How To Report An Open Septic Tank System? (Correct answer)

  • ❒ Check the empty tank and note any signs of structural damage such as an open weep hole, leaking midseam, damaged baffles, or cracks. ❒ File report with the town. Check with your local town hall to find out whether you or the pumper need to provide the report of the completed pump-out.

How do I report a septic tank?

If you are concerned about a neighbouring septic tank system and are not in a position to resolve it with them, contact the environment section of your City or County Council. If the system is potentially contaminating your well, contact the local Environmental Health Officer (EHO) also.

What’s the law on septic tanks?

According to new regulations passed in 2015, if your septic tank discharges to surface water such as a ditch, stream, canal or river, you will have to upgrade your system to a sewage treatment plant or install a soakaway system by 1 January 2020.

Are septic tank locations public record?

Contact your local health department for public records. These permits should come with a diagram of the location where the septic system is buried. Depending on the age of your septic system, you may be able to find information regarding the location of your septic system by making a public records request.

What can I do about a saturated septic field?

Additional ways to help keep the soil in your drain field from becoming over-saturated include:

  1. Avoid using too many water fixtures in the home at once.
  2. Ensure all home gutter downspouts are directed away from the drain field.
  3. Don’t point lawn sprinklers toward drain field.

Are septic tanks still legal?

Septic Tanks Explained… Septic tanks cannot discharge to surface water drains, rivers, canals, ditches, streams or any other type of waterway. you are required to upgrade or replace your septic tank treatment system to a full sewage treatment plant by 2020, or when you sell a property, if it’s prior to this date.

How far should a septic tank be from a house?

Most importantly, a septic tank must be at least seven metres from a house, defined as a ‘habitable property’. Septic tanks are built underground and release wastewater slowly into the surrounding environment. For this reason, they must be a set distance away from a home.

Do I need a certificate for my septic tank?

The General Binding Rules were designed to simplify the regulation of small sewage discharges. Septic tanks and small sewage treatment plants no longer need to be registered and there is no legal requirement to keep records of maintenance (although this is advisable).

Does heavy rain affect septic tank?

It is common to have a septic back up after or even during a heavy rain. Significant rainfall can quickly flood the ground around the soil absorption area (drainfield) leaving it saturated, making it impossible for water to flow out of your septic system.

Do I need consent to discharge septic tank?

You will require a ‘Permit to Discharge’, however you may qualify for an exempt status if your system meets certain requirements such as amount of discharge, septic tank or sewage treatment plant model (only EN 12566-3 2005 Certified plants accepted), plant location, intended discharge point, installation and

How do I find out if my septic tank is registered?

Check if your septic tank is already registered You can check if your tank has already been registered by contacting your environmental regulator. If you are unsure then it is best to check and avoid making an unnecessary payment. The NIEA and SEPA have records of all registered septic tanks.

How do I know if my house has a septic tank?

A surefire way to confirm whether or not your home has a septic system is to check your property records. It is likely that the building permit and blueprints for your home and property will contain information about the presence (or lack) of a septic tank.

How do you find a metal detector with a septic tank?

6 Steps to Locate a Septic Tank

  1. Find Your Main Sewer Drain Line. Sewage from your toilets, sinks, and showers collects into a main drain line.
  2. Check Permits and Public Records.
  3. Determine Septic Tank Material.
  4. Time to Dig.
  5. Mark the Location for Future Maintenance.

Are long showers bad for septic systems?

Washing frequent, small loads of laundry or taking exceptionally long showers every day is all it takes to overload your septic system with too much water. The primary treatment tank needs time to break up solids before partly-treated water can enter the drain field.

How do you tell if the leach field is clogged?

Stay vigilant for five signs your drainfield does not drain correctly anymore.

  1. Slowing Drainage. Homeowners first notice slower than usual drainage from all the sinks, tubs, and toilets in a home when they have a compromised drainfield.
  2. Rising Water.
  3. Increasing Plant Growth.
  4. Returning Flow.
  5. Developing Odors.

How do you know if your septic field is failing?

The first signs of a failing septic system may include slow draining toilets and sinks, gurgling noises within the plumbing, sewage odors inside, continuing drainage backups, or bacteria in the well water. The area of the strongest odor will point to the location of the failure in the septic system.

Septic Systems Guidance, Policy, and Regulations

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has created a number of publications detailing its goal, priorities, and regulatory authority, as well as guidance and technical information to assist towns in establishing complete septic (onsite) management plans.

  • Provision of guidance in the form of voluntary national guidelines and implementation tools in order to enhance the overall management of septic wastewater systems The following are examples of policy and regulations: Congressman’s reports, program strategies, and regulatory requirements for Class V wells

Guidance

  • Factsheet on the Decentralized Management Guidelines
  • Presentation on Understanding the Decentralized Management Guidelines

A “how-to” guide for adopting the Environmental Protection Agency’s Voluntary National Guidelines for the Management of Onsite and Clustered (Decentralized) Wastewater Treatment Systems is available in the Handbook for Managing Onsite and Clustered (Decentralized) Wastewater Treatment Systems. In this tutorial, you will learn how to construct a step-by-step strategy to establishing a community program for managing decentralized wastewater systems. You will also find community examples, aspects for good management, and links to other resources.

National Management Measures to Control Nonpoint Source Pollution from Urban Areas are currently being developed.

A guide for tribal nations on how to build, manage, and control onsite wastewater treatment facilities is available at Tribal Management of Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems.

Guideline for specifying management measures for nonpoint sources of pollution in inland and coastal waters Governmental guidelines on which environmental management methods to incorporate into state and territorial Coastal Nonpoint Pollution Control Programs are available.

Policy and Regulations

Your Choice: A Guide for Local Officials on Small-Community Wastewater Management Options is available for download at the following link: A booklet on wastewater management systems for municipalities with populations of less than 10,000 people, outlining wastewater treatment alternatives for community leaders and decision makers, is available for download. Controlling Nonpoint Source Pollution from Urban Areas: National Management Measures Nonpoint source pollution from urban activities is addressed in this document by providing guidance to states, territories, authorized tribes, and the general public.

Part 503 Biosolids Rule Interpretation and Implementation Guide for the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) biosolids rule, which provides criteria for the final use or disposal of sewage sludge (biosolids), as well as residential septage Guideline for specifying management measures for nonpoint sources of pollution in inland and coastal waters is available online.

Governmental guidelines on which environmental management methods to incorporate into state and territorial Coastal Nonpoint Pollution Control Programs are provided.

Backups, Leaks and Odors

In the event that sewage is backing up within your home’s drains or surfacing outside your property, or if you detect foul odors in and around your home, it is possible that your septic system is malfunctioning. The most likely perpetrators are as follows:

  • Absence of maintenance – If solid waste accumulates in the tank to an excessive level, it may be driven out of the tank and into the drainfield, where it might cause clogging of the gravel and soil. The result might be a backup of wastewater or an eruptive eruption from the earth. Fittings that are missing, damaged, or worn – Tee fittings and baffles are tank components that are used to slow down the input and outflow of wastewater, respectively. The purpose is to provide bacteria enough time to digest waste while also allowing for the separation of solids, grease, and scum from liquids during the process. If any of these fittings are damaged, the system will not function as it should. Because of the obsolete “perc” soil testing procedure, some septic tanks have been constructed in soils that would not pass a site inspection today under the current standards. There are also other elements that might influence the lifetime of a septic system, including annual maintenance. A septic system is not intended to endure indefinitely. Incorrect installation – tanks installed backwards, drainfield sections that are not level, soil that has been compressed by heavy machinery – there are many things that might go wrong during the installation process. Misuse – When more people live in a home than the home was built to accommodate, it might lead to difficulties in the future. In the case of a three-bedroom home that is subsequently transformed into a rental property that “sleeps 12,” a septic tank intended for that residence will be prone to failure.

Check out our septic tank maintenance recommendations. Water Flooding – What to DoWhen grass surrounds a tank or drainfield, it indicates the presence of a leak or other issue. An uncovered sewage tank pit filled to ground level with disgusting looking backed-up septic tank crap.

Your Legal Responsibility

If the Department of Health and Human Services receives a complaint about a failing septic system or links a pollution problem to a failing septic system, the owner will be served with a notice informing them that they are in violation of Regulation 61-56, Onsite Wastewater Systems, and that they must repair their failing septic tank system immediately. For individual households, the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) does not provide any funding or financing alternatives to assist with the repair or replacement of failing septic systems or the construction of new residential septic systems.

Save Money

Regular inspections and pumping (by DHEC-licensed septic tank contractors or pumpers) of your septic system are the most effective and least expensive methods of keeping your septic system in good functioning condition.

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Septic Tank Alerts Septic Tank Alerts

Florida Department of Health in Volusia

  • How can a new business determine whether or not it need an examination of its septic system? In order to add a room to my house, why do I need to get the current septic tank system authorized first? Who determines whether or not I require a mound septic system
  • What exactly do I need to do in order to fix my drainfield? Does the government offer any help programs for septic system repairs?

1. What is the reason for an inspection of the septic tank system for a new business?

A shop in the appropriate size and location has been discovered for my new business, which I want to launch shortly after. When I went to receive my Business Tax Receipt (BTR), (formerly known as an occupational license), they informed me that I needed to get the septic tank system certified by the Florida Department of Health in Volusia County. I agreed to this. A: According to Florida Statute 381.0065, all companies that rely on a septic tank system for sewage disposal are required to acquire clearance from the local health authority whenever the company owner, the kind of business, or a tenant changes.

Modifications to company activities may result in an increase in sewage flow or a change in sewage characteristics.

Who is in charge of completing and submitting the application?

Section 1: Introduction

2.What is the reason to have the existing septic tank system approved before I add a room onto my home?

I intend to expand my current residence by adding a room. The building department informed me that they would not grant a building permit unless the current septic tank system had been authorized by the department. Because it will not be air conditioned, I do not believe that I will be required to do so. If you are planning to build an addition to your current house, you will need to have your existing septic system inspected first. This inspection technique is required in order to establish whether or not the current septic system has sufficient capacity to accommodate the extension.

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This criterion is not affected by whether or not the addition has air conditioning or heating.

The enclosed livable space of a housing unit is referred to as the building area, and it is used to calculate the size of the septic system that is required. Applications and guidelines for a Residential Inspection of Septic System Application for an Existing Septic System Section 1: Introduction

3. Who determines if I need a mound septic system?

I possess a piece of land on which I intend to build a house. According to a buddy of mine, I will most likely require a mounded septic system in order to properly dispose of waste. My lot is high and dry, and it never flooded during the recent torrential rains, thus I do not want a mound built on top of it. The Florida Administrative Code, Chapter 64E-6, mandates a 24 inch buffer between the wet season water table and the bottom of the drainfield during the rainy season. It is possible for water tables to change dramatically between wet and dry seasons.

As soon as the water table has been determined, a permit is drafted in accordance with state law requirements.

If sod is to be used on the slopes, a 2:1 slope is necessary for mounds up to 36 inches in height, and a 3:1 slope is required for mounds higher than 36 inches in height; if hay and seed is to be used on the slopes, a 5:1 slope is required regardless of the height of the mound.

Application for a New Septic System Construction Permit, as well as instructions on how to complete the application

4. What do I need to do to fix my drainfield?

My drainfield isn’t performing as expected. A septic system repair permit must be obtained before any work on your septic drainfield may be done.

5. Are assistance programs for septic system repairs available?

If you qualify, the Volusia County Community Assistance Division may have cash available to you. Contact them for more information. Please email [email protected] or call 386-736-5955 for further information. Section 1: Introduction

Florida Department of Environmental Protection

For more information on the Springs Protection Act and how it applies to septic systems, please see the Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s webpage onProtecting Florida’s Springs!

  • You may find out more about this new initiative by visiting the DEP’sSeptic Upgrade Incentive Programwebpage. On the DEP’sSprings Restoration Fundingwebpage, you may get more information about financing opportunities.

Section 381.0065, Florida Statutes (F.S.)

Section 381.0065 of the Florida Statutes prohibits the use of septage for agricultural purposes. Information about septage haulers affected by this prohibition is provided here (F.S.) In order to help septage haulers who are looking for alternate methods of septage management as defined by Section 381.0065, Florida Statutes, the following information is provided:

  • September Hauler Information for Those Affected by the Prohibition on the Land Application of Septage enacted by Florida Statutes Section 381.0065 (F.S.) In order to aid septage haulers in their search for alternate methods of septage management as defined by Section 381.0065, Florida Statutes, the following information has been provided:
  • Overview for Applicants Seeking a DEP Septage Management Facility Permit
  • List of Wastewater Facilities that May Be Interested in Accepting Septage
  • And

Onsite Sewage Treatment and Disposal Systems

In Florida, a septic system is referred to as an Onsite Sewage Treatment and Disposal System, or OSTDS, according to state laws. The septic tank is only one component of an OSTDS that has been properly designed. Septic tanks, subsurface drainfields, aerobic treatment units (ATUs), graywater tanks and laundry wastewater tanks; grease interceptors; pump tanks; waterless toilets, incinerating or organic waste-composing toilets; and sanitary pit privies are all examples of on-site wastewater treatment systems (OSTDS).

On-site wastewater treatment systems, according to the United States Environmental Protection Agency, are “potentially feasible, low-cost, long-term, decentralized alternatives to wastewater treatment” if they are properly planned, constructed, installed, managed, and maintained.

OSTDS are not permitted in any of the following situations: where the estimated domestic sewage flow (as calculated in Table 1 of 64E-6.008, F.A.C.) from the establishment is greater than 10,000 gpd, or where the estimated commercial sewage flow exceeds 5,000 gpd; where there is a likelihood that the system will receive toxic, hazardous, or industrial wastes; or where a sewer system is available; or where any system or flow from the establishment is currently regulated by

  • Onsite Sewage Treatment and Disposal System, or OSTDS, is the term used by the state of Florida to describe the system. OSTDS systems are comprised of several components, the septic tank being one of them. Septic tanks, subsurface drainfields, aerobic treatment units (ATUs), graywater tanks and laundry wastewater tanks
  • Grease interceptors
  • Pump tanks
  • Waterless toilets, incinerating toilets or organic waste-composing toilets
  • And sanitary pit privies are all examples of OSTDS components, according to the EPA’s definition. In contrast to a “package plant,” an OSTDS is not a manufacturing facility. No open tanks or treatment units are permitted in the system, and underground effluent disposal must be provided for. On-site wastewater treatment systems, according to the United States Environmental Protection Agency, are “potentially viable, low-cost, long-term, decentralized approaches to wastewater treatment” if they are “planned, designed, installed, operated, and maintained in an appropriate manner.” Environmental health sections of county health departments and the Bureau of Onsite Sewage Programs within the Florida Department of Health (DOH) control the usage of OSTDSs in the state. OSTDS are not permitted in any of the following situations: where the estimated domestic sewage flow (as calculated in Table 1 of 64E-6.008, F.A.C.) from the establishment is greater than 10,000 gpd, or where the estimated commercial sewage flow exceeds 5,000 gpd
  • Where there is a likelihood that the system will receive toxic, hazardous, or industrial wastes
  • Where a sewer system is available
  • Or where any system or flow from the establishment is currently regulated by DE

DEP and DOH Coordination

The Department of Environmental Protection and the Department of Health came into an interagency agreement in 1983 to coordinate the regulation of onsite sewage systems, septage and residuals, and marina pumpout facilities, among other things. This agreement establishes mechanisms for resolving interagency concerns, particularly those involving authority. Domestic wastewater comprises waste from residences, portable toilets, holding tanks, boats and marinas, as well as wastewater from certain commercial and industrial organizations, according to the terms of the agreement.

Please keep in mind that the term “commercial wastewater” does not always refer to wastewater generated by commercial enterprises.

The Department of Health and Human Services (DOH) may grant a waiver of jurisdiction from the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) in cases where the estimated sewage flow exceeds the DOH jurisdictional flow specified above or where there is a likelihood of toxic, hazardous, or industrial wastewater.

The applicant must next submit an application for an OSTDS permit to the local county health department (CHD) and file a variance request with the local CHD to be considered.

More information on the interagency agreement can be obtained by calling the DEP OSTDS coordinator at 850-245-8614.

Septic Systems

How it operates, how to maintain it, and how to acquire a permit to build or repair it are all covered. Septic systems in Massachusetts are under the jurisdiction of the Department of Environmental Protection and the municipal boards of health, which are both state agencies. Title 5 (310 CMR 15) is the state statute that covers the permitting, installation, usage, and inspection of these devices. It is the responsibility of the local board of health to ensure that the laws of Title 5 and any local rules pertaining to septic systems are adhered to in their jurisdiction.

  1. a succinct explanation The use of a septic system allows for on-site wastewater treatment in situations where there is no connection to municipal sewerage.
  2. An “alternative” septic system is similar in construction, but it makes use of components that have been expressly engineered to compensate for site restrictions.
  3. A “tight tank,” sometimes known as a “holding tank,” is a tank that is completely sealed and does not allow water to leak into the ground.
  4. The use of a septic system is safe and effective when it is installed, maintained, and sited properly.
  5. Taking good care of and maintaining The region above your leachfield may appear to be “great real estate,” vacant property that is demanding to be developed, but in reality, this land is being utilized.
  6. Leachate is often dispersed over a field in trenches, which can be harmed by soil disturbance (such as digging or invasive tree roots), as well as compression (by parking or driving on top of it).
  7. Although plants are quite adept in absorbing nutrients from the soil, the nutrients in this situation are not something you’d want to consume.) To cover it with grass, volleyball or badminton are acceptable options.

In either case, make sure to mow it at least once a year.

If poisons such as antifreeze, paint thinner, and pesticides are flushed down the toilet, they will contaminate the groundwater supply.

Non-biodegradable materials such as grease, diapers, and latex paint might block the leaching trenches, resulting in a costly failure of the system.

Septic tank pumpers who are licensed in the Town of Shutesbury are responsible for removing these solids.

When it comes to “septic system additives” that claim to clean or condition your septic system, it’s best to avoid them.

The following link will take you to the Department of Environmental Protection website, where you may get more specific information on how your septic system works and how to maintain it running properly: Taking Good Care of Your Septic System Obtaining approval for a septic system Obtaining a permit to install a septic system is a time-consuming and difficult process.

  • This designer will conduct a soil evaluation, design the system, prepare an application for submission to the Board of Health, prepare drawings for review, and inspect the system during its installation.
  • Claudia Lucas and Charlie Kaniecki of the Eastern Franklin County Health District, who are working on behalf of the Board of Health, are providing this service.
  • The Board of Health will not provide a septic system permit until it receives a recommendation from our representative.
  • Normally, these are completed in tandem, although they can also be completed independently.
  • It is necessary for deep hole observations to be witnessed by a representative of the Board of Health before they can be utilized as the foundation for an approvable septic system design.
  • Identifying the Right Time to Sell Your House According to state law, a septic system must be examined at the time of sale, and the buyer must be provided with a copy of the septic system report.
  • The system must be repaired within two years if it is found to be defective; the law does not specify whether the repair is to be carried out by the buyer or the seller.
  • (This rule does have a few exceptions, but the number of them is much smaller than you might expect.
  • It is common for people to wait until they have a potential buyer before having the inspection completed.
  • The examination must be carried out by a septic system inspector who has been approved.

A copy of the inspection report, as well as a $50 filing fee payable to the Town of Shutesbury, must be submitted to the Board of Health for consideration.

Septic Systems

How it works, how to maintain it, and how to acquire a building or repair permit are all covered. Those responsible for septic systems in Massachusetts include the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection and the state’s local health boards. Their permitting, installation, usage, and inspection are all governed by Title 5 of the Massachusetts Code (310 CMR 15). In order to implement the laws of Title 5 as well as any local legislation pertaining to septic systems, the local board of health is in charge of doing so.

  • a succinct summary of the terms When there is no connection to public sewerage, a septic system is used to treat wastewater on the premises.
  • Unlike conventional septic systems, an alternative septic system makes use of specifically built components to compensate for the restrictions of a particular location.
  • Unleashed water is not allowed to leak into the earth because of the strong seal of a “tight tank” or “holding tank.” It is necessary to regularly pump out such a tank.
  • Preparation and upkeep Your leachfield may appear to be “great real estate,” vacant property that is demanding to be developed, but this land is really being utilized.
  • The majority of the time, leachate is dispersed over a field in trenches, which can be harmed by disruption of the soil (by digging or invasive tree roots) or compression of the leachate (by parking or driving on top of it).
  • This includes parking lots, platforms for buildings such as sheds and hoophouses, as well as vegetable gardens, among other things.
  • Alternatively, you might carefully remove the grass layer and plant perennial wildflowers in its place.
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Because the effluent from your septic system will remain on your property, you must be cautious about what you put into it to prevent contamination.

Bleach and ammonia, which are common household chemicals, should be used only when absolutely necessary.

Excess accumulation of particles that remain in the tank after the liquid effluent has been evacuated is another source of issues.

Once every 3-5 years, it is recommended to empty the tank.

The most effective methods of extending the life of the system are proper use and frequent pumping.

Issuing an approval for the installation of an underground septic system is a time-consuming and complicated process.

This designer will do a soil evaluation, design the system, submit an application for submission to the Board of Health, create drawings for review, and inspect the system during the installation.

A representative of the Board of Health, Claudia Lucas and Charlie Kaniecki of the Eastern Franklin County Health District, are providing this service on their own time.

Without the advice of our agent, the Board of Health will not grant a septic system permit.

Although these are typically completed simultaneously, they can also be completed independently.

Deep hole observations must be seen by an agent of the Board of Health before they may be utilized as the foundation for an approvable septic system design.

Identifying the Right Time to Sell Your Residence In accordance with state law, an inspection of a septic system must be performed prior to the sale of the property, and the septic system report must be sent to the buyer.

The system must be fixed within two years if it is found to be defective; the legislation does not specify whether the repair is to be performed by the buyer or by the seller.

(This rule does include a few exceptions, but the number of them is far smaller than you may think.

It is common for people to wait until they have a potential buyer before having an inspection performed.

The inspection must be carried out by a septic system inspector who has been approved by the local government.

A copy of the inspection report, as well as a $50 filing fee due to the Town of Shutesbury, must be filed with the Board of Health.

Steps to receive approval for a new septic system

  1. Learn how it works, how to maintain it, and how to get a building permit to build or repair it. Those responsible for septic systems in Massachusetts include the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection and the state’s municipal boards of health. Title 5 (310 CMR 15) is the state statute that covers their permits, installation, usage, and inspection. The municipal board of health is responsible for enforcing the laws of Title 5 as well as any local rules pertaining to septic systems. In Shutesbury, the only local regulation that is more stringent than Title 5 is the “perc season” requirement, which states that the soil evaluation must take place between March 1 and April 30 for new construction – not repairs – and that the evaluation must take place between March 1 and April 30 for repairs. A succinct explanation When there is no connection to public sewerage, a septic system is used to treat wastewater on-site. A standard septic system consists of a tank where solids can settle and begin to decay, as well as a soil absorption system (SAS) that further processes the liquid effluent by eliminating some of the bacteria, viruses, phosphorus, and nitrogen. An “alternative” septic system is similar, but it makes use of components that have been expressly engineered to compensate for site restrictions. Both traditional and alternative methods need that the tank be pumped on a regular basis to remove solids. A “tight tank,” sometimes known as a “holding tank,” is a tank that is completely sealed and does not allow water to seep into the ground. A tank of this nature must be pumped on a regular basis. The usage of a septic system is safe and effective when it is constructed, maintained, and sited properly. It also has environmental benefits since water from your well is utilized, cleaned, and returned to the ground on site, rather than being piped to a sewage treatment facility and dumped into the ocean. Maintenance and upkeep The region above your leachfield may appear to be “great real estate,” vacant property that is demanding to be developed, but in reality, this land is being exploited. Structures that impede natural sunshine and precipitation should be relocated away from the leaching area in order for it to continue to function properly. In most situations, leachate is dispersed over a field in trenches, which can be harmed by disruption of the soil (by digging or invasive tree roots) or by compression (by parking or driving on top of it). This space is not intended to be used as a parking lot, a platform for a shed or hoop house, or a vegetable garden, and it must not be utilized as such. (Plants are extremely effective in absorbing nutrients from the soil, but in this case, the nutrients are not ones you’d want to consume.) To cover it with grass, volleyball or badminton are acceptable options. Alternatively, you might (gently) remove the grass layer and seed perennial wildflowers in its place. In any case, make sure to mow it at least once a year. The sewage from your septic system remains on your property for the time being, so you must be careful what you put into it. If poisons such as antifreeze, paint thinner, and pesticides are dumped down the drain, they will contaminate the groundwater. Chemicals often found in the home, such as bleach and ammonia, should be used sparingly. Chemicals that are non-biodegradable (such as grease), diapers, and latex paint, can block leaching trenches and result in costly system failure. Excess accumulation of particles in the tank after the liquid effluent has been evacuated is another source of concern. Septic tank pumpers who are licensed in the Town of Shutesbury must remove these solids from the system. At the absolute least, the tank should be emptied every 3-5 years. Save your money on “septic system additives” that promise to clean or condition your septic system. The most effective method of extending the life of the system is through proper use and frequent pumping. Please see the following link for more thorough information on how your septic system works and how to maintain it running properly: Department of Environmental Protection. Maintaining Your Septic System Obtaining a septic system installation permit Obtaining a permit for the installation of a septic system is a time-consuming and difficult process. No matter if you’re building a new house or rebuilding an old one that has failed, the first step is to acquire the services of a septic system designer (an engineer or registered sanitarian). This designer will do a soil evaluation, design the system, create an application for submission to the Board of Health, submit drawings for review, and check the installation. septic system proposals are not reviewed by the Shutesbury Board of Health. Claudia Lucas and Charlie Kaniecki of the Eastern Franklin County Health District, acting on behalf of the Board of Health, are providing this service. Designs for septic systems must be submitted to the district for approval. The Board of Health will not grant a septic system permit unless our agent recommends it. An examination of the soil A soil assessment consists of two parts: a soil profile and a deep hole analysis (sometimes known as a “perc test”). Normally, these are completed in tandem, although they can also be completed independently. There is no longer a “perc season” as of September 2020, and perc tests can be performed at any time of the year. Deep hole observations must be witnessed by an agent of the Board of Health in order to be utilized as the foundation for an approvable septic system design. The Town of Shutesbury will get $200 in compensation for the agent’s time. Identifying the Right Time to Sell Your Home According to state law, a septic system must be examined at the time of sale, and the buyer must be provided with a copy of the septic system inspection report. This rule applies to any and all purchases, including sales within families. If the system fails, it must be fixed within two years
  2. The legislation does not specify whether the repair is to be performed by the buyer or the seller. In other words, a property with a failing septic system may be sold “as is,” but only after a thorough investigation has been performed. (This rule does include a few exceptions, but the number of them is far lower than you might expect. If you have any questions, you can contact the Board of Health.) A septic system inspection, often known as a “Title 5 inspection,” is valid for two years after it is completed (three if the tank is pumped annually for those three years). Many individuals wait until they have a potential buyer in mind before scheduling an inspection. Pumping the tank and excavation of system components may be necessary during the inspection. The inspection must be completed by a septic system inspector who has been approved by the state. Anyone who is competent to build a septic system may also examine one, and there is no legal prohibition against an engineer checking a system that he or she initially created. A copy of the inspection report, as well as a $50 filing fee due to the Town of Shutesbury, must be submitted to the Board of Health.
  1. The address and/or location of the site in question
  2. Staked site boundary lines and site measurements should be recorded, and a survey plat copy should be supplied. Identify the locations of existing structures, wells, ponds and streams, as well as any easements, roads and driveways, if any
  3. A map indicating the planned or present position of the structure to be served by the system, as well as the proposed system location (area to be tested). Make a note of any potential alternate areas as well. In the case of private residences: The number of bedrooms, whether or not a garbage disposal will be installed, and whether or not the house will have a basement are all important considerations. For commercial usage, please include the following information: kind of company, number of employees and shifts, type of plumbing fittings planned, and any other pertinent information
  1. It is necessary to pay a $300 site evaluation charge at the time the application is filed. If the findings of the site inspection indicate that there is a usable space for a potential septic system installation, the inspector will mark the location of the usable area. Construction activities such as grading, heavy equipment traffic, the placement of building materials, and other associated activities are not permitted in this region. This is done in order to avoid compaction and soil structure damage, both of which might have a detrimental impact on the system’s capacity to function. Disturbance of the allowed area in the way stated above may result in the site evaluation being nullified. Unless specifically prohibited, normal mowing or bush hogging of the area would be permitted
  2. An applicant will be given with a copy of the site evaluation report when it has been completed. There will be a list of the inspector’s soil characteristic findings in the report, as well as information on the bare minimum system choice. The certified installer is responsible for determining the specific system component requirements associated with any options selected. However, if the installer or applicant has any doubts about the information provided, they can simply call the health inspector for further information. If the site got a suitable or provisionally appropriate overall rating, the certified installer may submit an application to the Health Department for a permit to build a septic system on the property in question. At that time, all relevant papers, as well as the permission money, must be presented to the city. The site evaluation findings about site features, as well as the installer’s system design proposal, will be used to determine whether or not to grant the permit. Once the septic system has been installed, the installer must seek an inspection from the Health Department before any of the work may be reimbursed.
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Please keep in mind that the actions outlined above should be completed prior to any development taking place on the site. This will allow the property owner to learn about the restrictions of the site, obtain quotes on various solutions, and ensure that the property owner complies with all applicable regulations imposed by the Health Department.

Steps to receive approval to repair or alter a septic system

  1. Make contact with a certified installer to discuss possible system modifications. Fill out a repair site evaluation questionnaire. (Word,PDF)
  2. Obtain a permit for repairs

Requesting an inspection of an existing septic system

Existing septic systems may need to be evaluated in connection with the selling of a property, the construction of an addition, or the reconstruction of a home following a natural disaster. In the event that you are selling or acquiring a house, you can request that the Health Department check the current septic system. Local building code offices mandate that an existing septic system be inspected by the Health Department prior to the issue of a building or modification permit. Please fill out the form (Word, PDF) and send it together with the appropriate cost in order to request an inspection.

More information

The Environmental Protection Agency of the United States has published A Homeowner’s Guide to Septic Systems. Kentucky’s septic system requirements are shown here (902 KAR 10:085)

Selling Your Property?

A Homeowner’s Guide to Septic Systems (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency) septic systems are subject to Kentucky laws and regulations (902 KAR 10:085)

  • Provides information on the state of the system at the time of the inspection
  • This section contains information on the septic system and any minor issues. This publication contains recommended practices for long-term septic system maintenance.

Let’s get started.

  1. Make contact with a qualified professional. Consult with an expert to examine your system and pump your tanks. Online, by mail, or in person, you can submit your inspection report and RSS application.
  • Online submission of an RSS application
  • Print out the RSS application and submit it by mail or in person if possible.
  • We examine the application and notify you if there are any issues.
  • Our target is to complete the RSS in ten business days or less. This cannot be accelerated or guaranteed
  • Nevertheless, you may check the progress of yourRSS application online.

We strongly advise you to send your applications as soon as possible. Once we have issued the RSS, it is valid for a period of one year only.

Need more information?

  • What exactly is a Report of System Status, and how can I obtain one of these? If you have a septic system in your house, this article will explain how to prepare for a home sale. RSS with a 90-day conditional period. Property that has been identified as having a defect can be sold using this method. There is a promise that problems will be resolved within 90 days. Review of your private or public water system’s water distribution system. RSS inspects the water supply to ensure that it is enough. Form for Request for Exemption (Request for Exemption)

Resources

  • Service companies for septic systems that are authorized to work in Pierce County
  • You may look up your record drawing on the internet. Look for records on any property you want to buy. On the internet, you may look up prior service and inspection records. For properties that have many structures, RSS guidance is provided.

Questions?

Please contact us at [email protected] or (253) 649-1423 if you have any questions. Some of the included documents require the use of a free viewer to be viewed. They may be obtained by clicking on the appropriate icons below. Adobe Acrobat Reader is required. Windows Media Player is a multimedia player for Windows. Word Viewer is a program that allows you to see text in a variety of formats. Excel Viewer is a program that allows you to view spreadsheets in Excel format. PowerPoint Viewer is an application that allows you to view PowerPoint presentations.

Septic Systems

Septic systems that are in good working order are beneficial to your family, your budget, and the environment. You can safeguard your septic system and save money on costly repairs by following a few easy procedures. Your groundwater, as well as the lakes, rivers, and beaches of Puget Sound, will benefit as well!

What is a septic system?

Consider them to be similar in size to a sewage treatment facility, but considerably smaller. They collect, store, treat, and dispose of the items that you flush or pour down the toilet. Various sorts of systems are available to choose from.

Some are straightforward, requiring merely a tank and a drainage area. Others are more complicated, necessitating the use of pumps, filters, or materials that have been particularly created. For further information, please see our 3D septic system models.

A maintained septic system keeps you and the environment healthy and helps:

  • You could compare them to a sewage treatment facility, but a somewhat more compact size. They collect, store, treat, and dispose of the items that you flush or pour down the toilet or down the sink. It is possible to have many sorts of systems at one place. A tank and a drainfield are used in some of the most straightforward designs. Others are more complicated, necessitating the use of pumps, filters, or materials that have been specifically created. Check out our 3D septic system models to learn more about septic tanks.

Our role is to:

  • Consider them to be similar to a sewage treatment facility, but much smaller. They collect, store, treat, and dispose of the items you flush or pour down the toilet. It is possible to have many types of systems in place. Some are straightforward, requiring merely a tank and a drainage system. Others are more sophisticated, necessitating the use of pumps, filters, or materials that have been particularly created. Check out our 3D septic system models to learn more.

What are the regulations?

  • Environmental Health Code, Chapter 1, General Provisions
  • Environmental Health Code, Chapter 2, On-Site Sewage
  • Environmental Health Code, Chapter 3, Water Regulation
  • Appeals Process for Orders and Decisions of the Health Officer
  • Environmental Health Code, Chapter 1, General Provisions

Resources

  • The Septic Systems 101 webinar is available online
  • Designers and Engineers —A list of designers and engineers that are qualified to work in Pierce County is available online
  • Septic Systems 101 webinar is available online
  • Installation Companies —A list of companies that have been certified to work in Pierce County
  • Fee Schedule — Fee Schedule for On-Site Sewage, Wells, and Water Resources Services
  • Complaints can be lodged against a Pierce County Septic Service Company or a person. A list of firms that have been certified to work in Pierce County’s septic system service industry.

Have questions? We have answers!

For further information, please contact us at [email protected] or (253) 649-1925.

Forms

Unless otherwise noted, all downloads are in the Adobe Acrobat PDF format unless otherwise stated. If a pop-up window with the message “Enter Network Password” displays when downloading a file, simply click thecancelbutton and the file should open. To save the file to your local disk in the event that the file you are attempting to download does not open properly, right click on the link and select “Save Target As” to save the file to your local computer. 11-62 (Chapter 11-62) HAR Wastewater Systems is a manufacturer of wastewater treatment systems.

  • Unless otherwise noted, all downloads are in the Adobe Acrobat PDF format. A pop-up box stating “Enter Network Password” will appear when downloading a file. If this occurs, click thecancelbutton to dismiss the window and the file will open. To save the file to your local disk in the event that the file you are attempting to download does not open properly, right click on the link and pick “Save Target As” from the drop-down menu. 11-62 (Chapter 11) HAR Wastewater Systems is a company that specializes in the treatment of waste water.

Animal Waste in the Planning and Design Section

  • Guidelines for Livestock Waste Management
  • Appendix to the Guidelines for Livestock Waste Management

Biosolids and Wastewater Treatment Facilities

  • Guidelines for the WWB Registration of Wastewater and Wastewater Sludge Pumpers and Haulers
  • WWB 2021 Registration Application Form for Wastewater and Wastewater Sludge Pumpers and Haulers
  • WWB 2021 Registration Application Form for Wastewater and Wastewater Sludge Pumpers and Haulers Form B – Wastewater Sludge Pumping and Hauling Report (excel)
  • Form B – Wastewater Sludge Pumping and Hauling Report (pdf)
  • Guidelines for the Individual Management Permit Application
  • Individual Management Application Form
  • Registered Wastewater/Sludge Pumper and Hauler List (expiration date: December 31, 2020)
  • Registered Wastewater/Sludge Pumper and Haul

Individualized Wastewater Treatment System (IWS) To submit an Individual Wastewater System (IWS) application online, please click here.

  • Requirements for the IWS Review Process
  • List of Licensed Civil Engineers who are responsible for preparing IWS designs
  • IWS Forms
  • Memorandum on Large Capacity Cesspools
  • IWS Forms
  • Prerequisites for the IWS’s Review Process a list of civil engineers who are licensed in the state of California and who develop IWS plans IWS Forms
  • Memorandum on Large Capacity Cesspools

Performing an on-site wastewater treatment survey and evaluation It is the goal of the Onsite Wastewater Treatment Survey and Assessment to provide guidance on the various treatment and disposal systems that are currently available, as well as a description of their advantages and limitations, so that those involved in the selection of treatment and disposal systems, their design, construction, operation, maintenance, and permitting of these facilities can make informed decisions.

Works for the Treatment of Wastewater

  • Engineer and Owner Certification Form (pdf)
  • Engineer and Owner Certification Form (word)
  • Engineer and Owner Certification Form (pdf). In September 2014, the California Title 22 – Alternative Treatment Technology Report for Recycled Water was published.

Investigations into On-Site Sewage Disposal

  • Investigations into On-site Sewage Disposal

Obtaining Access to Public Records

  • Oahu Cesspool/Septic Tank Public Record Request
  • Maui Cesspool/Septic Tank Public Record Request
  • Hilo Cesspool/Septic Tank Public Record Request
  • Oahu Cesspool/Septic Tank Public Record Request
  • Oahu Cesspool/Septic Tank Public Record Request Inquiry into a Cesspool/Septic Tank Public Record in Kona
  • Inquiry into a Cesspool/Septic Tank Public Record in Kauai
  • Inquiry into a Cesspool/Septic Tank Public Record in Maui
  • Inquiry into an Access to a Government Record in Hawaii

Call (808) 586-4294 or fax (808) 586-4300 for further information. Wastewater BranchEnvironmental Management DivisionHawaii State Department of Health919 Ala Moana Blvd., Room 309Honolulu, HI 96814-4920 Wastewater BranchEnvironmental Management DivisionHawaii State Department of Health

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