth of 6ft below the invert of the lowest sewage pipe, which when combined with MHW being 1.3ft above Mean Sea Level means that the cesspit will require a minimum depth of 12ft below grade to the water table in order to be deemed appropriate. Otherwise, a septic tank will be required
  • Projects with 10-50 bedrooms (1000-5000 Igpd) in ecologically sensitive regions
  • Any residential developments with more than 50 bedrooms
  • And any residential developments with more than 50 bedrooms.

Requirements

The Department of Planning must be notified of any development that necessitates the installation of a septic tank. The Department of Health will evaluate the proposal when it reaches the building permit stage of the planning application process, which is the next step. If a waste disposal borehole is necessary for the tank, a separate approval for a Water Right from the Environmental Authority is required. Applicants must submit a copy of their Water Right application to the Department of Environment and Natural Resources together with their construction permit application.

Construction

All septic tanks must be built of concrete block, fiberglass, or polyethylene to ensure that they are watertight. A minimum of 12 inches of plastering and sponge floating must be applied to all interior surfaces of concrete block tanks constructed with Type 50 sulphate-resistant cement. They must be planned and constructed in such a way that they can sustain all projected loads and fulfill the structural criteria of the Department of Planning. Appendix 1: Septic Tank Design may be seen online.

Design of Septic Tanks

A minimum of two compartments must be present in septic tanks. There should be no less than two-thirds of the total capacity, or less than 416 imperial gallons liquid capacity, in the intake compartment, which shall be a minimum of three feet broad and five feet long (inside measurements). 208 imperial gallons is the minimum capacity required for the secondary compartment of a septic tank, with a maximum capacity equal to one-third of the overall tank capacity. It is required that the minimum length be 2 feet 6 inches.

The depth that is ideal is 48 inches.

3-4″ transfer pipes should be installed in the baffle wall between the first and second chambers, 12″ below the top of the liquid level measured from the top of the pipes, to connect the two chambers together.

Large rectangular tanks must be created with the longest dimensions parallel to the direction of flow, and their shortest dimensions parallel to the direction of flow. The internal diameter of cylindrical tanks must be at least 48 inches on the inside.

Inlets and Outlets

The outflow of the septic tank should be elevated above the high water table so that it will not be inundated at any time during tidal or rainfall changes, unless otherwise specified. Because of the lack of a historical record of water table changes at this location, the invert of the outflow should be located no lower than three feet above the nearest ordnance datum point. All tanks or tank compartments should be equipped with sanitary tees or baffles constructed of acceptable materials and designed to disperse flow and retain scum in the tanks or compartments at the inlet and outflow.

It is required that a minimum of 2 inches of open space be supplied above the top of the baffles or tees.

Appendix 1: Septic Tank Design may be seen online.

Manholes

At least one manhole opening 24 inches square or diameter should be provided in each compartment of a tank and shall be situated over the inlet or outlet of the tank. Any septic tank with an inlet compartment that is more than 12 feet long must have an extra manhole installed above the dividing wall. Manholes must be finished flush with the grade or in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications.

Manhole covers

Covers made of concrete, steel, cast iron, or other permitted materials must be installed over manholes to prevent water from getting into the hole.

Double Running TrapVent

There must be no installation of a double running trap and vent on the drain line leading into the septic tank.

Capacity of Septic Tanks

The minimum liquid capacity for all tanks, with the exception of Klargester spherical septic tanks, is 624 imperial gallons. The minimum liquid capacity for Klargester spherical septic tanks is 616 imperial gallons. In addition to three bedrooms, the septic tank’s liquid capacity must be raised by 150 gallons for each additional bedroom above three bedrooms.

Other Buildings

Calculation of liquid capacities for septic tanks other than residential septic tanks is performed using the values listed in Table 802.7.2 of the Standard Private Sewage Disposal Code 2007, which is published by the Southern Building Code Congress International and is available at the Department of Health.

Installation

Septic tanks must be placed with a minimum horizontal distance between various elements, as specified in the table below, to ensure proper operation. Prefabricated tanks that are subjected to submersion in groundwater must be constructed for such uses and be properly anchored in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications. All septic tank installations, with the exception of those built of concrete block, must have a 3 inch thick compacted sand bedding base installed.

Minimum Horizontal Separation Distances for Septic Tanks

Element Distance (Feet)
Building 10
Potable Water Tank 20
Foundation Wall 10
Pond, Shoreline 40
Boundary 10
Well 20
Swimming Pool 20

Maintenance and Sludge Disposal

Whenever the total thickness of settled sludge and floating scum exceeds one-third of the tank’s liquid capacity, a septic tank should be cleaned.

12 months is the very minimum amount of time that should pass between cleanings. Everything that is septage must be disposed of at the Government Septage Facility, which is currently located near Tynes Bay on Palmetto Road.

Final Effluent Disposal Methods

The Department of Environment and Natural Resources must approve the final disposal technique before it can be implemented. Boreholes and sand filters must be designed in accordance with the following criteria:

Boreholes

A grout that has been certified for use in boreholes and applied throughout the whole depth of the annular area between the casing and the formation must be used to case and seal the borehole. Two inches must be allowed for the annular gap to be as wide as possible. According to the Environmental Authority, the sealed depth of the borehole must be defined (typically between 40 feet and 110 feet below sea level), and there must be at least 20 feet of open hole below the sealed part. The site of the borehole must be authorized by the Environmental Authority before it may be dug.

Sand Filters

Sand filters must be designed adequately for the flow rates that will be encountered. The minimum measurements for homes with up to three bedrooms must be three feet by four feet by four feet in depth. The discharge into the sand filter must be accomplished by the use of perforated PVC spreader pipes that are positioned on top of the sand. To allow for the cleaning and replacement of sand as needed, access to the sand filter chamber must be granted. Appendix 3 on Septic Tank Design can be seen online.

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