How To Test Aerator Septic Tank Pump? (Correct answer)

  • Remove the pump, disconnect power, connect to rated voltage and actuate control switch. Look for deformation, burned or melted components, or a lot of black discoloration. Unplug the pump’s cord from the piggyback plug of the float switch. Insert the pump’s plug directly into an outlet to test it.

How do I know if my septic aerator is working?

The surest sign your aerator has failed is an overwhelming unpleasant odor coming from where your system discharges, whether into a secondary treatment system or directly into the environment.

How long do septic aerator pumps last?

How long does a septic aerator usually last? Most septic air compressors will last about three years before a malfunction occurs. Fortunately, spare parts and rebuild kits are available for all of the major aerator brands. These kits can be far more cost effective than purchasing a new aerator.

What happens when your septic pump fails?

Without a functioning pump, the sewage level continues to rise and the alarm lets you know the waste isn’t being removed from the tank. This alarm will sound and alert you before a sewage backup occurs.

How do septic tank aerators work?

An aerator, or air pump, pushes air and oxygen into your septic system. The additional oxygen increases natural bacterial activity within the system, that then provides additional treatment for nutrients in the effluent.

How often should aerobic septic sprinklers go off?

All aerobic systems are required to be checked every 4 months per TCEQ regulations, even if your county doesn’t require a maintenance company to perform the service (there’s a lot more to servicing your system than just adding chlorine, not to mention the health risk of coming into contact with wastewater).

Should a septic tank aerator run all the time?

The aerator should run 24/7. It should continuously provide much-needed oxygen inside the septic tank of an aerobic system. The aerobic bacteria need air to survive.

How often should septic aerator run?

1 Answer. The aerator should run 24/7 nonstop and should not cost more than 10 dollars a month to run. If you electric bill is high something else is causing it or the system is not correctly hooked up.

Should I aerate my septic tank?

An aerator helps to push air into your septic system. Research has shown that when the air is introduced into the septic system, the air helps to break up waste faster. It also helps to give the good bacteria in your tank air that they need to survive, help them to thrive, and break up waste quickly.

Can RIDX be used in aerobic septic system?

Rid-X is full of helpful bacteria and enzymes that work to break down things like toilet paper and grease. These enzymes will not hurt your aerobic septic system. These enzymes will not hurt your aerobic septic system.

How do you maintain an anaerobic septic system?

8 Dos and Don’ts for Aerobic System Maintenance

  1. Regularly Inspect Your Septic System.
  2. Pump Out Whenever Necessary.
  3. Be Water-wise.
  4. Use Licensed, Certified Companies.
  5. Flush Solids Down the Drains.
  6. Pour Harsh Chemicals in Your Toilets.
  7. Park Cars or Trucks on Your Drainfield or Reserve Area.
  8. Add Septic Tank Additives.

Troubleshooting a Septic Aerator

Septic tanks are made up of a number of different components, with the septic aerator being one of the most important of them. Before water is returned to the environment, septic tanks are used to purify it and make it safe for consumption. septic tanks, in which water is subjected to minimum treatment in order to remove harmful compounds, are connected to the household drainage system (HDS). Aerobic septic treatment, which is assisted by a septic aerator, is the preferred method of treatment for such household septic tanks.

The aeration system is comprised of aerator pumps, which aid in the movement of fresh air into the tank from the outside environment.

Troubleshooting Septic Aerator Pump

The septic aerator pump is made up of several components, each of which must be checked and maintained on a regular basis. Diaphragm The diaphragm is susceptible to becoming excessively dry and worn down over a period of time. You must repair and lubricate the diaphragm in accordance with the instructions in the owner’s manual that was supplied at the time of installation or the retailer’s recommendations. If the diaphragm has significant surface damage, it should be replaced. Standard oils, which may be purchased at hardware stores, are used for lubrication.

  1. The sellers typically provide additional filters that are intended to be replaced every few months.
  2. Cleaning the filters is a time-consuming and a sloppy endeavor.
  3. Diffuser It is not necessary to change the diffuser on a regular basis.
  4. Disconnect the diffuser and soak it in a basin of muriatic acid for a few minutes.

Troubleshooting Lack of Bacteria in Septic Aerator System

It’s possible that your septic aerator system is suffering from a shortage of aerobic microorganisms. This has the potential to reduce the overall effectiveness of the septic tank system. Examining the quantity of sludge in the tank is the quickest approach to figure out what’s wrong with the system. Make sure the aeration chamber is open. Insert a rod into the tank’s inside. If the sludge deposits take up more than half of the rod’s length or more, you will need to discharge the sludge from it.

It is important that no water be used in the house for a couple of hours.

Open the septic aerator tank and rinse away the sludge with a high-pressure garden hose to remove any remaining sludge.

For scrubbing the affected filth, a mop can be used effectively. It is possible to employ water-soluble, organic chemicals that are sold for dissolving dirt and boosting bacterial growth if some of the deposits appear to be too sticky.

Troubleshooting Septic Aerator through Timely Prevention

If there are any signs of wear on the inside surface of the tank, look into the materials that are being drained into the septic tank system to determine the cause. Inspect the aerator tank to make sure that paint thinners, paints, industrial solvents, and other chemicals are not being routed through it. This protection is also necessary from the standpoint of promoting the growth of germs in the environment. Such compounds have the potential to readily destroy the beneficial microorganisms that are required for decomposition.

What Happens When Your Aerator Isn’t Working?

Chances are good that your system alarm has sounded at some point in the past if you have an aerobic septic system (i.e., one that has an aerator). The majority of the time, this warning does not imply that your aerator is malfunctioning or that your system is on the verge of collapsing catastrophically. This warning is triggered when anything in your system requires your attention, which is more frequently than not. Occasionally, though, this alarm, particularly when combined with other significant warning indicators, can alert you to the presence of issue with your aerator.

1.

How Septic Aerators Work and What Happens When They Don’t

First and foremost, comprehending how your aerator works is essential to determining why it isn’t functioning properly. The design and purpose of aerators in an aerobic septic system have been discussed previously, but in a nutshell, aerators accelerate the process of solids breakdown in your system by adding oxygen, which encourages the growth of bacteria that breaks down and digests the wastewater in your holding tank. We’ll go over the specifics of how aerators work in more detail later. A higher concentration of these beneficial, natural bacteria in your septic system translates into a more efficient system that cleans wastewater more quickly and completely than a lower concentration.

The failure of the aerator in your septic system will cause your system to naturally transition from an anaerobic environment to another anaerobic environment, which will result in a much slower and less efficient environment for breaking down the particles in your septic system.

For this reason, and due to the fact that aerator septic systems often have smaller secondary treatment systems (and occasionally none at all), your system will either begin releasing raw sewage straight into the environment or into the secondary treatment system.

The most telling symptom that your aerator has failed is an overpowering foul stench emanating from the point at which your system discharges, whether it is into a secondary treatment system or straight into the atmosphere.

Aeration System Problems

If there is a problem with your septic aerator, the first sign that anything is amiss is usually the sound of the system alarm. Unfortunately, there are a variety of reasons why your alarm may go off, not all of them are directly related to the aerator. The septic alarm is analogous to the “check engine” light on your automobile, and, like with your car, determining the source of the alarm sometimes necessitates the assistance of a specialist. Although not all of these are related to the aerator, the following are the most often encountered reasons of septic alarms:

  • The loss of power is one of the more straightforward concerns to resolve. A tripped circuit breaker is frequently the source of this problem. But if this problem continues to manifest itself, it is indicative of a more serious electrical problem that should be addressed by us as soon as possible. sewage pump failure: If your sewage pump fails, the water level in your system will increase, which will activate your septic alarm. sewage pump failure The sewage pump in your system may require replacement or repair in order for it to work properly again. Inadequate Air Pressure: In order for your aerator to properly oxygenate your system, it must have sufficient air pressure. This frequently indicates that the aerator in your system needs to be replaced or repaired
  • However, this is not always the case. Breakdown of the Timer: The timer in your aerobic system guarantees that water is not released until the effluent is clear and clean enough to be transported to the next phase of your system, whether it is immediately discharged or moved to a secondary treatment system. Clogged Diffuser: Because the diffuser serves as the system’s outlet, if it becomes clogged, the system will be unable to discharge the fluids that have accumulated in the system.

It is important to mute your sewage alarm and quickly examine to see whether the problem is merely caused by an overloaded circuit breaker. It is necessary to have your system repaired as soon as possible if this is not the problem or if the breaker continues to trip. It is important not to put off calling if you are experiencing problems with your aerobic septic system. In Northeast Ohio, Supeck Septic is the only septic service company that has its own independent aerator repair shop, allowing us to handle all brands and models of aerators, with most faulty devices being repaired within a week.

Is your system in desperate need of repair or maintenance?

Common Aerobic System Issues – Septic Tank Pumping – B&B Pumping – Top Rated Septic Cleaning Services

For any owner of an aerobic septic system, the sound of a wailing alarm is likely to be a very familiar sound. This alert does not always indicate that you are having a septic crisis, but it may indicate that one of the many components of your septic system need care. When it comes to dealing with this alarm, there are a variety of issues that you’ll need to look out for. In today’s article, BB Pumping of the Fort Worth region will discuss some typical aerobic system concerns as well as how to identify and diagnose them.

No Power In The System

Clients’ aerobic systems are frequently experiencing this problem, which is likely the most prevalent problem we see. If your alarm has sounded, one of the first actions you should do to resolve the problem is to check your power supply for a short circuit. Ensure that the system’s power switch has not been mistakenly turned off by checking the power indicator light. You should examine your home’s electric breaker if the switch is turned on but you’re still hearing the alarm or seeing the service light.

Check For A Clogged Chlorinator

When you have an aerobic septic system, the wastewater in your tank is broken down and treated with oxygen. Often, once it has been aerobically cleaned, this effluent is returned to the home’s sprinkler system, where it may be used to irrigate a grass. This water is treated with chlorine before it is utilized in the sprinklers to ensure that the wastewater is disinfected. This chlorinator is used extensively throughout the year to treat wastewater, and it can become blocked if you don’t schedule frequent septic tank repair appointments with a professional.

If your aerobic septic system is getting power but the alarm is still sounding, we recommend that you check for obstructions in your chlorinator next.

Submersible Pump Doesn’t Work

Most of the time, if the submersible pump is not functioning properly, it is an indication that you require a new pump entirely. A defective float, poor wiring, or any other type of damaged element may, however, render the pump inoperable in some instances, resulting in the pump not functioning at all. Rather than attempting to repair or replace these components on your own, it is advisable to bring in one of our professionals to do some septic tank maintenance on your system for you.

Low Air Pressure

It is essential for the efficient functioning of your aerobic septic system that you maintain a consistent intake of oxygen to help break down your waste. If your system isn’t getting enough air, and the air pressure is low, it’s probable that you need a new aerator, or that a professional will need to rebuild your aerator system from the ground up.

Broken Timer Or Photocell

When all of these components operate together, you can time when water is released from your system and put to use in your sprinklers. If one or both of these components are broken or fail, it can prohibit your system from discharging wastewater through your sprinklers, resulting in an accumulation of water in your system that finally becomes too much.

Septic Air Pumps – The Lifeline of Your Aerobic System

There are numerous frequent misconceptions concerning the purpose and importance of the air pump or aerator in an aerobic septic system, and these beliefs are addressed below. In this post, I will go into further detail about the significance of your air pump and why it is so critical that it is kept in good working order at all times, including during emergencies.

AEROBIC SYSTEMS VS. CONVENTIONAL SEPTIC SYSTEMS

Aerobic Treatment Systems are a type of wastewater treatment that is technologically sophisticated. They are often composed of a single many chambered tank or a number of tanks with a variety of stages. These stages are often comprised of a solids collection tank (trash tank), an aeration chamber, and a settling tank, among other things. Even more advanced models include an additional four-stage disinfection stage (using chlorine or ultra-violet) that may also serve as a pump chamber. An Aerobic Treatment System is capable of processing waste and discharging water that is more than 98 percent clean and odorless.

See also:  How Deep Do You Burry A Septic Tank Under The Ground? (Solution)

Conventional septic systems are typically comprised of a single or two compartment tank that collects big particles while allowing liquids to pass through to a secondary treatment system for further treatment (drain field, mound system, sand filter, etc.).

You’re probably asking what all of this has to do with air pumps now that you’ve gotten a quick introduction of the two primary types of sewage systems.

THE SEPTIC AIR PUMP – IT GOES BY MANY NAMES

On an aerobic system, the air pump can be referred to by a variety of names, among which are the following: Septic Air Pump, Septic Aerator, Aerator Pump, and Compressor are all types of septic equipment.

For the purpose of simplicity, I’ll refer to it as a Septic Air Pump throughout this post, and I’ll be referring to the small box in your yard that pumps air into your septic tank rather than any of the other titles I gave above.

THE LIFELINE TO YOUR AEROBIC SYSTEM

In many ways, the septic air pump is the lifeline of your aerobic system. It is impossible for the system to function properly unless the air pump is operating properly. Two distinct functions serve as the basis for the air pump’s operation. Firstly, the air pump introduces oxygen into the water, allowing Aerobic bacteria to colonize and survive in the water. The Aerobic bacteria in the tank are responsible for completely decomposing all of the waste. When compared to the anaerobic bacteria present in a traditional septic system, these bacteria are far bigger and more efficient at digesting waste.

Second, the air pump provides an action in the tank that breaks down big solids into little particles, making it very simple for bacteria to cling to and consume the waste, resulting in a cleaner tank.

It is the absence of a secondary treatment system behind your aerobic system, as is the case with a traditional anaerobic septic system, that poses the greatest risk of this occurring.

Raw sewage dumping into a ditch, lake, or pond, or being sprayed on your grass, as you may be aware, is not a nice thing.

SIZE DOES MATTER

Another common myth is that because the air pump just adds air to the water, it doesn’t matter what size is utilized. This is not true. It’s impossible to imagine something more far from the truth. The sizing of your air pump is really quite crucial to the performance of your system, and not every system will need the same size air pump as another. If you have visited our website, you are already aware that we provide a wide range of products in a variety of sizes and shapes. It is customary for the size of the air pump to be dictated by the volume of the tank, the kind of air diffusers installed in the tank, and the number of GPD (Gallons Per Day) that the system is meant to treat.

In most circumstances, we just require either the model number of the pump you are replacing or the brand and GPD rating of your aerobic system in order to assist you.

Why Is My Septic Alarm Going Off?

If you are receiving an alert from your septic system, it is clear that something is not quite right. In this Knowledge Base post, we’ll go over the most prevalent reasons of a septic alert, as well as how to identify and avoid them in the future.

It is recommended that you contact your local service provider to determine the source of the problem if you are unfamiliar with the operation of your system or do not feel comfortable inspecting it on your own.

ALARMS ON CONVENTIONAL SEPTIC SYSTEMS

Aeration is not present in a normal septic tank since it lacks any form of aeration equipment. If you have this sort of system and you receive an alarm, it is likely that the water level is too high. The following are the primary causes of a high water level in a traditional septic tank system:

  1. Septic tank effluent filter that is blocked with organic matter In many typical septic tank systems, an effluent filter is installed near the tank’s outflow point. Cleaning should be performed on this filter about every 6 months. if the filter becomes clogged with particles, it will slow down the flow of water out of the system, causing the water level in the septic tank to rise
  2. The submersible pump has failed or the float that regulates the submersible pump has failed Even though not all traditional septic tank systems will require a submersible pump, some may do so if they are properly designed. Occasionally, when gravity feeding the secondary treatment system is not possible, an electric submersible pump is employed. The failure of a submersible pump or a float switch will result in a high water level in the pump tank and the septic tank
  3. The outlet line will be stopped, or the leach field will be flooded. An obstruction in the outlet pipe of the septic tank or a failing leach field are the other possible causes of a high water level in the tank if it does not have a submersible pump.

An often-heard myth is that a septic tank alarm signaling a high quantity of sewage signifies that the tank has to be drained out. A high level alert will not signal when a tank requires pumping, and while emptying the tank out may temporarily resolve the warning, once the tank fills back up, the alarm is likely to re-occur due to the fact that the primary problem with the system has not been rectified.

ALARMS ON AEROBIC TREATMENT SYSTEMS

Air pumps and air compressors, as well as internal units such as a shaft aerator or a submersible aerator, are commonly used in aerobic treatment systems. External air pumps and air compressors are also used in aerobic treatment systems. The failure of the aeration device or a high amount of water in the tank are the two most common causes of alarms in aerobic systems, respectively. If your alarm or control panel does not display which alarm is now active, the methods outlined below will assist you in identifying the problem.

  1. To test if the aeration equipment is operational, check the following: If you have an air pump or compressor that is located above ground, be sure that the item is operational before proceeding. You may also check to see if the device is producing air by disconnecting the main line that connects to the aerobic tank. Alternatively, if you have an in-tank aerator, remove the lid from the aeration chamber and check to see if the aerator is operating. If your aerator is not performing properly or is not releasing air, this is the source of your concern. Depending on the kind and condition of the aerator, it may be necessary to repair or replace the device altogether. Assuming that the aerator appears to be performing correctly, the most likely source of the warning is a high amount of water in the tank. Although this is not an emergency that must be addressed immediately, we recommend that the system be restored to operational status within 1-2 weeks of the incident. Check to check whether the water level in the aeration tank and/or the pump tank is excessively high. In a perfectly functioning system, the water level should be below the intake and at the bottom of the outflow. If the water level is high, the following are the most likely reasons why:
  • If you have a gravity-displacement system, a blockage in the outlet line would be the source of your excessive water level. The chlorine feeder is the most typical source of contamination. Remove the tube that contains the chlorine tablets and clean the feeder of any material that has accumulated. Also, if the system has surface discharges, make certain that the discharge exit is free of weeds and other debris. High water levels in a system with a submersible pump are usually caused by either the failure of the submersible pump or the failure of the float switch, which controls when the pump is turned on and off. The most effective method of testing a float switch is to use an ohm meter to check for continuity. The switch should be tested closed in the elevated position and open in the lowered position to ensure that it is functioning properly. By detaching the submersible pump from the float switch and running it directly from a known functional power supply, the pump may be checked. Remember that the pump will not automatically shut off when you do this, and you will need to separate it from power in order to turn it off before the tank is completely emptied.

THIS DID NOT RESOLVE MY ISSUES

If none of the troubleshooting steps listed above appear to resolve the issue you are experiencing, it is possible that there are difficulties with your control panel or alarm system that are causing the system to malfunction or causing you to get a high level alarm. In this case, we recommend that you contact a professional service provider to inspect the system and address the problem for you.

Troubleshooting Pumps: The Pump Motor Doesn’t Run

Check the wires in the septic system for damage with a voltmeter or comparable gadget to determine whether or not they need to be replaced.

Interested in Pumps?

Get the latest Pumps articles, news, and videos delivered directly to your email! Now is the time to sign up. Pumps+ Receive Notifications Checking for faults with a septic pump’s electrical system, the pump itself, and its controls are all important first steps when it won’t start. Dealing with electricity may be extremely dangerous; thus, exercise extreme caution while working with electricity and turn off power supply breakers when testing components inside the electrical system. If you are not 100 percent sure in your ability to execute any of these tests safely, consult with a specialist before proceeding.

Electrical problems

If the pump does not appear to be operating at all, does not respond to any testing, and does not appear to be pumping effluent, it is possible that there is a wiring issue. Examine your circuit breaker first, and then try to use a voltmeter or similar equipment to check the wires in your septic system for damage to determine whether or not they need to be changed. If the wires are damaged, replace them.

  1. A fuse has blown or a circuit breaker has been triggered on the circuit. Check the fuses and circuit breakers. Fuse replacement is necessary as needed. Take note of the pump manufacturer’s suggested size as well as the pump nameplate rating. In the event that a circuit repair is required, contact an electrician. The power cord for the pump is improperly connected and makes poor contact with the pump. The pump cable cap prongs should be checked for tightness and corrosion if the system is equipped with a piggyback plug in. Alternatively, replace the plug, clean the plug prongs with abrasive paper, or have the electrical receptacle changed
  2. The branch circuit wiring is insufficient to support the pump load. Check the voltage on the line and compare it to the manufacturer’s standards if necessary. The pump should be hooked into a separate circuit breaker from the rest of the system (or fuse). If the circuit breaker also supplies electricity to other outlets or appliances, an additional outlet should be added so that the pump has its own circuit breaker as well. The pump motor overload tripped the circuit, which necessitated the call for an electrician. Allow the pump to cool for five to ten minutes before reconnecting it to the power source. If the overloadtrip occurs again, remedial action should be taken. Verify that the line voltage is within specifications by comparing it to the manufacturer’s specs. Check the voltage of the branch circuit with an electrician or with the power provider. Make sure that the pump is connected to a separate branch circuit since the voltage provided is insufficient. Voltagenmust be within 10% of motor ratings on either side of the equation. Check that adequate power is being sent through the system by measuring the voltage at the pressure switch, the control box, and any other components through which power is being delivered. a. If you notice that the electricity is too high or too low at the power panel, you may need to call the electric utility provider for assistance. Thermal overload and shutdown will occur as a result of low voltage at the pump. Call your local electrician to fix the circuit and, if necessary, contact your energy supplier. Check the controlpanel connections and watertightness as well. Look for clear evidence of flaws and wear on the control panel with a visual inspection. Check for faulty connections as well as burned or melted components. Perhaps your prior examination of the power supply at your control panel led you to the conclusion that a bad splice connection or broken conduit could be the source of your problem. Make a visual inspection of any electrical splice connections for corrosion and other visible evidence that power is not being delivered to the pump. It is important to ensure that the conduit, and thus the wire within it, has not been damaged (for example, if it has been struck by a lawn mower).

Pump problems

It is possible that the motor for the lift pump is not functioning properly, in which case power is still flowing to the pump but it is unable to function.

At this stage, make sure that the pump is not clogged and that it is capable of performing its intended function; otherwise, the pump will need to be fixed or replaced totally.

  1. Theimpeller has been blocked or restricted. Disconnect the power, remove the pump from the sump, and inspect it for freedom of rotation of the impeller and shaft. Clean the volute and impeller, and remove any obstructions
  2. The bearings have frozen in their positions. Disconnect the power, remove the pump from the sump, and inspect it for freedom of rotation of the impeller and shaft. Lower bearing of the column pump should be free and lubricated. In order to repair the pump bearing, contact a licensed service shop. The water level is not sufficiently enough to activate the control switch. Water should be added to the sump to make it turn on. Control floats or weights must be readjusted
  3. An internal motor problem exists. Pump should be removed, power should be disconnected, and rated voltage should be connected before the controlswitch is actuated. To have your vehicle repaired or replaced, contact an authorized service shop.
See also:  Septic Tank Backs Up When Doing Laundry? (Solved)

Float/control problems

In comparison to a float tree, a pump linked to a line is used. If the pump detects sewage levels using a float, the float may become caught or destroyed, in which case the pump will not operate. Usually, you can adjust the float or otherwise correct it so that it floats normally again, but if the problem is severe enough, you may need to replace the float totally.

  1. The operation of the float is hampered or restricted in some way. Water should be added to the sump to make it turn on. Make any necessary adjustments to the control floats or weights. If the float rod is bent or obstructed by debris, consider adding a separate float tree to make pump removal and float operation easier. If the float rod is bent or obstructed by debris, consider replacing it. Examine and keep an eye on things. Make necessary adjustments to the control floats or weights
  2. The float switch is faulty. Remove the pump, turn off the power, connect the power to the rated voltage, and turn on the controlswitch. Inspect for deformation, charred or melted components, or a significant amount of black discoloration. Unplug the pump’s chord from the piggyback plug on the floatswitch, and then reconnect the cord. To test the pump, just put the plug straight into an electrical outlet. If the pump continues to run, the float switch has failed and must be replaced. (Do not keep the pump plugged in for an extended period of time or it may burn out.) Make any necessary adjustments to the control floats or weights. Replace the liquid level control with a new one. Give the pressure switch a thorough visual inspection to check for flaws and wear and tear. Turning on and off switches is essential for a fully functioning system, and they are reasonably priced.

a little about the author Sara Heger, Ph.D., is an engineer, researcher, and lecturer in the Onsite Sewage Treatment Program at the University of Minnesota’s Water Resources Center. She holds a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering and a master’s degree in environmental science. She has given presentations at several local and national training events on topics such as the design, installation, and administration of septic systems, as well as research in the related field. Her responsibilities include serving as the education chair for the Minnesota Onsite Wastewater Association and the National Onsite Wastewater Recycling Association, as well as serving on the National Science Foundation’s International Committee on Wastewater Treatment Systems.

Heger will respond as soon as possible.

This article is part of a series on troubleshooting pumps:

  • If the pump motor does not turn on, troubleshooting is necessary. Pump problems include: the pump turns on, but there is no water
  • The pump turns on, but there is no water. Pump problems include the following: the pump runs continuously or cycles too frequently
  • Pump problems include the following: the pump makes a lot of noise
  • Pump Troubleshooting: There is a strong odor of sewer gas

Common Problems That Occur with Aerobic Septic Systems

6:15 p.m. on June 26, 2019 Use of an aerobic treatment system at Canyon Lake, TX is widespread. Possibly you are in the process of purchasing or relocating to a property that employs an aerobic septic system. In the event that you are unfamiliar with this form of septic system, it is crucial to recognize that they are very different from regular septic systems, and that they come with their own set of possible concerns. As long as you have regular aerobic septic system maintenance performed by an experienced and qualified technician, you will most likely not have any problems with your system.

After all, you can only avoid or correct an issue if you are aware that one exists!

  • Having no power: Do not be alarmed if you realize that your aerobic septic system has just ceased operating. First, make sure that the power switch for your aerobic septic system hasn’t been unintentionally switched off, and that the power breaker hasn’t been tripped by another appliance or person. This is frequently the case, and it is one of the most straightforward difficulties to resolve
  • Problems with submersible pumps: Is your submersible pump not performing as it should be? Investing in a new submersible pump is sometimes the most cost-effective solution to this problem. However, it is possible that the problem is due to faulty wiring or a faulty float, which may be resolved without the need to replace the complete pump. A low level of air pressure in your aerobic septic system: Have you observed that the level of air pressure in your aerobic septic system is lower than it should be? This has the potential to be a significant problem for the operation of your system. However, it may be resolved by purchasing a new aerator or, if feasible, repairing any problems with your present aerator. The timer or photocell is not functioning properly: The timer and photocell are two extremely crucial components of your aerobic septic system, since they are responsible for retaining the water in the pump tank until it is time to release it into the environment. In the event that this portion of your system isn’t functioning properly, it is possible that one of these components is malfunctioning. A problem with your spray head might be caused by it not rotating properly or not popping down after spraying once it has finished. Unfortunately, a professional will be able to repair or replace this component with relative ease. Failure to perform routine maintenance: In the event that you fail to get your aerobic septic system maintained on a regular basis by a skilled and licensed expert, the likelihood that one of the problems outlined above will occur increases significantly. Stick to a regular maintenance plan and delegate the work to an experienced professional to avoid this destiny
  • Or

Do you have a nagging feeling that something is amiss with your septic system but aren’t sure what it may be? We are here to assist you! Make a call to Countryside Construction Inc., and we will dispatch a team to assist you with your aerobic treatment system in Canyon Lake, TX. Contact us now. We look forward to being of service to you in the near future! Septic Services,Aerobic Treatment Systems,Aerobic Treatment Systems Admin is the author of this blog article.

Aerobic System Inspection and Maintenance LLC

Septic System FAQs Am I required to have a maintenance contract?Yes, it is a Brazos County law that you must keep up a valid maintenance contract at all times. If the County finds that you are not under contract, it could result in a court date and fines up to $500.What should I do if I’m buying a house with a septic system?When buying a home with a septic system you should request to have the system cleaned out and inspected. You want to start fresh in your new home by having the system cleaned out, and having an inspection done will ensure that the septic system is in good condition. If the system is not up to code or there are problems with it, the inspection will give you a chance to negotiate the proper repairs before closing on the property.What can I do to prepare for large gatherings during the holidays?Having a large number of people over for gatherings can be hard on your septic system. An aerobic system is designed for the size of the house and the number of people who live there. Large parties can easily overload the system and cause problems if your system is already getting full. To avoid any embarrassing situations, have your system checked and possibly cleaned out before the holidays.Should my septic system be making a noise?Your aerator will make a constant humming noise. But, if you hear a loud buzzing sound that means your septic alarm is on. First you should check your breakers to make sure power is getting to your system. If the breakers have not been tripped, call ASIM immediately. If the alarm is on, there is something wrong that should be checked out.Is my Aerobic system supposed to run all the time?Yes, your aerobic septic system is intended to run constantly. If your aerator or spray pump is not running, contact ASIM.Do I have to add chlorine to my aerobic system?Yes, it is the law. You must maintain a chlorine residual in your system at all times. Violating this law can result in a fine of up to $80 per day. The only way that the wastewater can be treated is for chlorine to be in the system. So, if you are not adding chlorine, it is spraying out untreated water.Where can I get chlorine tablets?Most larger home improvement stores carry septic chlorine tablets. You can also purchase a 10 lb bucket from ASIM. A 10 lb bucket typically lasts close to a year. If you buy a larger bucket, the moisture will begin to break down the remaining tablets in the bucket and they will go bad before you can use the whole bucket. Also, make sure you ONLY buy SEPTIC chlorine. DO NOT use Pool chlorine tablets. These tablets are made differently and can react with gas and byproducts in your septic system and have been known to explode.Why does my aerobic system smell bad?Some people are more sensitive to septic smells than others. If you are experiencing a sewage smell, that does not mean you need to add more chlorine to your system. This is typically a sign that your aerator is out or there is an aeration problem.Should the alarm and sprayers keep coming on during and after rain?Septic systems typically take in ground water when it rains. This can cause the water level to rise and trigger the high water alarm and sprayers. After the rain stops and water soaks in or runs off, most systems will correct themselves. If you still have a problem, call ASIM.Should my sprayers keep coming on during an ordinary day when there is no rain?If there is no rain water to raise the water level in your tanks, and your sprayers are going off frequently during the day, this is a sign of overloading or a plumbing problem. If you use too much water for the system to handle, it will spray. Also, if your sprayers are going off frequently and you are not using water in the house, check for leaking faucets or leaky/running toilets. This will add to the water level. SEPTIC SYSTEMS DO NO MAKE WATER. If the sprayers are spraying, something is adding water to the system.Since my septic system runs continually, will my electric bill go increase?No, an aerobic septic system uses about the same amount of electricity as a 100 watt light bulb.If there is a bad odor inside my house, that is a septic problem, right?No, septic odors inside the house are typically from a plumbing problem. A plumber is responsible for the area under the house, we are responsible for the area from the cleanout to the system.How do I mute the alarm?There is a button marked on your control panel box to mute the alarm. Anytime you mute the alarm, you should call your septic maintenance company. The alarm comes on for a reason and it should be addressed sooner than later.What can I do if my neighbor’s septic system stinks?If your neighbor has a smelly septic system and doesn’t appear to care or try to fix the problem, you can make an anonymous complaint to the Environmental Health Services division at the local Health Department.What to do if my electricity is out? If your septic system is a conventional system and no pumps are used everything should be normal. However, if you depend on a pump to move your treated water to another tank, disposal area, or if you have an aerobic septic system with surface spray disposal you should minimize water usage during the interruption in electrical service. Once electric service has been restored you may encounter a period of an alarm indicating there is too much water in a tank and after some period of time, which will vary from system to system and usually an hour or less, the alarm should clear itself and everything should return to normal.What can I do if my drains and toilet flushes are slow?Unfortunately during bad weather conditions there is not much anyone can do but if there is no electricity for a long period of time or the rains have caused some degree of flooding things could get backed up. The best thing to do is minimize water usage. If this does not help the last resort would be to locate your sewer clean-out. advise caution when doing this, and remove the cap. Weather conditions may prove to prohibit this procedure and also there could be pressure on the cap which could spray you with raw sewage. Taking the cap off will help relieve the possibility of a sewer backup in the house and let it go outside instead. Once the weather subsides and electric service restored and everything has returned to normal be sure to have your sewer clean-out cap replaced. Your septic service provider should assist you if needed.How often will I need to have my tank pumped?Not very often. An average family of four living in a three-bedroom house will need their tank pumped every three to five years. If your installer is a licensed septic contractor in the area, he should know exact guidelines for your home, usage, and locality.Or you can check with your county health department. If there are no major changes in your household and your usage is stable, you may want to consider a regular pumping schedule for best results with the least worry.Can I build over my septic tank?This is never advisable and is against most municipal codes. Do not build any additions, pools, or driveways over a tank.Also, do not build or plant on top of your drainfield.If I think there is a problem, should I open my septic tank?NO! Though septic systems are safe for your family, opening the septic tank without professional training can expose you to dangerous gases and bacteria. Call a certified and trained septic professional if you detect any problems in your system.What are the major dos and dont’s of maintaining a trouble-free system?DO THIS .Conserve water to reduce the amount of wastewater that must be treated and disposed. .Repair any leaking faucets and toilets. .Only discharge biodegradable wastes into your system. .Restrict garbage disposal use. .Divert down spouts and other surface water away from your drainfield. .Keep your septic tank cover accessible for tank inspections and pumping. .Have your septic tank pumped regularly and checked for leaks and cracks. .Call a professional when you have problems. .Compost your garbage or put it in the trash. DON’T DO THIS .Flush sanitary napkins, tampons, disposable diapers, condoms, wipes, and such products into your system. .Dump solvents, oils, paints, thinners, disinfectants, pesticides, or poisons down the drain. They can disrupt the treatment process and contaminate groundwater. .Dig in your drainfield or build anything over it. .Plant anything over your drainfield except grass. .Drive over your drainfield or compact the soil in any way.
See also:  What Is A Cesspool Vs Septic Tank? (Correct answer)

How to Check Your Septic Panel and Pump Chamber

It is recommended that you inspect your pump chamber once a year to ensure that everything is in proper working order. Follow the 11-step procedure outlined below to complete this task on your own! (Do you require further assistance? Alternatively, you may watch our instructional video below.)

‍ 1. Let’s start by inspecting the panel. Make sure the power is on by verifying the power switch to the panel is on.

The following items should be included in this general overview: The electrical box may be seen in the lower left corner of the image below, starting at the bottom of the image.

Check to verify that all of the cables are firmly connected before using it. Next, take a look at the lower right corner of the shot, where you can see the discharge pipe for the pump. Check to see if it is operational (valve should be lined up with pipe). It’s now time to have some fun!

‍ FIRST.PUT ON GLOVES!That is one step you DO NOT want to miss. Remove the float tree (the pipe with a pvc handle located upright left in our picture) and pull up the alarms.

*Please keep in mind that these instructions are for a 4-float system. Some systems contain only two or three floats.

If you don’t hear an alarm, this is cause for concern. Starting at the top, I will explain the floats and how to ensure each one is working.

NOTE: If your water supply is depleted, you may need to replenish it. Fill it up a little with water from a yard hose.

7. Continue testing.

Check that the pump is operating properly by flipping the second float from the bottom upside down and then turning it back around. With your other hand, turn the next float up (which would be the second from the top) upside down while still holding the first float. You should be able to hear the pump start up. As soon as you have confirmed that the pump is operational, just release these two floats. There’s one more float to go. The top float serves as an alert in case of high water. Turn it over down to see whether this is the case.

8. Now is the time to inspect the power cords.

Check to see that everything is securely tied to the float tree and not just hanging free. Zip ties can be used to reattach any stray cables.

9. Securely return the float tree to its holder and coil any dangling cords so that they are out of the water.

Before a manufacturer of a certain OSSF model may sell their model in Texas, the model is submitted to a testing center for a six-month routine of rigorous testing. If the tank fractures while being tested, the test will be deemed a failure. The manufacturer had to pay $250,000 for each tank that was subjected to these tests. This case study is about an OSSF that had multiple fractured walls, as described in the introduction. Advanced Aerobic Systems was selected to offer maintenance services for an installed OSSF that was positioned near to a water source.

  1. The tank has been in use for three years.
  2. Advanced Aerobic Systems discovered major breaches in the common internal tank wall that the pump tank shares with three other compartments after doing a more thorough inspection (trash, treatment and clarifier -see tank diagram).
  3. Because of several fractures in the common wall dividing the garbage, treatment, and clarifier compartments, effluent from the trash, treatment, and clarifier compartments flowed into the pump tank section.
  4. An in-depth examination was done and delivered to the property owner, along with many photographs of the tank and its contents.
  5. In order to get a second opinion from the original installer, the owner contacted the company.
  6. According to the county, either the owner or the installer would be required to demonstrate that coliform bacteria (a disease indicator) was being pushed into the spray field.
  7. Although this technique is not necessary in this county, it was not included in the maintenance contract because it is not required in this county.

Other counties would demand either the tank be successfully repaired or replaced based on the prima facie evidence of fractured walls and uniformly low water levels, according to the prima facie evidence.

Septic Solutions – Frequently Asked Questions

Collin County law requires that you retain a valid maintenance contract in existence at all times, and this is a requirement under that legislation. It is possible to be fined up to $500 per infraction for operating your aerobic septic system without a legal contract, with each day being considered a separate crime.

2. Is there a maintenance contract that will cover everthing?

Yes! We provide three different degrees of service. Our services vary from the most basic of minimal coverage to the most comprehensive of all-inclusive coverage.

3. What do you inspect on a maintenance visit?

At each maintenance visit, your septic system is subjected to a thorough 16-point check to verify that it is operating properly. All of your filters and screens are cleaned on a regular basis. After the inspection is complete, a report on the performance of your septic system is posted on your door to keep you informed of the system’s functioning.

4. How do I know if my septic inspection is being performed?

Your maintenance firm should be placing a label in your control box and leaving a door hanger to inform you that they have inspected your system and found nothing wrong. If all of these steps are taken, but you still have a suspicion that your inspection is not being handled properly, place a small rock on the lid of your septic tank that will have to be removed in order for a proper inspection to take place. This will provide you the assurance that you are receiving the service that you deserve.

5. Is my septic system supposed to run all the time?

You are correct in that your aerobic system is meant to function on a continuous basis. Septic Solutions should be contacted if your air pump is not functioning properly.

6 If my septic system runs continually, will I have a large electric bill?

Not at all; the amount of power consumed by an aerobic septic system is comparable to that of a 100 watt incandescent light bulb.

7. Is my septic system supposed to be making a noise?

Your air pump will be making a constant buzzing noise throughout the day. In contrast, if you are hearing a loud, unpleasant buzzing noise, it is likely that your septic alarm is activated. Ensure that electricity is going to your septic system by checking your circuit breakers. If your breakers have not been tripped, call Septic Solutions right away to schedule an inspection.

8. Why does my aerobic system smell?

It is normal for your air pump to create an intermittent buzzing noise when running. You should call 911 if you are experiencing an unbearably loud and irritating buzzing noise. To ensure that electricity is going to your septic system, check your circuit breakers. Contact Septic Solutions right away if your breakers haven’t been tripped yet.

9. If I have an odor inside my home, ist that septic related?

Septic smells that emanate from within the residence are almost always the consequence of plumbing problems.

10. What can I do if my neighbor’s septic system stinks?

It is possible to file an anonymous complaint with your local Health Department / Development Services if your neighbor has a stinking septic system and shows no sign of wanting to address the problem.

11. What do I do if an alarm and/or alarm light comes on?

Ensure that electricity is going to your septic system by checking your circuit breakers. If your breakers have not been tripped, call Septic Solutions right away to schedule an inspection.

12 Should my alarm and sprinklers activate continually during and/or after rain?

When it rains, the majority of septic systems absorb groundwater.

If your water level rises as a result of this, your high-water alarm and spray heads will be activated. The majority of septic systems will self-correct after the rain has stopped falling. If this is not the case, contact Septic Solutions immediately.

13. How do I mute my alarm?

To mute the alarm, there should be a button clearly indicated on your control panel. Make sure to unmute your alert as soon as your septic problem has been resolved.

14. How often should I have to replace parts?

The cost of replacement parts varies based on the kind of system you have and how well your septic system is kept up and maintained. Some aerobic brands need the repair of parts on a yearly basis. Keeping ants and rodents away from your septic system will help to extend the life of the system’s components. If you find that replacing components is a burden or an inconvenience, you might consider signing up for our Gold Service Plan.

15. Why are the air pump and water pump so expensive?

The pumps are high-end, precision-machined components. They are made and intended to endure harsh external weather conditions for an extended period of time, ensuring a long service life.

16. What should I do if I’m purchasing a home with a septic system?

In the event of a house purchase that includes a septic system, it is highly suggested that you request that the system be cleaned and inspected before closing. Cleaning will help you get started on the right foot, and examining the septic system will guarantee that you know your septic system is in good working order when you move into your new home. You will have the option to request necessary repairs if the system is not up to code or is not working properly during the inspection period prior to closing on the residence.

17. Is the water safe?

If the chlorine is properly maintained and your system is operating properly, the water supply that is sprayed into your lawn is supposed to be safe for children and dogs to walk around on. Humans and pets should never drink from puddles of standing water.

18. Do I have to add chlorine?

The requirement to keep chlorine in an aerobic septic system at all times is a legal requirement in some jurisdictions. Those who violate the law can face fines of up to $2,500 per infraction, with each subsequent day constituting a separate crime.

19. Where can I purchase chlorine?

Chlorine may be purchased in the plumbing department of Home Depot or Lowe’s. It is possible to purchase chlorine from Septic Solutions, either from their office or service van. When compared to the standard retail price offered by home improvement retailers, purchasing chlorine from Septic Solutions will save you roughly $10!

20. Where do I add chlorine?

The position of the chlorine will differ depending on the kind of aerobic system you have installed. Grate pipes are typically 2 3/4″ in diameter, and they are connected to the sewer system. On most systems, you’ll find the pipe protruding from the ground near your tank lids or inside the final lid of your system. If you are having difficulty identifying your chlorinator pipe, call Septic Solutions to talk with a professional who will be able to pinpoint the exact position of your system’s chlorinator for you.

21. How much chlorine am I supposed to add?

The usual guideline is that 1-2 pills per person per week should be used in moderation. Depending on the size of your family and how much water you consume, this will be different for each individual home.

22. Do I have to use tablets or is there a different method?

There is an other technique of adding chlorine to your septic system, which is described below.

If you have a Smart-Chlor bleach injection system installed, you can use standard home bleach if you have the required equipment.

23. Is there a difference between a dripper and a Smart-Chlor?

Yes, a dripper is often a home-made device that drips continuously, similar to an intravenous drip. Each time your water pump starts, a Smart-Chlor is inserted into your plumbing system and is intended to dose the water with chloride. This solution reduces the need for superfluous chlorine consumption and ensures that the chlorine in your septic system is correctly regulated.

24. How much maintenance is required from me with a Smart-Chlor?

The Smart-Chlor requires little to no maintenance at all! It has a capacity of up to 6 gallons of regular home bleach, according to the manufacturer. Every 2-3 months, pour a gallon or two into the tank and you’re done! Not to mention that it comes with a lifetime warranty!

25. Will my sludge level break down by itself?

No, the sludge that has accumulated at the bottom of your septic tanks must be cleaned by a professional septic cleaning service in order to be effective.

26. How do I know when my septic is ready to be cleaned out?

Septic system cleaning should be performed when the amount of sludge in your system climbs to more than 8 inches. Septic failure might occur if the cleansing process is left unattended for an extended period of time.

27.Do aerobic septic systems have to be cleaned out?

Every three to five years, all septic systems must be cleaned up.

28. Is there a difference between pumping and cleaning the septic?

Yes. Pumping is simply the process of removing water from your septic tanks as well as some of the floating solids. Water and compacted muck that has collected in the bottom of the tanks must be properly removed, and this is accomplished through the process of “cleaning.”

29. How should I prepare for holidays and/or large gatherings?

When you anticipate hosting a big number of guests, cleaning your septic system before to the event will help you prevent an embarrassing septic system breakdown during your gathering.

30.Are there certain things I can not put into the septic?

Most items are fine in moderation; however, things like significant volumes of chemicals, grease, and other such substances are not permitted. See Septic System Do’s and Don’ts for a more in-depth list of what should and should not be put into your septic system. Septic Solutions of Texas retains ownership of the copyright and reserves all rights.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *