What Can Be Used As A Septic Tank? (TOP 5 Tips)

Concrete, fiberglass, and plastic are commonly used. Concrete is sturdy, and it’s still used for some septic tanks today. However, although concrete is a relatively affordable tank material, it’s not considered the longest-lasting modern septic tank material due to two downsides.

What chemicals are in septic tank?

  • Septic tank chemicals consist of caustic chemicals that are either derivatives of acids or alkalis. Chemicals that are commercially available that are used for the wellness of your plumbing contain these same chemicals. Essentially, they are used to unclog the pipes.

What can I use instead of a septic tank?

Alternative Septic Systems

  • Raised Bed (Mound) Septic Tank Systems. A raised bed drain field (sometimes called a mound) is just like what it sounds.
  • Aerobic Treatment Systems (ATS) Aerobic systems are basically a small scale sewage treatment system.
  • Waterless Systems.

What is the cheapest septic system?

Conventional septic system These conventional septic systems are usually the most affordable, with an average cost of around $3,000.

What are the 3 types of septic systems?

Types of Septic Systems

  • Septic Tank.
  • Conventional System.
  • Chamber System.
  • Drip Distribution System.
  • Aerobic Treatment Unit.
  • Mound Systems.
  • Recirculating Sand Filter System.
  • Evapotranspiration System.

What is an unconventional septic system?

An alternative septic system is a system that is different from the common traditional style septic system. An alternative system is required when the site and soil conditions on a property are limiting, or when the wastewater strength is too strong for the receiving environment (i.e. restaurants).

Can you have a septic tank without a leach field?

The waste from most septic tanks flows to a soakaway system or a drainage field. If your septic tank doesn’t have a drainage field or soakaway system, the waste water will instead flow through a sealed pipe and empty straight into a ditch or a local water course.

What is the smallest septic tank available?

If you’re looking to install a septic system, the smallest tank size you’re likely to find is 750-gallon, which will accommodate one to two bedrooms. You can also opt for a 1,000-gallon system, which will handle two to four bedrooms.

What size septic tank do I need for a tiny house?

Tiny homes typically require a 500 to 1,000-gallon septic tank. Though, it’s not always possible to implement a tank of this size. In some states, for example, the minimum tank size is 1,000 gallons. There may be exceptions to this rule if your home is on wheels.

How much does it cost to pump a septic tank?

How much does it cost to pump out a septic tank? The average cost is $300, but can run up to $500, depending on your location. The tank should be pumped out every three to five years.

How big of a septic tank do I need?

The larger your home, the larger the septic tank you’re going to need. For instance, a house smaller than 1,500 square feet usually requires a 750 to 1,000-gallon tank. On the other hand, a bigger home of approximately 2,500 square feet will need a bigger tank, more than the 1,000-gallon range.

How long do septic tanks last?

A septic system’s lifespan should be anywhere from 15 to 40 years. How long the system lasts depends on a number of factors, including construction material, soil acidity, water table, maintenance practices, and several others.

What is the difference between a septic tank and a septic field?

The septic tank is a buried, water-tight container usually made of concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene. The liquid wastewater (effluent) then exits the tank into the drainfield. The drainfield is a shallow, covered, excavation made in unsaturated soil.

What is a soak away pit?

A soak pit, also known as a soakaway or leach pit, is a covered, porous-walled chamber that allows water to slowly soak into the ground.

What was used before septic tanks?

Although civilizations have tried improving sanitation over the last 3,000 years, it was not until the early 1860s when the first “septic tank” was invented and put to use using concrete and clay pipe. In the 1960s, precast concrete tanks became more prevalent as the standard of practice improved.

Modern Septic Tanks: Materials, Types, and Accessories

While septic tanks used to be made of a variety of materials (including wood), today’s tanks are primarily constructed of high-performance materials that have been proved in the field. Whether you haven’t had a septic system in decades or this is your first time owning one, you’ll want to learn everything you can about septic tanks before making an offer on a rural property. While only one component of a septic system, the tank is an extremely vital component that requires regular maintenance, such as pumping and cleaning.

Materials for the Tank The body of a contemporary septic tank is normally constructed of a material that is designed to withstand the forces that attack it.

Concrete, fiberglass, and plastic are some of the most widely utilized materials.

However, despite the fact that concrete is a very inexpensive tank material, it is not regarded the most long-lasting contemporary septic tank material due to two drawbacks: it is porous and it is prone to cracking.

  1. The second type of erosion is caused by sewage gases.
  2. As a result, the gas might transform into acid, which eats away at the concrete.
  3. Fiberglass As a result of the fact that fiberglass is largely impervious to acid assaults, it may be used to prevent any of the erosion that concrete may be subject to over time.
  4. However, because these tanks are lighter than concrete, they must be properly secured to prevent them from drifting away when the ground becomes flooded.
  5. Although plastic is frequently regarded as harmful to the environment due to the fact that it takes an inordinate amount of time to decompose, that same characteristic might be a lifesaver in this application.
  6. Types The kind of septic tank that is put in your property may be determined in part by the peculiarities of your home’s setting.
  7. Listed here are some of the most common types of septic tanks that you’ll find on the market and in your garden.

A one-compartment tank is the most basic design, and it has been in use for many decades.

There are two compartments.

Some jurisdictions (such as the state of Washington) require that new tanks contain at least two chambers to be compliant.

There are three compartments.

Others may just have three chambers for processing, in order to boost the overall efficiency of the system even further.

Components of a baffle Designed to be installed at the entrance or exit of the septic tank, a baffle or sanitary tee directs and controls wastewater flow.

Plastic tees are preferable in a contemporary tank, although both styles serve the same purpose in a variety of situations.

At the outlet, a tee or baffle stops floating particles from entering the outflow pipe and clogging it.

Components for gaining access to the tank Older septic tanks may have hidden lids that are difficult to reach and access, making it difficult to get access to each tank compartment.

As you can see, the design, substance, and appurtenances of a contemporary septic tank can vary significantly from one tank to the next.

Make contact with an experienced local septic and plumbing company, such as Easy Rooter Plumbing, for further information on how to properly care for your contemporary septic tank and system.

Not only can we assist you with septic pumping, but we can also provide inspections, maintenance, and even trenchless repair for underground lines that are linked to your septic tank. Contact us now!

Types of Septic Systems

Septic system design and size can differ significantly from one neighborhood to the next, as well as throughout the country, due to a variety of variables. Household size, soil type, slope of the site, lot size, closeness to sensitive water bodies, weather conditions, and even municipal ordinances are all considerations to take into consideration. The following are 10 of the most often encountered septic system configurations. It should be noted that this is not an exhaustive list; there are several additional types of septic systems.

  • Septic Tank, Conventional System, Chamber System, Drip Distribution System, Aerobic Treatment Unit, Mound Systems, Recirculating Sand Filter System, Evapotranspiration System, Constructed Wetland System, Cluster / Community System, etc.

Septic Tank

This tank is underground and waterproof, and it was designed and built specifically for receiving and partially treating raw home sanitary wastewater. Generally speaking, heavy materials settle at or near the bottom of the tank, whereas greases and lighter solids float to the surface. The sediments are retained in the tank, while the wastewater is sent to the drainfield for further treatment and dispersion once it has been treated.

Conventional System

Septic tanks and trench or bed subsurface wastewater infiltration systems are two types of decentralized wastewater treatment systems (drainfield). When it comes to single-family homes and small businesses, a traditional septic system is the most common type of system. For decades, people have used a gravel/stone drainfield as a method of water drainage. The term is derived from the process of constructing the drainfield. A short underground trench made of stone or gravel collects wastewater from the septic tank in this configuration, which is commonly used.

Effluent filters through the stone and is further cleaned by microorganisms once it reaches the soil below the gravel/stone trench, which is located below the trench.

Chamber System

Gravelless drainfields have been regularly utilized in various states for more than 30 years and have evolved into a standard technology that has mostly replaced gravel systems. Various configurations are possible, including open-bottom chambers, pipe that has been clothed, and synthetic materials such as expanded polystyrene media. Gravelless systems can be constructed entirely of recycled materials, resulting in considerable reductions in carbon dioxide emissions during their lifetime. The chamber system is a type of gravelless system that can be used as an example.

The key advantage of the chamber system is the enhanced simplicity with which it can be delivered and built.

This sort of system is made up of a number of chambers that are connected to one another.

Wastewater is transported from the septic tank to the chambers through pipes. The wastewater comes into touch with the earth when it is contained within the chambers. Microbes on or near the soil remediate the wastewater.

Drip Distribution System

An effluent dispersal system such as the drip distribution system may be employed in a variety of drainfield configurations and is very versatile. In comparison to other distribution systems, the drip distribution system does not require a vast mound of dirt because the drip laterals are only placed into the top 6 to 12 inches of soil. In addition to requiring a big dosage tank after the sewage treatment plant to handle scheduled dose delivery of wastewater to drip absorption areas, the drip distribution system has one major disadvantage: it is more expensive.

Aerobic Treatment Unit

Aerobic Treatment Units (ATUs) are small-scale wastewater treatment facilities that employ many of the same procedures as a municipal sewage plant. An aerobic system adds oxygen to the treatment tank using a pump. When there is an increase in oxygen in the system, there is an increase in natural bacterial activity, which then offers extra treatment for nutrients in the effluent. It is possible that certain aerobic systems may additionally include a pretreatment tank as well as a final treatment tank that will include disinfection in order to further lower pathogen levels.

ATUs should be maintained on a regular basis during their service life.

Mound Systems

Using mound systems in regions with short soil depth, high groundwater levels, or shallow bedrock might be a good alternative. A drainfield trench has been dug through the sand mound that was erected. The effluent from the septic tank runs into a pump chamber, where it is pumped to the mound in the amounts recommended. During its release to the trench, the effluent filters through the sand and is dispersed into the native soil, where it continues to be treated. However, while mound systems can be an effective solution for some soil conditions, they demand a significant amount of land and require regular care.

Recirculating Sand Filter System

Sand filter systems can be built either above or below ground, depending on the use. The effluent is discharged from the septic tank into a pump compartment. Afterwards, it is pushed into the sand filter. The sand filter is often made of PVC or a concrete box that is filled with a sand-like substance. The effluent is pushed through the pipes at the top of the filter under low pressure to the drain. As the effluent exits the pipelines, it is treated as it passes through the sand filtering system.

However, sand filters are more costly than a standard septic system because they provide a higher level of nutrient treatment and are thus better suited for areas with high water tables or that are adjacent to bodies of water.

Evapotranspiration System

Evaporative cooling systems feature drainfields that are one-of-a-kind. It is necessary to line the drainfield at the base of the evapotranspiration system with a waterproof material. Following the entry of the effluent into the drainfield, it evaporates into the atmosphere. At the same time, the sewage never filters into the soil and never enters groundwater, unlike other septic system designs. It is only in particular climatic circumstances that evapotranspiration systems are effective. The environment must be desert, with plenty of heat and sunshine, and no precipitation.

Constructed Wetland System

Construction of a manufactured wetland is intended to simulate the treatment processes that occur in natural wetland areas. Wastewater goes from the septic tank and into the wetland cell, where it is treated. Afterwards, the wastewater goes into the media, where it is cleaned by microorganisms, plants, and other media that eliminate pathogens and nutrients. Typically, a wetland cell is constructed with an impermeable liner, gravel and sand fill, and the necessary wetland plants, all of which must be capable of withstanding the constant saturation of the surrounding environment.

As wastewater travels through the wetland, it may escape the wetland and flow onto a drainfield, where it will undergo more wastewater treatment before being absorbed into the soil by bacteria.

See also:  How Much Does It Cost To Suck Out Your Septic Tank? (Solution found)

Cluster / Community System

In certain cases, a decentralized wastewater treatment system is owned by a group of people and is responsible for collecting wastewater from two or more residences or buildings and transporting it to a treatment and dispersal system placed on a suitable location near the dwellings or buildings. Cluster systems are widespread in settings like rural subdivisions, where they may be found in large numbers.

How Your Septic System Works

Underground wastewater treatment facilities, known as septic systems, are often employed in rural regions where there are no centralized sewage lines. They clean wastewater from residential plumbing, such as that produced by bathrooms, kitchen drains, and laundry, by combining natural processes with well-established technology. A conventional septic system is comprised of two components: a septic tank and a drainfield, often known as a soil absorption field. It is the septic tank’s job to decompose organic matter and to remove floatable stuff (such as oils and grease) and solids from wastewater.

Alternate treatment systems rely on pumps or gravity to assist septic tank effluent in trickling through a variety of media such as sand, organic matter (e.g., peat and sawdust), constructed wetlands, or other media to remove or neutralize pollutants such as pathogens that cause disease, nitrogen, phosphorus, and other contaminants.

Prior to discharging wastewater into the environment, several alternative systems are designed to evaporate or disinfect the effluent.

Specifically, this is how a typical conventional septic system works:

  1. All of the water that leaves your home drains down a single main drainage pipe and into a septic tank. An underground, water-tight container, often composed of concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene, serves as a septic system’s holding tank. Its function is to retain wastewater for a long enough period of time to allow particles to sink to the bottom and form sludge, while oil and grease float to the surface and produce scum. Sludge and scum are prevented from exiting the tank and moving into the drainfield region by compartments and a T-shaped outlet. After that, the liquid wastewater (effluent) exits the tank and flows into the drainfield. The drainfield is a shallow, covered hole dug in unsaturated soil that serves as a drainage system. Porous surfaces are used to release pretreated wastewater because they allow the wastewater to pass through the soil and into the groundwater. In the process of percolating through the soil, wastewater is accepted, treated, and dispersed by the soil, finally discharging into groundwater. Finally, if the drainfield becomes overburdened with too much liquid, it can flood, causing sewage to flow to the ground surface or resulting in toilet backups and sink backups. Finally, wastewater percolates into the soil, where it is naturally removed of harmful coliform bacteria, viruses, and nutrients. Coliform bacteria are a kind of bacteria that may be found in the intestines of humans and other warm-blooded animals, with humans being the most common host. As a result of human fecal contamination, it is a sign of this.

The Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority has built an animated, interactive model of how a residential septic system works, which you can view here.

Do you have a septic system?

It’s possible that you’re already aware that you have a septic system. If you are not sure, here are some tell-tale symptoms that you most likely are:

  • You make use of well water. In your home, the water pipe that brings water into the house does not have a meter. In the case of a water bill or a property tax bill, you will see “$0.00 Sewer Amount Charged.” It is possible that your neighbors have a septic system

How to find your septic system

You can locate your septic system once you have confirmed that you have one by following these steps:

  • Taking a look at the “as constructed” drawing of your house
  • Making a visual inspection of your yard for lids and manhole covers
  • Getting in touch with a septic system service provider for assistance in locating it

Failure symptoms: Mind the signs!

A bad odor is not necessarily the first indicator of a septic system that is failing to work properly. Any of the following signs should prompt you to seek expert assistance:

  • Water backing up into the drains of homes and businesses
  • It is especially noticeable in dry weather that the drainfield grass is bright green and spongy. The presence of standing water or muddy soil near your septic system or in your basement
  • A strong stench emanating from the area surrounding the septic tank and drainfield

Alternatives to a Septic Tank

Table of Contents for Home-DIY Septic tanks are not always the most cost-effective option when building a home, nor are they the only alternative. Knowing the alternatives to a septic tank might be beneficial in terms of saving money. Also vital is determining which solution is most advantageous for your particular situation.

Leach Field

A leach field functions in the same way as a leaching system connected to a septic tank, but without the need for a tank. From the home, the effluent is sent through perforated pipes that are contained under a layer of gravel-filled ditches. The effluent seeps into the gravel from the perforated pipes, and then into the soil beneath the gravel. Traditional septic systems require more room than what is required for this system. Leach field beds can be stacked on top of one another. Due to the fact that excavation must be done from the sides in order to avoid compaction of the bed bottom, there are size restrictions on beds.

It is necessary to have a minimum soil depth of 18 inches below the bed.

Lagoon System

By exposing sewage to air, sunshine, and microbes, the lagoon system is able to effectively treat it. Storage tanks collect wastewater, which is subsequently discharged into solid pipe that drains into the lagoon’s bottom. Lateral fields are utilized to capture the overflow, which is then absorbed into the soil by the vegetation. Lagoons are less expensive than septic tanks and are less difficult to install. Lagoons are low-maintenance structures. To keep the lagoon safe, fencing and gates will be required.

When working with rocky soil or steep slopes, creating lagoons might be tricky.

Mounds

Mound systems are comprised of a collection system that pumps wastewater into a mound through distribution networks that are located in the upper section of the sand. Effluent passes through the soil, via fill material, and finally through natural soil. This technique should be used in places with a lot of groundwater, clay soil, or bedrock soil. This is a system that requires little upkeep. Because these systems require flat terrain, they may be difficult to design and are sometimes prohibitively expensive.

Constructed Wetlands

This system includes a primary treatment unit with two compartments and a rock-lined bed, as well as a secondary treatment unit. 12 inches of rock cover the bed, which also contains an overflow lateral field. The use of aquatic plants aids in the treatment of wastewater, with surplus effluent being disposed of in the lateral field. The fields may be set up on irregular or segmented lots, and they can be situated in places with shallow water tables or high bedrock, depending on the situation.

When compared to traditional systems, one of the disadvantages is that they require more maintenance. Wetlands are more expensive to construct and have a longer lifespan than other types of landscaping.

Compost Toilet

Compost toilets are designed to organically break down waste. The effluent is collected in a receptacle beneath the toilet, where it decomposes naturally. Using wood shavings, straw, or leaves to aid in the process is recommended. The container is emptied and buried in a designated location of the yard. Septic tanks are no longer required with this technology. Compost toilets are useful in regions where other sanitation methods are not feasible to build. Composting toilets are not permitted as a stand-alone installation in all places.

These systems require regular heating and ventilation in order to function correctly, which necessitates the use of a continuous electrical supply.

The Drip Cap

  • Septic tanks are not always the most cost-effective option when building a home, nor are they the only alternative. Knowing the alternatives to a septic tank might be beneficial in terms of saving money. Traditional septic systems require more room than they do
  • This system requires less space. Lagoons require little care. Typically, a mound system involves the pumping of effluent into a mound through distribution networks in the upper half of the sand
  • However, a mound system can also be used for other purposes. Because these systems require flat terrain, they can be difficult to construct and can be prohibitively expensive
  • Nonetheless, This system is comprised of a main treatment unit with two compartments and a rock-lined bed
  • A secondary treatment unit with two compartments and a rock-lined bed
  • An overflow lateral field is present in the bed, which contains 12 inches of rock. In regions where other systems cannot be implemented, compost toilets are an excellent alternative.

What Is an Alternative Septic System? 7 Alternatives to Conventional Septic Tanks

Finally, the opportunity has arisen for you to put in place a septic system on your property. You had initially intended on installing a normal septic tank and leach field, but what about the forest preserve near your home? What do you do about that? Will a standard septic tank harm the watershed in question? And throughout your investigation, you recollect that when developing your property, you ran into concerns with bedrock beneath the top of the earth-what if the soil around your property is too shallow to dig deep enough to install a normal septic tank?

What are Alternative Septic Systems?

In the context of alternative septic systems, any sort of building wastewater (also known as “effluent”) drainage system that differs from the traditional septic tank is considered to be such. Diverting and cleaning water waste from your house is not limited to the use of a typical septic system; there are many more options available to safely reintroduce it back into the environment! You will learn the following things from this blog post:

  • Identifying the reasons why some properties require alternate septic systems
  • Alternative septic systems come in a variety of shapes and sizes. The operation of each sort of system

Why Do People Want Alternatives to Septic Tanks?

Just though traditional septic systems are commonplace does not imply that they are appropriate for every property or situation. There are a variety of reasons why the conventional model for wastewater sanitation does not always meet the needs of the community. For example, some parcels of property contain bedrock that is too close to the surface of the soil, making it difficult to build a septic tank deep enough to be effective. A large number of inhabitants in the United States also live near bodies of water that are particularly vulnerable to water contamination, which means that the normal technique of sanitation in septic tanks is insufficient to preserve the ecology of the region in question.

  • The term “perking” refers to the soil’s capacity to absorb and hold onto water.
  • Repairing a sewer pipe Fortunately, you may have your septic system or sewage line repaired before you break ground on your new system.
  • Never fear if your perc test does not go as planned, or if you have any additional worries about installing a traditional septic system on your land.
  • Each of the alternative septic systems that you will come across in this blog article has a distinct amount of upkeep that is necessary.

Additionally, the cost of alternative septic systems varies depending on the equipment and upkeep that is required. Discover alternative septic solutions that may be a better fit for your property than a standard system by continuing reading.

Types of alternative septic systems

In situations when the soil surrounding your house or structure is too dense or too shallow, or when the water table is too high, mound systems are a good option to septic tanks to consider. Mound systems are a popular alternative to traditional systems, despite the fact that they are more expensive and require more care. They are above-ground systems that are covered with topsoil and incorporate an additional component known as a pump chamber, which separates effluent from the scum and sludge in the first septic tank before it is discharged into the environment.

Pressurized Dosing

When using a pressurized dosing system, you may deliver effluent onto the leach field in more uniform, calibrated dosages (just as the system’s name implies!). Because of the measured technique of dispersing wastewater, this strategy can be particularly beneficial for repairing a leach field following a septic system failure. Given that this approach is simply concerned with the dissemination of effluent into the soil, pressure dosing can be used in conjunction with any of the water treatment systems listed below.

Plastic Chamber Leach Field

Plasti-chamber leach fields are an excellent alternative to traditional septic systems for small lots and sites with high or fluctuating groundwater tables. Plastic chambers in the shape of half pipes are installed in the leach field to replace the gravel and create a gap for wastewater to flow through. Designed in the shape of a half moon, the plastic chambers are placed in the soil with the open side facing down, allowing effluent to come into touch with the soil underneath them, purifying the water and allowing it to flow back into the ground.

Sand Filter

Sand filter septic systems, as the name implies, cleanse and eliminate pollutants from wastewater through the use of sand filters. The sand filter system, which is similar to the aerobic treatment method described above, includes oxygen into its system in order to filter out germs. This cleansing takes place in an enclosed chamber that may either be erected above or below ground level depending on the situation. This is an example of an alternative septic system that does not require the use of a leach field, making it suitable for use in ecologically sensitive locations.

Aerobic Treatment System

Through the use of an air pump, which draws fresh air from the surrounding environment into the treatment tank, an aerobic treatment system introduces oxygen into the septic tank. It is believed that the increased oxygen aids in the cleaning of the effluent by increasing natural bacterial activity. As explained by the Environmental Protection Agency, aerobic treatment systems use the same technology as large-scale sewage treatment facilities, but on a smaller scale.

This is yet another excellent alternative septic system for tiny lots, lots with inadequate soil conditions, and lots located near bodies of water that are sensitive to pollutant runoff.

Drip Distribution/Irrigation

The drip distribution method disperses treated septic water over a larger area of land than the conventional method. To “irrigate” the leach field, instead of using a single PVC pipe to disseminate treated water into the leach field, the drip distribution technique makes use of a length of flexible tubing that is wound around itself and releases tiny increments of water all the way along its length. With this procedure, newer technology also enables for the discharge of water to be timed and regulated.

See also:  My Septic System Tank Needs New Lids How Much Does This Cost? (Perfect answer)

It is possible that power interruptions will make these alternative septic solutions more difficult to maintain than traditional systems.

Constructed Wetland System

The designed wetland system makes use of wetland plants to help your septic system filter waste by performing some of the filtration job. While the water waste from your home or building still passes through a single septic tank, the cleaned water is then sent to a plot of wetland that has a variety of various types of pebbles and grasses. Following that first stage of filtration, the water is channeled into a drain field, where it is discharged back into the soil, exactly as it would be with a traditional system.

  • Take into consideration the land on your property as well as the surrounding surroundings while deciding which system is best for your needs.
  • Finally, the opportunity has arisen for you to put in place a septic system on your property.
  • What do you do about that?
  • When you’re researching a septic tank, you’ll recall that when you were developing your property, you came into problems with bedrock beneath the top of the soil.
  • Fortunately, there are numerous different types of alternative septic systems that are designed specifically for situations like the ones described above.

What are Alternative Septic Systems?

In the context of alternative septic systems, any sort of building wastewater (also known as “effluent”) drainage system that differs from the traditional septic tank is considered to be such. Diverting and cleaning water waste from your house is not limited to the use of a typical septic system; there are many more options available to safely reintroduce it back into the environment! You will learn the following things from this blog post:

  • Identifying the reasons why some properties require alternate septic systems
  • Alternative septic systems come in a variety of shapes and sizes. The operation of each sort of system

Why Do People Want Alternatives to Septic Tanks?

Just though traditional septic systems are commonplace does not imply that they are appropriate for every property or situation. There are a variety of reasons why the conventional model for wastewater sanitation does not always meet the needs of the community. For example, some parcels of property contain bedrock that is too close to the surface of the soil, making it difficult to build a septic tank deep enough to be effective. A large number of inhabitants in the United States also live near bodies of water that are particularly vulnerable to water contamination, which means that the normal technique of sanitation in septic tanks is insufficient to preserve the ecology of the region in question.

  1. The term “perking” refers to the soil’s capacity to absorb and hold onto water.
  2. Repairing a sewer pipe Fortunately, you may have your septic system or sewage line repaired before you break ground on your new system.
  3. Never fear if your perc test does not go as planned, or if you have any additional worries about installing a traditional septic system on your land.
  4. Each of the alternative septic systems that you will come across in this blog article has a distinct amount of upkeep that is necessary.

Additionally, the cost of alternative septic systems varies depending on the equipment and upkeep that is required. Discover alternative septic solutions that may be a better fit for your property than a standard system by continuing reading.

Types of alternative septic systems

In situations when the soil surrounding your house or structure is too dense or too shallow, or when the water table is too high, mound systems are a good option to septic tanks to consider. Mound systems are a popular alternative to traditional systems, despite the fact that they are more expensive and require more care. They are above-ground systems that are covered with topsoil and incorporate an additional component known as a pump chamber, which separates effluent from the scum and sludge in the first septic tank before it is discharged into the environment.

Pressurized Dosing

When using a pressurized dosing system, you may deliver effluent onto the leach field in more uniform, calibrated dosages (just as the system’s name implies!). Because of the measured technique of dispersing wastewater, this strategy can be particularly beneficial for repairing a leach field following a septic system failure. Given that this approach is simply concerned with the dissemination of effluent into the soil, pressure dosing can be used in conjunction with any of the water treatment systems listed below.

Plastic Chamber Leach Field

Plasti-chamber leach fields are an excellent alternative to traditional septic systems for small lots and sites with high or fluctuating groundwater tables. Plastic chambers in the shape of half pipes are installed in the leach field to replace the gravel and create a gap for wastewater to flow through. Designed in the shape of a half moon, the plastic chambers are placed in the soil with the open side facing down, allowing effluent to come into touch with the soil underneath them, purifying the water and allowing it to flow back into the ground.

Sand Filter

Sand filter septic systems, as the name implies, cleanse and eliminate pollutants from wastewater through the use of sand filters. The sand filter system, which is similar to the aerobic treatment method described above, includes oxygen into its system in order to filter out germs. This cleansing takes place in an enclosed chamber that may either be erected above or below ground level depending on the situation. This is an example of an alternative septic system that does not require the use of a leach field, making it suitable for use in ecologically sensitive locations.

Aerobic Treatment System

Through the use of an air pump, which draws fresh air from the surrounding environment into the treatment tank, an aerobic treatment system introduces oxygen into the septic tank. It is believed that the increased oxygen aids in the cleaning of the effluent by increasing natural bacterial activity. As explained by the Environmental Protection Agency, aerobic treatment systems use the same technology as large-scale sewage treatment facilities, but on a smaller scale.

This is yet another excellent alternative septic system for tiny lots, lots with inadequate soil conditions, and lots located near bodies of water that are sensitive to pollutant runoff.

Drip Distribution/Irrigation

The drip distribution method disperses treated septic water over a larger area of land than the conventional method. To “irrigate” the leach field, instead of using a single PVC pipe to disseminate treated water into the leach field, the drip distribution technique makes use of a length of flexible tubing that is wound around itself and releases tiny increments of water all the way along its length. With this procedure, newer technology also enables for the discharge of water to be timed and regulated.

It is possible that power interruptions will make these alternative septic solutions more difficult to maintain than traditional systems.

Constructed Wetland System

The designed wetland system makes use of wetland plants to help your septic system filter waste by performing some of the filtration job. While the water waste from your home or building still passes through a single septic tank, the cleaned water is then sent to a plot of wetland that has a variety of various types of pebbles and grasses. Following that first stage of filtration, the water is channeled into a drain field, where it is discharged back into the soil, exactly as it would be with a traditional system.

Take into consideration the land on your property as well as the surrounding surroundings while deciding which system is best for your needs.

Alternative Septic Systems

Previous PostNext PostThe standard septic system is well-known to the majority of people. Depending on the terrain of the location, the classic tank and field method may not be effective. Landowners will be required to adopt an alternate septic system in certain instances. In the first instance, unexpected water accumulating in your garden or drain field may indicate that you should consider switching systems. You should contact your local Greater Syracuse plumber as soon as you discover anything strange in your plumbing.

Raised Bed (Mound) Septic Tank Systems

A raised bed drain field (sometimes known as a mound) is exactly what it sounds like: a raised bed drain field. When there is not enough area for a full drain field, it is occasionally necessary to construct a retaining wall. A specialized sand fill material is used to elevate the mound over the surrounding natural soil. A gravel bed with a network of pipes is embedded within the sand. The water that is pushed via the pipes is dispersed across the bed in little amounts at regular intervals. In order for your system to function effectively, drainage surrounding the mound must be maintained at all times.

Aerobic Treatment Systems (ATS)

In its most basic form, aerobic systems function as a small-scale sewage treatment system. It works in a similar way to a septic tank system, but it employs an aerobic process (which means it requires more air and oxygen). A single residence or a small group of residences might benefit from one of these systems, which are most commonly seen in rural settings.

The effluent (waste water) produced by the ATS is of greater quality than the wastewater produced by conventional systems. This provides for greater freedom in the placement of the leach field, as well as a reduction in the needed size of the field by half.

Waterless Systems

A growing number of individuals in poor nations, as well as those who want to be more environmentally conscious, are opting to become waterless. I’m not sure what this means in terms of meaning. If you use your toilet instead of a septic tank, you are essentially turning it into a compost bin. One or more of the toilets is equipped with a remote system that directs waste down a chute to a compost bin. In a crawlspace someplace underneath or outside the house, there is a garbage can. Do you have a qualm about composting?

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DIY Septic Tank Treatment

Septic tank systems are notoriously difficult to maintain and may be quite expensive when they fail. Over the course of almost two decades, we’ve only had to pump our septic tank once. Here’s how we maintain our system running smoothly: DIY Septic Tank Treatment

Natural Enzyme Action

Septic tanks, like your stomach, require the presence of beneficial bacteria and enzymes in order to break down the particles that travel through them. It is possible to obtain these helpful bacteria and enzymes from a variety of sources, but one of our favorites is rotting tomatoes. These naturally occurring enzymes are proteins known as Pectinase or Pectinolytic enzymes, and they break down pectin. Lipase, hydrolyzes, and lyase are all members of the pectinase family of enzymes that are capable of breaking down pectin and plant cell walls in the natural environment, therefore aiding in the decomposition and recycling of waste plant materials.

DIY Septic Tank Treatment

It is simple and inexpensive to treat a septic tank with DIY solutions. We “feed” our septic tank 3-4 rotting tomatoes every 3 months or so, which we do through our garbage disposal. The idea is to make sure that you split up the tomato and pass only half a tomato or so at a time through the water while it is running to ensure that it is properly flushed out. As an alternative, if you don’t have access to a garbage disposal, you may throw two or three large rotting tomatoes in a bag (chances are they’re already packed away in a bag in your refrigerator and starting to liquefy anyway!).

Dump them into a toilet (but don’t use bleach!) and flush them away.

Normally, having rotten tomatoes every few months isn’t a big deal because the garden overproduces in the spring, summer, and fall, and there are always a few extras available.

However, during the winter months, tomatoes have gotten pushed to the back of the fridge and started to liquefy before I realized what was happening. At the very least, they aren’t going to waste completely.

Toilet Paper No-No’s

When we had our septic system pumped for the first time in more than two decades, we were assured that it was totally unnecessary because the system was operating well and looked fantastic. During our conversation, the gentleman shared numerous true horror stories of systems he’d witnessed at his place of employment where the families utilized “fluffy” toilet paper. That one where the cute little bears in the advertisements are pleased of themselves for not having any lint left behind? You know the one I’m talking about.

Image courtesy of Ian Haycoxis (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0).

He especially inquired about the brand of tissue we use, which is Scott Tissue.

Alternatively, if you don’t happen to have any rotting tomatoes on hand, you may use baking or brewing yeast to bring healthy bacteria to your tank as an alternative.

How to Clean Septic Tank Naturally

Yeast and sugar work really well to clean a septic tank organically, here’s an easy method to utilize them.

See also:  How Much Does It Cost To Fill A Old Septic Tank? (Correct answer)

Septic Tank Cleaner

2 cups granulated sugar 5 cups of hot water (optional) 3 tbsp. active dry yeast Sugar and yeast should be dissolved in water. Pour the mixture into a toilet (that does not contain bleach!) and flush it. This is best done at night so that the yeast may continue to work throughout the night; do not flush for at least 3 hours after completion.

Additional Tips:

1Avoid flushing raw or cooked meat down the toilet, down the garbage disposal, or any other form of introducing meat into your septic system; meat is NEVER a helpful bacterium. 2. Never add oils, grease, or fat in any form (solid or liquid) to your tank. This includes, but is not limited to, cooking oils, bacon grease, meat grease from draining ground beef/turkey, and other fat-containing foods. 3Avoid flushing anything other than garbage and toilet paper down the toilet; this means that feminine products should be disposed of in the trash, baby diapers and wipes should be disposed of in the trashcan, and so on.

Have you tried the rotten tomato technique yet?

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In addition to being an ecologically favorable option for homeowners, a septic safe wastewater treatment system is sometimes the only option for cottages and rural residences that are not connected to the municipal sewage system. In addition, it implies that what you flush down the toilet is significantly more crucial, and this includes your cleansers and other household products. Continue reading to discover more about septic systems and how your cleaning products might have an impact on their operation.

WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE “SEPTIC SAFE”?

If you were born and reared in a city, it’s likely that you have little awareness about septic tanks and systems. Septic systems are an alternate drainage solution for rural households that do not have access to centralized sewage infrastructure. To answer all of your questions, Septic Systems are a type of drainage system. They transport waste and water from a residence to a specialized septic tank, where microorganisms are used to separate waste from the surrounding water. This type of tank makes use of perforated pipes that discharge the water into a piece of soil known as a drainage field.

As a closed-loop system, septic systems are useful in the Zero Waste Movement’s attempts to reduce waste. Find out how you can reduce your own carbon impact and begin your Zero Waste journey now.

WHY PEOPLE CHOOSE SEPTIC SYSTEMS

The advantage of using a septic tank over a sewage system is that they are significantly less expensive and more durable. Because it is a closed system that does not require any external energy, it does not produce a monthly cost and can endure for decades before it has to be upgraded. Septic systems make a good contribution to the health and well-being of the local ecosystem from an environmental perspective. During the process of pushing water through a drain field, it serves to nourish local bacteria and microorganisms, which in turn supports the growth of both plants and bacteria in the area.

  1. As a result, if toxins-containing items are introduced into these systems, they can have severe consequences not just for the mechanisms of the tank, but also for the entire ecosystem.
  2. Septic systems are not designed to protect groundwater from the chemicals contained in some home items.
  3. When purchasing new appliances, look for ones that are most suited for septic systems, such as high-efficiency toilets or washing machines that are Energy Star certified.
  4. Please choose natural laundry detergent that is made for both high-efficiency and normal machines.
  5. There are several natural alternatives to synthetic disinfectants that are safe for use in a septic system, for example.

HOUSEHOLD PRODUCTS TO AVOID

Sewage pipelines are more expensive than septic tanks, but they last far longer since they are made of plastic. Being a closed system that requires no external energy, it does not create a monthly cost and can survive for decades before needing to be repaired or replaced. Septic systems have a beneficial impact on the health and well-being of the surrounding ecosystem from an environmental standpoint. septic systems During the process of pushing water through a drain field, it serves to nourish local bacteria and microorganisms, which in turn supports the growth of both plants and bacteria.

  1. It is because of this that the introduction of toxic chemicals into these systems can have serious consequences not just for the mechanics of the tank, but also for its entire ecosystem.
  2. Septic systems are not designed to protect groundwater from the chemicals contained in some home items.
  3. Worse, it has the potential to pollute nearby rivers if put into a septic system.
  4. Additionally, the amount of HE laundry detergent you use in those high-efficiency washers is crucial.
  5. It should either be unscented or lightly fragranced with essential oils.

Natural disinfectants with higher concentrations of oxygen and thyme oil, for example, will still need to be diluted with water before being injected into the system due to their high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and thyme oil.

  • Water softeners have the potential to damage the microorganisms in the septic tank, resulting in higher amounts of waste and grease being released into the drain field.

Oil, gasoline, paint thinners, solvents, photography chemicals, weed or bug killers are just a few examples of what you may get away with.

  • It is possible that these pollutants will poison Septic Systems and endanger the water supply.

Using Cooking Oil

  • It is possible for solidified frying fat, such as that from bacon, to build up in the tank and cause blockages in the entering and exiting pipes.
  • While these oils are pleasant to the touch, they have the potential to block the drain field and coat the waste within the tank, making it ineffective at decomposition.

Kitty Litter is a type of litter that is used for cats.

  • The majority of kitty litter is made of clay, which can block pipes.

CLEANING PRODUCTS TO AVOID

Cleaners and disinfectants that are antibacterial

  • Antibacterial and disinfectant products are not required in most household circumstances (they were originally developed to sanitize hospitals), and they will kill beneficial bacteria that aid in the proper functioning of your septic tank.

Chlorine Bleach is a kind of disinfectant.

  • A septic tank’s microorganisms might be killed or disrupted if it receives too much bleach. Additionally, it is hazardous to aquatic life. It is very likely that the bleach from your wastewater is being released directly into the groundwater if your septic tank is located close to a natural water system
  • If your septic tank is located close to a natural water system, it is very likely that the bleach from your wastewater is being released directly into the groundwater through your septic system.

Drain Cleaners that are chemical in nature

  • When these materials are used to unclog the drain, they destroy the microorganisms in the tank, resulting in the need for expensive repairs.

Products containing methylisothiazolinone are referred to as

  • Methylisothiazolinone is a synthetic compound with antibacterial characteristics that is found in a variety of consumer items. It is most often found in cleaning products, where it serves as a synthetic preservative. Apart from the fact that it is a frequent allergy, various investigations have revealed that it is also poisonous to aquatic life.

SEPTIC SAFE CLEANING PRODUCTS

Natural ingredients at their best.

  • Please remember that your septic tank does not filter out chemicals or pollutants, and that the waste it produces is returned directly into the surrounding ecosystem. This is why it is critical to utilize natural cleansers that will not contribute to the rising quantity of synthetic chemicals that are severely harming our natural environment.

Biodegradable

  • Product formulations should only contain biodegradable substances that will degrade in a natural setting, rather than persistent synthetic compounds that might accumulate in a product. Inquire as to whether your cleaning products, especially those used on a regular basis such as dishwasher detergents, are truly non-toxic and completely biodegradable.

Certified by a third party

  • It is critical to seek third-party certification that the items that flow through your septic system and into the environment will not have a harmful influence on the ecosystem. Examples of such organizations are Ecocert and The Environmental Working Group. By doing so, you may be confident that the items you select are truly better for the environment and are not merely making unfounded “green” claims for the sake of branding. To determine which products are best for your septic system, see the Environmental Working Group’s Healthy Cleaning Guide rating.

SEPTIC SAFE CLEANING PRODUCTS LIST

Septic systems are quite fragile. A 1,000-gallon septic tank may be completely decontaminated with just two gallons of chlorine bleach, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. While even a tiny amount of the wrong chemicals may cause havoc on your septic system, the majority of all-natural cleansers are safe to use on your system. Natural cleaning solutions that are non-chlorine, non-ammonia, non-antibacterial, non-toxic, and biodegradable can assist you in keeping your septic system in good operating condition.

  • Baking soda, borax, and salt are all ingredients in distilled white vinegar.

SEPTIC SAFE BATHROOM CLEANERS

While it’s simple to utilize all-natural cleaning solutions in the majority of places of your house, the bathroom is one area where chemical cleansers are almost always a given. A clean bathroom is crucial for your health, but cleaning your shower, tub and other bathroom surfaces does not require the use of harsh chemicals to get the desired results. These natural bathroom cleansers are highly effective and do not harm septic systems:

  • The natural enzymes in white vinegar will break down soap scum and foul smells
  • White vinegar is inexpensive and readily available. Baking soda – The abrasive texture of baking soda is ideal for polishing brass bathroom fittings. To get optimum disinfection power on surfaces, mix 12 cup of borax with 12 cup of water.

TOILET CLEANERS SAFE FOR SEPTIC SYSTEMS

The toilet is infamous for being a filthy environment. It might be tempting to use strong cleaning agents to ensure that germs are completely destroyed. Many toilet bowl cleaners contain bleach, and others are even formulated with hydrochloric acid to remove stains from the bowl. Natural, plant-based cleansers, on the other hand, are robust enough to clean your toilet while still being the safest for the health of your septic system and the health of your family. Make sure to avoid using cleansers that include hazardous ingredients such as harmful bleach or ammonia as well as phosphates and petroleum-based compounds, which can disrupt your septic system.

Here is a list of natural toilet cleansers that are safe to use in a septic tank:

  • Baking soda is a scouring agent that is both affordable and effective. Pour half of a small box of baking soda into the toilet bowl and leave it to rest for at least an hour. Immediately after mixing, flush the liquid down the toilet before cleaning it with a toilet brush. White Hard water stains in the toilet bowl may be broken down with the aid of household vinegar, which has a high acidity. Pour one cup of vinegar into the bowl and let it aside overnight. In the morning, scrape the surface. If you use baking soda along with the vinegar, you’ll find that their effects cancel each other out and become ineffectual.

SEPTIC SAFE CLEANING

Natural cleaning solutions are generally considered to be safe for use in septic systems. Take the guesswork out of selecting items for use in septic systems by using a product comparison chart. “Septic Safe” is a label that appears on products that are safe for use in septic systems. Most of these materials are natural and biodegradable, and they will appropriately degrade within the tank without interfering with the bacteria’s ability to function. Consumer items such as housekeeping and cleaning products are one of the most serious threats to septic systems.

Being environmentally conscious means using items that are safe for septic tanks and taking responsibility for what you put in the water and the soil.

Products that you use on a regular basis, such as laundry detergent and dish soap, should be handled with extra caution. Even if you have centralized sewage, use septic-safe products to keep your home and yard clean.

SEPTIC SAFE CLEANERS: FAQ

In the world of septic systems, there is contradicting information regarding what is safe and what is potentially dangerous. Here, we clarify the air on some often asked issues about septic cleaners:

1. IS VINEGAR SAFE FOR SEPTIC SYSTEMS?

Vinegar is completely harmless to septic systems and will not do any damage to them. White vinegar and apple cider vinegar are wonderful cleaning tools that may be used throughout the house, including the laundry room, kitchen, bathroom, and other areas. Because it is non-toxic and 100 percent natural, vinegar of any kind is completely safe for your septic system and your household.

2. WHAT DRAIN CLEANERS ARE SAFE FOR SEPTIC SYSTEMS?

Drain cleaners are famously harsh because they are required to be so. It might require a significant amount of force to break through the buildup in pipes. However, only a few drain cleaners, when used in moderation, are suitable for septic systems. Drain cleaners that foam, solidify, or crystallize can cause harm to the system and should not be utilized. To avoid causing harm to the system, use septic-safe liquid drain cleaning only when absolutely necessary. Non-chemical methods such as a pipe snake can be used to safely clear clogged drains that have become stubborn.

SAFE SEPTIC CLEANING WITH ASPENCLEAN

To ensure that all of their laundry detergents and cleaning chemicals are completely septic-safe, AspenClean employs the same natural, biodegradable, and ecologically friendly cleaning materials as they use in their professional cleaning service. It is possible to ensure that your home will receive a high-quality clean while not causing damage to your septic system by utilizing natural laundry detergents, dish soaps, as well as their house cleaning services and supplies.

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