What Exactly Breaks Down The Organic Matter In The Septic Tank? (Solution)

These large organic molecules are easily decomposed by bacteria in the septic system. However, oxygen is required for this process of breaking large molecules into smaller molecules and eventually into carbon dioxide and water. However, BOD content of sewage is also important for septic systems.

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  • Bacteria in the septic tank naturally break down organic waste matter and slow the accumulation of the sludge layer. HOW CAN INSUFFICIENT BACTERIA BE A CAUSE OF SEPTIC TANK SYSTEM FAILURE?

What will digest organic material in your septic tank?

Bacteria, algae, protozoa, fungi, rotifers, and nematodes are all present in a typical septic system. Aerobic bacteria are the most effective at breaking down materials in wastewater.

What will dissolve roots in septic tank?

Flush 2 pounds of granular copper sulfate down the toilet for every 300 gallons of water that the septic tank holds. Copper sulfate kills and dissolves tree roots as they absorb the tank’s water. After entering a tank, the majority of copper sulfate settles in tank, and little passes into the leach bed line.

How do you dissolve sludge in a septic tank?

How to Reduce Sludge in a Septic Tank Without Pumping

  1. Install an aeration system with diffused air in your septic tank.
  2. Break up any compacted sludge.
  3. Add a bio-activator or microbe blend.
  4. Maintain the aeration system.
  5. Add additional Microbes as required.

Where does the biological breakdown occur in a septic tank?

For bacteria activity to occur, a septic tank should have a temperature above 40 degrees F. Bacteria, which are naturally present in all septic systems, digest the solids that have settled to the bottom of the tank and begin the decomposition process. A septic tank will usually have a pH between 6 and 7.5.

How can I increase bacteria in my septic tank naturally?

Homemade Septic Tank Treatment The ingredients required for this natural solution are the following: Water, Sugar, Cornmeal, and Dry Yeast. To concoct this mixture, first start by boiling roughly a half gallon of water. Add in 2 cups of sugar. The sugar will act as the first food your bacteria will eat!

How do I increase bacteria in my septic tank?

What Can You Do to Promote Septic Tank Bacteria Growth? Bacteria will grow naturally in your septic tank. You promote growth of bacteria by flushing more solid waste down into the tank all the time.

Can you put root killer in septic tank?

Root Killer is non-corrosive and safe for all types of plumbing and will not harm surrounding trees, ground cover, or the natural bacteria content in septic tanks and cesspools.

What kills roots in drain field?

Copper sulfate can be injected into the drain field (past the tank) to kill roots.

Can you put root killer directly into septic tank?

RootX root killer can also be added directly to the septic tank at a rate of 8 pounds per 1,000 gallons of septic tank capacity.

How do I clean my septic tank naturally?

You can mix about a 1/4 cup of baking soda with 1/2 cup of vinegar and 2 tablespoons lemon to make your own natural cleaning agent. The baking soda will fizz up to help get the dirt and grime in your tub and drains. It’s a great cleaner and your septic system will thank you!

What eats sludge in septic tank?

One example of a homemade remedy is to flush ¼-½ a cup of instant yeast down your toilet. The yeast eats away at the sludge and helps loosen it, breaking it down so that wastewater can get through.

Do septic tank additives really work?

There is little scientific data to suggest that you should add bacteria or enzymes to your septic system. The United States Environmental Protection Agency reported that biological additives do not appear to improve the performance of healthy septic tanks.

What destroys a septic tank?

Neglecting to Pump Your Tank Regularly Another surefire way you’re destroying your septic tank is if you never have it pumped. This is one disadvantage of a septic system vs. a city water hookup. Tanks only hold so much waste and need to be emptied every 3 or 5 years, even more often if you use your system heavily.

Do I need to add enzymes to my septic tank?

But septic tanks don’t really need help from extra additives. As long as you are only putting wastewater and toilet paper down the pipes, the tank can take care of its job on its own. Putting anything extra in can cause more harm than good and it’s best to stick to the tanks natural ecosystem when possible.

What does lime do for a septic tank?

A septic tank is a large container where sewage or other matter is decomposed by bacteria. Hydrated lime is also called calcium hydroxide and is added to septic tanks to stop or prevent them from smelling bad.

The role of enzymes and bacteria in a septic tank

Wastewater from residences is disposed of into a septic tank for treatment in areas where municipal sewer lines are not readily available or are inaccessible. The presence of microorganisms, particularly bacteria, in the septic tank helps to break down and liquefy organic waste. The treatment of wastewater in most septic systems is divided into two primary steps. When wastewater is fed into the septic system, the solids fall to the bottom of the system, where they combine with the anaerobic bacteria to produce the sludge and scum layers.

After passing through the second phase, the effluent is discharged into the drainfield region, where it is further treated by physical and biological processes as it percolates through the soil.

What are enzymes?

Bacterial enzymes are a class of proteins that are released into the environment. Enzymes are quite selective in terms of the types of organic materials that they degrade. Enzymes, in contrast to bacteria, are not living organisms. They are incapable of growing or reproducing. Enzymes are often produced by bacteria and serve as catalysts for anaerobic digestion, which occurs in the absence of oxygen. Enzymes may be thought of as blades that cut through complicated molecules and break them down into smaller fragments that are more digestible for bacteria to consume.

Types of enzymes found in septic systems

Following are some of the most essential enzymes in sewage treatment systems. Protease is a digestive enzyme that breaks down protein-based waste such as blood and feces. Lipase is a digestive enzyme that breaks down fats, greases, and oils. Amylase is a digestive enzyme that breaks down carbohydrates such as porridge, rice, pasta, and so on. Cellulase is a digestive enzyme that breaks down cellulose, such as that found in paper-based goods. Urease is a digestive enzyme that breaks down urea.

The majority of these enzymes are generated by bacteria in their natural environment.

Organic matter and enzymes such as amylase, protease, cellulases, and lipases are introduced into the septic tank by Bio-maintenance Sol’s products in order to break down the organic waste and aid in the digestion process in the tank.

What are bacteria?

When it comes to bacteria, they are the most prevalent and significant germs in a septic system. Fungi, protozoa, rotifers, and nematodes are some of the other microorganisms that exist. Despite the fact that bacteria are microbes, which means that they are exceedingly little, they are still living entities, and as such, they require some type of nutrition to survive. They get their nutrition from organic stuff. Approximately 1/25,000 of an inch in length is the length of a bacterium. They may grow in large numbers in a little amount of area due to their minuscule sizes.

  1. Bacteria that require oxygen are referred to as aerobic bacteria, whilst bacteria that do not require oxygen are referred to as anaerobic bacteria.
  2. This explains why several common home goods are not very beneficial to the septic tank’s performance.
  3. When the conditions are good, bacteria can multiply every 15-20 minutes if the right conditions are there.
  4. This frequently results in the reduction of the bacteria population, which is a phenomena that has been linked to the failure of numerous septic systems in the past.

Fortunately, you can simply renew the bacteria in your septic tank by adding billions of bacteria every month to it using Bio-keepup Sol’s solution, which you can get online.

Types of bacteria found in the septic tank

When it comes to septic systems, there are four basic kinds of bacteria to consider. There are anaerobic, aerobic, facultative, and bacterium spores among these types of bacteria. Let’s take a closer look at each of these in turn.

Anaerobic bacteria

In terms of septic systems, bacteria may be divided into four basic types. Anaerobic, aerobic, and facultative bacteria are all types of bacteria, as are bacteria spores. Let’s take a closer look at each of these points.

Facultative bacteria

Facultative bacteria are capable of flourishing in both the presence and absence of air. When there is enough oxygen available, they can survive by aerobic respiration. When there is no oxygen available, these bacteria convert to fermentation. As a result, facultative bacteria may be described as having the potential to change into either aerobic or anaerobic conditions depending on the conditions in the environment they are exposed to. In most cases, this transition takes a few of hours to complete.

Aerobic bacteria

Bacteria such as this require the presence of oxygen in order to thrive. Aerobic bacteria are extremely effective at feeding on organic waste, and as a result, they may be employed to break down trash in high-tech waste-treatment systems. Aerobic bacteria, on the other hand, are extremely sensitive to changes in their surrounding environment. Aspects of their size are likewise greater than those of anaerobic bacteria in most cases. Aerobes have a substantially greater metabolic rate than anaerobes, and this difference is considerable.

Bacteria spores

Bacteria endospores are a dormant structure that is created by stressed bacteria cells and is used as a protective barrier. They create a protective shell around the cell, which shields it from the impacts of the environment. Endospores can, as a result, endure circumstances that would readily kill any other bacteria, such as high temperatures. These materials can survive extreme pressure, ultraviolet radiation, chemical degradation and other conditions. However, despite the fact that this makes it easier for them to live in the septic tank, they are not particularly effective when it comes to the digestion of organic waste.

  • A pathogen is a microbe that is responsible for the transmission of illness.
  • The bacteria in the septic tank are responsible for the breakdown of organic waste in the septic system.
  • An inadequately functioning system may not be able to effectively remove harmful microorganisms, resulting in groundwater pollution.
  • Diseases transmitted by drinking water are caused by harmful bacteria, which are found in abundance.

Septic system owners must consequently examine their systems on a regular basis to verify that they are operating in the manner intended by the manufacturer. Shock therapy should be used promptly if you have a clogged drain field in order to restore it to its normal operating state.

The sludge layer

Heavy materials in wastewater from your home sink to the bottom of your tank, forming a layer known as sludge. When wastewater from your home enters your septic system, it forms a layer known as the sludge layer. Anaerobic bacteria aid in the partial breakdown of the sludge by oxidizing the organic matter. Sludge layers are often composed of mixed biodegradable and nonbiodegradable substances, making it impossible for the bacteria to completely decompose the layer. As a result, septic tanks must be drained on a regular basis, according to the requirements of your provincial legislation.

Applying probiotics to septic systems

At some point, every septic system will fail. Not if, but when will this happen is the real question. The harmful compounds utilized in houses, which ultimately make their way into septic tanks, might be held responsible for this impending breakdown of the system. Despite the fact that there are billions of naturally existing bacteria in the septic tank, these bacteria require a pH level of about 7. The harmful compounds that come from residences interact with the pH levels of the septic tank, resulting in the death of a large number of bacteria in the tank.

It has been suggested that using probiotics to septic systems may be one method of addressing this issue.

Conclusion

Even though there are thousands of different septic tank additives available on the market today, they are not all created equal. Some of them, in fact, will cause more harm than benefit to the septic tank’s environment. Some investigations have revealed that chemical additions can really cause the collapse of a septic system as well as the pollution of groundwater. For this reason, only biological additions such as those provided by Bio-Sol should be used in your recipes. They are created from bacteria and enzymes that have been meticulously chosen, and they inject billions of bacteria into the sewage treatment system as a result of their use.

It is a good idea to add biological additives to your septic tank on a regular basis to ensure that it is operating as effectively as possible.

How Your Septic System Works

Underground wastewater treatment facilities, known as septic systems, are often employed in rural regions where there are no centralized sewage lines. They clean wastewater from residential plumbing, such as that produced by bathrooms, kitchen drains, and laundry, by combining natural processes with well-established technology. A conventional septic system is comprised of two components: a septic tank and a drainfield, often known as a soil absorption field. It is the septic tank’s job to decompose organic matter and to remove floatable stuff (such as oils and grease) and solids from wastewater.

Alternate treatment systems rely on pumps or gravity to assist septic tank effluent in trickling through a variety of media such as sand, organic matter (e.g., peat and sawdust), constructed wetlands, or other media to remove or neutralize pollutants such as pathogens that cause disease, nitrogen, phosphorus, and other contaminants.

Prior to discharging wastewater into the environment, several alternative systems are designed to evaporate or disinfect the effluent.

Specifically, this is how a typical conventional septic system works:

  1. All of the water that leaves your home drains down a single main drainage pipe and into a septic tank. An underground, water-tight container, often composed of concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene, serves as a septic system’s holding tank. Its function is to retain wastewater for a long enough period of time to allow particles to sink to the bottom and form sludge, while oil and grease float to the surface and produce scum. Sludge and scum are prevented from exiting the tank and moving into the drainfield region by compartments and a T-shaped outlet. After that, the liquid wastewater (effluent) exits the tank and flows into the drainfield. The drainfield is a shallow, covered hole dug in unsaturated soil that serves as a drainage system. Porous surfaces are used to release pretreated wastewater because they allow the wastewater to pass through the soil and into the groundwater. In the process of percolating through the soil, wastewater is accepted, treated, and dispersed by the soil, finally discharging into groundwater. Finally, if the drainfield becomes overburdened with too much liquid, it can flood, causing sewage to flow to the ground surface or resulting in toilet backups and sink backups. Finally, wastewater percolates into the soil, where it is naturally removed of harmful coliform bacteria, viruses, and nutrients. Coliform bacteria are a kind of bacteria that may be found in the intestines of humans and other warm-blooded animals, with humans being the most common host. As a result of human fecal contamination, it is a sign of this.

The Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority has built an animated, interactive model of how a residential septic system works, which you can view here.

Do you have a septic system?

It’s possible that you’re already aware that you have a septic system. If you are not sure, here are some tell-tale symptoms that you most likely are:

  • You make use of well water. In your home, the water pipe that brings water into the house does not have a meter. In the case of a water bill or a property tax bill, you will see “$0.00 Sewer Amount Charged.” It is possible that your neighbors have a septic system
See also:  Where To Find Out If There Is A Septic Tank? (Solved)

How to find your septic system

You can locate your septic system once you have confirmed that you have one by following these steps:

  • Taking a look at the “as constructed” drawing of your house
  • Making a visual inspection of your yard for lids and manhole covers
  • Getting in touch with a septic system service provider for assistance in locating it

Failure symptoms: Mind the signs!

A bad odor is not necessarily the first indicator of a septic system that is failing to work properly. Any of the following signs should prompt you to seek expert assistance:

  • Water backing up into the drains of homes and businesses
  • It is especially noticeable in dry weather that the drainfield grass is bright green and spongy. The presence of standing water or muddy soil near your septic system or in your basement
  • A strong stench emanating from the area surrounding the septic tank and drainfield

Is adding bacteria or enzymes in a septic tank beneficial?

A septic system is made up of two parts: a septic tank and a leach field. Septic tanks are used to collect and contain solid waste, while microorganisms are used to break down organic stuff in the tank itself. A functional septic system is comprised of vast colonies of bacteria that perform the hard lifting and decompose the organic materials contained in the sewage. Bacteria in the septic tank break down solid particles into liquids and gases, which are then discharged. The grease and oils rise to the surface and produce a layer of scum, while the solid material that bacteria are unable to break down falls to the bottom and forms a layer of sludge on the bottom.

How is waste broken down in the septic tank?

  • Bacterial colonies of enormous size flourish in the septic tank. In order to break down organic substance into smaller particles, bacteria create enzymes that serve as a catalyzer. Effluent is formed when bacteria digest the waste particles, allowing the liquid to separate and produce the effluent.

Under normal conditions, the bacteria may survive on their own and do not require the addition of any additional ingredients. Do you require expert assistance with septic system maintenance? Allow our septic system professionals to assist you.

Should you add bacteria or enzymes?

There is no “magic bullet” or “quick fix” that can improve the performance of your septic system. In a well-maintained tank, the natural bacteria should be sufficient to ensure that the septic tank operates efficiently. However, if you are flushing dangerous chemicals down the toilet, the germs may be killed. Organic waste will not decompose if there is no bacteria present, and you will have to have your septic tank drained more regularly. Regular maintenance and pumping of the septic system are all that is required to keep the system running properly.

If your tank is not operating correctly because it has not been pumped out, or if you are flushing things down the toilet that are harmful to the beneficial bacteria, you should get expert assistance as soon as possible.

How to maintain your septic system?

The following are some suggestions for extending the life of your septic system:

  • Conserve water – Use less water since excessive water use might place an additional burden on the system and overburden the naturally present bacteria with their workload. It is not advisable to flush dangerous items down the toilet. If you flush harmful materials such as paints, solventes, bleach, household cleansers, chlorine, or pharmaceuticals down the toilet, they will kill the microorganisms in the system and clog the system. To maintain your system in excellent working order, just flush toilet paper and garbage. Preventative maintenance – Have your septic system examined by a wastewater professional on a yearly basis. Aside from that, it is advised that you get the tank pumped every 3-5 years.

Reduce the amount of water you use – Using too much water might place an additional strain on the system and overburden the naturally present microorganisms. It is not advisable to flush dangerous items down the toilet. If you flush harmful materials such as paints, solventes, bleach, household cleansers, chlorine, or pharmaceuticals down the toilet, they will kill the bacteria in the system and clog it up. Maintain the health of your system by just flushing toilet paper and garbage. Schedule yearly inspections by an environmental professional to ensure that the system is in good working order.

Aside from that, it is advised that you get the tank pumped once every 3-5 years.

  • Do’s and don’ts when it comes to septic systems What causes septic systems to fail

Your Local Septic System Experts

If you require further information regarding your septic system or if it is not performing as planned, please contact our wastewater specialists for further assistance. In South-East Queensland, we provide a wide range of services. For all of your septic system needs, from design to installation, repairs to maintenance, our knowledgeable specialists can provide you with cost-effective solutions for your home or business system. For further information, please fill out our online inquiry form or call us on 1300 722 517.

Allow our professionals to assist you.

Not what you’re looking for?

More information about septic, sewage, and wastewater systems may be found by using the search box provided below.

Why Use Express Wastewater Solutions?

  • We are able to offer the optimum solution for your wastewater needs since we are not a manufacturer and are not bound to a certain technology.

EXPERT TEAM

  • Because we do this on a daily basis, we have built a close-knit experienced team that can handle every step of the process – from blueprints and council paperwork through excavations, electrical, and plumbing – without sacrificing quality. We take care of everything to ensure that the procedure is as stress-free and speedy as possible.

FREE 30 MINUTE WASTEWATER CONSULTATION

  • Because we do this on a daily basis, we have built a close-knit experienced team that can handle every step of the process – from blueprints and council paperwork through excavations, electrical, and plumbing – without compromising quality. Our team takes care of everything in order to make the entire procedure as stress-free and efficient as possible

STREE FREE INSTALLATIONS

  • The entire wastewater installation process is handled by us
  • We can deal with all of the trades, the municipality, and everything else, so you don’t have to worry about a thing.

QUALIFIED, LICENSED PROFESSIONALS

  • Have confidence in the fact that Express is a team of certified and insured specialists that will do your task correctly the first time

FREE EXPERT ADVICE

  • Not sure which system is best for you, or want to know if your current system is up and running efficiently? Simply give one of our knowledgeable wastewater specialists a call, and they will be more than delighted to assist you

SAVE UP TO $10,000 ON REPAIRING YOUR SEPTIC SYSTEM

  • We will always attempt to fix your system rather than replacing it if it is not necessary to do so, which will normally save you a significant amount of money, often up to and beyond $10,000.

How Does a Septic Tank Work?

Mr. Fix-It-Up-For-The-Family You may save a lot of money if you understand how a sewage treatment system works—and what can go wrong—so that you can handle your own septic system maintenance.

How does a septic tank work?

Pumping the tank on a regular basis eliminates sludge and scum, which helps to keep a septic system in good working order. It is possible for a well-designed and well built septic system to last for decades, or it might collapse in a matter of years. It is entirely up to you as long as you can answer the question of how do septic tanks function. Healthy septic systems are very inexpensive to maintain, but digging up and replacing a septic system that has completely collapsed may easily cost tens of thousands in labor and material costs.

It’s critical to understand how a septic tank works in order to maintain one.

Let’s take a look below ground and observe what happens in a properly operating septic system, shall we?

Understand that a septic system is a cafeteria for bacteria

Bacteria are responsible for the proper operation of a septic system. They decompose garbage, resulting in water that is clean enough to safely trickle down into the earth’s surface. The entire system is set up to keep bacteria healthy and busy at all times. Some of them reside in the tank, but the majority of them are found in the drain field. 1. The septic tank is the final destination for all waste. 2. The majority of the tank is filled with watery waste, referred to as “effluent.” Anaerobic bacteria begin to break down the organic matter in the effluent as soon as it enters the system.

  1. A layer of sludge settles to the bottom of the container.
  2. 4.
  3. Scum is mostly constituted of fats, greases, and oils, among other substances.
  4. Grease and oils float to the surface of the water.
  5. (5) A filter stops the majority of particles from reaching the exit pipe.
  6. The effluent is discharged into the drain field.
  7. Effluent is allowed to leak into the surrounding gravel because of holes in the drain septic field pipe.

When gravel is used to surround pipes, water can run into the soil and oxygen can reach germs. The garbage is completely decomposed by aerobic bacteria found in gravel and dirt. 9. Potable water seeps into the groundwater and aquifer system from the surface.

Septic Tank Clean Out: Don’t abuse the system

Septic systems that have been correctly planned and constructed require just occasional ‘pumping’ to remove the sludge and scum that has built up inside the tank. However, if you don’t understand how a septic tank works, you may unintentionally hurt or even destroy the system.

  • Drains are used to dispose of waste that decomposes slowly (or not at all). Cigarette butts, diapers, and coffee grounds are all known to cause issues. Garbage disposers, if utilized excessively, can introduce an excessive amount of solid waste into the system. Lint from synthetic fibers is emitted from washing machine lint traps. This substance is not degraded by bacteria in the tank and drain septic field. Bacteria are killed by chemicals found in the home, such as disinfecting cleansers and antibacterial soaps. The majority of systems are capable of withstanding limited usage of these goods, but the less you use them, the better. When a large amount of wastewater is produced in a short period of time, the tank is flushed away too quickly. When there is too much sludge, bacteria’s capacity to break down waste is reduced. Sludge can also overflow into the drain field if there is too much of it. Sludge or scum obstructs the flow of water via a pipe. It is possible for tree and shrub roots to obstruct and cause harm to a drain field. Compacted soil and gravel prevent wastewater from seeping into the ground and deprive germs of oxygen. Most of the time, this is caused by vehicles driving or parking on the drain field.

Get your tank pumped…

Your tank must be emptied on a regular basis by a professional. Pumping eliminates the accumulation of sludge and scum that has accumulated in the tank, which has caused the bacterial action to be slowed. If you have a large tank, it may be necessary to pump it once a year; but, depending on the size of your tank and the quantity of waste you send through the system, you may go two or three years between pumpings. Inquire with your inspector about an approximate guideline for how frequently your tank should be pumped.

…but don’t hire a pumper until you need it

Inspections and pumping should be performed on a regular basis. However, if you’re not afraid of getting your hands dirty, you may verify the sludge level yourself with a gadget known as The Sludge Judge. It ranges in price from $100 to $125 and is commonly accessible on the internet. Once you’ve verified that your tank is one-third full with sludge, you should contact a professional to come out and pump it out completely.

Install an effluent filter in your septic system

Garbage from your home accumulates into three distinct strata. The septic filter is responsible for preventing blockage of the drain field pipes.

Septic tank filter close-up

The septic tank filter is responsible for capturing suspended particles that may otherwise block the drain field pipes. Obtain an effluent filter for your tank from your contractor and place it on the outflow pipe of your tank. (It will most likely cost between $50 and $100, plus labor.) This device, which helps to prevent sediments from entering the drain field, will need to be cleaned out on a regular basis by a contractor to maintain its effectiveness.

Solution for a clogged septic system

If your septic system becomes clogged and you find yourself having to clean the filter on a regular basis, you might be tempted to simply remove the filter altogether. Hold on to it. Solids, wastewater, and scum are separated into three levels in septic tanks, which allows them to function properly (see illustration above). Solids sink to the bottom of the container, where microbes breakdown them. The scum, which is made up of trash that is lighter than water, rises to the surface. In the drainage field, the middle layer of effluent leaves the tank and goes through an underground network of perforated pipes to the drainage field.

  1. Keep the effluent filter in place since it is required by your state’s health law.
  2. Waste particles might flow through the filter and clog the perforated pipes if the filter is not used.
  3. Your filter, on the other hand, should not require cleaning every six months.
  4. A good chance is high that you’re flushing filter-clogging things down the toilet, such as grease, fat, or food scraps.
  5. A garbage disposal will not be able to break down food particles sufficiently to allow them to flow through the septic tank filtration system.
  6. Plastic items, disposable diapers, paper towels, nonbiodegradable goods, and tobacco products will clog the system if they are flushed through it.

For additional information on what should and should not be flushed down the toilet, contact your local health authority. More information on removing lint from your laundry may be found here.

Get an inspection

Following a comprehensive first check performed by an expert, regular inspections will cost less than $100 each inspection for the next year. Your professional will be able to inform you how often you should get your system inspected as well as how a septic tank functions. As straightforward as a septic system appears, determining its overall condition necessitates the services of a professional. There are a plethora of contractors who would gladly pump the sludge out of your tank, but many, in my experience, are unable to explain how a septic system works or how it should be maintained.

A certification scheme for septic contractors has been established in certain states; check with your state’s Secretary of State’s office to see whether yours is one of them.

Also, a qualified inspector will be able to tell you whether or not your tank is large enough to accommodate your household’s needs, as well as the maximum amount of water that can be passed through it in a single day.

As you learn more about how a septic tank works, your professional should be able to tell you whether or not your system will benefit from this treatment.

Alternatives to a new drain field

If an examination or a sewage backup indicate that your drain field is in need of replacement, the only option is to replace it completely. As a result, it’s important to talk with a contractor about other possibilities before proceeding with the project.

  • Pipes should be cleaned. A rotating pressure washer, used by a contractor, may be used to clean out the drain septic field pipes. The cost of “jetting” the pipes is generally around $200. Chemicals should be used to clean the system. A commercial solution (not a home-made one) that enhances the quantity of oxygen in the drain field should be discussed with your contractor before installing your new system. Septic-Scrub is a product that I suggest. A normal treatment will cost between $500 and $1,000. Make the soil more pliable. The practice of “terra-lifting,” which involves pumping high-pressure air into several spots surrounding the drain field, is authorized in some regions. Some contractors use it to shatter compacted dirt around the pipes. Depending on the circumstances, this might cost less than $1,000 or as much as $4,000 or more.
See also:  What Is The Price To Install A Septic Tank In Pickens Sc? (Correct answer)

Protect your drain septic field from lint

Make sure the pipes are clean and free of debris. A rotating pressure washer, used by a contractor, can be used to clean out the drain septic field pipe. The cost of “jetting” the pipes is around $200. Chemicals should be used to clean the system up. A commercial solution (not a home-made product) that enhances the quantity of oxygen in the drain field should be discussed with your contractor before installation. Septic-Scrub is a product that I highly suggest. The average cost of a treatment is between $500 and $1,000.

The procedure of “terra-lifting,” which involves pumping high-pressure air into several spots around the drain field, is authorized in some jurisdictions.

This might range from less than $1,000 to more than $4,000, depending on the circumstances.

Don’t overload the septic system

Reduce the amount of water you use. The volume of water that flows into your tank, particularly over a short period of time, can be reduced to avoid untreated waste from being flushed into your drain field.

Replace outdated toilets with low-flow ones, install low-flow showerheads, and, perhaps most importantly, wash laundry throughout the week rather than just on Saturday mornings to save water.

Meet the Expert

Septic systems, according to Jim vonMeier, are the solution to America’s water deficit because they supply cleaned water to depleted aquifers, according to vonMeier. He travels the country lobbying for septic systems, giving lectures, and giving testimony. For septic system inquiries, as well as information on the operation of the septic tank, contact him by email.

Septic Tank Maintenance – How to Break Down Organic Solids

In the 1870s, the French are said to have been the first to deploy septic tank systems, which were then adopted by the United States. Septic tanks, invented more than a century ago, are still in use across the world in residences that do not have access to sewage treatment plants. Located beneath the ground surface, a septic tank, which can be composed of concrete, plastic, or fiberglass, serves the purpose of decomposing waste created by a home. A faulty system has the potential to generate a broad range of issues, including surface water contamination, disease outbreaks, and environmental issues.

The process through which a septic tank degrades organic solid waste A septic system is made up of a series of pipes, a tank, and a drain field, in general.

Microorganisms that are alive serve an important part in the biological degradation of organic material, which is subsequently properly disposed away into the surrounding environment.

  1. A system of pipes transports wastewater created by the bathroom and human waste generated by the toilet to the septic tank. In the tank, millions of microorganisms that naturally occur in the environment break down organic waste
  2. Sludge is formed at the bottom of the tank when solids settle to the bottom of the tank, and liquids, such as fats, oils and grease, float to the top of the tank. It is the effluent, which is the treated liquid that runs out of the tank and into the drain field.

Septic tank systems, on the other hand, can occasionally fail. When the organic solid waste is unable to be broken down, it might cause backup problems in your house. Furthermore, untreated sewage has the potential to pollute drinking water, attract vectors, insects, and rats, generate foul odors, and detract from the aesthetics of a building. Homeowners can prevent a number of variables that lead to septic tank failure if they properly adhere to the recommended maintenance procedures. For example, if you use more water than the system is capable of handling, the system may malfunction.

  • Not all waste items should be flushed down the toilet, but only biodegradable ones.
  • It is possible that the discharge of excessive chemical quantities into the septic tank will have an adverse effect on the system’s efficiency since it will destroy helpful bacteria.
  • Septic tank maintenance should be made easier with the aid of the preventative actions listed above.
  • The biological additives aid in the breakdown of waste by promoting the growth and performance of the microbial population present in the septic tank, hence speeding up the decomposition process overall.
  • Organica Biotech is a prominent provider of cutting-edge septic tank treatment technologies.
  • It accomplishes the goal of waste digestion while minimizing sludge build-up by employing enzyme-producing microorganisms.

Please feel free to contact us at any time for any information. Also, check out: Your Step-by-Step Guide to Septic Tank Maintenance Success 5 Tips for Keeping Your Septic Tank in Good Working Order This is Your Guide to Preserving the Performance of Your Septic Tank During the Rainy Season

Septic Tank Everything that goes down any of the drains in the house

Septic TankEverything that goes down any of the drains in the house (toilets, showers, sinks, laundry machines) travels first to the septic tank. The septic tank is a large-volume, watertight tank which provides initial treatment of the household wastewater by intercepting solids and settleable organic matterbefore disposal of the wastewater (effluent) to the drainfield.Function of the Septic TankHow Long Liquids Must Remain In TankSolids StorageAnaerobic DecompositionFlow Into And Out Of The TankEffluent FilterFlow BufferingMicrobes in Septic Tanks Digest, Dissolve, and Gasify Complex Organic Wastes.FUNCTION OF THE SEPTIC TANK While relatively simple in construction and operation, the septic tank provides a number of important functions through a complex interaction of physical and biological processes. The essential functions of the septic tank are to: receive all wastewater from the house separate solids from the wastewater flow cause reduction and decomposition of accumulated solids provide storage for the separated solids (sludge and scum) pass the clarified wastewater (effluent) out to the drain field for final treatment and disposal.Primary TreatmentAs stated, the main function of the septic tank is to remove solids from thewastewater and provide a clarified effluent for disposal to the drain field.The septic tank provides a relatively quiescent body of water where thewastewater is retained long enough to let the solids separate by bothsettling and flotation. This process is often called primary treatment andresults in three products: scum, sludge, and effluent.Scum: Substances lighter than water (oil, grease, fats) float to the top,where they form a scum layer. This scum layer floats on top of the watersurface in the tank. Aerobic bacteria work at digesting floating solids.Sludge: The “sinkable” solids (soil, grit, bones, unconsumed food particles)settle to the bottom of the tank and form a sludge layer. The sludge isdenser than water and fluid in nature, so it forms a flat layer along thetank bottom. Underwater anaerobic bacteria consume organic materials in thesludge, giving off gases in the process and then, as they die off, becomepart of the sludge.Effluent: Effluent is the clarified wastewater left over after the scum hasfloated to the top and the sludge has settled to the bottom. It is theclarified liquid between scum and sludge. It flows through the septic tankoutlet into the drain field.Back to listingsHOW LONG LIQUIDS MUST REMAIN IN TANK Effective volume: The floating scum layer on top and the sludge layer on thebottom take up a certain amount of the total volume in the tank. Theeffective volume is the liquid volume in the clear space between the scumand sludge layers. This is where the active solids separation occurs as thewastewater sits in the tank.Retention time: In order for adequate separation of solids to occur, thewastewater needs to sit long enough in the quiescent conditions of the tank.The time the water spends in the tank, on its way from inlet to outlet, isknown as the retention time. The retention time is a function of theeffective volume and the daily household wastewater flow rate:Retention Time (days) = Effective Volume (gallons)/Flow Rate (gallons per day)A common design rule is for a tank to provide a minimum retention time ofat least 24 hours, during which one-half to two-thirds of the tank volume istaken up by sludge and scum storage. Note that this is a minimum retentiontime, under conditions with a lot of accumulated solids in the tank. Underordinary conditions (i.e., with routine maintenance pumping) a tank shouldbe able to provide two to three days of retention time.As sludge and scum accumulate and take up more volume in the tank, theeffective volume is gradually reduced, which results in a reduced retentiontime. If this process continues unchecked-if the accumulated solids are notcleaned out (pumped) often enough-wastewater will not spend enough time inthe tank for adequate separation of solids, and solids may flow out of thetank with the effluent into the drain field. This can result in clogged pipesand gravel in the drain field, one of the most common causes of septic systemfailure.Back to listingsSOLIDS STORAGE In order to avoid frequent removal of accumulated solids, the septic tank is(hopefully) designed with ample volume so that sludge and scum can be storedin the tank for an extended period of time. A general design rule is thatone-half to two-thirds of the tank volume is reserved for sludge and scumaccumulation. A properly designed and used septic system should have thecapacity to store solids for about five years or more. However, the rate ofsolids accumulation varies greatly from one household to another, and actualstorage time can only be determined by routine septic tank inspections.Back to listingsANAEROBIC DECOMPOSITION While fresh solids are continually added to the scum and sludge layers,anaerobic bacteria (bacteria that live without oxygen) consume the organicmaterial in the solids. The by-products of this decomposition are solublecompounds, which are carried away in the liquid effluent, and various gases,which are vented out of the tank via the inlet pipe that ties into the houseplumbing air vent system.Anaerobic decomposition results in a slow reduction of the volume ofaccumulated solids in the septic tank. This occurs primarily in the sludgelayer but also, to a lesser degree, in the scum layer. The volume of thesludge layer is also reduced by compaction of the older, underlyingsludge. While a certain amount of volume reduction occurs over time, sludgeand scum layers gradually build up in the tank and eventually must be pumpedout.Back to listingsFLOW INTO AND OUT OF THE TANK The inlet and outlet ports of the tank are generally equipped with devicessuch as baffles, concrete tees, or in more recent years, sanitary tees(T-shaped pipes with one short and one long leg).InletsThe inlet device dissipates the energy of the incoming flow and deflects itdownwards. The vertical leg of the tee extends below the liquid surface wellinto the clear space below the scum layer. This prevents disturbance of thefloating scum layer and reduces disruptive turbulence caused by incomingflows. The inlet device also is supposed to prevent short-circuiting offlows across the water surface directly to the outlet.The upper leg of the inlet should extend well above the liquid surface inorder to prevent floating scum from backing up into, and possibly plugging,the main inlet pipe. The open top of the inlet tee allows venting of gasesout of the tank through the inlet pipe and fresh air vents of the householdplumbing.OutletsThe outlet device is designed to retain the scum layer within the tank. Asanitary tee can be used with the lower leg extending below the scum layer.The elevation of the outlet port should be 2 to 3 inches below the elevationof the inlet port. This prevents backwater and stranding of solids in themain inlet pipe during momentary rises in the tank liquid level caused bysurges of incoming wastewater.Typical inlet/outlet teesGas Deflection BaffleGases are produced by the natural digestion of sludge at the bottom of thetank, and particles of sludge can be carried upward by these rising gases.Some tanks have a gas deflection baffle, which prevents gas bubbles (towhich solid particles often adhere) from leaving the tank by deflecting themaway from the outlet and preventing them from entering the drain field.Back to listingsTHE EFFLUENT FILTER In newer systems, there is often an effluent filter: one of the significantimprovements in septic tank design in decades. They range from 4 to 18inches in diameter. As we have described, the most serious problem withseptic systems is the migration of solids, grease, or oil into thedrain field, and the filter is effective in preventing this.A filter restricts and limits passage of suspended solids into the effluent.Solids in a filtered system’s effluent discharge are significantly less thanthose produced in a non-screened system.Back to listingsFLOW BUFFERING The septic tank also provides a buffering of flows between the house and thedrain field. Large surges from the household, such as toilet flushing orwashing machine drainage, are dampened by the septic tank so that the flowsleaving the tank and entering the drain field are at substantially lower flowrates and extend over a longer period of time than the incoming surges.Back to listingsMICROBES IN SEPTIC TANKS DIGEST, DISSOLVE, AND GASIFY COMPLEX ORGANIC WASTES In 1907, W. P. Dunbar conducted tests on the decomposition of vegetable andanimal matter in septic tanks. He stated, “The author has investigated thesubject by suspending in septic tanks a large number of solid organicsubstances, such as cooked vegetables, cabbages, turnips, potatoes, peas,beans, bread, various forms of cellulose, flesh in the form of dead bodiesof animals, skinned and unskinned, various kinds of fat, bones, cartilage,etc., and has shown that many of these substances are almost completelydissolved in from three to four weeks. They first presented a swollenappearance, and increased in weight. The turnips had holes on the surface,which gradually became deeper. The edges of the cabbage leaves looked asthough they had been bitten, and similar signs of decomposition were visiblein the case of other substances. Of the skinned animals, the skeleton aloneremained after a short time; with the unskinned animals the process lastedrather longer. At this stage I will only point out that the experiments wereso arranged that no portion of the substances could be washed away; theirdisappearance was therefore due to solution and gasification.”Back to listings

How Soil Impacts your Septic System – Septic Maxx

The usage of septic systems allows isolated homes that are not connected to municipal sewer systems to have low-cost sewer services. They are reliant on a variety of biological activities as well as human intervention in order to function effectively. The soil is one of the most important participants in the septic activity. Generally speaking, soil works in two ways to prepare wastewater for re-entry into the earth. Water that has been properly treated is essential for sustaining the health of ground and surface waterways, which are largely reliant on for drinking water.

The Journey of Effluent

The water that has been running after you turn off the shower or sink or flush the toilet continues to flow. If you use a septic system for your sewer treatment, this water will first pass through the septic tank, where it will go through a process that separates heavy particles from lighter items such as oils and grease before exiting the system. Heavier solids sink to the bottom of the tank and accumulate to produce a sludge layer, while lighter materials float to the top of the tank and accumulate to form a scum layer.

See also:  How Much Soil On Top Of A Septic Tank? (Solution found)

When the effluent leaves the treatment plant, it goes to the distribution box, where it flows via a series of pipelines until arriving to the drainfield.

Soil Beneath the Drain Field

The soil underneath your drainfield serves as the final stage in the treatment of the wastewater that has traveled through your septic system and into the ground. The primary function of soil is to act as a natural filter for water and other substances. Soil is made of 50 percent solid elements and 50 percent pore space, according to the International Soil Association. Minerals and rotting plant and animal remnants, as well as organic stuff, make up the solid components of the structure. In order to determine how successfully the soil filters incoming wastewater, the texture of the soil is critical.

It is the proportion of these three particles in the soil that determines how well the soil is able to store water and finally enable it to access the ground surface.

Physical Water Treatment

Water travels through the soil in your drainfield, allowing big particles to be filtered out while smaller particles are absorbed into the soil or adhere to the soil surface. Positively charged chemicals and viruses are attracted to and retained by negatively charged soil particles. Minerals in soil can also bond with contaminants, as previously stated. The physical features of soil also help to extract nutrients such as nitrogen, phosphorus, and oxygen from the environment.

Biological Water Treatment

The soil has a diverse range of bacteria that are dependent on the organic material in the wastewater for their survival. The bacteria, algae, protozoa, fungus, rotifers, and nematodes found in a conventional wastewater treatment system are all harmful to the system’s operation. In wastewater, aerobic bacteria are the most effective in degrading the compounds that are present. The survival of this species of bacterium is dependent on the presence of oxygen. Additionally, anaerobic bacteria can be discovered in your sewage system, namely in your septic tank.

This is why soil that has been oversaturated with water is not a suitable filter, since it prevents oxygen from being absorbed, enabling anaerobic bacteria to flourish.

It is critical to apply an all-natural septicadditive on a monthly basis in order to replace the “good bacteria” in your septic system. Call 800-397-2384 today to for a free trial!

The Role of Microbes in Your Septic System

Generally speaking, your septic system works in three steps to treat wastewater:

  1. The wastewater in your septic tank divides into three layers: scum, wastewater, and sludge
  2. The scum layer is the most visible. After that, the partially cleansed wastewater passes via a distribution box, which divides the water across drain field lines. Eventually, water will filter out through the perforated pipes and into the surrounding soil when it reaches the drain field lines.

Microbes, and specifically bacteria, play a significant role in the treatment of sewage, both in the septic tank and after the water reaches the land.

Microbes in the Septic Tank

During the separation process in the septic tank, wastewater is separated into three layers. Aerobic bacteria, which use oxygen in order to digest waste, are responsible for breaking down the top layer of scum. Bacteria in the sludge at the bottom of the septic tank use anaerobic digestion to break down the sludge, which does not require the presence of oxygen to occur. Solid trash can decompose into gases such as methane, hydrogen sulfide, and sulfur dioxide, accounting for up to half of all garbage generated.

Microbes in the Drain Field

After passing through the septic tank’s middle layer, the partially cleansed wastewater runs out into the drain field, where it seeps into the surrounding soil through perforated drain pipes. Drain field pipes are surrounded by a biomat, which is formed by anaerobic bacteria and other microorganisms in the soil around them. Biomat is a thick, tar-like bacterial slime coating that grows around the pipes. Biomat self-cleans and controls itself, accumulating or degrading in response to the amount of biomass carried by the wastewater and the number of bacteria required to metabolize one another when the available biomass levels fall below a certain threshold.

  • As the water passes through the biomat, it slows it down and begins to feed on the nutrients that are still present in the water.
  • Filtration Filtration occurs when wastewater passes via cracks, fissures, and pores in the soil around the drain field, allowing it to pass through the soil and biomat.
  • They gradually accumulate to the point where the system becomes clogged, lowering the flow rate of the water and restricting the mobility of the pathogens.
  • The majority of viruses that are trapped are collected by adsorption because their tiny size makes them less likely than other pathogens to be prevented by filtration.
  • During this period, the cleansed water dissipates through the surrounding soil, eventually returning to the water table of the area.

If you want to be sure that your septic tank has the correct concentration and type of bacteria, we recommend that you check out our BioMax septic tank treatment solutions, which are available online.

Septic System Education – McCutcheon Enterprises, Inc. in PA

A septic tank is a waterproof tank that is constructed of a sturdy material that will not corrode or deteriorate over time. The majority of septic tanks are constructed of concrete. Tanks with two compartments became the standard in the 1990s. (However, one-compartment tanks that are fully working can still be considered appropriate.) In Pennsylvania, the majority of septic tanks are 1,000-gallon tanks. It is never recommended that you enter a septic tank. Septic tanks contain potentially harmful gases and should only be entered by specialists who have received sufficient training and are equipped with the appropriate oxygen breathing equipment.

  1. It is the sinkable solids (such as soil, grit, and unconsumed food particles) that settle to the bottom of the tank and produce the sludge layer that causes the tank to back up and clog.
  2. Effluent is the cleared wastewater that remains after the scum has floated to the top and the sludge has dropped to the bottom of a wastewater treatment plant.
  3. It exits the tank through the outflow and enters the absorption region.
  4. It includes drainfields (leachfield or disposal field), mounds, seepage bed, seepage pits, and cesspools.
  5. Anaerobic bacteria that attach themselves to soil and rock particles and consume the organic stuff present in septic tank effluent make up this microbial community.
  6. Anaerobic– does not require the presence of oxygen in order for microorganisms to survive.

TWO MAIN TYPES OF ON-LOT WASTEWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS

The first compartment is made up of the following items:

  • This line permits wastewater to flow into the inlet baffle
  • The inlet baffle drives water downward as it enters the tank, allowing particles to settle out more efficiently
  • And the outlet baffle. Moreover, it prevents untreated effluent from skimming across the surface of the tank and escaping via the outflow. When it comes to the vast majority of scum and sludge layer formation, most of the sludge will settle to the bottom and the scum layer will build on top of it, with the water in the center. In the wall that separates the first compartment from the second compartment, there will be a hole or a pipe that will allow the water to pass through

The second compartment is made up of the following items:

  • Following are the contents of the second compartment:

5 Main Functions of a Septic Tank

Septic tanks are responsible for collecting all of the wastewater generated by the residence. Septic tanks are used to separate solid waste from wastewater flow. Septic tanks are responsible for the reduction and breakdown of solid waste. Septic tanks are used to store the sediments that have been removed from the liquid (sludge and scum). Septic tanks discharge the purified wastewater (effluent) to the absorption region, where it is absorbed. Tanks for Anaerobic Treatment (Previous Next) The use of an air compressor or a propeller to maintain an aerobic (oxygenated) atmosphere for the development of microorganisms is described as a mechanical system.

Comparing aerobic tanks to septic tanks, aerobic tanks have higher initial expenses and higher maintenance costs, but they break down sewage more effectively and produce higher-quality effluent with less particulates, which minimizes the likelihood of an absorption area being blocked.

OTHER TYPES OF ON-LOT WASTEWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS

PITS FOR SEEPAGE A seepage pit is a deep hole that is 4-12 feet in diameter and 10-40 feet deep, with a porous-walled chamber in the center and a filling of gravel between the chamber and the surrounding soil on each side of the hole. Effluent from the septic tank enters the chamber and is temporarily kept there until it seeps out and onto the soil surrounding the chamber. These methods have grown less prevalent as time has progressed.

CESSPOOL

The cesspool is considered to be the first kind of a septic system. A cesspool is often a cylindrical hole in the ground that is several feet in diameter and many feet deep. The majority of them have a permeable inner wall made of stone, masonry, or other building materials. Gravel is used to cover the outside surface of the wall (the area between the stone wall and the outer soil wall). The top of the structure is covered with a concrete lid, and the earth is then backfilled on top of the lid.

  1. Following its passage through the stones and gravel-filled outer chamber, wastewater eventually finds its way into the earth.
  2. An on-lot septic system accounts for almost 20 million residences and, as a result, approximately 29 percent of the population of the United States.
  3. Please refer to the chart on the right for further information!
  4. We at McCutcheon Enterprises, Inc.
  5. See the section below for some typical septic system misconceptions, as well as some Septic System Do’s and Don’ts to avoid.

ITEMS THAT SHOULDNOTBE PUT INTO A SEPTIC TANK

  • Diapers
  • Antifreeze or motor oil
  • Paper towels or toilet tissue that hasn’t been approved by the FDA. Drain cleaners that are harsh or caustic
  • Filters and buttes for cigarette smoking
  • Laundry detergents with a lot of foam
  • Plastic, bleach, eggshells, bones, and food scraps, as well as herbicides and pesticides, are all prohibited. Coffee grinds, cat litter, and excessive oils and grease are all examples of contaminants.

Common Septic System Do’s and Don’ts

  • Maintain the cleanliness and integrity of your septic system on a regular basis. Garbage disposals should be used as little as possible or not at all. Garbage disposals introduce additional materials into the system that are difficult to break down in the septic system.
  • Connecting roof drains and/or yard drains to your septic tank is not recommended. Due to the excess water, the tank and absorption area will be completely filled. Roots from trees in the absorption area will block the pipes in the region, thus avoid planting trees in the absorption area
  • Putting vehicles and large things (such as swimming pools) on top of your septic tank or absorption area is not a good idea.

Myths about Septic Systems That You Should Know The use of yeast, buttermilk, or commercial items will eliminate the need to have my septic system pumped in the future. TRUE, no scientific research has been able to determine whether or not the use of these chemicals is beneficial to your septic system. It has been discovered, however, that these chemicals are detrimental to your septic system. The additives agitate the sediments in the septic tank, rather than letting them to float to the top or settle to the bottom of the tank as is the case with conventional methods.

  • Once in the absorption region, they block the pipes and dirt pores as a result of the flushing process.
  • It is recommended that I cleanse my septic tank with a lot of water if it is in poor condition.
  • Floating the system will push the solids further into the absorption region, increasing the amount of damage that is done to the absorption area.
  • TRUTH BE TOLD, this is a symptom that the effluent is most likely not going into the soil at the rate that it should be.

INSPECTIONS OF SEPTIC TANKS What is included in a septic tank inspection and how long does it take? The inspector will perform a visual assessment of your septic tank as well as the absorption area surrounding it. The following will be performed during the examination of your septic tank:

  • Measure the amount of scum and sludge present and keep a record of it. In the majority of circumstances, you will need to pump empty your tank. The baffles in your tank should be checked to ensure that sediments are not leaving your tank. Cracks, leaks, and infiltration should all be looked for in the tank. Analyze the design and installation of the tank (this will allow you to check for any sensitivities or potential difficulties in the future)

The following items will be checked during the inspection of your absorption area:

  • Observe for symptoms of a faulty system (such as foul smells, mushy areas, or effluent on the surface)
  • And Surface water (which demonstrates inadequate filtering)
  • Examine the effluent distribution to ensure good operation. Check the absorption area for possibly dangerous bushes, trees, or any other risks that may be present.

The inspector will draw up a report detailing the findings of the examination as well as information about your septic system. This report is not intended to provide a guarantee; rather, it is intended to tell you if your septic system is in proper or improper functioning condition at the time of the inspection. When should I have a home inspection performed on my property? Inspecting and maintaining your septic system should be done on a regular basis. An inspection of the septic system should take place every one to three years, according to industry standards.

The inspection of the septic system before purchasing a home is strongly advised.

After passing through the septic tank, the purified wastewater (effluent) will be sent into the soil absorption system for treatment.

SEPTIC TANK DRAINFIELDThe drainfield is meant to release septic tank effluent below ground into the natural soil where it may be treated and eventually disposed.

In order to spread the effluent over the length of the trench, a perforated pipe will be installed at or near the top of the gravel.

Water will drain out of the septic tank through the output pipe and will continue to flow through a waterproof pipe to the drainfield trenches until it reaches the drainfields.

Water will drain from the perforated pipes and through the gravel, where it will seep into the soil beneath and next to the perforated pipes.

The cleaned liquid will ultimately evaporate, be absorbed by plants, or make its way into the groundwater.

There is a layer of gravel covering the bottom of the pit, and several pipes are set on top of the gravel with a spacing of 3-5 feet between them.

DistributionThe majority of traditional systems rely on gravity to transport effluent from the treatment tank to and through the absorption region, as shown in the diagram below.

Asymmetrical effluent distribution results in an overburdening of the absorption region, which can lead to a variety of difficulties and high expenses in the long run.

A distribution box is utilized in all trench systems, as well as certain bed systems, to split the flow in an equal amount.

Some systems need that the effluent be piped to the absorption region in order to function correctly. This occurs when the effluent cannot be transported to the absorption region by gravity alone, often because it must be pushed up a steep slope to reach the absorption area.

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