What Is Good Fo0R Septic Tank? (Correct answer)

  • Mild Soaps Mild hand soaps and dish detergents are best for home septic tanks. Septic systems rely on bacteria buildup within the tank to break down waste for settling and dispersal to the soil. 18 Related Question Answers Found Is liquid soap bad for septic systems? Most all-natural cleaners are septic safe.

How do I keep my septic tank healthy?

Do’s and Don’ts when maintaining your septic system

  1. Regularly inspect and maintain your septic system.
  2. Pump your septic tank as needed.
  3. Keep your septic tank lids closed and secured.
  4. Be water-wise.
  5. Direct water from land and roof drains away from the drainfield.
  6. Landscape with love.
  7. Keep septic tank lids easily accessible.

What is the best thing to put in your septic tank?

Biological Additives. Biological additives, like bacteria and extracellular enzymes, are the only acceptable septic tank treatment for promoting a healthy, natural bacterial ecosystem, maintaining an effective drain field, and protecting the health of the local groundwater.

What is the best bacteria to put in septic tank?

Much like your stomach, septic tanks need good bacteria and enzymes to break down the solids that pass through it. These beneficial bacteria and enzymes can come from several sources, but our favorite is actually rotten tomatoes. These naturally occurring enzymes are proteins called Pectinase or Pectinolytic enzymes.

Is a mound septic system bad?

A mound septic system is an alternative to other septic tank systems. It rests near the top of the ground and does not use a container for the waste. This type of septic system disposes the waste through sand, and the ground will absorb the waste. The mound septic system has many good points and bad points.

What are the signs that your septic tank is full?

Here are some of the most common warning signs that you have a full septic tank:

  • Your Drains Are Taking Forever.
  • Standing Water Over Your Septic Tank.
  • Bad Smells Coming From Your Yard.
  • You Hear Gurgling Water.
  • You Have A Sewage Backup.
  • How often should you empty your septic tank?

How can I increase bacteria in my septic tank naturally?

Homemade Septic Tank Treatment The ingredients required for this natural solution are the following: Water, Sugar, Cornmeal, and Dry Yeast. To concoct this mixture, first start by boiling roughly a half gallon of water. Add in 2 cups of sugar. The sugar will act as the first food your bacteria will eat!

What can break down poop in septic tank?

Yeast helps actively breaks down waste solids when added to your septic system. Flush ½ cup of dry baking yeast down the toilet, the first time. Add ¼ cup of instant yeast every 4 months, after the initial addition.

How do I increase bacteria in my septic tank?

Flush a packet of brewer’s dry yeast down one toilet on the bottom floor of your house once a month. The yeast will help add “good” bacteria to your septic tank and break down waste.

Is beer good for septic tanks?

Do not flush meat, buttermilk, yeast, vegetables, beer etc. down your drain to “Feed” your septic system. This will kill the good bacteria in your septic system.

Can you put too much bacteria in a septic tank?

Too much of a good thing can cause problems. A septic system relies on the correct balance of bacteria to do its job. An overpopulation of bacteria can deplete the oxygen in the septic tank and turn the environment septic. A septic, septic system is one in which the ecosystem within the tank is out of balance.

How do I clean my septic tank naturally?

You can mix about a 1/4 cup of baking soda with 1/2 cup of vinegar and 2 tablespoons lemon to make your own natural cleaning agent. The baking soda will fizz up to help get the dirt and grime in your tub and drains. It’s a great cleaner and your septic system will thank you!

How often should a 1000 gallon septic tank be pumped?

For example, a 1,000 gallon septic tank, which is used by two people, should be pumped every 5.9 years. If there are eight people using a 1,000-gallon septic tank, it should be pumped every year.

Should you mow a septic mound?

To prevent compaction, do not allow any vehicles or heavy equipment on the mound. When mowing the lawn, use a hand mower, rather than a riding mower. This will also help protect the mound from losing soil to erosion. The slope of the mound makes it more susceptible to erosion than a conventional drain field.

How long does a mound septic last?

Replace the pump instead of repairing it to avoid unexpected system failure. How Often Do Septic Tanks Need to Be Replaced? A septic tank can last between 20 and 40 years. The lifespan depends on the tank’s material.

Can you walk on a septic mound?

Low-maintenance perennial plants that minimize the need to walk on the mound are ideal. Walking compacts the soil and may interfere with the evaporation of effluents. Do as little digging as possible when planting to avoid disturbing the mound and be sure to wear gloves to minimize your physical contact with the soil.

Best septic tank treatments for rural homeowners

If you reside in a rural area of the United States, the chances are good that you will not be linked to a municipal water and sewer system. This means that your water will come from a well, and your body waste will be disposed of in a septic tank. It is the latter that we will be discussing in this article. After all, while septic tanks are capable of decomposing human waste on their own, they occasionally require assistance, and it is at this point that we as homeowners turn to the internet for information on the finest septic tank treatments available.

Consider it to be akin to re-digesting the solids before sending them to a distribution box (D-box) and then out onto a leaching field to break them down.

If anything isn’t operating properly, you may find yourself stuck with obstructions and a buildup of gasses.

After all, septic repairs are not inexpensive – I had to have my leaching field replaced a few years ago, which resulted in a bill of several thousand dollars.

In all likelihood, it will require pumping, however we have been able to go even longer without the need for pumping.

Here are 5 of the greatest septic tank treatments that we’ve come across that you may use if you need to give your septic system a little more TLC:

Green Gobbler Septic Saver Pacs

You are likely to be disconnected from a municipal water and sewer system if you reside in a rural area of the United States. This means that your water will come from a well and your body waste will be put in a septic tank, as is common in rural areas. What we’re going to speak about here is the latter scenario, namely. After all, while septic tanks are capable of decomposing human waste on their own, they occasionally require assistance, and it is at this point that we as homeowners turn to the internet for information on the finest septic tank treatment options.

Every home is going to be a bit different in terms of what it need to do this – the size of the home (and, consequently, the size of the septic tank), the layout of the property, and other elements are all important considerations.

A good septic tank treatment may introduce millions or billions of active bacteria to the septic tank, which can aid in the restoration of the tank’s equilibrium and the restoration of its ability to function correctly if it has been neglected.

Every three to five years, regardless of whether or not you are using septic tank treatment, it is recommended that you have your tank professionally examined.

Whatever the case may be, it all comes down to how large your family is in relation to the tank’s capacity and how strictly you adhere to the rule of not flushing anything other than waste and toilet paper down the drain (things like cat litter and feminine hygiene products don’t break down naturally and can cause clogs).

If you find that you need to give your septic systems a little boost, here are 5 of the greatest septic tank treatments that we’ve come across thus far:

Rid-X Septic Tank Treatment Enzymes

This is the brand that you’ll see the most advertisements for on television, and in our experience, these enzyme pacs are really effective! Septic backups are prevented by continually breaking down household waste – the natural bacteria and sophisticated enzymes begin working instantly to target paper, protein, oils, and grease. Rid-X is available in a variety of sizes. One packet of provides a one-month treatment for septic tanks ranging in capacity from 700 to 1,500 gallons. To use, simply insert a pouch in your toilet and flush it down the toilet.

Instant Power 1868 Septic Shock

Septic Shock unclogs and deodorizes blocked, foul-smelling septic systems while also aiding in the digestion of soap, paper and grease. Pouring two liters (one container) of bleach directly into the toilet and flushing it will introduce millions of helpful bacteria to the system. This product comprises bacterial/enzyme strains of lipase (grease), protease (protein), cellulose (paper), and alpha amylase, which work together to breakdown system-clogging waste and debris.

Bio-Tab for Septic Systems

Using this ecologically friendly septic tank treatment will not affect your plumbing or septic system because it is non-corrosive and non-poisonous. Each container has a year’s worth of supplies (14 no-mess pills), as well as a calendar on the lid to keep track of your monthly use. Bio-Tab is made up of organisms that have been considered safe by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and is non-toxic to people and animals.

Walex Bio-Active Drop-Ins Septic Additive

Each month, you’ll receive a box that is safe for all types of plumbing and environmentally friendly – just put it in the toilet and flush it. With each dose, billions of bacteria and septic-specific enzymes are released, assisting in the prevention of blockages and the dissolution of solid materials. The use of Bio-Active helps to replenish the biological population of beneficial worker bacteria and enzymes, which are responsible for solids reduction. Each package contains 12 packets, which is enough for a year’s supply.

Purchases made through the retail links in our product evaluations result in commissions being earned by us.

On AG Daily, there is sponsored content.

Types of Septic Systems

Septic system design and size can differ significantly from one neighborhood to the next, as well as throughout the country, due to a variety of variables. Household size, soil type, slope of the site, lot size, closeness to sensitive water bodies, weather conditions, and even municipal ordinances are all considerations to take into consideration. The following are 10 of the most often encountered septic system configurations. It should be noted that this is not an exhaustive list; there are several additional types of septic systems.

  • Septic Tank, Conventional System, Chamber System, Drip Distribution System, Aerobic Treatment Unit, Mound Systems, Recirculating Sand Filter System, Evapotranspiration System, Constructed Wetland System, Cluster / Community System, etc.

Septic Tank

This tank is underground and waterproof, and it was designed and built specifically for receiving and partially treating raw home sanitary wastewater.

Generally speaking, heavy materials settle at or near the bottom of the tank, whereas greases and lighter solids float to the surface. The sediments are retained in the tank, while the wastewater is sent to the drainfield for further treatment and dispersion once it has been treated.

Conventional System

Septic tanks and trench or bed subsurface wastewater infiltration systems are two types of decentralized wastewater treatment systems (drainfield). When it comes to single-family homes and small businesses, a traditional septic system is the most common type of system. For decades, people have used a gravel/stone drainfield as a method of water drainage. The term is derived from the process of constructing the drainfield. A short underground trench made of stone or gravel collects wastewater from the septic tank in this configuration, which is commonly used.

Effluent filters through the stone and is further cleaned by microorganisms once it reaches the soil below the gravel/stone trench, which is located below the trench.

Chamber System

Gravelless drainfields have been regularly utilized in various states for more than 30 years and have evolved into a standard technology that has mostly replaced gravel systems. Various configurations are possible, including open-bottom chambers, pipe that has been clothed, and synthetic materials such as expanded polystyrene media. Gravelless systems can be constructed entirely of recycled materials, resulting in considerable reductions in carbon dioxide emissions during their lifetime. The chamber system is a type of gravelless system that can be used as an example.

  1. The key advantage of the chamber system is the enhanced simplicity with which it can be delivered and built.
  2. This sort of system is made up of a number of chambers that are connected to one another.
  3. Wastewater is transported from the septic tank to the chambers through pipes.
  4. The wastewater is treated by microbes that live on or near the soil.

Drip Distribution System

An effluent dispersal system such as the drip distribution system may be employed in a variety of drainfield configurations and is very versatile. In comparison to other distribution systems, the drip distribution system does not require a vast mound of dirt because the drip laterals are only placed into the top 6 to 12 inches of soil. In addition to requiring a big dosage tank after the sewage treatment plant to handle scheduled dose delivery of wastewater to drip absorption areas, the drip distribution system has one major disadvantage: it is more expensive.

This method necessitates the use of additional components, such as electrical power, which results in a rise in costs as well as higher maintenance.

Aerobic Treatment Unit

Aerobic Treatment Units (ATUs) are small-scale wastewater treatment facilities that employ many of the same procedures as a municipal sewage plant. An aerobic system adds oxygen to the treatment tank using a pump. When there is an increase in oxygen in the system, there is an increase in natural bacterial activity, which then offers extra treatment for nutrients in the effluent. It is possible that certain aerobic systems may additionally include a pretreatment tank as well as a final treatment tank that will include disinfection in order to further lower pathogen levels.

ATUs should be maintained on a regular basis during their service life.

Mound Systems

Using mound systems in regions with short soil depth, high groundwater levels, or shallow bedrock might be a good alternative. A drainfield trench has been dug through the sand mound that was erected. The effluent from the septic tank runs into a pump chamber, where it is pumped to the mound in the amounts recommended. During its release to the trench, the effluent filters through the sand and is dispersed into the native soil, where it continues to be treated. However, while mound systems can be an effective solution for some soil conditions, they demand a significant amount of land and require regular care.

See also:  How Long Is California Septic Tank Certification Valid? (Perfect answer)

Recirculating Sand Filter System

Sand filter systems can be built either above or below ground, depending on the use. The effluent is discharged from the septic tank into a pump compartment. Afterwards, it is pushed into the sand filter. The sand filter is often made of PVC or a concrete box that is filled with a sand-like substance. The effluent is pushed through the pipes at the top of the filter under low pressure to the drain. As the effluent exits the pipelines, it is treated as it passes through the sand filtering system.

However, sand filters are more costly than a standard septic system because they provide a higher level of nutrient treatment and are thus better suited for areas with high water tables or that are adjacent to bodies of water.

Evapotranspiration System

Evaporative cooling systems feature drainfields that are one-of-a-kind. It is necessary to line the drainfield at the base of the evapotranspiration system with a waterproof material. Following the entry of the effluent into the drainfield, it evaporates into the atmosphere. At the same time, the sewage never filters into the soil and never enters groundwater, unlike other septic system designs. It is only in particular climatic circumstances that evapotranspiration systems are effective.

The environment must be desert, with plenty of heat and sunshine, and no precipitation. These systems perform effectively in shallow soil; but, if it rains or snows excessively, they are at risk of failing completely.

Constructed Wetland System

Construction of a manufactured wetland is intended to simulate the treatment processes that occur in natural wetland areas. Wastewater goes from the septic tank and into the wetland cell, where it is treated. Afterwards, the wastewater goes into the media, where it is cleaned by microorganisms, plants, and other media that eliminate pathogens and nutrients. Typically, a wetland cell is constructed with an impermeable liner, gravel and sand fill, and the necessary wetland plants, all of which must be capable of withstanding the constant saturation of the surrounding environment.

As wastewater travels through the wetland, it may escape the wetland and flow onto a drainfield, where it will undergo more wastewater treatment before being absorbed into the soil by bacteria.

Cluster / Community System

In certain cases, a decentralized wastewater treatment system is owned by a group of people and is responsible for collecting wastewater from two or more residences or buildings and transporting it to a treatment and dispersal system placed on a suitable location near the dwellings or buildings. Cluster systems are widespread in settings like rural subdivisions, where they may be found in large numbers.

How to Care for Your Septic System

Septic system maintenance is neither difficult or expensive, and it does not have to be done frequently. The maintenance of a vehicle is comprised of four major components:

  • Inspect and pump your drainfield on a regular basis
  • Conserve water
  • Dispose of waste properly
  • And keep your drainfield in good condition.

Inspect and Pump Frequently

Inspection of the ordinary residential septic system should be performed by a septic service specialist at least once every three years. Household septic tanks are normally pumped every three to five years, depending on how often they are used. Alternative systems that use electrical float switches, pumps, or mechanical components should be examined more frequently, typically once a year, to ensure that they are in proper working order. Because alternative systems contain mechanical components, it is essential to have a service contract.

  • The size of the household
  • The total amount of wastewater produced
  • The amount of solids present in wastewater
  • The size of the septic tank

Service provider coming? Here is what you need to know.

When you contact a septic service provider, he or she will inspect your septic tank for leaks as well as the scum and sludge layers that have built up over time. Maintain detailed records of any maintenance work conducted on your septic system. Because of the T-shaped outlet on the side of your tank, sludge and scum will not be able to escape from the tank and travel to the drainfield region. A pumping is required when the bottom of the scum layer or the top of the sludge layer is within six inches of the bottom of the outlet, or if the top of the sludge layer is within 12 inches of the bottom of the outlet.

In the service report for your system, the service provider should mention the completion of repairs as well as the condition of the tank.

If additional repairs are recommended, contact a repair professional as soon as possible. An online septic finder from the National Onsite Wastewater Recycling Association (NOWRA) makes it simple to identify service specialists in your region.

Use Water Efficiently

In a normal single-family house, the average indoor water consumption is about 70 gallons per person, per day, on average. A single leaking or running toilet can waste as much as 200 gallons of water each day, depending on the situation. The septic system is responsible for disposing of all of the water that a residence sends down its pipes. The more water that is conserved in a household, the less water that enters the sewage system. A septic system that is operated efficiently will operate more efficiently and will have a lower chance of failure.

  • Toilets with a high level of efficiency. The usage of toilets accounts for 25 to 30% of total home water use. Many older homes have toilets with reservoirs that hold 3.5 to 5 gallons of water, but contemporary, high-efficiency toilets consume 1.6 gallons or less of water for each flush. Changing out your old toilets for high-efficiency versions is a simple approach to lessen the amount of household water that gets into your septic system. Aerators for faucets and high-efficiency showerheads are also available. Reduce water use and the volume of water entering your septic system by using faucet aerators, high-efficiency showerheads, and shower flow restriction devices. Machines for washing clothes. Water and energy are wasted when little loads of laundry are washed on the large-load cycle of your washing machine. By selecting the appropriate load size, you may limit the amount of water wasted. If you are unable to specify a load size, only complete loads of washing should be performed. Washing machine use should be spread throughout the week if at all possible. Doing all of your household laundry in one day may appear to be a time-saving strategy
  • Nevertheless, it can cause damage to your septic system by denying your septic tank adequate time to handle waste and may even cause your drainfield to overflow. Machines that have earned theENERGY STARlabel consume 35 percent less energy and 50 percent less water than ordinary ones, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Other Energy Star appliances can save you a lot of money on your energy and water bills.

Properly Dispose of Waste

Everything that goes down your drains, whether it’s flushed down the toilet, ground up in the trash disposal, or poured down the sink, shower, or bath, ends up in your septic system, which is where it belongs. What you flush down the toilet has an impact on how effectively your septic system functions.

Toilets aren’t trash cans!

Your septic system is not a garbage disposal system. A simple rule of thumb is to never flush anything other than human waste and toilet paper down the toilet. Never flush a toilet:

  • Cooking grease or oil
  • Wipes that are not flushable, such as baby wipes or other wet wipes
  • Photographic solutions
  • Feminine hygiene items Condoms
  • Medical supplies such as dental floss and disposable diapers, cigarette butts and coffee grounds, cat litter and paper towels, pharmaceuticals, and household chemicals such as gasoline and oil, insecticides, antifreeze, and paint or paint thinners

Toilet Paper Needs to Be Flushed! Check out this video, which demonstrates why the only item you should flush down your toilet are toilet paper rolls.

Think at the sink!

Your septic system is made up of a collection of living organisms that digest and treat the waste generated by your household. Pouring pollutants down your drain can kill these organisms and cause damage to your septic system as well as other things. Whether you’re at the kitchen sink, the bathtub, or the utility sink, remember the following:

  • If you have a clogged drain, avoid using chemical drain openers. To prevent this from happening, use hot water or a drain snake
  • Never dump cooking oil or grease down the sink or toilet. It is never a good idea to flush oil-based paints, solvents, or huge quantities of harmful cleansers down the toilet. Even latex paint waste should be kept to a bare minimum. Disposal of rubbish should be avoided or limited to a minimum. Fats, grease, and particles will be considerably reduced in your septic tank, reducing the likelihood of your drainfield being clogged.

Own a recreational vehicle (RV), boat or mobile home?

If you have ever spent any time in an RV or boat, you are undoubtedly familiar with the issue of aromas emanating from sewage holding tanks.

  • The National Small Flows Clearinghouse’s Septic System Care hotline, which may be reached toll-free at 800-624-8301, has a factsheet on safe wastewater disposal for RV, boat, and mobile home owners and operators.

Maintain Your Drainfield

It is critical that you maintain the integrity of your drainfield, which is a component of your septic system that filters impurities from the liquid that emerges from your septic tank once it has been installed. Here are some things you should do to keep it in good condition:

  • Parking: Do not park or drive on your drainfield at any time. Plan your tree plantings so that their roots do not grow into your drainfield or septic system. An experienced septic service provider can recommend the appropriate distance for your septic tank and surrounding landscaping, based on your specific situation. Locating Your Drainfield: Keep any roof drains, sump pumps, and other rainfall drainage systems away from the drainfield area. Excess water causes the wastewater treatment process to slow down or halt completely.

7 Tips to Take Care of Your Septic System

Every editorial product is chosen on its own merits, while we may be compensated or earn an affiliate commission if you purchase something after clicking on one of our affiliate links. As of the time of writing, the ratings and pricing are correct, and all goods are in stock.

Maintaining a home’s septic system may seem like a daunting and stinky task, but it’s really not. Being mindful of what you’re doing inside the home will keep the system healthy.

Preventing and treating problems with your septic system is not difficult and does not have to be expensive. Failure to maintain your septic system, on the other hand, might result in significant financial loss, since digging up and rebuilding a septic system can cost tens of thousands of dollars.

What Is a Septic System?

Because it handles all of the wastewater that comes from your home, including the water from the bathrooms, kitchen, and laundry room, if your home is not connected to a municipal water and sewer system, your septic system is essential. Septic systems are generally comprised of a tank, into which wastewater is channeled for treatment and the particles are separated from the liquid.

Microorganisms break down the organic stuff in wastewater, allowing it to be recycled. A perforated pipe system transports wastewater from there to a drain or leach field, which collects the effluent. Either the wastewater will evaporate or it will seep into the surrounding land.

Get Familiar With Your Septic System

Understanding how your septic tank works, what sort of system it is, and where it is placed are all important first steps in proper maintenance. The county or town should keep a record of the permit, as well as a chart showing the tank’s layout and placement, because state rules demand a permit for septic system installation. Visual clues, such as sewage covers, or the direction in which the sewer pipe, which is located in the basement, runs out of the home, may be able to assist you in your search.

Have It Pumped Routinely

Every three to five years, the ordinary residential septic system should be pumped (that is, the sediments should be removed). According on the size of the tank, the typical price of pumping a residential septic tank is between $300 and $600. When you contact a septic service company, they will also inspect your septic tank for leaks and evaluate the sludge layers in your tank for any problems. Remember to save a copy of any maintenance paperwork pertaining to work performed on your septic tank.

Spread Your Washing Machine/Dishwasher Usage Throughout the Week

You may believe that scheduling a “laundry day,” during which you wash all of your clothing and possibly even run your dishwasher, would save you time. However, it puts a great deal of strain on your septic system. If you don’t allow your septic system enough time to process the wastewater, you risk overloading the system and flooding your drainfield with wastewater. Replace this with doing a full load of laundry (to ensure that you are not wasting water) a couple of times a week.

Don’t Treat Your Toilet Like a Trash Can

The only item that should be flushed down the toilet that does not come out of your body is toilet paper. Everything else should be discarded. This implies that there will be no tissues, diapers, feminine items, hair, dental floss, or anything else. Toilet paper is supposed to decompose in the septic tank after it has been used. Any additional materials are not permitted; they will clog and cause harm to your septic tank. Make sure you use toilet paper that is safe for use with your septic system.

Think About What You Dump Down the Kitchen Sink Drain

We flush a variety of items down the kitchen sink that might cause serious damage to a septic system. Never flush objects down the sink drain, including coffee grounds, eggshells, medicine, produce stickers, flour, and other such items. All of these things can clog pipes and cause screens to get obstructed. Do not dispose of any oil, including cooking oils and paint, grease, and fat since these substances will block your sewer line and cause it to back up into your home. Even dairy products such as milk, cream, and butter are harmful if they are flushed down the toilet.

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When you use a garbage disposal in conjunction with a septic tank, the ground-up food particles contribute to the layer of solids that accumulates at the bottom of the tank’s bottom.

Therefore, householders must exercise extra caution to ensure that only biodegradable food waste is flushed down the garbage disposal.

Be Careful With Cleaning Chemicals

Cleaning agents that homeowners use can be harmful to the beneficial microorganisms in their septic systems. When washing textiles, avoid using harsh chemicals such as bleach. If you absolutely must, use only a little quantity of the product. Use of drain cleaners is discouraged since, in addition to destroying beneficial bacteria, they can cause harm to the tank itself. Alternatively, if a plunger does not work, a toilet drain snake, which is also effective on clogged kitchen and bathroom sinks, may be used.

Quaternary ammonia is also present in antibacterial soaps and disinfectants, which should be avoided.

Protect Your Drainfield

As previously said, proper management of your drainfield begins with careful monitoring of water consumption and the materials that enter your septic system. Never drive or park a vehicle on top of your drainage system. Make certain that gutters and sump pumps discharge water far enough away from the drainfield to prevent flooding. Avoid growing trees and bushes in close proximity to the drainfield since the roots of these plants might interfere with the pipes.

How To Keep Your Septic System Healthy

The most recent update was made on June 26, 2020 by Choosing to live in the country is a popular choice for many people who appreciate the peace and quiet, wide open spaces, and natural beauty that the countryside has to offer. What I’m going to talk about today, on the other hand, is something that may not sound or smell all that pleasant: Onsite Sewage Treatment and Disposal System (OSTDS). Understanding how these systems work, as well as how to keep them operating at peak performance, is critical to the health of your family.

What is a septic system?

Figure 1 is a section-view depiction of a contemporary septic system installed beneath a residential structure. Septic systems are available in a variety of shapes and sizes. The traditional septic system is the most popular type of onsite wastewater treatment system (Figure 1). Septic tanks and soil absorption fields, commonly known as drainfields, are two components of a septic system. In order for wastewater to exit a residence, it must first pass through the septic tank, which is an enclosed waterproof container in which solid wastes are separated from liquid wastes.

The partly treated effluent was then discharged onto the drainfield.

Septic systems that use aerobic treatment units (ATUs) are the other type of septic systems that are used in Florida.

An aerobic system adds oxygen to the treatment tank using a pump.

ATUs are typically found in residences with smaller lots, poor soil conditions, or in homes that are in close proximity to a surface water source. The following factors were critical to the operation and maintenance:

  • The wastewater treatment technologies that are used to eliminate toxins from wastewater
  • The volume of wastewater that the system is capable of handling
  • Solids, nutrients, organic debris, and pathogens are all factors that influence the strength of wastewater.
How to maintain a conventional septic system?

Solids should be removed from a typical three-bedroom home with a 1000-gallon septic tank every three to five years, according to industry standards. Tanks with a smaller capacity must be pumped more frequently. Make sure you don’t put off this work until the tank and sewer are completely full, and the toilet spills onto the bathroom floor. If this occurs, it is possible that a new drainfield will need to be installed.

Do septic tank additives work?

Whether you believe it or not, your septic tank chemicals that “clean” the tank are not actually cleaning the tank. They are either ineffective or may cause sediments to be drained from the septic tank into the drianfield, resulting in clogging difficulties in the drianfield. Other chemicals may be used to create a septic tank effluent that will degrade soil structure and cause the drain field to collapse prematurely as a result.

What can I flush?

When opposed to regular toilet paper, the usage of items such as “flushable” wipes has been promoted as providing a superior cleaning experience in recent years. There are a number of methods in which these items are advertised, including as “septic-safe,” “break down like toilet paper,” and “safe for sewer and septic.” However, as compared to ordinary toilet paper, they tend to take far longer to decompose, which is an issue. Consequently, they may cause significant clogs in sewage systems and must be manually removed from lift stations.

  • Be aware that anything you flush down the toilet or grind down the trash disposal, or whatever you pour down the sink, shower, or bath, ends up in your septic system and must be treated accordingly.
  • A simple rule of thumb is to avoid flushing anything other than the 4Ps.
  • Paper and puking are the other two options.
  • Think about it when you’re at the sink.
  • It is possible to eliminate or minimize the usage of the trash disposal, which will dramatically reduce the quantity of fats, grease, and sediments that enter your septic tank and eventually block its drainfield.
  • Inspect and pump your system on a regular basis, dispose of water in an appropriate manner, utilize water effectively, and keep your drainfield in good condition, and you should have a system that is almost issue free.

Please see this page for additional information about septic systems. Posting date: June 26, 2020, 0byYilin Natural Resources, Water are some of the categories. Septic Additives, Septic System, Septic Tank, Yilin Zhuang, Clogged Pipes.

Healthy septic systems

The upkeep of septic systems or underground sewage treatment systems is the responsibility of residents who live in locations without access to municipal sewers (SSTS). Septic systems that do not perform properly can pose a concern to human health and the environment because they may not be able to remove germs as well as minerals and other pollutants from spent water before it gets into our groundwater or lakes.

Understand your system

A septic system is composed of three components:

  • Plumbing for the home, a tank to collect sewage and sediments, and a soil treatment area are all included.

In order to offer successful sewage treatment, all three components must be operational. Septic systems 101 is a good place to start (wq-wwists1-10)

Maintain your system

Many septic system owners believe that as long as their used water “disappear[s],” their system is in proper operating condition. In order to function properly, septic systems must be designed particularly for your site’s requirements and installed properly as well. Maintenance and inspection of the system on a regular basis are the only ways to verify that it is effectively treating your waste water. Look for signs of a septic system that is not operating properly. The following are examples: a pipe that drains straight into a lake or the ground (even laundry water!

Septic system maintenance will extend the life of the system.

For some homes, the accumulation process can take several years, while for others, the process may take less than a year to complete.

For example, using the garbage disposal on a regular basis will result in an increase in the buildup of material in the tank.

Manage your system

Preventing costly repairs or premature replacement of your septic system is possible by following these operating and maintenance guidelines: DOs and DON’Ts when it comes to septic systems (wq-wwists6-14)

Household plumbing

  • Ensure that you conserve water by repairing any leaks and installing low-flow fixtures. Distribute your water consumption across the day and week. Consult with a septic specialist if you have times of excessive usage to discuss measures that can assist your system handle your lifestyle. Utilize as little as possible harsh cleaning agents such as bleach, antibacterial soaps, and detergents. Paints, medicines, and other chemicals should not be disposed of through your septic system. Exclude greasy substances, lint, food, feminine hygiene products, and plastics from the area.

Septic tank

  • Solids should be pumped through the tank’s maintenance hole on a regular basis — at least once every three years
  • Solids should not be removed through inspection pipes. Install and insulate risers to the maintenance hole to provide for easier management access
  • And When the tank is pumped, have the baffles examined. Install an effluent screen and keep it in good working order
  • It is not necessary to apply tank additives or cleansers.

Soil treatment area

  • Maintain a lawn, natural grasses, or flowers all around the treatment area for aesthetic purposes. Mow, but do not fertilize, irrigate, or burn the lawn
  • And Planting trees, bushes, or deep-rooted plants on or near the property is prohibited. Do not plant vegetables or build playgrounds on the ridge above the area. Heavy vehicles (cars, tractors, snowmobiles, boats, and so on) should be kept away from the region. Contribute to keeping the system from freezing. For more information, go to the links in the supplementary resources section.

Don’t let your septic system freeze

The arrival of cold weather is imminent. Don’t allow your septic system go into freeze-up mode. Here are some straightforward suggestions that might help you prevent costly septic system problems in the future.

Hire a licensed professional to help you

The MPCA maintains a list of professionals who are currently licensed by the state to perform this specialized job, which is updated on a regular basis. Learn about your septic system professional’s business practices by conducting an interview with them. By requesting and reviewing references, you can ensure that they are licensed, trustworthy, and dependable.

Additional resources

It is always a good idea to check with your local government (township, city, or county) to establish the requirements in your region because local regulations might differ from state code requirements.

Septic System Basics

When a household isn’t connected to a public sewage system, it normally relies on septic systems to treat and dispose of wastewater. Sewage treatment systems require a substantial financial commitment. The correct maintenance and upkeep of a well-designed, installed, and maintained system will provide years of dependable and low-cost service. The failure of a system can become a source of pollution and public health concern, resulting in property damage, ground and surfacewater pollution (such as contamination of well water used by you and your neighbors), and the spread of disease.

Aside from that, if you are planning to sell your property, your septic system has to be in good functioning order.

Septic systems are available in a variety of configurations to accommodate a wide range of soil and site conditions.

A conventional septic tank system is composed of three major components:

  • This is known as the Septic Tank. In order to remove particles from wastewater, store and partially decompose as much solid material as possible, while allowing the liquid (or effluent) to flow to the drainfield, a septic tank must be installed. more
  • The Drainage System After the particles have settled in the septic tank, the liquid wastewater (also known as effluent) is released to the drainfield, which is also known as an absorption or leach field, or both. more
  • The Soil is a very important factor. The soil under the drainfield is responsible for the ultimate treatment and disposal of the septic tank effluent once it has been treated. Following the passage of wastewater into the soil, organisms in the soil remediate the effluent before it percolates downward and outward, eventually entering ground or surface water sources. A drainfield’s efficacy is also affected by the kind of soil
  • For example, clay soils may be too tight to allow much wastewater to run through, while gravelly soil may be too coarse to give much treatment.
  • Septic System Inspection Done at Home In order to aid you in examining your system, a VideoField Guide and Checklist may be available at the bottom of the homepage.

Homeowners and residents have a significant impact on the functioning of their septic systems. Overloading the system with more water than it is capable of handling might result in system failure. A septic system can also be damaged by the improper disposal of chemicals or excess organic waste, such as that produced by a trash disposal. The following maintenance suggestions might assist you in ensuring that your system provides long-term, effective treatment of domestic waste.

Inspect and Pump Frequently

The most critical step in keeping your septic tank in good working order is to eliminate sludge and scum build-up before it may flow into the drainfield. The frequency with which your tank has to be pumped is determined by the size of the tank, the number of people in your family, the quantity of water utilized, and the amount of solids (from humans, garbage disposal, and any other waste) that enter the tank’s drainage system. Tanks should be pumped out on average every 3 to 5 years, depending on usage.

  • The Guide to Septic Inspection and Pumping
  • Performing a Septic Tank Inspection

Use Water Efficiently

System failure is frequently caused by an excessive amount of water. The soil beneath the septic system must be able to absorb all of the water that is used in the residence. Too much water from the washing machine, dishwasher, toilets, bathtubs, and showers may not provide enough time for sludge and scum to separate properly in the drain. The less water that is consumed, the less water that enters the septic system, reducing the likelihood of system failure. For further information on water conservation, visit:

  • Indoor Water Conservation
  • Every gallon of water conserved equates to a savings of $1.00.

Minimize Solid Waste Disposal

What you flush down the toilet can have a significant influence on the performance of your septic system.

Many things do not breakdown properly, and as a result, they accumulate in your septic tank. If you have the option of disposing of it in another manner, do so rather than introducing it into your system.

Keep Chemicals Out of Your System

Protect your septic system against home chemicals such as caustic drain openers, paint and pesticides. Also avoid flushing down the toilet with chemicals such as brake fluid, gasoline, and motor oil. The improper dumping of dangerous substances down the drain is damaging to the environment, as well as the bacteria that are necessary for the breakdown of wastes in a septic system, and should be avoided.

Septic System Additives

It is not essential to add a stimulant or an enhancer to a septic tank in order to assist it in functioning or “to restore bacterial equilibrium.” The naturally occurring bacteria required for the proper operation of the septic system are already present in human excrement. Septic systems, like automobiles, are designed to offer long-term, effective treatment of residential waste if they are properly run and maintained on a regular basis. The majority of systems that fail prematurely, on the other hand, are the result of poor maintenance.

See also:  How Much Does A Septic Tank Cleaningtruck Cost?

In the event that your septic system fails, call Thurston County Environmental Health at 360-867-2673 for assistance.

  • Odors, surface sewage, moist areas, or a dense growth of plants in the drainfield region are all possible problems. Backups from the plumbing or septic tank (which are often a dark liquid with a foul odor)
  • Fixtures that take a long time to drain
  • The plumbing system is making gurgling sounds. Your drainfield may be failing if you have a well and tests reveal the presence of coliform (bacteria) or nitrates in the water from it. Even in the midst of a drought, the drainfield is covered with lush green grass.

What Is an Alternative Septic System? 7 Alternatives to Conventional Septic Tanks

Finally, the opportunity has arisen for you to put in place a septic system on your property. You had initially intended on installing a normal septic tank and leach field, but what about the forest preserve near your home? What do you do about that? Will a standard septic tank harm the watershed in question? When you’re researching a septic tank, you’ll recall that when you were developing your property, you came into problems with bedrock beneath the top of the soil. What if your property’s soil is too shallow to allow you to dig down far enough to install a conventional septic tank?

What are Alternative Septic Systems?

In the context of alternative septic systems, any sort of building wastewater (also known as “effluent”) drainage system that differs from the traditional septic tank is considered to be such. Diverting and cleaning water waste from your house is not limited to the use of a typical septic system; there are many more options available to safely reintroduce it back into the environment! You will learn the following things from this blog post:

  • Identifying the reasons why some properties require alternate septic systems
  • Alternative septic systems come in a variety of shapes and sizes. The operation of each sort of system

Why Do People Want Alternatives to Septic Tanks?

Just though traditional septic systems are commonplace does not imply that they are appropriate for every property or situation. There are a variety of reasons why the conventional model for wastewater sanitation does not always meet the needs of the community. For example, some parcels of property contain bedrock that is too close to the surface of the soil, making it difficult to build a septic tank deep enough to be effective. A large number of inhabitants in the United States also live near bodies of water that are particularly vulnerable to water contamination, which means that the normal technique of sanitation in septic tanks is insufficient to preserve the ecology of the region in question.

  1. The term “perking” refers to the soil’s capacity to absorb and hold onto water.
  2. Repairing a sewer pipe Fortunately, you may have your septic system or sewage line repaired before you break ground on your new system.
  3. Never fear if your perc test does not go as planned, or if you have any additional worries about installing a traditional septic system on your land.
  4. Each of the alternative septic systems that you will come across in this blog article has a distinct amount of upkeep that is necessary.

Additionally, the cost of alternative septic systems varies depending on the equipment and upkeep that is required. Discover alternative septic solutions that may be a better fit for your property than a standard system by continuing reading.

Types of alternative septic systems

In situations when the soil surrounding your house or structure is too dense or too shallow, or when the water table is too high, mound systems are a good option to septic tanks to consider. Mound systems are a popular alternative to traditional systems, despite the fact that they are more expensive and require more care. They are above-ground systems that are covered with topsoil and incorporate an additional component known as a pump chamber, which separates effluent from the scum and sludge in the first septic tank before it is discharged into the environment.

Pressurized Dosing

When using a pressurized dosing system, you may deliver effluent onto the leach field in more uniform, calibrated dosages (just as the system’s name implies!). Because of the measured technique of dispersing wastewater, this strategy can be particularly beneficial for repairing a leach field following a septic system failure. Given that this approach is simply concerned with the dissemination of effluent into the soil, pressure dosing can be used in conjunction with any of the water treatment systems listed below.

Plastic Chamber Leach Field

Plasti-chamber leach fields are an excellent alternative to traditional septic systems for small lots and sites with high or fluctuating groundwater tables. Plastic chambers in the shape of half pipes are installed in the leach field to replace the gravel and create a gap for wastewater to flow through. Designed in the shape of a half moon, the plastic chambers are placed in the soil with the open side facing down, allowing effluent to come into touch with the soil underneath them, purifying the water and allowing it to flow back into the ground.

Sand Filter

Sand filter septic systems, as the name implies, cleanse and eliminate pollutants from wastewater through the use of sand filters. The sand filter system, which is similar to the aerobic treatment method described above, includes oxygen into its system in order to filter out germs. This cleansing takes place in an enclosed chamber that may either be erected above or below ground level depending on the situation. This is an example of an alternative septic system that does not require the use of a leach field, making it suitable for use in ecologically sensitive locations.

Aerobic Treatment System

Through the use of an air pump, which draws fresh air from the surrounding environment into the treatment tank, an aerobic treatment system introduces oxygen into the septic tank. It is believed that the increased oxygen aids in the cleaning of the effluent by increasing natural bacterial activity. As explained by the Environmental Protection Agency, aerobic treatment systems use the same technology as large-scale sewage treatment plants, but on a smaller scale.

This is yet another excellent alternative septic system for small lots, lots with suboptimal soil conditions, and lots located near bodies of water that are sensitive to pollutant runoff.

Drip Distribution/Irrigation

The drip distribution method disperses treated septic water over a larger area of land than the conventional method. To “irrigate” the leach field, instead of using a single PVC pipe to disseminate treated water into the leach field, the drip distribution technique makes use of a length of flexible tubing that is wound around itself and releases tiny increments of water all the way along its length. With this procedure, newer technology also enables for the discharge of water to be timed and regulated.

It is possible that power interruptions will make these alternative septic solutions more difficult to maintain than traditional systems.

Constructed Wetland System

The designed wetland system makes use of wetland plants to help your septic system filter waste by performing some of the filtration job. While the water waste from your home or building still passes through a single septic tank, the cleaned water is then sent to a plot of wetland that has a variety of various types of pebbles and grasses. Following that first stage of filtration, the water is channeled into a drain field, where it is discharged back into the soil, exactly as it would be with a traditional system.

  1. Take into consideration the land on your property as well as the surrounding surroundings while deciding which system is best for your needs.
  2. Finally, the opportunity has arisen for you to put in place a septic system on your property.
  3. What do you do about that?
  4. When you’re researching a septic tank, you’ll recall that when you were developing your property, you came into problems with bedrock beneath the top of the soil.
  5. Fortunately, there are numerous different types of alternative septic systems that are designed specifically for situations like the ones described above.

What are Alternative Septic Systems?

In the context of alternative septic systems, any sort of building wastewater (also known as “effluent”) drainage system that differs from the traditional septic tank is considered to be such. Diverting and cleaning water waste from your house is not limited to the use of a typical septic system; there are many more options available to safely reintroduce it back into the environment! You will learn the following things from this blog post:

  • Identifying the reasons why some properties require alternate septic systems
  • Alternative septic systems come in a variety of shapes and sizes. The operation of each sort of system

Why Do People Want Alternatives to Septic Tanks?

Just though traditional septic systems are commonplace does not imply that they are appropriate for every property or situation. There are a variety of reasons why the conventional model for wastewater sanitation does not always meet the needs of the community. For example, some parcels of property contain bedrock that is too close to the surface of the soil, making it difficult to build a septic tank deep enough to be effective. A large number of inhabitants in the United States also live near bodies of water that are particularly vulnerable to water contamination, which means that the normal technique of sanitation in septic tanks is insufficient to preserve the ecology of the region in question.

  1. The term “perking” refers to the soil’s capacity to absorb and hold onto water.
  2. Repairing a sewer pipe Fortunately, you may have your septic system or sewage line repaired before you break ground on your new system.
  3. Never fear if your perc test does not go as planned, or if you have any additional worries about installing a traditional septic system on your land.
  4. Each of the alternative septic systems that you will come across in this blog article has a distinct amount of upkeep that is necessary.

Additionally, the cost of alternative septic systems varies depending on the equipment and upkeep that is required. Discover alternative septic solutions that may be a better fit for your property than a standard system by continuing reading.

Types of alternative septic systems

In situations when the soil surrounding your house or structure is too dense or too shallow, or when the water table is too high, mound systems are a good option to septic tanks to consider. Mound systems are a popular alternative to traditional systems, despite the fact that they are more expensive and require more care. They are above-ground systems that are covered with topsoil and incorporate an additional component known as a pump chamber, which separates effluent from the scum and sludge in the first septic tank before it is discharged into the environment.

Pressurized Dosing

When using a pressurized dosing system, you may deliver effluent onto the leach field in more uniform, calibrated dosages (just as the system’s name implies!). Because of the measured technique of dispersing wastewater, this strategy can be particularly beneficial for repairing a leach field following a septic system failure. Given that this approach is simply concerned with the dissemination of effluent into the soil, pressure dosing can be used in conjunction with any of the water treatment systems listed below.

Plastic Chamber Leach Field

Plasti-chamber leach fields are an excellent alternative to traditional septic systems for small lots and sites with high or fluctuating groundwater tables. Plastic chambers in the shape of half pipes are installed in the leach field to replace the gravel and create a gap for wastewater to flow through. Designed in the shape of a half moon, the plastic chambers are placed in the soil with the open side facing down, allowing effluent to come into touch with the soil underneath them, purifying the water and allowing it to flow back into the ground.

Sand Filter

Sand filter septic systems, as the name implies, cleanse and eliminate pollutants from wastewater through the use of sand filters. The sand filter system, which is similar to the aerobic treatment method described above, includes oxygen into its system in order to filter out germs. This cleansing takes place in an enclosed chamber that may either be erected above or below ground level depending on the situation. This is an example of an alternative septic system that does not require the use of a leach field, making it suitable for use in ecologically sensitive locations.

Aerobic Treatment System

Through the use of an air pump, which draws fresh air from the surrounding environment into the treatment tank, an aerobic treatment system introduces oxygen into the septic tank. It is believed that the increased oxygen aids in the cleaning of the effluent by increasing natural bacterial activity. As explained by the Environmental Protection Agency, aerobic treatment systems use the same technology as large-scale sewage treatment facilities, but on a smaller scale.

This is yet another excellent alternative septic system for tiny lots, lots with inadequate soil conditions, and lots located near bodies of water that are sensitive to pollutant runoff.

Drip Distribution/Irrigation

The drip distribution method disperses treated septic water over a larger area of land than the conventional method. To “irrigate” the leach field, instead of using a single PVC pipe to disseminate treated water into the leach field, the drip distribution technique makes use of a length of flexible tubing that is wound around itself and releases tiny increments of water all the way along its length. With this procedure, newer technology also enables for the discharge of water to be timed and regulated.

It is possible that power interruptions will make these alternative septic solutions more difficult to maintain than traditional systems.

Constructed Wetland System

The designed wetland system makes use of wetland plants to help your septic system filter waste by performing some of the filtration job. While the water waste from your home or building still passes through a single septic tank, the cleaned water is then sent to a plot of wetland that has a variety of various types of pebbles and grasses. Following that first stage of filtration, the water is channeled into a drain field, where it is discharged back into the soil, exactly as it would be with a traditional system.

Take into consideration the land on your property as well as the surrounding surroundings while deciding which system is best for your needs.

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