How To Tell If Septic Tank Is Draining Properly?

How to tell your septic tank is full and needs emptying

  1. Pooling water.
  2. Slow drains.
  3. Odours.
  4. An overly healthy lawn.
  5. Sewer backup.
  6. Gurgling Pipes.
  7. Trouble Flushing.
  • Wastewater (sewage) remains underground and out of sight when the septic system works properly. Solid waste particles block drain field pipes, resulting in wastewater collecting and rising to the surface. Foul odors are another immediate indicator that your septic tank is full.

How do you know your septic tank needs emptying?

Here are some of the signs for which you should look.

  1. Water puddling above the septic tank. So you noticed a small pool of water but it didn’t rain?
  2. Drains moving slowly. If the drain is moving slowly when you flush the toilet, it could be due to a clog.
  3. Bad smells coming from the septic tank.
  4. The sewer has backed up.

What are the signs of a clogged septic tank?

Signs of Septic System Clogging: Water and sewage from toilets, drains and sinks backing up into your home. Bathtubs, showers, and sinks draining slowly. Gurgling sounds present in the plumbing system. Bad odors coming from the septic tank or drain field.

What is the average time to empty a septic tank?

A common question people ask is how long it takes to empty a septic tank. The answer to this varies, depending on the process you use. On average, the process takes up to 20 minutes if you have professional equipment.

How full of water should a septic tank be?

A septic tank should always be “filled” to its normal liquid level, or the bottom of the outlet pipe which carries effluent to the absorption area. This normal liquid level is usually between 8” to 12” from the top of the tank on average (see picture at right).

Can I shower if my septic tank is full?

Only the water would get out into the leach field in a proper system unless you run too much water too fast. The thing to do is to run your shower water outside into it’s own drain area, but it may not be allowed where you are. Used to be called gray water system.

How often should you pump your septic tank?

Inspect and Pump Frequently The average household septic system should be inspected at least every three years by a septic service professional. Household septic tanks are typically pumped every three to five years.

How do you unclog a septic tank drain?

Sprinkle the drain with baking soda, then dump vinegar into the pipe. Leave the mixture to sit in the pipe for an hour or two. Finally, flush the drain with hot water. If the clog is small, this could be enough to clear the pipe.

How do I check my septic tanks sludge level?

To measure the sludge layer:

  1. Slowly lower the tube into the septic tank until it touches the bottom of the tank.
  2. As the device is slowly pulled out of the water, the check valve closes capturing a liquid/solid profile of the septic tank water. The thickness of the sludge layer can be measured.

How long does it take for a 1000 gallon septic tank to fill up?

A family of four will fill the 300-gallon storage volume of a 1,000-gallon septic tank in about 1.5 years. By making adjustments in this analysis for adults working outside of the home a third of the time and children going to school, it is easy to conclude that a septic tank should be pumped every two to three years.

How often does a 1000 gallon septic tank need to be pumped?

For example, a 1,000 gallon septic tank, which is used by two people, should be pumped every 5.9 years. If there are eight people using a 1,000-gallon septic tank, it should be pumped every year.

What to do after septic is pumped?

After you have had your septic tank pumped by a trusted septic company, there are some things you can and should do as the septic system owner.

  1. 1) Get on a Schedule.
  2. 2) Take Care of the System.
  3. 3) Know the Parts of Your System.
  4. 4) Check Other Possible Issues.

Will a flooded septic tank fix itself?

Most septic tanks are not damaged by flooding since they are below ground and completely covered. However, septic tanks and pump chambers can fill with silt and debris, and must be professionally cleaned. If the soil absorption field is clogged with silt, a new system may have to be installed.

Why is my septic tank filling up so fast?

If your tank seems to be filling up much more quickly, it could indicate a problem with one of its components, or it could be a sign that your tank is taking on more liquids than it can handle. Call a local professional if your tank is needing more septic pumping than usual.

7 Signs Your Septic Tank Is Full & Needs Emptying

Septic tank ownership presents a set of issues that are distinct from other types of property ownership. The consequences of failing to empty your septic tank are slightly more significant than those of neglecting to empty your trash cans. If you’ve had a septic tank for a long amount of time, you may have noticed that there are several tell-tale symptoms that your tank may need to be pumped out. If you’re new to having a septic tank, the symptoms listed below will be the most important things to keep an eye out for in the beginning.

How to tell your septic tank is full and needs emptying

  1. Pooling water, slow drains, odors, an unusually healthy lawn, sewer backup, gurgling pipes, and difficulty flushing are all possible problems.

What Does A “Full” Septic Tank Mean?

Before we get into the seven warning signals you should be on the lookout for, it’s crucial to understand what it means to have a “full” tank. There are three alternative ways to define the term “full.” 1.Normal Level- This simply indicates that your septic tank is filled to the maximum capacity for which it was built. This implies that the intake and outtake valves are free of obstructions and allow waste and wastewater to flow into and out of the septic tank without interruption. When a tank is pumped, it is completely empty; nevertheless, when the tank is utilized, it returns to its typical level of “full.” 2.

  1. Over time, sludge can accumulate and become entrapped in the system.
  2. Waste water will continue to flow out of the building and into the drainage system.
  3. An overfilled tank will eventually reach a point where the drainage field will no longer absorb water.
  4. The water level will increase to the maximum capacity of the system.

1. POOLING WATER

Firstly, it’s crucial to grasp what a “full” tank might signify before moving on to the seven signals you should be on the lookout. A comprehensive definition can be defined in three distinct ways. This simply implies that your septic tank is filled to the maximum capacity for which it was intended. This implies that the intake and outtake valves are free of obstructions and allow waste and wastewater to flow into and out of the septic tank without difficulty. As the tank is utilized, it will return to its regular level of “full.” When a tank is pumped, it will be emptied.

Sludge can accumulate over time and become entrapped in the system.

There will be no change in the flow of waste water to and via the drainage system.

When this occurs, water will overflow into the overflow tank.

There will be a significant increase in water levels to their maximum carrying capacity. Having established the many ways a septic tank might become overflowing, we can proceed to discuss the seven warning signals that you should be aware of.

2. SLOW DRAINS

If you see your sink, bath, or toilet draining slowly, or if you notice any other draining slowly in your house, take note. A blockage in your septic system, or the fact that your system is completely full and has to be emptied, might be the cause of this. Slow drains, in either case, are a warning flag that should not be ignored. The first line of defense may be to employ a septic-friendly drain cleaner, but if the problem persists, it is advisable to have the septic tank drained completely.

3. ODOURS

Because all of the waste water from your home will be disposed of in your septic tank, you can be assured that it will not be a nice odor. And it will very certainly have a distinct fragrance that you will notice. In the event that you begin to notice odors surrounding your septic tank, this is another indication that it is either full or near to being full. It’s also possible that you have a leak, therefore it’s important to conduct a fast inspection. The flip side of smells is that it will not just be you who will be able to detect them.

However, it is important to discover a remedy as soon as possible after realizing the problem.

4. A REALLY HEALTHY LAWN

A septic tank that is overflowing has a few beneficial effects. It’s possible that the grass atop your sewage tank is the healthiest patch of grass you’ve ever seen. It will outshine the other elements in your yard, allowing you to spot it more easily. If you do happen to discover this, it’s still another red flag to keep an eye out for. If it’s near your septic tank, it’s possible that water is seeping from your system, indicating that it’s either leaking or that it’s full. Whatever the case, it’s time to get it checked out.

5. SEWER BACKUP

The chances of missing this one are little to none, and it’s absolutely something you don’t want to happen. It’s the most evident, and it’s also the most detrimental. Always keep a watch on the lowest drains in your home, since if they begin to back up, you should get your tank emptied as soon as possible.

6: Gurgling Water

Unless you are aware of any gurgling sounds coming from your pipes, you should ignore them. This is especially true if they are dependable. This is another another indication that your septic tank is overflowing and needs to be drained.

7: Trouble Flushing

Don’t disregard any gurgling sounds that you hear coming from your pipes. This is especially true if they are a reliable source of information. It’s another another indication that your septic tank is overflowing and requires emptying.

The Important of Septic Tank EmptyingMaintenance

Maintaining a schedule is the most effective way to determine when your tank needs to be emptied, and it is recommended. It’s a straightforward, yet effective, solution. If you can determine proper emptying intervals, it is possible that you will not notice any of the warning signs listed above. The length of time between emptyings will be determined by the size of your septic tank and the number of people who use it. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, septic tanks should be drained every 3-5 years at the absolute least.

The precise timing will be determined by a number of factors. The following parameters will be taken into consideration when determining the optimum emptying intervals for your tank:

  • Typical household characteristics include: size of the septic tank, amount of wastewater generated, and volume of solid waste.

Typical household dimensions include: size of the septic tank, amount of wastewater generated, and volume of solid waste.

Signs of Septic System Failure

  • Flooding is occurring in the home as a result of backed up water and sewage from toilets, drains, and sinks Bathtubs, showers, and sinks all drain at a snail’s pace
  • The plumbing system is making gurgling sounds. The presence of standing water or moist patches near the septic tank or drainfield
  • Noxious smells emanating from the septic tank or drainfield
  • Even in the midst of a drought, bright green, spongy luxuriant grass should cover the septic tank or drainfield. Algal blooms in the vicinity of ponds or lakes In certain water wells, there are high quantities of nitrates or coliform bacteria.

Septic systems, like the majority of other components of your house, require regular maintenance. As long as it is properly maintained, the septic system should give years of dependable service. If the septic system is not properly maintained, owners face the risk of having a dangerous and expensive failure on their hands. Septic systems, on the other hand, have a limited operating lifespan and will ultimately need to be replaced. Septic systems that have failed or are not working properly pose a threat to human and animal health and can damage the environment.

It is possible that a prompt response will save the property owner money in repair costs, as well as disease and bad influence on the environment in the future.

What happens when a septic system fails?

When a septic system fails, untreated sewage is dumped into the environment and carried to places where it shouldn’t be. This may cause sewage to rise to the surface of the ground around the tank or drainfield, or it may cause sewage to back up in the pipes of the structure. It is also possible that sewage will make its way into groundwater, surface water, or marine water without our knowledge. Pathogens and other potentially harmful substances are carried by the sewage. People and animals can become ill as a result of exposure to certain diseases and pollutants.

What are some common reasons a septic system doesn’t work properly?

The pipe between the home to the tank is obstructed. When this occurs, drains drain very slowly (perhaps much more slowly on lower floors of the structure) or cease draining entirely, depending on the situation. This is frequently a straightforward issue to resolve. The majority of the time, a service provider can “snake the line” and unclog the problem. Keeping your drains clear by flushing only human waste and toilet paper down the drain and having your system examined on an annual basis will help prevent clogs.

  • Plant roots might occasionally obstruct the pipe (particularly on older systems).
  • The inlet baffle to the tank is obstructed.
  • In case you have access to your intake baffle aperture, you may see if there is a blockage by inspecting it.
  • It is essential that you avoid damaging any of the septic system’s components.
  • Avoid clogging your inlet baffle by just flushing human waste and toilet paper, and get your system examined once a year to ensure that it is in good working order.
  • This may result in sewage backing up into the residence or surfacing near the septic tank as a result of the situation.
  • If there is an effluent filter, it has to be cleaned or changed as necessary.
See also:  How Much Ti Have A Septic Tank Pumped In Hickory Nc? (TOP 5 Tips)

Preventing this sort of problem from occurring is as simple as cleaning your effluent filter (if you have one) and getting your system examined once per year.

It is possible for sewage to back up into the residence when the drainfield collapses or becomes saturated with water.

Additionally, smells may be present around the tank or drainfield.

It is possible that the system was run incorrectly, resulting in an excessive amount of solid material making its way to the drainfield and causing it to fail prematurely.

While it is conceivable that a drainfield will get saturated due to excessive quantities of water (either from enormous volumes of water flowing down the drain or flooding the drainfield), it is not always viable to dry out and restore a drainfield.

A connection to the public sewer system should be explored if the drainfield has failed and it is possible to make the connection.

It will be necessary to replace the existing drainfield if this does not take place. It is possible for a septic system to fail or malfunction for various reasons. Septic professionals should be contacted if your system isn’t functioning correctly.

How can I prevent a failure?

The proper operation of your septic system, together with routine maintenance, can help it last a long and trouble-free life. Assuming that your septic system has been correctly planned, located, and installed, the rest is up to you to take care of. Inspect your system once a year and pump as necessary (usually every 3-5 years). Avoid overusing water, and be mindful of what you flush down the toilet and what you flush down the drain. Learn more about how to properly maintain your septic system.

Can my failing septic system contaminate the water?

Yes, a failed septic system has the potential to pollute well water as well as adjacent water sources. Untreated wastewater is a health problem that has the potential to cause a variety of human ailments. Once this untreated wastewater enters the groundwater, it has the potential to poison your well and the wells of your neighbors. It is possible that oyster beds and recreational swimming sites will be affected if the sewage reaches local streams or water bodies.

Is there financial help for failing systems or repairs?

Yes, there are instances where this is true. Here are a few such alternatives.

  • In addition, Craft3 is a local nonprofit financial organization that provides loans in many counties. Municipal Health Departments- Some local health departments provide low-interest loan and grant programs to qualified applicants. A federal home repair program for people who qualify is offered by the USDA.

More Resources

  • Septic System 101: The Fundamentals of Septic Systems
  • Taking Good Care of Your Septic System
  • A video on how to inspect your septic system yourself
  • Using the Services of a Septic System Professional
  • Safety of the Septic Tank Lid

5 Signs You Should Have Your Septic Tank Pumped

The majority of households do not devote much effort to thinking about their septic system. After all, who can blame them?! However, if this leads in a lack of attention, it may become a serious problem. When installed and maintained properly, every septic system has the potential to efficiently handle waste for many decades. Were you able to pick out the crucial word “if” in the above sentence? If a septic system is properly maintained, it will continue to operate at peak performance for decades!

  • There are numerous critical components to developing a successful septic system maintenance plan.
  • The majority of specialists recommend that you pump your septic tank every 3 to 5 years.
  • In the event that a septic system is not adequately maintained, there are several tell-tale indicators that suggest the onset of a problem.
  • Sluggish Drains and/or Flushing are required.
  • Your sink, tub, or shower will most likely stop draining as soon as they should, and your toilet may not flush as thoroughly as it should if your septic system is beginning to back up.
  • Take action now before this develops into a far more serious and expensive situation.
  • Some of these gases may begin to originate from your toilet or drains within your home at certain periods.

If you begin to detect unpleasant scents in and around your house, contact a septic service right once to get the situation resolved before it becomes much worse.

It should not be the case that the lawn above a septic drain field seems noticeably better than the rest of the yard when the system is operating correctly.

This occurs because the grass is receiving more fertilizer in the form of excessive waste fluids, which is beneficial to the grass.

Water That Isn’t Moving It is possible to detect water gathering in numerous locations across your yard when your septic tank is nearly full.

It is a solid indicator that your septic system needs to be pumped and thoroughly inspected if you notice water collecting in these spots.

Back-up of Sewage Raw sewage backing up into a home is the most obvious symptom of a problem, and it is undoubtedly something that no one wants to encounter at any time in their lives.

If this occurs to you, contact a septic service as soon as possible and avoid the affected area.

The most effective approach to prevent having to deal with any of the unpleasant indicators listed above is to keep a regular pumping and inspection routine in place.

In addition to being a full-service septic maintenance and repair company, Athens Professional SepticDrain is well prepared to manage any sort of septic emergency that may occur.

Even yet, the most effective way to prevent disasters from occurring is to enroll in our regular service plan and ensure that your septic system is in peak operating condition.

7 Ways to Tell When it’s Time to Empty Your Septic Tank

It is essential that septic tanks are properly maintained in order to avoid blockages and potentially hazardous situations. Septic tanks collect waste water from the home, with particles sinking to the bottom and floating on top of the liquid scum on the surface. Bacteria digest and break down the waste, and surplus water soaks into a gravel-filled drainage area outside the tank, known as the “flush field.” Bacteria digest and break down the waste. And the tank’s solid contents accumulate over time, the level of the tank’s solid contents rises.

Some of the indicators that a tank is overflowing are caused by the waste backing up into the septic pipes and blocking them.

  • Waste water falls slowly down the drains of the home. An overflowing septic tank is causing problems with all or most of the drains. If only one drain is taking a long time to empty, it is possible that that drain has a separate clog. Restrooms become clogged with sewerage trash. It is possible for sewer waste to accumulate in the shower and tub drains, as well as in the toilet
  • Septic lines may be leaking. The pressure caused by backed-up waste in the septic systems might cause the pipes to leak
  • The leach field area in the yard is squishy because to the recent rainfall. The water waste from the tank should either evaporate or be absorbed by grass roots to prevent flooding. Squishy patches and pools indicate that the water that is being discharged from the septic tank is not being absorbed by the soil. There’s a strong sewage stink in the air. The odor of sewage is not one that is easily misidentified. The stench of sewage in your bathrooms or yard indicates that the tank is full and cannot store any more waste. In addition to being greener, the grass over the leach field grows at a quicker rate than the rest of your lawn. Plants benefit from the nutrients in septic tank contents, which is why grass grows exceptionally well when nourished by septic waste overflow. The depth of the sludge layer is one-third the depth of the liquid layer, or even deeper. The easiest approach to determine whether or not your tank need pumping is to have it inspected by a competent contractor. He’ll check the depth of the solid and liquid levels in the tank and pump it out before it overflows, if necessary.

Septic tanks don’t require much in the way of maintenance, as long as you take care of the essentials first. Generally speaking, septic tanks should be drained every three to five years, but they should also be examined once or twice a year to ensure that they are in proper operating order. Inquire with a trained specialist about the condition of your tank, and he or she can determine how often it should be pumped. To get answers to your questions, get in touch with the Pink Plumber right away.

3 Signs Your Septic System Is Full

It is necessary to pump away the waste that accumulates in septic tanks when they reach capacity. If you are a homeowner whose home is serviced by a septic system, you should be aware of the signs that indicate a septic system is full. Discover the three telltale indications to keep an eye out for. 1. Pools of stagnant water are formed. When water collects near a septic tank and there is no evident reason for it to be there, a full septic tank is the most probable culprit to blame. This is especially true if there hasn’t been any rain in a while or if the water contains visible waste.

  1. The drainfield is a network of pipes that drains water that has passed through the system and into the soil underneath the system.
  2. But if your septic tank gets overflowing with solid waste, the sludge may begin to seep into the pipes leading to your drainfield.
  3. After the water has entered the field, it will not flow through the pipes in the manner intended and will instead pool in a specific region.
  4. Due to the likelihood that the water is polluted with human waste, you should avoid the area until you can adequately resolve the issue.
  5. 2.
  6. You may check for potential problems by occasionally sniffing the air surrounding your septic tank and drainfield to see if anything is wrong.
  7. In reality, it has an unpleasant odor due to the fact that it is contaminated with kitchen waste, human waste, and general wastewater.

If you discover a foul odor around your septic tank and drainfield, however, the odor indicates that gases are escaping from the drainfield and should be investigated.

The fact that they are present is a warning that your septic tank is beginning to fill up.

However, the trash will not be disposed of in the drainfield immediately.

Because no pipes will need to be unclogged, the service will be kept as easy as possible.

3.

When only one drain becomes sluggish, it is likely that a clog has formed in the pipes that are directly linked to that drain.

Instead, it has spread throughout the majority of your home, and it may even be in your septic system.

Without immediate action, the situation will only deteriorate and become far more serious If this is the case, you should pump your septic tank as soon as you possibly can. If you need to have an aseptic tank pumped out, call Pete’s Outflow Technicians for assistance.

Symptoms of Septic Problems — Magneson Tractor Service Inc.

If you know what to look for, you will be able to detect problems with your septic tank system if it is not performing properly. Noises made by a pipe gurgling A gurgling sound from pipes when flushing or running the water may indicate that a tank is full or that it needs to be pumped. It may also indicate that there is another problem with the tank. 2. Problems with the toilet flushing When the toilet is sluggish to flush or refuses to flush at all, and a plunger does not resolve the problem, it is possible that there is a problem with the septic system.

  1. A blockage in the pipes might possibly be the cause of this symptom.
  2. Drains that are too slow 3.
  3. 4.
  4. One of the most unpleasant indications of a failed septic system is sewage back up into the home.
  5. Unpleasant Smells All you need is a keen sense of smell to determine whether or not something is amiss with your septic tank.
  6. You are most certainly inhaling poisonous sulfur vapors, unless they are leftovers from the last Easter Egg search.
  7. 6.
  8. It is common for grass to grow quicker or greener than the rest of the land as a sign that the septic leach field is failing to function properly.
  9. 7.
  10. A failure in the system has resulted in stinky water gathering near a drain field, which is potentially hazardous to human health and thus has to be rectified promptly.
  11. The Root Causes of Septic Tank Issues Frequently, septic tank problems are caused by objects entering the tank that shouldn’t be there in the first place, such as toilet paper, kitchen sink waste, or garbage disposal.

In order to minimize sediments and excessive use of the trash disposal, only gray water should be used in the kitchen sink. Identifying and Understanding Potential Leach Field Issues Try to avoid these frequent septic tank concerns that are related with problems near the leach field.

  • Over the drain field, you should never park a car or other heavy equipment. The additional weight may cause difficulties such as cracking and buckling, which will interfere with the tank’s ability to function. The region above the drain field should be completely clear of obstructions. The pipe below may become compromised as a result of the weight of the objects or the volume of traffic. If the pipe becomes compacted and then breaks, it can cause significant damage to your leach field and be extremely expensive to repair. Having too much sludge near the drain field can cause sulfite and bio-mat accumulation, both of which require the knowledge of a septic specialist to remove before your system backs up
  • Putting grease down the drain or into the toilet will cause it to cool and solidify as it travels down the line. Hardened fats have the potential to induce capping, which is the complete removal of all oxygen from the system, as well as damage to the leach field. Never plant new trees in the vicinity of a septic tank’s drain field. Roots will ultimately seek for moisture underneath and will pierce the tank, drain field, or pipelines linked with the septic system, depending on the amount of moisture available. The roots will develop swiftly and inflict substantial harm as soon as they reach the source of the moisture.
See also:  How Far Should My Septic Tank Be From House? (Solution found)

To avoid any septic tank problems in the future, call the experts at Magneson Tractor Service to check your system before trouble arises.

Over the drain field, you should never park a car or other heavy machinery. When the tank is overloaded, it may experience cracking and buckling, which can interfere with its ability to function. An obstruction-free region should exist above the drain field. The pipe below may become compromised as a result of the weight of the products or traffic. If the pipe becomes compacted and then breaks, it can cause damage to your leach field and be a very expensive repair to do. Having too much sludge near the drain field can cause sulfite and bio-mat accumulation, both of which require the knowledge of a septic professional to resolve before your system backs up; It will ultimately cool and harden if grease is dumped down the sink or into the toilet and is not removed.

You should never plant any new trees in the vicinity of your septic tank’s drainage area.

The roots will develop swiftly and inflict substantial harm as soon as they reach the source of the water.

1. Water (or sewage) is backing up inside your home

It is possible for water—or a foul-smelling black liquid—to gurgle up into the drains in your kitchen or sink for a variety of reasons:

Your tank or drain field are too full

In your septic tank, as soon as unclean water and waste are introduced, the solids are separated from the liquids. The wastewater is finally forced out into a drain field, which is a network of subterranean tunnels or chambers where it may be collected and treated. Once there, any hazardous bacteria is either absorbed by the soil or digested by naturally occurring microorganisms in the environment. However, if your tank gets a large amount of water in a short period of time (for example, because of heavy rain or because you are using significantly more water than usual), the tank or the drain field may become overwhelmed.

A blocked pipe

The presence of a blocked distribution line somewhere between your house and your septic tank is another possible cause of water backing up into your home. Possibly you have a little child who has joyfully flushed an entire sock down the toilet, or perhaps you have a habit of flushing stuff down the toilet, such as not-so-flushable wipes. Take the initiative: Keep an eye on how much water you’re using. As suggested by Glenn Gallas, vice president of operations at Mr. Rooter Plumbing, “take brief showers, install low-flow toilets, and wash clothing over a few days rather than all at once.” Flush diapers, paper towels, tampons, or anything else that is not biodegradable down the toilet.

In addition, you should restrict the amount of food that you put down your waste disposal system. Indeed, over time, food waste might become clogged in your drain field due to the grinding it undergoes to become little bits.

2. Green, spongy grass around your septic tank

Although it may appear to be a terrible indicator, wilting grass on top of your septic tank is not always the case. (Because the dirt on top of your septic tank is typically not as deep as the soil over the rest of your lawn, it is easy for the grass there to get dry.) However, when the grass on top of your septic tank is prospering at a rate that is far higher than everywhere else in your yard, this is a warning signal. “Even if the environment appears to be lush and green, it is a clear indication that you are dealing with a serious situation,” Monell explains.

It essentially functions as fertilizer once it has escaped from your septic tank.

This will help you avoid costly repairs later.

3. You’ve got trees or shrubs near your system

Although it is admirable of you to desire to beautify the region, tree roots are naturally attracted to sources of water, which might include faulty pipes or even condensation. As a result of their need to obtain sustenance, they “may split septic tank pipes, enabling dirt to enter, or they can collapse the pipes completely,” according to Gallas. It is not necessarily better to have smaller shrubs because they have the potential to develop deep roots. Take the initiative: In order to plant a tree, first determine how tall it will be when it reaches maturity, and then keep it at least that distance away from your system.

Some trees, such as bamboo, pine, and walnut, have even more aggressive roots and will require you to plant them much further away from your septic system, so talk to your septic professional before you start digging.

Check the pipes every time your system is serviced to ensure they are not affected.

4. Water’s pooling in your yard

Gallas explains that a high water table or significant rainfall might occasionally fill the drain field, preventing the septic tank from emptying correctly. For those who believe severe rains are to blame for the little lakes in their yard, they might try to allow their septic system more time to catch up by using their water less frequently. (At long last, an excuse not to do the laundry!) However, if this does not eliminate the standing water, a plumber should be contacted.

Take the initiative: Rainwater runoff should be directed away from your drain field. Make certain that your waterlines are at least 10 feet away from your septic system before connecting them. If you have a sprinkler system, be certain that it is equipped with certified backflow devices.

5. A rotten egg smell

Yes, a foul sewage stench might be an indication that your system is malfunctioning. However, this is not always the case. In Monell’s opinion, there are numerous distinct reasons why you could be smelling septic gases: A dried-out wax seal on a toilet (which locks your toilet bowl to the floor) as well as a dry trap in a floor drain are examples of such things as this. (It is frequently filled with water, which prevents sewage gases from entering.) Take the initiative: According to Monell, if you have a chronic stench in your house, “the first course of action should be to examine all exposed fixtures, and if nothing is found, it should be followed up with a smoke test to detect leaks in the lines,” he adds.

6. Slow drains

Generally speaking, “slow drains are an indication that there is a blockage in the pipe itself that goes into the septic,” adds Monell. And, while you might be tempted to reach for the Drano or another drain cleaning, resist the temptation. Chemicals that are harsh on your pipes might cause them to corrode over time. In addition, chemical drain cleaners might destroy the beneficial enzymes and bacteria in your tank that aid in the breakdown of waste, according to Monell. Take the initiative: Make use of a natural product that contains bacteria and enzymes; the crud that has gathered within your pipes is delicious food for these organisms.

Clogged Drain or Clogged Septic Tank?

Robs Septicon is the author of this piece. Postings under Uncategorised A clogged septic tank can cause problems that are very similar to those caused by a clogged drain. Knowing the difference between the two can assist you in taking care of your home. Here’s what you need to know about the situation. When a septic tank overflows, why do drains become clogged? The septic tank is a holding tank that is located underground. All of the wastewater from the house drains into the septic tank, which slowly fills up with waste over time.

  • Towards the top of the tank, there is a pipe that leads into the yard, into an area known as the drain field, where the tank is located.
  • The soil filters the water and kills the bacteria that are present.
  • It is possible for the septic tank to fill up without any water draining out if the pipe leading into the drain field becomes clogged.
  • As the water rises through the main line, the ability of fixtures in the house to drain properly diminishes.
  • The drains will become sluggish if the septic tank is only partially clogged, as the water struggles to make its way down into the septic tank.
  • What Are the Signs of a Septic Tank Clog?
  • It can be difficult to tell the difference at times.

Due to the fact that they are the most closely associated with the septic tank, the lower drains in the house will be affected first when the septic tank overflows.

In addition to becoming more sluggish, they may begin to make strange noises, such as gurgling sounds, as they age.

Local clogs typically only affect a single fixture or a small number of fixtures that are connected to it.

If all of the other fixtures in the house are working properly, this is an indication that there is a clog in the house rather than in the septic tank itself.

A clog in a septic tank should not be repaired by someone who has only rudimentary training or who lacks the necessary tools.

In some cases, you may be able to fix the problem yourself if you believe that the clog is in the pipe rather than in the septic tank.

Allow for an hour or two for the mixture to sit in the pipe before using it.

If the clog is small, this could be enough to clear the pipe.

An auger has a long, stiff cable with a pointed, twisty end.

If you cannot clear the clog using either of these methods, you may need to call a plumber.

Chemical drain cleaner can kill beneficial bacteria in your septic tank, which could eventually cause another clog.

Clogs in septic tanks occur for a variety of reasons.

Many septic tanks need to be pumped every three to five years.

What Should You Do If You Suspect a Septic Tank Problem?

Your septic tank company can inspect your tank and tell you whether the tank needs to be pumped.

For more information about clogs and septic tanks,contact Rob’s Septic Tanks, Inc. We’ll be happy to answer your questions and give you more information.

7 Warning Signs of Septic Tank Problems!

If you are new to living in a home with a septic system, as we are, you should be aware of the following seven symptoms that septic issues may be on the horizon: There is no guarantee that any of these difficulties will result in an expensive repair, but if there is a problem and you ignore it, the situation will only deteriorate and become more serious. You should contact a septic specialist if you detect any of the following seven indicators that your system is malfunctioning.

  1. Inefficient draining
  2. Toilet that does not flush correctly
  3. There are gurgling sounds coming from the pipes. Back-ups of water are occurring in drains. Grass that is more lush over the drain field area sewage or rotten egg stench both inside and outside the house. Standing water in the vicinity of a septic tank or a drain field
See also:  Where Do I Find Septic Tank Records In Douglas County Ga? (Correct answer)

Let’s take a look at each symptom to see what could be causing it, how you might try to solve it, and when you should seek expert assistance.

1)Drains are emptying slowly

There are several possible causes for this: something is blocking the drain (flushable wipes, hairball, small toys), the septic tank is not emptying into the drain field (also known as a leach field), or the drain field is not working properly. If the drain field is not working properly, the septic tank should be emptying into the drain field (also known as a leach field) as soon as possible. A septic tank is a type of system that works on the principle of “water in, water out.” There are other pages on this site that go into much deeper information about the system.) Because of the exit tube that leads to the drain field, it is able to keep a particular amount of water within.

  • As a result of the heavy rains experienced in your region, and if the ground is saturated, the drain field may simply be unable to discharge water properly since the earth cannot take any more water at this point in time.
  • Another reason for a brief backlog is when a large amount of water is pumped into the system in a short period of time.
  • You should keep in mind that when water flows into the septic tank, it leaves the opposite side through the drain field and filters down into the earth.
  • When there isn’t a problem with soggy soil, do all of the drains discharge slowly?
  • Is it possible for the shower drain closest to the septic tank to back up before the kitchen sink on the other side of the house in a single-level home?
  • If the lower-level drains are working properly, you most likely have a blockage that has to be cleared up completely.
  • The Drain Weasel contraption hasn’t been used by me yet, but we’ve had to use a drain auger (snake) on a number of occasions over the years.

Purchase a decent one, and if feasible, get one that is long enough to clean all of your pipes. It will prove to be a wise investment over time and will save you a significant amount of money.

2)Toilet Won’t Flush Properly

A toilet that doesn’t flush correctly is suggestive of the same problem as a drain that empties slowly, both of which are common. The flushing of the toilet is being hindered by some sort of clog (or septic backup). It is possible that obstructions exist in the pipes going to the septic tank or in the roof vent (see3 below for a deeper explanation). And if you have tiny children, it’s possible that a doll’s hairbrush has become stuck in the trap (true story).

3)Gurgling Noises in the Pipes

Noises in the plumbing can be caused by a simple obstruction in a pipe, a blockage in the vent pipe that runs through the ceiling, or a backed-up septic system, amongst other things. When we utilize the plumbing system, air is flushed down the drains together with the water. If the air cannot keep up with the flow, it will back up and gurgle out of the pipes (kind of like a plumbing burp). Additionally, an air intake is required for the plumbing to function at all, which is why our homes have vent pipes installed on the roofs over the bathrooms and kitchens to provide for proper ventilation.

Vent pipes are pipes that run from your plumbing to your roof (usually; however, we appear to have one in our back yard) and serve several functions: they allow foul-smelling (and potentially dangerous) sewer gases to escape, they allow air into the entire sewer system to encourage aerobic bacteria digestion, and they keep the entire flow of water moving throughout the system.

  1. Did you ever drink from a glass of water, soda, juice, or any other beverage using a straw when you were a kid?
  2. Were you perplexed as to why the liquid remained in the straw till you removed your finger from it?
  3. When you remove your finger, the pressure on the top is restored, and gravity takes hold, resulting in the liquid spilling out.
  4. And, like the liquid in the straw, they require airflow in order to move things along smoothly.

Vent pipes can get blocked as a result of leaves or other debris becoming lodged in the pipe (even small, curious animals who go down the pipe, but not back up.) Also, the presence of openings in sewage manhole covers allows poisonous gases to exit and fresh air to pour in, therefore keeping everything moving.) But I’m getting ahead of myself.)

4)Water is Backing Up Into Drains

When you flush a toilet, water may back up into a shower or bathtub, which is not uncommon. In addition, this can occur when the dishwasher or washing machine is completely empty. This indicates that there is a partial or total obstruction in the drain lines. A backed-up septic tank or leach field area might also be an indication of a clogged drain field. Back in the day, we lived in a house that would back up at least once every couple of years or so. When the dishwasher or washing machine (both of which were located in the kitchen area) was completely empty, one or both bathtubs would begin to fill.

  • The water in the shower had backed up.
  • As the big amount of water from the dishwasher or washing machine was being thrown out, the blockage prevented the water from flowing down to the city sewer pipes and into the storm drain.
  • This might be one of the reasons why you’re experiencing water backup into the drains.
  • As previously said, if it has been particularly wet and the water table in the earth has risen significantly, it is possible that the water in the drain field has nowhere to go.
  • The presence of an excessively high level or thickness of sludge layer in your septic tank is yet another possible cause of clogged pipes.

Both of these scenarios have the potential to generate scum or sludge to block the outlet and drain field lines. This is a dreadful situation. This is the most important reason why you should get your septic tank drained on a consistent basis.

5)The Grass Is Greener … On YOUR Side of the Fence, Especially Over the Drain Field Area

It sounds wonderful to have a thick, green grass without having to water it, which is especially true if you live in a desert area. However, a thick, green grass that is not being watered may be an indication of a problem with the septic system’s drain field. A unusually green patch of grass, most likely above a leach line, was discovered. If you have sections of thicker, greener grass, or even if you don’t have grass, but the ground around the drain field region is spongy and moist, you may have a problem.

Similarly, if you notice healthier grass surrounding the septic tank, it is possible that there is a leak or seepage of sewage stuff right there.

6) Sewage or Rotten Egg Smell Inside or Outside the House

Decomposition of sewage will result in the production of gasses such as methane (which is odorless) and hydrogen sulfide (rotten egg smell). Both of these things may be quite hazardous. If you notice a sewage, sulfur, or rotten egg odor, the first thing you should check is that all of the drain p-traps are filled with water. If you look beneath your bathroom or kitchen sink, you will notice that the pipes come out of the sink, descend down into a u-shape, and then rise up and out of the wall once again.

Due to the presence of water in the bottom loop of this trap, sewage gasses cannot move back from the septic tank (or sewer; the concept is the same here) via the drains and into your home.

Alternatively, if the p-trap was empty and allowing gasses to escape, this will halt the stench, however it may take several minutes for the smell to dissipate.

This might happen when on vacation, at a summer house, or in a drain that isn’t used very much at all.

7)Standing Water Around Septic Tank or Drain Field or Leach Field

If you notice standing water surrounding your leach field or septic tank, it is an indication that either a) water is arriving from an area where it should not be, or b) water is not going where it should. This is similar to noticing a greener lawn than intended. It is possible that standing water or even squishy ground near your septic tank indicates the presence of a leak in the pipes or tank, which is enabling sewage to escape. Standing water or mushy ground above your drain field might indicate that the drain field is struggling and is not allowing the water to flow down into the earth as it should.

  • Water-logged soil from another source (has it been very wet, was a hose left on in that area, is there water runoff from a neighbor’s house towards yours, etc.)
  • Blocked drain field pipes
  • Clogged up drainage regions
  • Compacted soil
  • Water-logged soil from another source

If it’s only been really wet owing to heavy rains or melting snow, then waiting a few days should allow it to dry out completely (provided the rain and melting snow have stopped). If you are not certain that this is the problem, please have someone come out to inspect your system as soon as possible since a failing drain field may be quite expensive to repair, especially if the breakdown worsens.

Additionally, standing water, particularly sewage, can be a health hazard as well as being aesthetically offensive.

So Now What?

What should you do if you are experiencing one or more of these problems? You could, of course, get a plumber in to have a look at the situation. If you don’t want to spend a couple hundred dollars for a service call since it’s something you can fix yourself, what options do you have? If you go through these seven indicators once again, you will notice that they all point to two generalized problems:

  • The plumbing lines have become clogged. an issue that might arise with the septic tank or leach field

Because a temporary problem such as delayed draining or backed up drains that ultimately clear out, or wet drain fields might be caused by an excessive amount of water, such as washing numerous loads of laundry on one day, or several people having long showers, etc., I use the term “potential problem.” If your rain gutters pour into your septic tank, this can potentially cause an overflow in the system.

Fixing it Yourself

If you are at all proficient and confident in using a plunger or a plumbing snake, you should attempt to unclog the pipes on your own before calling a professional. If you’re going to use a plumbing snake, start at the bottom of the home drains and work your way up to the septic tank. You may use the snakes in the sink, bath, and shower drains, as well as in the toilet drains, if necessary. Don’t forget to empty the washing machine’s drain as well. There has been a blockage in that area in the past.

If you believe a solid object, such as a toy vehicle or a miniature green army man, is causing a blockage, you can remove the p-trap from the sinks to see if you can locate the source of the problem.

We couldn’t get the snake to push it through (we didn’t know what the clog was at the time), but we could tell there was something there, so we had to take the toilet apart and turn it upside down to attempt to reach it from the bottom of the toilet bowl.

Don’t Use Chemical Cleaners!

There are a plethora of chemical “remedies” available for unclogging your drains. While they do work occasionally, it is evident that they will not work on all blockages (such as a stuck army man). In this instance, you also have caustic chemical cleaners backed up in the pipes, and if you or a plumber attempts to clear the pipes, the caustic chemical cleaners will likely go all over you. Additionally, any chemicals in your septic tank might destroy the bacteria and enzymes that are doing such a fantastic job of decomposing all of the doo-doo and garbage in the tank.

If your system is not momentarily overwhelmed with water and you are unable to resolve the problem on your own, it is time to bring in a professional plumber for assistance.

One Final Word

Keep in mind, as well, that a septic tank is constantly full (unless it was just pumped or it was newly installed a couple days ago). Don’t allow anyone convince you that “all you have to do now is pump the tank” straight from the beginning. It is possible that this will ‘cure’ the problem for a few days until the reservoir fills back up to normal operating levels.

However, they cannot say for definite that pumping the tank will repair the problem unless they first measure the level of the sludge and scum layers within it. They cannot tell you this for certain until they have measured the depth of the sludge and scum layers within the tank.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *