What Effect Do Disinfectants Have On Septic Tank?

  • The use of “ antibacterial,” “disinfectant,”or “sanitizing” products in the home can and do destroy both good and bad bacteria in septic treatment systems. “Normal usage” (according to directions) of these products will destroy some beneficial bacteria.

Can you use disinfectant with a septic tank?

Products containing bleach are safe for use with septic systems in small amounts, and mild detergents, such as laundry detergents, are generally safe for use in septic systems. Many water-based cleaners, such as water-based carpet cleaners, tub and toilet cleaners, and disinfectants are safe for septic use.

Why should disinfectants not be poured down a septic system?

Chemicals like solvents, oils, paints, disinfectants, pesticides, household cleaning products and bleaches can kill the helpful bacteria in your septic system. This may ‘kill’ the system and stop it digesting effluent.

What cleaners should you not use with a septic tank?

Top 10 products to avoid using when you have a septic tank

  • Fabric softeners. The principle of operation of fabric softeners is what makes them a bad idea for septic system owners.
  • Latex products.
  • Medicines.
  • Antibacterial soap.
  • Cosmetics.
  • Drain cleaners.
  • Bleach.
  • Dishwasher and laundry detergent.

What does Clorox do to a septic tank?

Septic systems rely on communities of beneficial bacteria to break down organic matter, soaps and potential contaminants. Flushing bleach down your drains will kill all of the bacteria in your septic tank—even the good ones.

Is Lysol safe for septic tanks?

It’s safe for plumbing and septic tanks, and cleans and disinfects both above and below the water line. Angled Spout for Hard-to-Reach Areas – This bottle is easy to use in urinals and toilets of all sizes. Allow cleaner to sit for at least 10 minutes then brush the entire bowl or urinal and flush.

Can I use bleach with a septic system?

You might consider bleach to be a great cleaner to use for your septic system. Unfortunately, that mindset is a dangerous one to have because it’s usually recommended to avoid using bleach in your septic system. The chemicals within bleach can kill the bacteria that your septic tank relies on.

How much bleach is too much for a septic tank?

Chlorine bleach in moderate amounts isn’t as bad for a septic system as you may have heard. But even a little drain cleaner may be terrible. One study found that it took nearly two gallons of liquid bleach but only about a teaspoon of chemical drain cleaner to kill the beneficial bacteria in a septic tank.

What is the best toilet bowl cleaner to use if you have a septic system?

For anyone on a septic system, the need to use a septic-safe toilet cleaner is very important. Fluidmaster’s self-cleaning 8202 Flush ‘n Sparkle toilet bowl cleaner is the best option for toilets with septic tanks.

How can I increase bacteria in my septic tank naturally?

Homemade Septic Tank Treatment The ingredients required for this natural solution are the following: Water, Sugar, Cornmeal, and Dry Yeast. To concoct this mixture, first start by boiling roughly a half gallon of water. Add in 2 cups of sugar. The sugar will act as the first food your bacteria will eat!

How do I increase bacteria in my septic tank?

Flush a packet of brewer’s dry yeast down one toilet on the bottom floor of your house once a month. The yeast will help add “good” bacteria to your septic tank and break down waste.

What is the best thing to put in your septic tank?

Biological Additives. Biological additives, like bacteria and extracellular enzymes, are the only acceptable septic tank treatment for promoting a healthy, natural bacterial ecosystem, maintaining an effective drain field, and protecting the health of the local groundwater.

Does antibacterial soap affect septic systems?

Antibacterial soap is made to kill bacteria. This is great for cleaning, but terrible for your septic system. Inside your septic tank, anaerobic bacteria is needed to break down solid waste, while aerobic bacteria in your system’s leach field destroys harmful pathogens which can cause disease.

Is Drano safe for septic tanks?

Will Drano® products harm my septic system? No, all Drano® products are septic safe drain cleaners and will not upset the bacterial action in septic systems. Use Drano® Max Build-Up Remover on a monthly basis to replenish the bacteria in the septic system that help break down toilet paper and organic matter in pipes.

Disinfection of septic tank and cesspool wastewater with peracetic acid

Peracetic acid (1-2 g L(-1)) has been used to treat the wastewater from private domestic septic tanks and cesspools over the past several years. The addition of 1 g L(-1) peracetic acid to wastewaters was simple, and it was shown to be effective in the destruction of enteric indicator bacteria in wastewaters. It was discovered that the proper mixing of peracetic acid and wastewater was essential to the process. Winter times marked by frozen soil, ice, and snow did not present any additional difficulties.

Once the peracetic acid-treated wastewaters were dumped into the animal slurry tanks, the hygienization process continued in the mixture of animal slurry and the treated wastewaters.

Similar articles

  • Inactivation of enteric microbes using chemical disinfectants, ultraviolet light, and a combination of chemical and ultraviolet light. Koivunen J, Heinonen-Tanski H, et al. Koivunen J, Heinonen-Tanski H, et al. Int J Water Res 2005 Apr
  • 39(8):1519-26. doi: 10.1016/jwatres.2005.01.021
  • Epub 2005 Mar 23. Water Res 2005 Apr
  • 39(8):1519-26. Disinfection of wastewater with peracetic acid: a review (Water Res. 2005
  • PMID:15878023)
  • Disinfection of wastewater with peracetic acid: a review Kitis, M., et al. Kitis M.Environ Int. 2004 Mar
  • 30(1):47-55. doi: 10.1016/S0160-4120(03)00147-8.Environ Int. 2004.PMID:14664864. Kitis M.Environ Int. 2004 Mar
  • 30(1):47-55. doi: 10.1016/S0160-4120(03)00147-8. An examination of the use of silver and copper in conjunction with hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid in the disinfection of an advanced primary treatment effluent Orta De Velásquez MT, Yáez-Noguez I, Jiménez-Cisneros B, Luna Pabello VM. Orta De Velásquez MT, Yáez-Noguez I, Jiménez-Cisneros B, Luna Pabello VM. Orta De Velásquez MT, Yáez-Noguez I, Jiménez-Cisneros B, Luna Pabell MT Orta De Velásquez and colleagues In: Environ Technol. 2008 Nov
  • 29(11):1209-17. doi: 10.1080/09593330802270632. In: Environ Technol. 2008.PMID:18975853
  • Treatment of Arctic wastewater by chemical coagulation, ultraviolet light, and peracetic acid. Chhetri RK, Klupsch E, Andersen HR, Jensen PE.Chhetri RK, Klupsch E, Andersen HR, Jensen PE.Chhetri RK, et al. Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018 Nov
  • 25(33):32851-32859. doi: 10.1007/s11356-017-8585-5. Epub 2017 Feb 16.Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018.PMID:28210951
  • Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018.PMID:28210951
  • Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2018. Peracetic acid for secondary effluent disinfection: a detailed performance evaluation of the technology Antonelli M, Turolla A, Mezzanotte V, Nurizzo C.Antonelli M, Turolla A, Mezzanotte V, Nurizzo C.Antonelli M, et al. 2013
  • 68(12):2638-44. doi: 10.2166/wst.2013.542.PMID:24355852Water Sci Technol 2013. Review

Disinfectant Overkill: Potential Harm for Septic Systems

Get articles, news, and videos about COVID-19 sent directly to your email! Now is the time to sign up. COVID-19+ Receive Notifications Despite the fact that septic systems are capable of handling modest doses of disinfectants, the current health concerns about COVID-19 have resulted in the introduction of new and existing products that may have an influence on septic systems.

  1. Cleansing and sanitizing wipes are problematic due of their ability to choke pipes. Products that promise to destroy 99.9 percent of germs in laundry sanitizers, including bleach and nonbleach alternatives. In home cleaning products, ammonium quaternary compounds (quats) are commonly found as active ingredients. Because they are registered as pesticides with the Environmental Protection Agency, you will often see them mentioned as active ingredients on the front label of disinfection products. Quats are disinfectants that may be used on their own or in combination with other cleaning agents. Dishwashing liquids, hand soaps, window cleaners, all-purpose cleaners, floor products, laundry detergents, infant care products, disinfectant sprays and wipes, air fresheners, and other cleaning products that promote antimicrobial action have all been infused with them by manufacturers.

Quats are not required to sterilize the surfaces in houses, and sanitizers are overkill in the majority of situations for ordinary household cleaning needs. Quats have proven to be successful in killing many different types of hazardous microorganisms in the laboratory, but there are substantial possible side effects that can occur as a result of that efficiency. Despite the fact that quats destroy germs on surfaces and in laundry, research conducted in households have never been able to demonstrate that they are more effective than soap and water in cleaning.

  • Hand washing with soap and water on a regular basis, on the other hand, has been shown to have health advantages.
  • Many people have skin irritation and rashes as a result of using them.
  • The growing usage of quats is a source of concern since they are contaminating our water supply.
  • Over the last several years, the identification of microorganisms that are resistant to quats has become more and more prevalent.
  • Infection-causing microbes such as bacteria and fungi gain the capacity to withstand the medications that are intended to kill them, which is known as antibiotic resistance.
  • Another thing to keep in mind is that many antibacterial products will linger on a surface for a lengthy period of time after they have been used.

There is a reason why disinfectant wipes containing quats are not recommended for use on any food-contact surfaces (such as cutting boards, plates or cutlery, highchair trays, and so on), as these powerful chemicals have the potential to contaminate the food they come into contact with, even after the cleaning has been completed.

How to avoid hidden sanitizers

Clients worried about the influence of their cleaning chemicals on the septic system may contact the following: 1. Look for cleaning products that do not have the term “antibacterial” on the label. Secondly, if they are in need of a sanitizer, they should look for substances that are listed on the front label, which must include the active compounds. They should avoid goods that contain the following ingredients, which are all derivatives of quats:

  • Benzyl dimethyl ammonium chlorides (C12-16)
  • Benzyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chlorides (C14 60%, C16 30%, C12 5%, C18 5%)
  • Alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chlorides (C14-14)
  • Alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chlorides (C12-18)
  • Alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chlorides (C14-60, C16 30%, C12 The following chemicals are used: ammonium chloride, benzalkonium chloride, benzethonium chloride, cetalkonium chloride, cetylpyridinium chloride, cetrimonium, cetrimide, didecyldimethylammonium chloride, dioctyldimethylammonium chloride, dofanium chloride, Domiphen bromide, methylbenzethonium chloride, tetraeth

Laundry advice

Whether or not their washing machine is equipped with a particular wash cycle for sanitizing laundry is something that property owners should look into. A sanitize setting is available on a large number of high-efficiency machines. Sanitize cycles employ an extra-hot wash temperature to eradicate 99.99 percent of the most common germs found in clothing, linens, and towels; this is the most effective cycle available. If the machine does not have a specified sanitize cycle, it is recommended that you utilize the hottest water temperature that is currently available.

  • Only when absolutely essential, liquid bleach or other sanitizing substances should be used to ensure that the beneficial bacteria in septic systems are not adversely affected.
  • She holds a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering and a master’s degree in environmental science.
  • Her responsibilities include serving as the education chair for the Minnesota Onsite Wastewater Association and the National Onsite Wastewater Recycling Association, as well as serving on the National Science Foundation’s International Committee on Wastewater Treatment Systems.
  • Heger will respond as soon as possible.
See also:  Where To Purchase A Septic Tank Riser In Pikeville Ky? (TOP 5 Tips)

You’re Probably Overusing Disinfectants and It’s Harming Your Septic System

The vast majority of people are completely uninformed of the detrimental effects that excessive disinfectant usage has on septic systems; thus, since the advent of COVID-19, the use of disinfectants and the associated harm to septic systems has increased significantly in the United States. So, how can these disinfectants harm your septic system, and how can you prevent using them in the first place? First and foremost, it is necessary to distinguish between the several things that may be affecting these septic systems:

  1. QUTS (quaternary ammonium compounds) are products that promise to destroy 99.9 percent of germs, including sanitizing wipes, laundry sanitizers, and hand sanitizer.

The primary active components in many of the products listed above are detergents, and many of the products also contain thickening and stabilizing chemicals. Surfactants, hydrotropes (for concentrated formulations such as powders), preservatives, aromas, perfumes, and colors are all likely to be included in the final formulation. Most of the time, surfactants are responsible for the foaming or suds that occur when cleaning solutions come into contact with water. Surfactants are normally non-toxic to surface or groundwater, but when they are exposed to saturated conditions, there is a high tendency for soil sorption, which results in a buildup of anionic surfactants.

Because of the addition of air to the system, excessive surfactants are frequently seen in aerobic treatment units.

Some suggestions for preventing high amounts of surfactants in your effluent include the following: Avoid products that contain any of the following active forms of quats and that advertise as “anti-bacterial” but do not contain any of the following active forms of quats:

  • Benzyl dimethyl ammonium chlorides (C12-16)
  • Benzyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chlorides (C14 60%, C16 30%, C12 5%, C18 5%)
  • Alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chlorides (C14-14)
  • Alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chlorides (C12-18)
  • Alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chlorides (C14-60, C16 30%, C12 The following chemicals are used: ammonium chloride, benzalkonium chloride, benzethonium chloride, cetalkonium chloride, cetylpyridinium chloride, cetrimonium, cetrimide, didecyldimethylammonium chloride, dioctyldimethylammonium chloride, dofanium chloride, Domiphen bromide, methylbenzethonium chloride, tetraeth

Select dish soaps that meet the requirements of the following criteria:

  • Surfactants derived from plants (or just simple soap)
  • The product is devoid of 1,4-dioxane and phlathate (synthetic scent). Dye-free
  • Petrochemical-free
  • sGlycol-free
  • sPhosphate-free
  • sCaustic-free

When doing laundry, remember to:

  • Make only essential and absolute use of liquid bleach or other sanitizing chemicals in order to limit the negative impact on beneficial microorganisms in the septic system. In lieu of this, use the “sanitize” setting on your washing machine, which employs an extremely high temperature to destroy 99.99 percent of the germs that may be found on clothing, towels, and sheets. Alternatively, if your washing machine does not offer a “sanitize” mode, it is advised that you use the highest possible water temperature. Both “sanitize” cycles and hot water, on the other hand, are more harsh on textiles and should only be used when absolutely required.

You may avoid experiencing any of these difficulties with your septic system if you follow the above guidelines, or even if you merely reduce the quantity of disinfectants you use in your home. If you are experiencing any current difficulties with your septic system or have any more concerns, please contact us through our website or by phone at (804) 581-0001!

Septic System Operation and Maintenance

  • It is possible to download Septic System Operation and Maintenance in Portable Document Format (PDF, 935KB).

If a septic system is properly installed, designed, constructed, and maintained, it will provide a long period of service to a home. Even the best-designed and-installed septic system will ultimately fail if it is not maintained on a regular basis. A basic description of septic system components and how they should be maintained is provided in this guide.

Septic System Components

In addition to the home sewer drain, the septic tank, the distribution box, and the soil absorption (leach) field are all components of a septic system, which is also known as an onsite wastewater treatment system (OWTS).

  1. The house sewer drain gathers all of the waste from household fixtures such as toilets, sinks, showers, and laundry, and links them to the septic tank for disposal. The septic tank gathers all of the waste generated by domestic plumbing and gives the necessary time for wastes to settle or float in the tank. Heavy solids settle to the bottom of the tank, where they are broken down by bacteria to generate sludge. Heavy solids settle to the bottom of the tank. Eventually, the lighter materials, such as fats and grease, breakdown and rise to the surface, where they produce a layer of scum. This procedure allows for the discharge of partly treated wastewater into the absorption field. The distribution box is responsible for distributing wastewater from the septic tank to pipes in the trenches of the absorption field in an even and consistent manner. It is critical that each trench receives an equal volume of flow in order to avoid overloading of one portion of the absorption field over another. Trenches receive sewage that has been partially treated. Wastewater is biologically treated by the soil around the absorption (leach) field, which is a system of trenches and distribution pipelines. The gravel, stone, or gravelless product used to partially fill the system is cleaned and screened. To ensure optimal functioning and long life, the absorption field must be correctly sized, built, and maintained. Theventallows gases that have accumulated in the pipework to be released from the system.

Septic Tank Maintenance

Once every two to three years, you should have your septic tank emptied out. Septic tank pumpers who are licensed by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation may examine, measure tank layers, and pump out the tank when it is required.

Maintain Your System

  • When necessary, pump out your septic tank on a regular basis. Document all pumps, inspections, and maintenance/repairs that take place. Plan the location of the septic tank and other system components. Either use a map or use permanent pegs to mark the locations of the various components. This is useful for gaining access to the system and will protect system components from being damaged when performing home maintenance or yard chores. Parking or driving big trucks or equipment on the septic system or any of its components is not permitted. It is not permissible to construct constructions such as decks, patios, or swimming pools that would cover the absorption field or restrict access to the septic tank or distribution box
  • Flush or use powerful chemicals and bacteria-destroying items such as drain cleaners, solvents, paint, paint thinners, floor cleaners, sink cleaners, motor oil, antifreeze, pesticides, and photo chemicals, which can damage or destroy the environment. These have the potential to interfere with the operation of a septic tank or absorption system. When used in regular domestic applications, household bleach, disinfectants, cleansers, and antibacterial soaps should have no adverse effect on system operation. Paper towels, cotton swabs, personal hygiene items, condoms, pharmaceuticals, disposable diapers, coffee grounds, cat litter, cooking fats/oils, face tissues, dental floss, cigarette butts, plastics, grease, and bones should not be flushed. Septic tank additives should be avoided. A properly designed and maintained septic tank will effectively handle residential wastewater without the need for chemical additions. Keep garbage disposals and grinders out of the septic tank and absorption field since they significantly increase the buildup of solids in the tank and absorption field. If they are employed, the capacity of the septic tank should be raised, and the tank should be drained out more frequently. If at all feasible, direct water treatment system outputs to a separate soil absorption system in order to reduce the amount of water that enters the septic system. Many water treatment system outputs can, however, be sent to the septic tank if the system is in good working order and can handle the increased flow
  • Again, this is only true in certain circumstances. Roof, cellar/footing (sump pump), and surface water run-off should be diverted away from the septic system. Plant grass and other shallow-rooted plants over the absorption field to help absorb excess moisture. Keep trees, long-rooted plants, and shrubs away from the absorption area and away from the surrounding area of the absorption area. Roots can grow into the pipes and cause them to get clogged. Water should be conserved. Repair leaky fixtures and appliances, and install appliances and fixtures that use less water and eliminate water-wasting behaviors. If you have a septic system, make sure to regularly examine and repair any effluent pumps and alarms that may be installed.

Find Out More

If you have any questions, please contact your local health agency or the New York State Department of Health, Residential Sanitation and Recreational Engineering Section at (518) 402-7650 or [email protected]

5 Key Toxins to Keep Out of Septic Systems

If you have any questions, please contact your local health agency or the New York State Department of Health, Residential Sanitation and Recreational Engineering Section at: (518) 402-7650, E-mail: [email protected]

Septic Safe Products and the Ones to Avoid

In addition to being an ecologically favorable option for homeowners, a septic safe wastewater treatment system is sometimes the only option for cottages and rural residences that are not connected to the municipal sewage system. In addition, it implies that what you flush down the toilet is significantly more crucial, and this includes your cleansers and other household products. Continue reading to discover more about septic systems and how your cleaning products might have an impact on their operation.

WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE “SEPTIC SAFE”?

In addition to being an ecologically favorable option for homeowners, a septic safe wastewater treatment system is sometimes the only option for cottages and rural residences that are not connected to the municipal sewage system. As a result, what you flush down the toilet is much more critical, and this includes your cleaning products. To discover more about septic systems and how your cleaning products may influence them, continue reading this article.

WHY PEOPLE CHOOSE SEPTIC SYSTEMS

The advantage of using a septic tank over a sewage system is that they are significantly less expensive and more durable. Because it is a closed system that does not require any external energy, it does not produce a monthly cost and can endure for decades before it has to be upgraded. Septic systems make a good contribution to the health and well-being of the local ecosystem from an environmental perspective. During the process of pushing water through a drain field, it serves to nourish local bacteria and microorganisms, which in turn supports the growth of both plants and bacteria in the area.

  • As a result, if toxins-containing items are introduced into these systems, they can have severe consequences not just for the mechanisms of the tank, but also for the entire ecosystem.
  • Septic systems are not designed to protect groundwater from the chemicals contained in some home items.
  • When purchasing new appliances, look for ones that are most suited for septic systems, such as high-efficiency toilets or washing machines that are Energy Star certified.
  • Please choose natural laundry detergent that is made for both high-efficiency and normal machines.
  • There are several natural alternatives to synthetic disinfectants that are safe for use in a septic system, for example.

Some of the stronger natural disinfectants, such as hydrogen peroxide and thyme oil, may still need to be diluted with water before being injected into the system due to their intensity; this is especially true for the thyme oil.

HOUSEHOLD PRODUCTS TO AVOID

Water softeners are devices that soften water.

  • Water softeners have the potential to damage the microorganisms in the septic tank, resulting in higher amounts of waste and grease being released into the drain field.
See also:  What Enzyme Is Used To Destroy Septic Tank Waste? (Best solution)

Oil, gasoline, paint thinners, solvents, photography chemicals, weed or bug killers are just a few examples of what you may get away with.

  • It is possible that these pollutants will poison Septic Systems and endanger the water supply.

Using Cooking Oil

  • It is possible for solidified frying fat, such as that from bacon, to build up in the tank and cause blockages in the entering and exiting pipes.
  • While these oils are pleasant to the touch, they have the potential to block the drain field and coat the waste within the tank, making it ineffective at decomposition.

Kitty Litter is a type of litter that is used for cats.

  • Cat litter kitty litter is a type of litter that is used to clean cat litter boxes.

CLEANING PRODUCTS TO AVOID

Cleaners and disinfectants that are antibacterial

  • Antibacterial and disinfectant products are not required in most household circumstances (they were originally developed to sanitize hospitals), and they will kill beneficial bacteria that aid in the proper functioning of your septic tank.

Chlorine Bleach is a kind of disinfectant.

  • A septic tank’s microorganisms might be killed or disrupted if it receives too much bleach. Additionally, it is hazardous to aquatic life. It is very likely that the bleach from your wastewater is being released directly into the groundwater if your septic tank is located close to a natural water system
  • If your septic tank is located close to a natural water system, it is very likely that the bleach from your wastewater is being released directly into the groundwater through your septic system.

Drain Cleaners that are chemical in nature

  • When these materials are used to unclog the drain, they destroy the microorganisms in the tank, resulting in the need for expensive repairs.

Products containing methylisothiazolinone are referred to as

  • Methylisothiazolinone is a synthetic compound with antibacterial characteristics that is found in a variety of consumer items. It is most often found in cleaning products, where it serves as a synthetic preservative. Apart from the fact that it is a frequent allergy, various investigations have revealed that it is also poisonous to aquatic life.

SEPTIC SAFE CLEANING PRODUCTS

Natural ingredients at their best.

  • Natural at its finest

Biodegradable

  • Product formulations should only contain biodegradable substances that will degrade in a natural setting, rather than persistent synthetic compounds that might accumulate in a product. Inquire as to whether your cleaning products, especially those used on a regular basis such as dishwasher detergents, are truly non-toxic and completely biodegradable.

Certified by a third party

  • It is critical to seek third-party certification that the items that flow through your septic system and into the environment will not have a harmful influence on the ecosystem. Examples of such organizations are Ecocert and The Environmental Working Group. By doing so, you may be confident that the items you select are truly better for the environment and are not merely making unfounded “green” claims for the sake of branding. To determine which products are best for your septic system, see the Environmental Working Group’s Healthy Cleaning Guide rating.

SEPTIC SAFE CLEANING PRODUCTS LIST

Septic systems are quite fragile. A 1,000-gallon septic tank may be completely decontaminated with just two gallons of chlorine bleach, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. While even a tiny amount of the wrong chemicals may cause havoc on your septic system, the majority of all-natural cleansers are safe to use on your system. Natural cleaning solutions that are non-chlorine, non-ammonia, non-antibacterial, non-toxic, and biodegradable can assist you in keeping your septic system in good operating condition.

  • Baking soda, borax, and salt are all ingredients in distilled white vinegar.

SEPTIC SAFE BATHROOM CLEANERS

While it’s simple to utilize all-natural cleaning solutions in the majority of places of your house, the bathroom is one area where chemical cleansers are almost always a given. A clean bathroom is crucial for your health, but cleaning your shower, tub and other bathroom surfaces does not require the use of harsh chemicals to get the desired results. These natural bathroom cleansers are highly effective and do not harm septic systems:

  • The natural enzymes in white vinegar will break down soap scum and foul smells
  • White vinegar is inexpensive and readily available. Baking soda – The abrasive texture of baking soda is ideal for polishing brass bathroom fittings. To get optimum disinfection power on surfaces, mix 12 cup of borax with 12 cup of water.

TOILET CLEANERS SAFE FOR SEPTIC SYSTEMS

The natural enzymes in white vinegar help to break down soap scum and smells. Making bathroom fixtures sparkle is made possible by baking soda’s abrasive texture. To get superior disinfection power on surfaces, use 12 cup of borax with 12 cups of water.

  • Baking soda is a scouring agent that is both affordable and effective. Pour half of a small box of baking soda into the toilet bowl and leave it to rest for at least an hour. Immediately after mixing, flush the liquid down the toilet before cleaning it with a toilet brush. White Hard water stains in the toilet bowl may be broken down with the aid of household vinegar, which has a high acidity. Pour one cup of vinegar into the bowl and let it aside overnight. In the morning, scrape the surface. If you use baking soda along with the vinegar, you’ll find that their effects cancel each other out and become ineffectual.

SEPTIC SAFE CLEANING

Natural cleaning solutions are generally considered to be safe for use in septic systems. Take the guesswork out of selecting items for use in septic systems by using a product comparison chart. “Septic Safe” is a label that appears on products that are safe for use in septic systems. Most of these materials are natural and biodegradable, and they will appropriately degrade within the tank without interfering with the bacteria’s ability to function. Consumer items such as housekeeping and cleaning products are one of the most serious threats to septic systems.

Being environmentally conscious means using items that are safe for septic tanks and taking responsibility for what you put in the water and the soil.

Even if you have centralized sewage, use septic-safe products to keep your home and yard clean.

SEPTIC SAFE CLEANERS: FAQ

In the world of septic systems, there is contradicting information regarding what is safe and what is potentially dangerous.

Here, we clarify the air on some often asked issues about septic cleaners:

1. IS VINEGAR SAFE FOR SEPTIC SYSTEMS?

Vinegar is completely harmless to septic systems and will not do any damage to them. White vinegar and apple cider vinegar are wonderful cleaning tools that may be used throughout the house, including the laundry room, kitchen, bathroom, and other areas. Because it is non-toxic and 100 percent natural, vinegar of any kind is completely safe for your septic system and your household.

2. WHAT DRAIN CLEANERS ARE SAFE FOR SEPTIC SYSTEMS?

Drain cleaners are famously harsh because they are required to be so. It might require a significant amount of force to break through the buildup in pipes. However, only a few drain cleaners, when used in moderation, are suitable for septic systems. Drain cleaners that foam, solidify, or crystallize can cause harm to the system and should not be utilized. To avoid causing harm to the system, use septic-safe liquid drain cleaning only when absolutely necessary. Non-chemical methods such as a pipe snake can be used to safely clear clogged drains that have become stubborn.

SAFE SEPTIC CLEANING WITH ASPENCLEAN

To ensure that all of their laundry detergents and cleaning chemicals are completely septic-safe, AspenClean employs the same natural, biodegradable, and ecologically friendly cleaning materials as they use in their professional cleaning service. It is possible to ensure that your home will receive a high-quality clean while not causing damage to your septic system by utilizing natural laundry detergents, dish soaps, as well as their house cleaning services and supplies.

Caring for Your Septic System

To ensure that all of their laundry detergents and cleaning chemicals are completely septic-safe, AspenClean employs the same natural, biodegradable, and ecologically friendly cleaning materials as they use in their professional cleaning services. With their natural laundry detergents and dish soaps, along with their house cleaning services and supplies, you can be certain that your home will receive a high-quality clean while not causing damage to your septic system or water supply.

Additional Resources for What is a Septic System?

To ensure that all of their laundry detergents and cleaning chemicals are completely septic-safe, AspenClean employs the same natural, biodegradable, and environmentally friendly cleaning materials in their professional cleaning service. By utilizing their natural laundry detergents and dish soaps, as well as their house cleaning services and supplies, you can be confident that your home will receive a high-quality clean without causing damage to your septic system.

Additional Resources for How often should I pump out my septic system?

  • Once every 3 to 5 years, have the system examined and pumped out. If the tank becomes overburdened with sediments, the wastewater will not have enough time to settle before it overflows down the drain. After that, the extra solids will be carried to the leach field, where they will block the drain pipes and the soil. Always know where your septic system and drain field are in relation to your house and keep a detailed record of all inspections, pumpings, repairs, contract or engineering work for future reference. Keep a sketch of it on hand for when you go to the service center. The drain field should be planted above the septic system with grass or small plants (not trees or bushes) to help keep the system in place. Controlling runoff through imaginative landscaping may be an effective method of reducing water consumption. Install water-saving devices in faucets, showerheads, and toilets to limit the amount of water that drains into the septic system and into the environment. Replace any dripping faucets or leaking toilets, and only use washing machines and dishwashers when they are completely full. Avoid taking long showers. Roof drains as well as surface water from roads and slopes should be diverted away from the septic system. Maintain a safe distance between the system and sump pumps and home footing drains as well. Take any remaining hazardous substances to a hazardous waste collection station that has been approved by the local government. Use bleach, disinfectants, drain and toilet bowl cleaners sparingly and in line with the directions on the product labels. Only utilize septic system additives that have been approved for use in Massachusetts by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP). In Massachusetts, it has been found that the additives approved for use have no detrimental effect on the particular system or its components, or on the environment in general.
  • Non-biodegradables (cigarette butts, diapers, feminine items, and so on) and grease should not be disposed of down the toilet or sink. The use of non-biodegradable materials can clog the pipes, and grease can thicken and block the pipes as well. Cooking oils, fats, and grease should be stored in a container and disposed of in the garbage
  • Paint thinner, polyurethane, antifreeze, insecticides, certain dyes, disinfectants, water softeners, and other harsh chemicals should all be added to the system to ensure that it works properly. Septic tank malfunctions can be caused by the death of the biological component of your septic system and the contamination of groundwater. Typical home cleaners, drain cleaners, and detergents, for example, will be diluted in the tank and should not do any damage to the system
  • And Make use of a garbage grinder or disposal that drains into the septic tank to eliminate waste. If you do have one in your home, you should use it only in extremely limited circumstances. The addition of food wastes or other solids lowers the capacity of your system and increases the frequency with which you must pump your septic tank. If you utilize a grinder, you will have to pump the system more frequently. Trees should be planted within 30 feet of your system, and vehicles should not be parked or driven over any section of the system Tree roots may block your pipes, and heavy cars may cause your drainfield to collapse
  • However, you can prevent this from happening. You should not allow anybody to work on your system or pump it without first ensuring that they are licensed system specialists
  • Wash an excessive number of loads of clothing in your washing machine. Doing load after load deprives your septic tank of the time it needs to properly process wastes and causes the entire system to become overwhelmed with surplus wastewater. As a result, you might be overflowing your drain field without giving yourself enough time to recover from the inundation. To calculate the gallon capacity and the number of loads per day that may be safely pumped into the system, you should speak with a tank specialist. Cleaning the plumbing or septic system using chemical solvents is recommended. Microorganisms that devour toxic wastes will be killed by “miracle” chemicals that have been developed. These items have the potential to pollute groundwater as well.
See also:  How Much Does A Septic Tank Pumpout Cost? (Correct answer)

Key Actions for Septic System Do’s and Don’ts

Use your toilet or sink as a garbage can by throwing non-biodegradable items (cigarette butts, diapers, feminine products, and so on) or grease down the toilet or sink drain. Non-biodegradable substances can clog pipes, and grease can thicken and block pipes as well. Cooking oils, fats, and grease should be stored in a container and disposed of in the rubbish. Paint thinner, polyurethane, antifreeze, insecticides, certain dyes, disinfectants, water softeners, and other harsh chemicals should all be added to the system to ensure that it operates properly.

  • Small amounts of common home cleaners, drain cleaners, detergents, and other products will be diluted in the tank and should not do any damage to the system.
  • Even if you do have one in your home, keep its usage to a bare minimum.
  • This will increase your reliance on septic tank pumping.
  • Build a tree or park/drive over any portion of your system if it is within 30 feet of it.
  • Anyone may come into your system and repair it or pump it without first verifying that they are licensed system specialists.
  • As a result of doing load after load, your septic tank is not given enough time to appropriately process wastes, and the entire system is burdened with too much liquid waste.
  • To calculate the gallon capacity and the number of loads per day that can be properly pumped through the system, you should speak with a tank specialist.

Microorganisms that ingest toxic wastes will be killed by “miracle” chemicals. It is also possible that these items will pollute groundwater supplies.

  • Your failure to maintain your water system could pose a serious health hazard to your family and neighbors, degrade the environment, particularly lakes, streams and groundwater, reduce the value of your property while also being extremely expensive to repair
  • And put thousands of water supply users at risk if you live in a public water supply watershed and fail to maintain your system.

Keep an eye out for the following warning signals of a malfunctioning system:

  • Surface sewage over the drainfield (particularly after storms)
  • Sewage backups in the home
  • Lush, green vegetation over the drainfield sewage smells
  • Toilets or drains that are difficult to empty

If your system fails, the first thing you should do is call your local board of health, which must authorize all modifications and the majority of repairs before they can be carried out or installed. The board of health will inform you of the steps that must be taken. In the event that your system fails, call your local Board of Health immediately!

Key Actions for Failing Septic Systems Can Be Hazardous to Your Health

The impact of COVID-19 on our septic systems is not widely discussed, despite the fact that many people are adopting social distance and sheltering at home. Because individuals spend the majority of their time at home, our systems are seeing a large increase in usage. Many of us are also applying extra disinfectants around the house in an effort to avoid the spread of the sickness among our family and friends. Find out how COVID-19 may be putting a specific burden on your septic system, as well as what you can do to keep your system operating efficiently.

People are still spending the majority of their time at home, even if the order has been reduced to a recommendation.

All of that time spent at home results in a huge increase in the amount of strain placed on your septic system.

Toilet flushing, showers, and laundry are all causing a torrent of waste into our septic systems today.

People are making more homecooked meals than ever before, whether it’s to avoid going out to dine and perhaps getting exposed to COVID-19, or simply to spend the time at home while the kids play.

Hot meals have taken the role of PBJ.

All of that cooking, although beneficial to our health, results in more dishes, which results in more FOGs and undigested food entering our septic systems, which is a bad thing.

Having the ability to work from home has provided homeowners with more free time to finally do all of those small jobs around the house.

These chemicals and non-biodegradable materials place a substantial amount of pressure on your septic tank.

Despite the fact that we realize the need of giving Fido a wash, especially during this time of year, septic system owners should be aware that pet hair presents specific issues for their systems.

Similarly, human hair falls within this category.

COVID-19 and the Increasing Use of Disinfectants Many homeowners are cleaning their homes from top to bottom, mostly in an effort to avoid the spread of COVID-19, according to the CDC.

As a result, we utilize these chemicals to limit the spread of illness since they are designed to destroy viruses and bacteria.

Use of antibacterial compounds to a greater extent than is necessary can have a negative impact on the ecology of your sewer system.

The accumulation of solids in your tank, as well as solids making their way into your drainfield or backing up into your house, might result as a result of this.

Recognizing the additional demands that COVID-19 is placing on your septic system, conserve water wherever you can and whenever possible.

Make flushing practices as conservative as possible — for example, flush every other time or just when there are particles in the toilet that need to be flushed away.

As is always the case, sanitary napkins and “flushable” wipes should not be flushed down the toilet or into the septic system.

If you have a garbage disposal in your house, try to avoid using it as much as possible or use it as little as feasible.

Prior to washing any dogs, thoroughly brush them and dispose of the hair that has accumulated in a rubbish can.

Whenever possible, use septic-safe household cleansers to disinfect your home, and try to keep your household’s usage of bleach to an absolute minimum.

Lemon juice, due to its extremely acidic nature, is a fantastic household cleaning solution that may be used on a regular basis.

Vinegar is yet another excellent scum-busting option to chemical-laden bathroom cleansers, and it is inexpensive.

Baking soda is another another septic-safe solution that works well on ovens and stovetops while also naturally eliminating smells from your refrigerator and dishwasher, among other things.

This increased pressure on your system may necessitate the need for you to have it pumped prior to an upcoming service visit with your septic provider, even if you have a planned appointment with your septic service provider.

You should plan your septic service appointment as soon as possible if you haven’t already done so so that any difficulties may be detected and resolved before they become a larger problem. To arrange a visit, please contact us right away! Articles that are related

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *