What Do I Need Access To In My Septic Tank? (Best solution)

What is a Septic Tank Riser and How Do You Install One?

  • Your Septic Tank Access port or pump-out port needs to be accessed anytime your tank needs to be emptied. Depending on the size of your tank, the number of people in the house, and the demand put onto the system, you will need to pump your tank about every 3 years. Advertisements

What are the components of a septic system?

A typical septic system has four main components: a pipe from the home, a septic tank, a drainfield, and the soil.

Should bath water go into septic tank?

In MOST household septic systems, yes. Probably 98%+ of septic systems receive all of the waste water from the house – tub, shower, sinks, washing machine, dishwasher, etc.

Do I need to vent my septic tank?

The bacteria active in a septic tank are anaerobic. Anaerobic means the bacteria operate without oxygen from the air. There is not a great deal of gas generated in a septic tank, but the gas must be released so pressure does not build up in the tank. If the septic tank has inlet and outlet baffles, they must be vented.

Do all septic tanks have filters?

First, not all septic tanks have a filter, especially the older septic tanks. Now many government agencies require or recommend a filter when a septic tank is installed. Cleaning a septic tank filter is different than pumping out a septic tank and cleaning it.

What to do after septic is pumped?

After you have had your septic tank pumped by a trusted septic company, there are some things you can and should do as the septic system owner.

  1. 1) Get on a Schedule.
  2. 2) Take Care of the System.
  3. 3) Know the Parts of Your System.
  4. 4) Check Other Possible Issues.

What are the five main parts to a septic system?

Septic Components: Septic Tank

  • Tank Components:
  • Inlet Sanitary “T” = All septic tanks have an opening for the waste to enter the tank and another one for the waste to exit the tank.
  • Outlet Sanitary “T”
  • Effluent Filter.
  • Scum Layer.
  • Liquid Effluent Layer.
  • Sludge Layer.
  • Tank Maintenance.

Can heavy rain affect septic tank?

It is common to have a septic back up after or even during a heavy rain. Significant rainfall can quickly flood the ground around the soil absorption area (drainfield) leaving it saturated, making it impossible for water to flow out of your septic system.

How do I prepare my septic tank for pumping?

3 Ways to Prepare for Septic Tank Pumping

  1. Keep a Record of Septic Tank Maintenance. We recommend you keep track of all septic tank maintenance, service, and repairs that have been conducted since you’ve lived in the home.
  2. Locate System Components.
  3. Clear Away All Debris.
  4. Choose Curt & Jerry for Septic Tank Pumping.

How do you know if septic tank is full?

Here are some of the most common warning signs that you have a full septic tank:

  1. Your Drains Are Taking Forever.
  2. Standing Water Over Your Septic Tank.
  3. Bad Smells Coming From Your Yard.
  4. You Hear Gurgling Water.
  5. You Have A Sewage Backup.
  6. How often should you empty your septic tank?

What are the do’s and don’ts of a septic tank?

DON’T flush material that will not easily decompose, such as hair, diapers, cigarette butts, matches, or feminine hygiene products. DO conserve water to avoid overloading the system. They kill the bacteria needed to decompose wastes in the septic tank and drain field. DO use substitutes for household hazardous waste.

Are long showers bad for septic systems?

Washing frequent, small loads of laundry or taking exceptionally long showers every day is all it takes to overload your septic system with too much water. The primary treatment tank needs time to break up solids before partly-treated water can enter the drain field.

Can I cut my septic vent pipe in yard?

They shouldn’t be removed but they can be cut down, level with the ground. Other white pipes may be standing above your septic tank, pump tank or close to your foundation. Those are available for maintenance, if needed, and shouldn’t be removed. Again, they can all be cut down close to the ground surface and recapped.

How far away can vent be from toilet?

According to the UPC, the distance between your trap and the vent should be no more than 6 feet. In other words, for the vent to work properly, it needs to feed into the drain line within 6 feet of the trapways that connect to it.

How do I find my septic vent pipe?

It will be found in a basement or crawlspace coming straight down from your house. In most cases it will be made of either cast iron or, in modern homes, PVC pipe, usually colored black. Most of these pipes will be at least 3 inches in diameter. Have someone flush the toilet and listen for a large draining sound.

Solving Septic Tank Access Issues

Receive articles, news, and videos about Systems/ATUs sent directly to your email! Now is the time to sign up. Systems/ATUs+ Receive Notifications Over the years, I’ve seen a lot of access issues with sewage tanks, including septic, pump, and aerobic tanks, and I’ve seen a variety of solutions. Tank maintenance must be undertaken on a regular basis as part of any management program. Some regulatory authorities mandate either a periodic inspection or a regular disposal of solid waste. Others need both.

To do this, a tank entrance with a minimum diameter of 20 inches is required, allowing for frequent cleaning and inspection of the tank as part of routine maintenance.

In most regions, it is now needed to have an effluent screen installed at the septic tank’s output baffle in order to function properly.

Fortunately, this occurs less frequently these days – but it does occur sometimes.

  • By selecting tanks that include this function, you may have a direct influence on the goods available in your region.
  • This entails, in my opinion, bringing access points to the surface through the use of risers and lids.
  • The news is filled with stories about children who have accidentally fallen into septic tanks and have suffered significant injuries or have even died as a result of their fall.
  • Additional safety devices or nets should be installed within the risers above the tank as a precautionary measure as well.
  • Pump tanks can experience similar problems to those seen with the effluent screen.
  • A pump tree for the pump and floats should be installed with a chain or rope attached so that they may be easily withdrawn from the tank for maintenance.
  • In addition to being affiliated with the University of Minnesota’s onsite wastewater treatment education program, Jim Anderson also holds the position of emeritus professor in the university’s Department of Soil, Water, and Climate.

Send him your questions on septic system maintenance and operation by email to [email protected] He will respond as soon as possible.

This article is part of a series about designing and installing onsite septic systems with future management in mind:

  • Septic systems should be built with management in mind
  • On-site system management should begin with the homeowner. It all comes down to the soil when it comes to sizing an onsite treatment area. Concerns about the soil that an installer can control
  • Keep accessibility at the forefront of your mind while designing your onsite system. Solving the problem of septic tank access
  • Drainfield Inspection Ports Should Be Secured Using These Tips

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Modern septic tanks are complex mechanisms, even though they may appear to be as basic as an ordinary concrete block from the exterior. As water rushes out of your home’s pipes, it flows via pipes and into the first compartment of your tank’s first section. You may expect your wastewater to interact with the complex chemical ecology and spontaneously split into three basic sections when it is stored here for an extended period of time. In the tank, solid waste collects at the bottom and settles there.

As any septic system owner will tell you, your septic system will require frequent inspections to check on the chemical balance in your tank as well as complete routine evacuation of your solid waste from time to time, as well as regular cleaning of your tank.

This access point is the manhole lid, and the other is the inspection pipe that you have installed.

When it comes time to have your solid waste collected, there should be no debate about whether septic tank pumping manholes or inspection access points in Prior Lake, MN should be used instead of each other.

Meet your access points

The majority of modern septic systems will feature at least one inspection point as well as at least one manhole cover. The inspection point is normally positioned above the second compartment of your septic tank, which is the section that deals with grease, oils, and other liquid waste. Meanwhile, the manhole cover is positioned above the primary compartment, which is responsible for storing the majority of the tank’s solid waste. Solid waste is often prevented from passing from one compartment to the other by a filter, which is typically installed between these two compartments.

So, what’s the big deal?

When your Prior Lake, MN septic tank repair staff disputes the merits of manholes against access points for septic pumping, you should take note and be worried. The reason for this is straightforward: if you pump solid waste from your tank using the inspection point, you run the risk of causing serious damage to your effluent filter, which might lead to it failing prematurely and enabling solid waste to freely flow between compartments. Additionally, you run the danger of creating an imbalance in the general environment of your tank.

Stay on the right side of the law

That last sentence proved to be a source of contention for both state and federal officials alike. In order to prevent this from happening in the future, numerous states passed legislation years ago that made pumping a septic system via an inspection point rather than a manhole cover criminal by steep fines.

To put it another way, pumping your septic system through an inspection point is not only harmful, but it is also possibly unlawful.

Your trustworthy team

When you deal with Mike’s SepticMcKinley Sewer Services, you won’t have to be concerned about septic tank pumping manholes vs. inspection access points in Prior Lake, Minnesota. We take great pleasure in providing immaculate, dependable septic servicing that will ensure that your system continues to operate properly for many years to come. Since 1956, this has been the method through which we have maintained the doors open. Learn more about what makes Mike’s SepticMcKinley Sewer Services stand out from the competition.

Septic Tanks Risers- Bring Your Access To Ground Level

Getting a little tired of having to dig up your yard every time your septic tank has to be pumped out or serviced? Are you getting tired of dealing with incredibly hefty concrete lids? It appears that you are in need of septic tank risers in order to bring your access down to ground level! Our septic tank risers and covers are constructed of high-quality, heavy-duty polyethylene plastic, which makes them extremely sturdy and durable while also being lightweight and simple to handle.

THE POLYLOK ADVANTAGE

Septic tank risers are available in a variety of shapes, sizes, and designs on the current market. We believe our Polylok septic tank risers are the best money can buy in terms of quality. There are several causes for this, but the following are the most significant:

FACTORY INSTALLED GASKETS

The Polylok brand is the only one on the market that is sent to you from the factory with gaskets already in place, making it unique. This means that there is no further work necessary to ensure that the riser system is air and water tight! Keep ground water out of your tank, wastewater in your tank, and potentially hazardous gases out of your yard! In contrast to most other products, our Polylok septic tank risers do not require you to purchase or use any other type of sealant between each riser part.

INTERNAL STRUCTURAL RIBS

Once the hole has been backfilled, the structural ribs in the Polylok septic tank risers are inserted inside around each riser piece, providing them with tremendous strength and allowing them to maintain their shape under the pressure of the earth being pressed on them. As a result of the freezing and thawing of the ground in many parts of the country, it is necessary to have a smooth surface on the outside of the riser’s exterior. It is possible for items that have structural support on the outside of the riser to actually be lifted from the tank, causing damage to both the riser and seal, during periods of freezing and thawing.

LIDS WITH HANDLES

Once the hole has been backfilled, the structural ribs in the Polylok septic tank risers are inserted inside around each riser piece, providing them with exceptional strength and allowing them to maintain their shape under the pressure of the dirt being pressed on them. These internal structural ribs allow the outside of the riser to be smooth, which is crucial due to the freezing and thawing of the ground in many parts of the United States. During freezing and thawing, the earth expands and contracts, causing items with structural support on the exterior of the riser to be removed from the tank and causing damage to the riser and the seal.

As a result of their extremely smooth exteriors, the Polylok items will have no problems in frosty environments!

LARGE ADAPTER RING

An adapter ring is required in order to properly install septic tank risers on your septic tank. We have one of the largest adapter rings available on the market, allowing you to cover up to a 25″ square or 27″ circular aperture with a Polylok adapter ring. This ring fits both 20″ and 24″ risers, allowing you to have a great deal of versatility no matter what size your opening happens to be!

GET OUT YOUR MEASURING STICK!

A few measures must be taken before purchasing a septic tank riser system in order to ensure proper installation. The first thing to consider is the size of your opening. Take a measurement of the aperture in your septic tank at its widest point to determine the size of your tank. Instead than measuring the present lid, it’s critical to measure the opening. Because you will be removing the present cover, the measurements of the lid are no longer important and may differ from the size of the aperture itself.

You are now prepared to make a purchase based on these two measures!

THE COMPLETE RISER SYSTEM

We have a large selection of components from which you may pick to create your own own full riser system. Our many various options offer our product the adaptability to be utilized in virtually any application, but they may also be a bit daunting when attempting to pick which components to buy for a certain application. Each component is discussed in further depth below.

ADAPTER RINGS

The adapter ring is the first component that you’ll need to put together in order to assemble a full riser system. The adapter ring attaches directly to the septic tank, allowing the risers to stack, lock, and mount to it without the need for any additional hardware. Having this component is critical since the risers are not flat on the bottom because they are meant to be stackable, and it is not feasible to install them straight to the septic tank without this piece. The adapter ring provides the flat surface you need to mount to the tank while also being able to accommodate the stackable risers that are included with the tank.

See also:  How Many Years Can You Go Without Checking Your Septic Tank? (Solution)

Our square tank adapter ring can accommodate big square apertures up to 25 inches in diameter and large round openings up to 27 inches in diameter.

They are intended to be used with openings that are 24″ or less in diameter.

Concrete anchors, a masonry bit for installing the anchors, and butyl sealer are all included in this set.

RISERS

To construct a full riser system, the adapter ring is the first component that must be assembled. Stacking, locking, and mounting risers to the septic tank are all made possible by the adapter ring, which attaches directly to the septic tank. As a result of their design to be stackable, the risers do not have a flat bottom and so cannot be mounted directly to the septic tank, which makes this item critical. Using the adapter ring, you may install your tank on a level surface, while also accepting the stackable risers that are included with it.

We can accommodate big square holes up to 25 inches in diameter and large round openings up to 27 inches in diameter with our square tank adapter rings.

Alternative: We sell and strongly suggest our Adapter Ring Installation Kit, which we sell and highly recommend as well.

Concrete anchors, a masonry bit for installing the anchors, and butyl sealer are all included in this package. The use of this installation kit provides a strong mount as well as a proper seal between the adapter ring and the septic tank during installation.

OPTIONAL SAFETY SCREEN

In addition to the 20″ and 24″ riser systems, Polylok also produces safety screens that fit within the riser systems. These screens serve as a supplementary layer of protection in the event that the riser cover is unintentionally damaged or removed, and they keep foreign objects from entering the septic tank. They also keep dogs from slipping into unprotected septic tank openings!

RISER LIDS

You will require a lid to complete your riser system, which is the final component you will require. Both the 20″ and 24″ riser systems may be used with the Polylok lids, which are available in two different types to suit your needs. For ease of access, the basic lid is equipped with handles and a gasket that has been factory placed, as well as stainless steel screws to keep it in place. These lids are strong enough to withstand foot traffic as well as the weight of a riding lawn mower driving across them.

  1. Stainless steel screws are included for installation.
  2. Installations below grade or in regions with a high volume of foot traffic are advised for the heavy-duty lids.
  3. The shipping of these items in large boxes necessitates the addition of additional time, materials, and UPS shipping fees.
  4. If you place your order before 2 PM CST, you will be able to get your order sent the same day you placed it.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

You will require a lid to complete your riser system, which is the last component. Both the 20″ and 24″ riser systems may be used with the Polylok lids, which are available in two different types to match your needs. For ease of access, the basic lid is equipped with handles and a gasket that has been factory placed, as well as stainless steel screws to secure it in position. A riding lawn mower may be driven on these lids without causing damage. They can also withstand foot usage. Heavy Duty lids are the second type of lid we provide.

They are also available in a variety of colors.

These goods may all be purchased from the following websites: NOTICE: FREE SHIPPING IS NOT AVAILABLE ON ORDERS FOR SEPTIC TANK RISERS AND LID.

SIMPLY ADD THE ITEMS TO YOUR SHOPPING CART TO RECEIVE THE SHIPPING COSTS. If you place your order before 2 PM CST, you will be able to get your order the next day.

WILL THE LID FIT DIRECTLY ON THE ADAPTER RING OR DO I NEED TO USE A RISER?

With the exception of the 24″ Heavy Duty Lid, the lid will often fit straight onto the adapter rings in the majority of cases. The underside of the 24″ Heavy Duty Lid is strengthened for added strength. The height of this reinforcement is actually more than the height of the adapter ring. Therefore, the 24″ Heavy Duty Lid will only be able to be used without using an adapter when the opening is at least 24″ in diameter. The lid will not fit through any aperture less than 24 inches in diameter.

CAN I CUT THE RISER SYSTEM DOWN TO A SPECIFIC HEIGHT?

No, the Polylok riser system is available in increments of 6″ and 12″, and it cannot be customized to a certain height. Cutting the riser will result in the lid not being adequately secured on the riser that has been cut down.

DO I BRING THE RISER SYSTEM JUST BELOW, AT, OR ABOVE GRADE?

Polylok riser systems are available in 6- and 12-inch increments; they cannot be customized to a specific height. When the riser is cut down, the lid will not be able to properly secure to the riser that was cut down.

SHOULD I USE THE STANDARD OR THE HEAVY DUTY LID?

The regular lid is sturdy enough to withstand foot activity and weights up to the weight of a small riding lawn mower passing over it without bending or breaking. If the riser system is located in a high traffic location or is going to be run over by lawn equipment on a frequent basis, the heavy duty lid is recommended. If you have any more queries, please contact us at 1-877-925-5132 or [email protected]

The Anatomy of a Septic Tank

Many homeowners in the United States possess septic systems, which include tanks, pipes, and leach fields. However, far too few of them are aware of what is happening beneath the surface of their yard. However, regardless of how discrete your septic tank and leach field are, you must be aware of their specs and standards in order to ensure that they function properly and for as long as possible. The compartments, baffles (both inlet and exit), and tank cover are some of the most important components of the tank itself.

  • Compartments for holding tanks You may think of your septic tank as the place where the wastewater from your house drains after it has been put down the sink or flushed down the toilet.
  • The tank doesn’t do much to clean the wastewater; all it does is serve as a home for bacteria, sort out the particles, and transport the liquids to the wastewater treatment field.
  • This is a rather passive process.
  • Tanks with two compartments are often the most recent and bigger models.
  • Baffles and Baffle Filters are two types of baffles.
  • The outflow baffle has a distinctive problem: it is susceptible to crumbling as a result of the gases located within the tank.
  • Blocked airflow via the inlet baffle is a common issue that happens.
  • An extremely strong possibility exists if the inlet was placed with the sewage line protruding just a bit too far into the inlet.
  • The use of access points and rippers It is typical for an untreated septic tank to include at least one access point the size of a manhole as well as one or more smaller inspection ports (the number might vary depending on tank form and how the manufacturer designed the tank).
  • Installing a riser raises the access point closer to the ground level, which can assist you avoid any additional expenses that may be incurred as a result of the additional labor that your pumping employees must perform when excavating.
  • A motor will almost certainly be required if your system is not entirely gravity-fed, making it far more intricate.

Walters Environmental Services, on the other hand, will work with you no matter what sort of septic system you have in place. To address any septic difficulties or maintenance requirements, please contact us as soon as possible.

Everything You Need to Know About Your Septic Tank

What is a septic tank, and how does it work? A septic tank is a water-tight container that is often constructed of concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene to prevent flooding (plastic). In fact, it is only one component of the entire septic system, which includes several other components such as a distribution box, pumps, float switches, aerators, filters, and other accessories. Septic systems are used to treat wastewater on-site in many rural and suburban areas that do not have access to centralized sewage systems.

The components of a conventional septic tank are depicted in the diagram below.

These are:

  1. The Tank: This is the water-tight tank into which wastewater from your house is sent once it has been collected. A hole, fracture, or any other structural damage should not be present. Access Ports: When a trained pumper comes to clean up your tank, they will utilize an access port. When it comes to tank cleaning, it is critical that the access port be large enough to allow the pumper to move the hose about within the tank properly. A common application for risers is to elevate septic tank access above ground level, eliminating the need to dig up your septic tank every time it has to be pumped. Last but not least, the access port should be securely secured with a child-resistant lid. It is vital for the protection of your family that septic tank lids are securely fastened with screws and that they are not cracked or damaged. Pipes for entering and exiting the septic tank: Wastewater from your house enters the septic tank through the intake pipe. After the particles have settled out, the effluent is discharged from the septic tank through the exit pipe and into the drainage field. There should be roughly 3 inches between the output pipe and the intake pipe. A baffle is fitted on the intake pipe within the tank, and it serves to keep the water out. It provides a variety of functions. Additionally, it helps to avoid the build-up of scum and its backup into the intake pipe It is also important for solids to settle in the tank that the input baffle be properly installed. When wastewater enters the septic tank, it should hit the entrance baffle, which will reduce the flow and prevent the tank from becoming agitated. This permits the contents of the septic tank to remain at rest, allowing the solids to sink to the bottom of the tank. The intake baffle can also prevent odorous odors from entering the sewage line and spreading throughout the home or business
  2. And It is even more crucial than the inlet baffle to have an exit baffle in place because it helps to prevent scum and other particles from flowing directly into the outflow pipe and eventually into the drain field. Gas Deflector/Effluent Filter: As gas bubbles climb to the top of a septic tank, they may bring sediments with them. This is why an effluent filter is used. A gas deflector prevents these solid-carrying gases from entering the output line by preventing them from entering. However, while not every septic tank is equipped with an effluent filter, it is strongly suggested as an additional safety to prevent particulates from entering your drain field.

Any of the above-mentioned components in your septic tank should be checked for damage or missing parts as soon as possible, and the problem should be resolved by a septic system specialist. What is the operation of a septic tank? Each and every drop of wastewater from your home is channeled via a main drainage pipe and into your septic tank. Solids are prevented from entering your drain field by using the septic tank, which is just a settling tank that serves as a filter. Ideally, the water should be kept in the tank for at least one day in order to enable time for the solids to settle.

  1. Heavy materials, such as dirt and digested waste, will sink to the bottom of the tank and form a sludge layer at the bottom of the tank.
  2. Effluent is the term used to describe the liquid that exists between the sludge and scum layers.
  3. It is critical that solids are given adequate time and space to settle before being used.
  4. In fact, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection mandates a minimum capacity of 900 gallons for any new septic tank installations in the state (the table below shows recommended septic tank capacities for different sized homes).
  5. Ideally, you should have your septic tank emptied every two to three years, according to the Pennsylvania Septage Management Association (PSMA).
  6. If a drain field has been ruined by a buildup of sediments, it might cost tens of thousands of dollars to rebuild it.
  7. It is crucial to understand that your septic tank must be completely filled with liquid in order to function effectively.
  8. The septic tank diagram shown above depicts the correct operating level of a septic tank in a residential setting.
  9. The result is that whenever more wastewater is added to the tank, an equal volume of effluent will be discharged from the tank and drain into the drain field.
  10. The opposite is true if the liquid level is higher than the outflow line, which may signal a blockage in a line downstream from the septic tank or in the drain field.

If you’re wondering if your septic tank is full, a skilled pumper will consider it “full” once solids have filled one-third of the tank’s capacity. This is the time of year when your septic tank will need to be pumped.

Procedure for Opening Septic Tanks

  • ASK a question or make a comment about how to open a septic tank safely and properly for inspection or cleaning.

InspectAPedia does not allow any form of conflict of interest. The sponsors, goods, and services described on this website are not affiliated with us in any way. Instructions on how to open the septic tank. The location of the septic tank cleanout or cover, as well as the access and opening processes. We discuss some of the things to look for before opening the septic tank, such as subsidence, indications of recent work, and septic tank coverings that are not suitable to use. Then we demonstrate how to remove the septic tank lid or the access port cover from the tank.

For this topic, we also have anARTICLE INDEX available, or you may check the top or bottom of the page.

Procedures for Safe Opening of a Septic Tank, Cesspool, or Drywall for Inspection or Cleaning

Conflicts of interest are not tolerated at InspectAPedia.com. No affiliation exists between us and any sponsors, products, or services mentioned on this website. Instructions on how to access the septic system. Procedures for accessing and opening the septic tank cleanout or lid. We discuss some of the things to look for before opening the septic tank, such as subsidence, indications of recent work, and septic tank covers that are not safe to be opened. Afterwards, we show you how to remove the septic tank lid or access port cover.

See also:  What Does Septic Tank Gas Smell Like? (Solution)

There is an article index for this topic available as well, or you can use the page top or bottom navigation options.

  • Conflicts of interest are not tolerated at InspectAPedia. We have no affiliation with any of the sponsors, goods, or services that are mentioned on this site. How to properly open a septic tank. Location of the septic tank cleanout or lid, as well as access and opening processes. We discuss some of the items to look for before opening the septic tank, such as subsidence, indications of recent work, and septic tank coverings that are in poor condition. Following that, we demonstrate how to remove the septic tank lid or access port cover. We demonstrate why pumping out a septic tank through a central manhole-sized lid, rather than an 8″ cleanout port or through the inlet or outflow baffle, is the ideal method of cleaning a septic tank. We also have anARTICLE INDEX for this topic, or you may check the top or bottom of the page. A SEARCH BOX is a convenient method to find the information you’re looking for.

In this septic tank pumpout article series, you’ll learn how to locate, open, pump out, clean, and inspect conventional septic tanks, as well as how to locate, open, pump out, clean, and inspect conventional septic tanks using photos. In addition to septic pumping tank truck operators, this guideline is meant to provide basic information to homeowners and septic service providers that are concerned about septic system maintenance.

  • There is a risk of dangerous, perhaps deadly collapse due to subsidence (depressions or low regions in the earth) near the location of the septic tank. Evidence of recent construction activity that may necessitate further investigation in order to determine the status of the septic system
  • Backup or effluent breakout at the surface of the ground in the septic tank region.
  • Here is an example of a septic tank cover that was discovered atop an unstable home-made collection of concrete blocks that had been piled by the owner to serve as an access well to his septic tank. Because the masonry blocks were misaligned and loose, and because the tank aperture into which the cover opened was bigger than the cover, there was a serious collapse risk that may have resulted in a deadly hazard. We covered the area with plywood and roped it off, and we quickly informed the residents and the property owner of the situation, both verbally and in writing

Procedure for Opening the Septic Tank Pumping Access Port

It is necessary to clean the septic tank using a cleanout port, which is normally positioned in the center of the tank. A small access opening, such as one over an intake or outlet baffle, does not provide enough space for adequate sludge removal from the septic tank bottom, and it increases the likelihood of future clogging of the tank’s inlet or outlet due to partially removed floating scum that has not been completely removed from the tank bottom. In this particular scenario, we already had the measurements to the exact placement of the septic tank cleanout cover due to previous work.

A wrecking bar is set to be used to remove the cover from the vehicle. It is important to note that we excavated far enough away from the tank entrance so that when we remove the lid, we will not have a large amount of dirt falling into the septic tank.

Reader CommentsQ A

@Ron, In order for a concrete septic tank lid to be correctly erected, it must feature both access openings and cast in iron loops to which a hoist may be attached. Alternatively, if your septic tank cover does not have those points of purchase for lifting, you will require a flat bar and a larger wrecking bar to pry up the excavated lid from the septic tank sufficiently to allow you to put a chain around the lid, most likely two Chainz, and lift the lid with a hoist and tripod mechanism or you will use an on-site motorized hoist.

  1. 1/2 x 27/4 removing the top of a septic tank @Phil, Although what you describe is theoretically doable, it may be less expensive and more rational to do so in a different way.
  2. This is due to the fact that just stitching a circular hole does not ensure that I am creating a hole through which the lid will not be dropped.
  3. Edge My concrete septic tank, which was constructed when the home was built in 1979 and does not have any manholes or openings for pumping out, is in poor condition.
  4. Is it feasible to cut two manholes using a concrete saw that are 20″/24″ in diameter and then build risers and a cover on top of them?
  5. Could you please share a picture of the tank top?
  6. It is common for the concrete top to be tapered; nevertheless, it may just be trapped by effloresent salts and filth.
  7. I have a feeling that simply tugging will not be effective.

This would have stopped leaks but would have made it extremely difficult to open the tank for the next person who needed to open the tank.

Repeat this process many times all around the cover’s perimeter.

For me, this has worked almost every time in the past.

It is recommended that you build a septic tank riser that is sealed to the tank top, as well as a new secure cover on top of the riser if your septic tank lid is not near to the ground level.

Never work on your own.

I’ve erected two wood 4x4s on top of the lifting ring to provide additional support.

All I’ve done three times is shattered those 4x4s.

Do you have any recommendations?

A septic tank pumping provider can remove plastic bags, tiny pebbles, and other debris from your tank, as well as the sediments, scum, and sludge that has accumulated there.

What is the best way to get them out?

When the septic tank is drained out, would it make sense to place a plastic bag over the top hole of the tank to keep the odors contained?

Gerard A plastic bag as a sewer line cap doesn’t seem right to me – it’s not durable, it’s the incorrect material if a cover is required, and if it’s a vent rather than an access pipe, the vent must be open to the atmosphere and protected from animal intrusion.

What is the function of this item?

A typical septic tank is equipped with clean out access covers that are strategically placed.

Maybe something as basic as a flat piece of concrete or stone will be sufficient, or maybe something more complex.

To be quite honest, I would have expected the contractor who dug the hole to be accountable for ensuring that the system was repaired and safe.

What should I do to solve it?

What store would I go to in order to acquire septic tank covers?

A few years ago, I had a beautiful new house built for me.

I have three plastic polylok lids, one of which is above ground and is for the pump.

I’d like to purchase risers so that I may build all three at a depth of around 6 inches below ground level.

What are the advantages and disadvantages.

Do you have any other suggestions?

I apologize for the lengthy post.

Sorry, but “True Bolt” isn’t a phrase I’m familiar with or associate with septic tank lids in any way.

Although this is not always the case, Mary, as the pumper may be able to access the entire tank bottom from a single opening depending on the tank’s size and shape; however, if your pumper is unable to do so from a single opening, you may want both openings opened to inspect the condition of the tank baffles.

There are two holes in my septic tank. Is it necessary to open both doors for a pump out?

Question:cannot find the manhole cover of the septic tank

@Ron, In order for a concrete septic tank lid to be correctly erected, it must feature both access openings and cast in iron loops to which a hoist may be connected. Alternatively, if your septic tank cover does not have those points of purchase for lifting, you will require a flat bar and a larger wrecking bar to pry up the excavated lid from the septic tank sufficiently to allow you to put a chain around the lid (probably two Chainz), to lift the lid with a hoist and tripod mechanism, or you will use an on-site motorized hoist.

  1. Half-inch by 27-quarter-inch septic tank top pushing up @Phil, Although what you describe is theoretically conceivable, it may be less expensive and more reasonable to do it in a different way, as described above.
  2. This is due to the fact that just stitching a circular hole does not ensure that I am creating a hole through which the lid will not fall.
  3. Edge My concrete septic tank, which was placed when the home was built in 1979 and does not have any manholes or openings for pumping out, was not designed for this.
  4. What if I want to cut two manholes using a concrete saw that are 20″/24″ in diameter and then construct risers with a lid on top of them?
  5. Please provide a photo of the tank top.
  6. Are there any specific details?
  7. The lid should be forced up using a chain hoist or a strip of horizontal timber held on one end by a post and the other by a hydraulic jack.

If someone was trying to seal the tank lid against ground water leaking when it was last installed, it’s likely that they oozed some silicone or butyl sealant over the lid edges, which would stop leaks but make it a nightmare for the next person who has to open the tank.

Repeat this process many times all around the cover.

In my experience, this method has worked nearly every time.

It is recommended that you build a septic tank riser that is sealed to the tank top, as well as a new secure cover on top of the riser, if your septic tank lid is not near to ground level.

Working alone is never a good idea.

Over the top of the lifting ring, I’ve built up two oak 4x4s.

Nothing more than breaking those 4x4s three times.

Do you have any advice?

In addition to plastic bags and tiny rocks, septic tank pumping companies may also remove the particles scum and sludge that have built up in your tank over time.

the best way to get them out of my system Gerard A plastic bag as a sewer line cap doesn’t seem right to me – it’s not durable, it’s the incorrect material if a cap is required, and if it’s a vent rather than an access pipe, the vent should be open to the atmosphere and protected from animal ingress.

  • Is this a good idea?
  • Gerard A plastic bag as a sewer line cap doesn’t seem right to me – it’s not durable, it’s the incorrect material if a cap is required, and if it’s a vent rather than an access pipe, the vent should be open to the atmosphere and protected from animal ingress.
  • Is this a good idea?
  • John, What you’re saying strikes me as a bit weird.
  • As a result, I’m completely baffled as to what sort of tank you’re running.
  • Attention: We don’t want surface water seeping into the tank, and we don’t want an unsafe cover that may cause harm or death if someone were to fall into the tank.
  • They cut a hole in the tank in order to pump out the contents.

Maree, The most convenient option is to locate a local septic tank provider near where you live rather than searching online.

Tom, What you’re proposing is totally acceptable in my opinion.

It was good when I had my tanks cleaned last week; the only problem was that he had to dig approximately 12 inches below ground for the lids.

I have two more in the basement.

All three of these structures will be around 6 inches below ground level, thus I would like to obtain risers for them.

What are the benefits and drawbacks of each option?

Do you have any additional ideas?

Your assistance has been greatly appreciated!

Although this is not always the case, Mary, as the pumper may be able to access the entire tank bottom from a single opening depending on the tank’s size and shape; however, if your pumper is unable to do so from a single opening, you may want both openings open to inspect the condition of the tank baffles.

It is possible to access my septic tank from two directions. For a pump out, do both valves have to be opened?

Reply:

If it’s a cesspool, rather than a septic tank, and it’s spherical, the access lid is normally located in the center of the container.

Question: how do i remove septic tank lid that is stuck

The entrance lid would normally be in the center of the cesspool, if it is in fact a cesspool rather than a septic tank, and it is spherical.

Reply:

Anon:WARNING: If the septic tank cover, lid, or access aperture has partially caved in or sank into the tank, the condition is extremely dangerous – an unsecure cover implies that someone might fall into the tank, which is generally lethal very quickly. Please keep everyone away from the septic tank area until such time as you have had the tank inspected and opened for additional inspection by a professional. Depending on the tank type and condition, lifting the lid may necessitate the use of a pry bar or wrecking bar, as well as a small portable winch (which is unusual).

Alternatively, consider the following:

Septic Pumping ProcedurePumper Truck Operation Articles

  • PROCEDURE FOR SEPTIC TANK INSPECTION
  • MISTAKES MADE IN SEPTIC TANK PUMPING
  • PROCEDURE FOR SEPTIC TANK PUMPING
  • HOW TO CLEAN A SEPTIC TANK
  • WHEN TO CLEAN A SEPTIC TANK
  • WHEN NOT TO PUMP A SEPTIC TANK
  • HOW TO FIND A SEPTIC TANK
  • HOW TO OPEN A SEPTIC TANK
  • INSPECT THE SEPTIC TANK BEFORE PUMPING
  • SEPTIC TANK INSPECTION PROCEDURE
  • SEPTIC TANK LEVELS OF SEWAGE
  • PUMPER TRU

Suggested citation for this web page

HOW TO OPEN A SEPTIC TANK at Inspect a Tank An online encyclopedia of building environmental inspection, testing, diagnosis, repair, and issue preventive information is available at Apedia.com. Alternatively, have a look at this.

INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES:ARTICLE INDEX to SEPTIC SYSTEMS

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See also:  What Happens If You Get Septic Tank Riddex On Your Hands? (Solved)

Proper Access Opening for Septic Tank Pumping

Pumping of the septic tank must take place through the septic tank lid ports in order to be effective. The only method to completely remove all of the waste from the tank is to thoroughly agitate the tank, which will remove both the water and the solids that have accumulated inside the tank. This is done in order to eliminate anything and everything from the tank! If someone is pumping through a clean-out or inspection port, they are not conducting a full cleaning job, according to industry standards.

Pumping vs. Cleaning Your Septic Tank

The sale of a pumping service and a cleaning service is offered by several businesses. BE EXTREMELY CAREFUL. The pumping service will only remove water from the ground; no solids will be removed. The fact that many people feel they only require that servicing every few years makes this a terrible waste of money, and it really causes more harm to the system than good. When the solids compress and pour into the disposal field, it might result in the field failing or requiring very expensive repairs.

Only through the septic tank’s lid holes can a proper cleaning service be conducted, according to the manufacturer.

There is just one service that you will ever require: a complete pumping and cleaning service.

The vast majority of companies who provide just pumping services do it appropriately, removing everything from the tank in question. Priority Pumping’s septic tank pumping service will ALWAYS include the removal of all of the liquid and sediments that have accumulated inside the tank.

How Many Lids Does My Septic Tank Have?

Most of the time, these lids are situated beneath the surface of the earth, and excavation is necessary to discover and expose those lids. Some tanks will only have one lid opening, while others will have two or three. How do you know what you have in your tank? The answer to this question is based on the year in which your septic tank was installed. From 1960 to 1970, the coffin lid was the most common type of lid. This will need further excavation in order to move the lid and pump. 1970s through the 1990s*: These septic tanks are normally one-compartment tanks with a manhole in the center that is 18 inches in diameter.

Years 2000–present: These tanks MIGHT additionally include a filter in the back chamber that has to be cleaned.

What If My Septic Tank Has Risers?

Septic tank “risers” come in a variety of shapes and sizes. The correct risers from which we may pump are composed of a polymer or concrete, depending on the use. Their mounting will be done immediately on the lids of the septic tanks, which is a good idea. The green and tan lids seen in the illustration above correspond to the correct pumping ports on the device. Because we will have to excavate and expose the septic tank lids if you do not have these types of risers, we will be forced to pump your septic tank.

  1. We’re going to be as cautious as we possibly can.
  2. It is possible for Priority Pumping to assist you with installing septic tank risers if your tank does not presently include any, but you would want to have them installed in your septic tank during the pumping service.
  3. You may either indicate this while arranging your appointment, or you can always chat with our professionals when they arrive at your home to do your service if you have any questions.
  4. Do you still have questions about pumping your septic tank?
  5. Call or text our office at 602.601.5751 if you have any questions.
  6. It is more than a pump job when you hire Priority Pumping as your contractor!

Common Septic Tank Facts

Septic systems are a low-cost and frequently successful alternative to conventional sewer systems. Concrete tanks have been the most frequent since the 1940s, with 3 – 500lids for a 1000 gallon tank and 4 – 500lids for a 1500 gallon tank being the most typical. Tanks began to be equipped with 16″ square concrete plugs with a lifting bail in the late 1990s, allowing for easier access to both sides of the tank. Many tanks today are made of fiberglass or plastic. Over time, the concrete might degrade, and the lids may develop cracks or possibly shatter completely due to the pressure.

  1. Even broken lids should be replaced for the sake of the public’s safety.
  2. They get access to your septic tank by removing green covers that are 20 inches in diameter.
  3. This is done in order to prevent anyone, especially children, from removing a lid and falling into the container.
  4. A typical water level for a tank should be 6″ below the top of the tank, and the tank should be kept completely filled at all times.
  5. The level of the water is often a good sign of potential problems.
  6. Additionally, it might suggest a clogged intake line, which could be caused by roots, a damaged pipe, or a loose joint.
  7. If there has been a lot of rain, the earth may get saturated, making it impossible for any additional water to seep through the soil to the surface.
  8. If your tank has allowed particles to enter the field lines, this might cause the openings in the corrugated pipe to get clogged, preventing water from percolating through the soil as effectively as it should be.

An output filter may be placed to prevent particulates from entering the field lines, but it would need to be cleaned on an annual basis to ensure that this does not happen. Nonetheless, it is far less expensive than rebuilding field lines.

The Dangers of Not Knowing Where Your Septic System Access Is

Every septic system must be pumped on a regular basis to prevent it from overflowing and causing damage to your yard or property. As a result, if you are unaware of the location of the septic system’s entry point, your home may be in risk. The following are some simple measures to take in order to locate your septic system, allowing you to avoid the danger of not knowing where your septic system access is located. Locate a Map In the event that you have recently moved into your house and are unfamiliar with the surroundings, you may be unable to determine where your septic system’s entry point is located.

  1. Every county should maintain records of every septic system that has been established, as well as a map with schematics showing the exact location on your property where your septic tank is located, if one has been erected.
  2. Keep up with the Pipe Every septic system is established in conjunction with a sewer line that runs from your house into your backyard.
  3. You can locate your tank with the help of a thin metal probe that is put into the pipe.
  4. When you feel the probe make contact with a solid surface, you’ve found your tank’s location.
  5. Remove the lid with care; do not attempt to do so yourself.
  6. In order to remove the lid, professionals must use specialized equipment.

How to Locate a Septic Tank

A surprising number of homeowners have had to figure out how to find the location of a septic tank on their premises. If you’re purchasing a home with a septic system or discover that your property’s tank hasn’t been maintained in years, you’ll want to know where the tank is located because all septic tanks must be pumped at some point in time. In the course of a real estate transaction, the property owners or real estate agent may be aware of the location of the tank. Inquire about the “as-built,” which is a schematic of the septic system and the specifics of its installation.

Unfortunately, locating the septic tank may not be as simple as it appears.

In other cases, not filing the as-built with the local health department was not required. Because septic system permits have only been needed in Oregon since 1972, you may have to depend on visual indicators to determine whether your system is working properly.

1.Follow the Outgoing Sewer Pipe

Look for the four-inch sewage pipe that runs through the structure and the location where it exits the building in the basement or crawl space. Locate the location outside the building where the pipe exits the building or the location of an access cover over the pipe. It is required that septic tanks be at least five feet away from the structure, although they are usually between 10 and 25 feet away. You may follow the pipe all the way to the tank using a metal probe. It is important to note that sewage lines may curve and run around the corner of a building rather than following a straight path to the holding tank.

2.Search for Septic Tank Risers and Lids

Depending on their age, septic tanks are either one- or two-compartment structures. Each compartment has a cover, with two additional lids for dual-compartment tanks that were added later. If the tank includes an access point known as a riser, the lid may be readily visible from outside. Look for round, plastic discs that are about a foot or two in diameter. Due to the fact that the lids might be flush with the ground or just a few inches above it, they can get overrun with grass and other plants over time.

Tanks without risers are likewise equipped with lids, however they are located underground.

3.Find the Drain Field First

In the absence of a riser and lid, search for indicators of a drain field, such as an area of grass that grows more quickly or more slowly than the rest of the yard, grass that is a different color from the rest of the yard, or areas where snow melts more quickly than in other parts of the yard. Spots of high or low ground in the yard might possibly indicate the presence of a subterranean tank or drain field. You will be able to discover the tank if you probe these regions.

Reasons to Hire a Contractor for Help

Attempting to locate a septic tank on your own can be risky, and in some cases, lethal, if the septic system is old and in danger of collapse. In the event that you fall into a cesspool, dry well, or septic tank, you will die. Removing septic tank lids on your own might potentially put you at risk of contracting bacterial or virus diseases. If you detect any of the following issues, please contact a contractor to assist you in locating or inspecting your septic tank:

  • Soil that is sinking around the tank or drain field. Drainage backup into the home’s sewer system, or toilet backup
  • A foul odor in the area where you assume the tank and drain field are located
  • When there is no rain, pooling water, muddy soil, or spongy grass might occur. Septic tank covers that are rusted, cracked, or have been replaced with improvised lids are prohibited.

Even though you may be ashamed about forgetting where your septic tank is, it is a very frequent problem among homeowners. A contractor may assist you in locating it, and he or she may do it as part of the pumping service. If you need assistance locating your tank or if you have any other questions, please contact us at 503-630-7802. We are available to assist you!

How to Find the Lid on a Septic System

All septic tanks eventually fill with sediments and must be pumped out on a regular basis in order to remain in excellent functioning order. If the tank’s lid is not on a riser at ground level and you are not the home’s original owner, you may be unable to determine where the lid is located.

A typical septic tank is 4 inches to 4 feet underground, with all of its components, including the cover, buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underneath. This is true regardless of whether the septic tank is equipped with special risers that keep the lid flush with the surface of the ground.

Consult A Map

First, choose with the most straightforward choice. The installation of septic tanks at all locations is recorded in most counties’ permission records, which are kept on file for future reference. Typically, this will include a schematic indicating the placement of the tank on the land, as well as certain dimensions that will allow you to measure to the precise site of the tank. If your tank was placed before your county made it a requirement to record the location of such tanks, you may find yourself with nothing to show for your efforts.

Search For A Sign

Septic tanks are placed in such a way that they are as unnoticeable as possible on the land. After the grass has grown back after installation and some time has passed, it is possible that just a few visual indications will remain. Pay particular attention to the contours of your yard for any inexplicable high or low points that might suggest the presence of an underground storage tank.

Follow The Pipe

Installation of the septic tank takes place along the sewage line that runs from the house into the front yard. Locate the 4-inch sewage pipe at the point where it exits the home in the basement or crawl space, if it is there. Locate the same spot outside and make a note of it. Insert a thin metal probe into the earth, identify the 4-inch sewage line, and follow it across the yard, probing every 2 feet, until you reach the end of the property. Septic tanks are required to be at least 5 feet apart from the home in all states except Alaska.

Whenever the probe makes contact with flat concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene it indicates that the tank has been located.

Locate The Lid

The majority of septic tanks are rectangular in shape and measure around 5 feet by 8 feet. Investigate the tank’s circumference to determine its boundaries and outline the rectangle’s boundary using a pencil. A septic tank that was built before 1975 will have a single concrete lid that is 24 inches in diameter in the center of the rectangle. If the tank was built after 1975, it will have two covers made of fiberglass or polyethylene, centered at the ends of the rectangle and centered at the ends of the rectangle.

Call A Professional

Opening a septic tank is a job best left to the pros once the lid has been discovered. Concrete septic tank lids are extremely heavy, and many require the use of lifting tools to remove them completely. An open tank has the potential to release toxic gases. Anyone going around on the property who comes into contact with an exposed septic tank might be in risk. Because of the noxious vapors present in an open tank, falling into one can be lethal.

Mark The Spot

Make a note on the ground near where the tank was pumped by a professional and the lid was buried to serve as a reference in the future.

In order to keep track of where you are, you should choose a hefty circular patio tile that is embedded in the ground. Additionally, draw your own map of the area and store it with your other important papers.

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