How To Pour A Concrete Septic Tank? (Solution)

Warning

  1. Determine the location and depth of your septic tank.
  2. Excavate the pit where you will pour the concrete tank.
  3. Fill the bottom of the pit with at least 6 inches of sand or gravel.
  4. Form and pour the floor of the tank first, inserting steel reinforcement to meet or exceed your local codes.

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  • Determine the location and depth of your septic tank. Excavate the pit where you will pour the concrete tank. Fill the bottom of the pit with at least 6 inches of sand or gravel.

How thick are the walls of a concrete septic tank?

The Construction The exterior walls of the septic tank are made of concrete, normally 4 inches thick. The concrete is either a minimum of 4,000 or 5,000 PSI concrete. A 1,200-gallon tank can weight as much as 8,000 pounds, so these are not items a homeowner can install on his own.

How deep should a septic tank be in the ground?

The general rule of thumb is that most septic tanks can be buried anywhere from four inches to four feet underground.

Can concrete septic tanks last forever?

Inspectapedia estimates that a steel tank baffles will rust out in 15 to 20 years and may collapse if driven over, but a concrete tank will last 40 years or more as long as the wastewater is not acidic. It’s important to consider the life expectancy of a drain-field, too.

What is the average size of a concrete septic tank?

What sizes do concrete septic tanks come in? Standard tank sizes are 1000 gallon, 1250 gallon, and 1500 gallons nationwide. In New Hampshire 1250 gallons is by far the most common tank that goes into the ground.

Are concrete septic tanks reinforced with rebar?

3 reinforcing rod (rebar). (11) The concrete tank and tank lid shall be reinforced by using a minimum reinforcing of six-inch by six-inch No. (13) A minimum 28-day concrete compressive strength of 3,500 pounds per square inch shall be used in the construction of the septic tank, concrete access riser and riser cover.

How do I determine the size of my septic tank?

Septic Tank Size Calculation based Per User Consumption

  1. Cooking – 5 Liters.
  2. Bathing & Toilet – 85 Liters/Person, So for 5 person – 425 liters/Day.
  3. Washing cloths & Utensils – 30 Liters.
  4. Cleaning House – 10 Liters.
  5. Other – 5 Litres.

How do you bury a septic tank?

In most cases, septic tank components including the lid, are buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underground. You can use a metal probe to locate its edges and mark the perimeter. If you do not find the lid by probing, shallow excavation with a shovel along the tank’s perimeter should reveal the lid.

How deep are drain fields buried?

A typical drainfield trench is 18 to 30 inches in depth, with a maximum soil cover over the disposal field of 36 inches.

Can you have a septic tank without a leach field?

The waste from most septic tanks flows to a soakaway system or a drainage field. If your septic tank doesn’t have a drainage field or soakaway system, the waste water will instead flow through a sealed pipe and empty straight into a ditch or a local water course.

Can you pour a concrete slab over a septic tank?

It is never recommended to build a structure over any portion of your septic system. No permanent structures should be built over any portion of the system, but at least in this case the homeowner can pump out their septic tank.

How much does it cost to pump a septic tank?

How much does it cost to pump out a septic tank? The average cost is $300, but can run up to $500, depending on your location. The tank should be pumped out every three to five years.

How long does a 1000 gallon septic tank last?

A septic tank depends largely on the pump and the family usage. That is, a 1,000-gallon tank would most likely last more than 20 years (on average), while a 500-gallon tank might only last 10-15 years under similar conditions.

How often should a 1000 gallon septic tank be cleaned?

For example, a 1,000 gallon septic tank, which is used by two people, should be pumped every 5.9 years. If there are eight people using a 1,000-gallon septic tank, it should be pumped every year.

Are plastic septic tanks better than concrete?

Plastic septic tanks are watertight and are immune to water-based corrosion. They are also rust-resistant. Plastic tanks are less prone to cracking since plastic is flexible, and thus a plastic septic tank does not crack as much as a cement septic tank. Plastic septic tanks are more hygienic than cement tanks.

How do you tell if your septic tank is full?

Here are some of the most common warning signs that you have a full septic tank:

  1. Your Drains Are Taking Forever.
  2. Standing Water Over Your Septic Tank.
  3. Bad Smells Coming From Your Yard.
  4. You Hear Gurgling Water.
  5. You Have A Sewage Backup.
  6. How often should you empty your septic tank?

How to Build a Concrete Septic Tank

Home-Diy If your home is not adjacent to a public sewer system, you may be required to install a septic tank and a lateral drainage system in order to treat your household waste properly. Pre-cast concrete septic tanks are easily accessible, but the cost of transport and installation is prohibitively high.

  • Survey of land grade
  • Permit
  • Excavation equipment
  • Steel reinforcing bars and ties
  • Sand
  • Concrete
  • Steel hooks
  • Manhole with cover
  • Crane

Tip

Although you may walk on top of the septic tank and drive a riding mower over it, you should avoid driving a car or tractor over it. If you are not familiar with the process of pouring concrete, you should hire a concrete contractor.

Warning

Form and pour as soon as feasible once excavation is completed. The soil might shift, causing a trench or pit to collapse. Maintain a safe distance between excavation and construction sites and keep children and animals out of the area. Septic tank construction is an involved operation that should be left to the specialists. As long as the local construction rules allow it, you may install your own septic tank on your property.

  1. Establish where your septic tank is located, as well as its depth. The fall of the sewage pipe that travels from the home to the intake outlet on the septic tank will be determined by your local construction codes. In addition, make sure that the water discharge line from the septic tank to the lateral leech fields has the proper drop needed by code. When determining the site, a survey crew will examine the gradient of your land. Excavate the hole into which you will pour the concrete for the concrete tank. A backhoe will be used to remove the soil from the pit and to build trenches for the pipe that will be used to connect the septic tank to the main sewer line. Fill the pit’s bottom with a minimum of 6 inches of sand or gravel to prevent it from sinking. In order to limit the likelihood of shifting or breaking, it is necessary to stabilize the base beneath the septic tank. First, form and pour the tank’s floor, installing steel reinforcing to ensure that the tank meets or exceeds local building regulations. Install the vertical steel rebar that will be used to brace the tank walls while the floor is being poured. Incorporating metal rebar into a wet concrete floor will provide a strong structural link between the walls and the floor. Install horizontal rebar rods and attach them using rebar ties to keep the structure stable. Despite the fact that the building code is mandatory here, normal rebar spacing is between 12 and 16 inches
  2. After the tank framework has been checked by the building inspector, order concrete. The building of septic tanks is highly regulated in most towns since a leaking tank has the potential to damage streams and water tables. Additionally, before you pour the walls, create allowances for the intake pipe and the drainage pipe. Separately, on a flat sand bed, form the tank cap to fit the tank. The cap’s measurements should correspond to those of the septic tank, and you will place a manhole in the form before pouring the concrete. You’ll also need steel reinforcement and four massive steel hooks that are positioned at each corner of the cap and extend all the way through the concrete to complete the project. The cap should be lifted from the sand bed with a crane by latching it onto the four steel hooks and carefully positioned atop the tank before covering the cap with earth
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Concrete Septic Tanks Are Probably The Best Option — Build With a Bang

Concrete Septic Tank with a Capacity of 1000 Gallon When it comes to septic systems, whether you’re in the market for a new system or just need a replacement tank, you’ve arrived to the perfect location. As part of our recent investigation into different types of septic systems that are available for your house, we decided that it would be a good idea to also investigate the many types of septic tanks now available on the market. The following are the three most common types of septic tanks that are easily accessible for installation: When constructed properly and maintained on a regular basis, the majority of concrete septic tanks may endure for up to 40 years.

  • Waste flow, home size, square footage, number of bedrooms, number of bathrooms, and a few other factors are taken into consideration in septic tank size recommendations and charts.
  • Septic tanks are available in a variety of sizes, and you can even obtain tanks that are smaller than 1000 gallons; however, we recommend that you go with a tank that is at least 1000 square feet in size.
  • Consult with a licensed expert before purchasing or installing any equipment if you’re going to install a new septic tank or septic system for the first time.
  • ” A few of states are now requiring 1000 gallon tanks as the minimum size requirement.

The popularity of the concrete septic tank can be attributed to its strength, weight, and longevity. For more precise information on durability, concrete septic tanks that are correctly constructed have a lesser probability of breaking, cracking, or floating.

Check out these 6 septic systems available for your home.

Nowadays, most concrete septic tanks are sold with a two compartment design, as opposed to the earlier style one compartment tank that was more common previously. Two compartment tanks tend to perform a better job of filtering and separating waste than one compartment tanks, which is why septic experts advocate them over a single compartment tank. All compartments are constructed with access for cleaning and pumping, regardless of the number of compartments in the system. Because it can readily handle most 0-3 bedroom dwellings, a 1000 gallon septic tank is the standard size for domestic applications.

Heavy Duty Options

Many tanks are also available in “high duty” configurations, which generally have a reinforced top and bottom. Purchasing the heavy-duty version may be a wise decision in the case that a vehicle, agricultural equipment, or other large piece of heavy machinery passes over the tank area.

Installation Requirements

Because of the size and weight of concrete septic tanks, they must be installed by a qualified specialist. These tanks are constructed of the hardest materials available, and while they are extremely durable, their installation necessitates the use of enormous, heavy machinery. If the intended or present site of your concrete septic tank does not allow for heavy machinery access, you may want to investigate a fiberglass or plastic (polyethylene) tank. Due to the fact that the majority of concrete tanks are precast, their sizes, weights, and dimensions are all different.

Lifespan and Durability

The method by which the concrete septic tank was constructed will have an impact on its long-term function. High-quality concrete, adequate water sealing, and the use of structural steel goods such as mesh and rebar will provide additional support, strength, and structural integrity to the structure. Keep in mind that concrete septic tanks are more prone to cracking and leaking than their plastic and fiberglass equivalents when exposed to exceptionally cold temperatures and pressures. Most concrete septic tanks have a lifespan of up to 40 years if they are constructed properly and serviced on a regular basis.

1000 Gallon Concrete Septic Tank

Septic tanks of 1000 gallon capacity or larger are the most typical size for household usage, as they can readily fit most 0-3 bedroom dwellings. Size Weight: The weight of each concrete tank is different. Some of the most common 1000 gallon concrete precast tanks are around 5′ 1″ X 8′ 2″ X 5′ 8″ in size and weigh almost 9,000 lbs. Others are approximately 5′ 1″ X 8′ 2″ X 5′ 8″ in size and weigh almost 9,000 lbs. Here are some examples of Jensen Precast projects completed in various cities around the United States.

1250 Gallon Concrete Septic Tank

Generally speaking, a 1250 gallon tank is a good choice for mid-size homes with 3-4 bedrooms. Size and weight: The sizes and weights of all concrete tanks are different. 1250 gallon concrete precast tanks are typically 5′ 9″ x 8′ 6″ x 5’8″ in size, with some of the more common models being 5′ 9″ x 8′ 6″ and others measuring 5′ 8″. The typical weight of a 1250 gallon concrete tank is 11,000 lbs, however this might vary depending on the distributor. Approximately 11 1/2 feet in depth, however this varies according on the distributor, state, and local statutes.

In addition, many of these bigger tank sizes are so massive that rebar and wire mesh are required within the walls and between layers to provide additional strength, stability, and durability.

1500 Gallon Concrete Septic Tank

Generally speaking, a 1500-gallon tank is the most popular size for large homes with five or more bedrooms. Size and weight: The sizes and weights of all concrete tanks are different. The dimensions of some of the most common 1500 gallon concrete precast tanks are around 6′ x 10′ 9″ x 5′ 5″ in length and width. The typical weight of a 1500 gallon concrete tank is 12,000 lbs, which is rather heavy. Approximately 12 feet in depth, however this varies according on the distributor, state, and local statutes.

Inlet Baffles

When installing a septic tank, an inlet baffle should be put on the inlet part closest to the point at which the sewer tank joins from the house structure to the tank. Due to the fact that it prevents scum and oils from blocking the entrance pipe, the inlet baffle is critical to the overall health and effectiveness of the septic system. The intake baffle is a bottle neck that is especially designed to do the following:

  • In order to prevent the breakdown process from being disrupted, it is necessary to slow the effluent entering the septic tank. A fast rate of inflow of effluent might cause problems by mistakenly combining the settled solid waste with oils, scum, and effluent. Make sure no sewage gases are allowed to enter the sewer line. These gases have the potential to infiltrate back into a home or structure, generating a foul odor.

Outlet Baffles

Every septic tank should be equipped with an exit baffle that is connected to the discharge line. The outlet baffle functions as a bottle neck in the same way as the inlet baffle, but in the opposite direction. It is meant to:

  • Preserving the septic tank by keeping scum, oils, and solid waste contained inside
  • It is necessary to prevent the discharge of waste items other than wastewater into the output pipe, drain field, and leach field.

All effluent from the septic tank must be clear of solid waste before it may be discharged. Other than that, the solids and oils will pollute the drain field/leach field and result in backups and pollutants entering the surrounding environment. Ensure that your baffles are correctly built and that they are not in need of repair by consulting with a licensed septic technician before doing anything else. Septic tanks made of fiberglass or polyethylene (polyethelyene) are also a suitable option, especially if your location has specialized environmental requirements.

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Mobility

In contrast to concrete septic tanks, which normally need a vehicle equipped with a crane and boom, fiberglass and polyethylene septic tanks are quite simple to transport. Therefore, fiberglass and plastic tanks are frequently employed in places where concrete septic tank delivery vehicles are unable to reach the tanks. The majority of fiberglass and plastic septic tanks weigh roughly 300 pounds or more, however concrete septic tanks can weigh up to 20-30 times as much.

Cost Effectiveness

If you’re seeking for a less expensive alternative to concrete, fiberglass and polyethylene (polyethylene) are excellent choices. The majority of fiberglass and plastic septic tanks are thousands of dollars less expensive than concrete septic systems.

Durability

When compared to a concrete septic tank, both plastic and fiberglass septic tanks have a lower likelihood of breaking. Furthermore, because fiberglass and plastic are nonporous materials, there is typically no problem with tree or bush roots growing into the tank and generating leaks as a result of root damage. Having said that, due to the tank’s smaller profile and lighter material composition, caution must be used during installation because heavy gear might easily harm it. Tanks made of fiberglass or plastic can be destroyed in the same way as concrete tanks can if too much weight is placed on the surface above them.

Despite the fact that plastic and fiberglass tanks are quite resilient, they can nonetheless leak under specific circumstances.

As a result, it’s important to contact with a septic installation specialist before making a final decision on a certain material. The size of the lot, the position of the tank, the amount of ground water, and the weather can all influence the selection.

Float

Plastic and fiberglass have a number of advantages, but they can also be troublesome. Yes, the lightweight character of these materials makes them perfect for installation, but same lightweight nature also results in a high level of buoyancy in the final product. It is possible that during a storm, a plastic or fiberglass tank can get dislodged from its couplings, causing considerable damage to the septic system and the homeowner’s property, with repair costs in the hundreds of dollars. A simple solution is to place a concrete slab on top of the tank to help weigh it down.

If you reside in an area with a high groundwater table, consult with a specialist to ensure that the higher water table will not cause harm to your fiberglass or plastic tank.

3 Tips to Maintain Your Concrete Septic Tank – Septic Maxx

Septic tanks are available in a variety of shapes and sizes and are constructed of a variety of materials, including cement, steel, and plastic, each of which has its own set of pros and disadvantages. Tanks made of concrete:

  • Possess high effluent concentrations
  • Possess a low likelihood of rising to the surface Are authorized in every state (as opposed to plastic tanks), and are environmentally friendly.

The fact that a majority of Americans choose concrete septic tanks over tanks made of any other material is a testament to these advantages. However, despite all of these advantages, if you have a concrete tank, you should be aware that it is possible for your tank to break under harsh weather conditions. This might result in costly leaks, which would make maintaining a concrete septic tank very difficult. These straightforward suggestions may assist you in maintaining your concrete septic tank and preventing cracks.

Reuse of Concrete Tanks

A long time has passed since concrete septic tanks were employed because of their durability. Despite the fact that they are prone to cracking, many people choose to reuse existing tanks in order to decrease maintenance and installation expenses. Before reusing a concrete tank, it must first be properly evaluated to verify that it is structurally sound and free of defects. Following the examination, the concrete tank must be refitted with a liner that is attached to the interior of the vessel.

It can also help to prevent corrosion, which is a leading cause of septic system failures, which can be quite expensive.

Repair Minor Damages

You should take care of any little damage to your concrete tank as soon as possible. As a result, you may extend the life of your septic tank and avoid minor problems from becoming major problems. The following are examples of typical concrete septic tank damages:

  • Pipe inlets and outlets that have been worn out
  • Baffles that have been damaged

Regular Inspections

The maintenance of a healthy septic system is essential. Pumping and inspecting your septic tank on a regular basis are required to keep it in good condition. Pumping is the process of removing sludge from a tank, whereas inspections are the process of checking the overall operation of the system. Identifying problems early on can save you from having to pay for incredibly expensive repairs later on. The proper maintenance of your septic system might assist to extend the life of your septic tank.

Septic Maxx provides environmentally friendly septic tank solutions that may do this, as well as minimize unpleasant odors and prevent material build-up in the tank. When you place your purchase now, you will have a very efficient septic tank treatment in your hands.

Building Near and Over Septic Tanks

Posted on a regular basis In most cases, minimum setback rules imposed by the Texas Commission on Environmental Equality (TCEQ) preclude the building of a new residence from occuring over any point of an existing sewage disposal system. Foundations, pools, property lines, wells, and other structures must be kept at a certain distance from the septic tank and drainfield in order to meet these setback requirements. It is possible that some homeowners will install objects such as patio decks or house additions over their systems, whether by accident or design.

Building over septic tanks

Construction of a building over any section of your septic system is not recommended. The most typical issue we see is when someone wants to pump out their septic tank but is unsure of where their tank is situated on their property. Tanks hidden beneath a hardwood deck, pool patio, driveways, or even room extensions are not unusual for us to discover and investigate. The majority of the time, this occurs because the homeowner is uninformed of the tank’s location and/or does not have a plan in place for future tank maintenance.

However, in this scenario, the homeowner will be able to pump out their septic tank because no permanent constructions should be constructed over any component of the system.

Building over drainfields

In order for the drainfield to function, water in the solids and some evapotranspiration must be absorbed. In order for bacteria in the soil beneath a drainfield to treat wastewater from a drainfield, the soil beneath the drainfield must have sufficient oxygen. However, if a permanent structure is constructed over a drainfield, it has the potential to reduce the amount of oxygen that can be absorbed by the soil and hence reduce evapotranspiration. The potential of causing the drainfield lines to collapse is a significant concern when constructing over them.

Depending on the age of your system and the restrictions of your local authorities, repairing or shifting your drainfield may need the installation of a whole new system.

We can assist you with any of your wastewater system needs, and our specialists can also assist you with your septic installation and maintenance requirements: 210.698.2000 (San Antonio) or 830.249.4000 (Austin) (Boerne).

How to Build a Homemade Septic System

Septic tanks, which are used to treat sewage before allowing it to process and soak into the earth, are available in a variety of designs and sizes. A well constructed septic system, which is often comprised of concrete or plastic, may last anywhere from 15 to 30 years with adequate maintenance.

Building a handmade septic system is time-consuming and not for the faint of heart, but it may save a homeowner hundreds to thousands of dollars over the course of the project. How to Construct a Do-It-Yourself Septic System Photograph courtesy of Valerie Loiseleux/E+/Getty Images.

Permits Before Digging

In order to discover if a home-made septic system is suitable in your location, check with your local health department and county government offices first. If they are, make a note of any regulations and get any licenses that may be required before you begin working. You must adhere to the local septic system standards as closely as possible during the construction process, or you may be forced to dig up your system and start over from the beginning later on.

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Early Site Planning

You’ll need to consider these factors when determining the ideal location for your septic tank and drainage system: most counties require soil testing to assess the percolation rate (drainage ability) of the soil as well as the seasonal water tables of the land. The optimal location for the septic system will be tested and approved by the local county planning boards and health agencies. County health agencies and planning boards will also provide you with information on how deep you should install your septic tank and drain field pipes.

Consider 75 gallons of septic tank space per person each day as a rough estimate.

Always err on the side of caution and budget an additional 150 gallons a day to account for visitors and other miscellaneous consumption.

Septic Tank Site Preparation

You may dig the septic tank pit yourself using a backhoe or shovel, or you can hire a digger business to do it for you. Even though digging by hand will take more time, doing so will save a few hundred bucks if this is wanted. You may also save money by preparing the hole so that the tank can be dumped in by the person who is delivering it as soon as it arrives. Prefabricated septic tanks start at $600.00 and rise in price in direct proportion to the amount of space they occupy. Connect the drain pipe that leads to the drain field either before or after the tank has been installed in the ground, depending on your preference.

The drain field, where the material from the tank will finally end up, should be at least 10 feet away from the dwelling as well as any body of water, such as a pond or river, where the material would eventually end up.

Septic systems typically require a total drain area of 100 feet in order to function properly.

It is also necessary for the trench to have a very little downhill slope in order for waste to be able to flow out of the drain pipe. If you haven’t already, fill the trenches with 1 foot of gravel or “drainrock” once they’ve been excavated.

Connections and Finishing Touches

After preparing the site and installing the septic tank, you will be able to connect the various components of the septic system together. The perforated drain pipe should be connected to the line that comes out of the septic tank. Add extra gravel and a thin layer of filter cloth to the perforated pipe in order to prevent dirt from filtering down to the drainpipe. Finally, fill in the trench with the soil that was previously taken from it by hand.

What is Concrete Septic Tank & Detail

Septic Tanks: The wastewater from residential washrooms, faucets, showers, and toilets is disposed of in a concrete septic tank, which is a cost-effective method of generating trash. This type of septic tank is typically seen in well-known locations where more sophisticated sewage systems are not utilized. Solid waste created by houses is separated from water via a process known as filtration. Concrete septic tanks are available in a variety of sizes, with the majority having a height of around 9 feet and a length of approximately 9 feet.

Concrete septic tanks are the most often utilized septic tanks because they are the most readily accessible and economical to build when compared to other types of septic tanks.

The poured tanks are readily demolished depending on the location in which they are placed and the weather conditions that prevail.

The precast tanks have shown to be more dependable and have not cracked readily over a lengthy period of time.

Role of a Septic Tank:

It goes without saying that a septic tank is an important part of your plumbing system. With the aid of a drainage and toilet system, a compartment holding building is constructed to collect wastewater. The biochemical treatment of solid and liquid influent begins in the building, with liquid sewage being discharged to a drain field covered by dirt, underneath of the building yard, after which the treatment is completed. Solid particles sink to the bottom of the septic tank, while light particles such as greases, oils, and fats rise to the surface of the tank.

Filtration of Septic Tank:

The filter in a septic tank is a terrific, cost-effective, and simple solution for extending the life of a concrete septic tank that is not equipped with a filtration system. Inspection, pump access, and cleaning are all easily accessible. Risers are used to hold lids that allow Carbon filters to be used.

If the amount of decreasing drainage gas is sufficient. Leaching buildings may be used in a variety of ways, such as decreasing energy consumption and expanding the area of leach fields. All septic tanks are constructed in a correct manner and are 100 percent waterproof.

Manufacturing:

The production process includes a rigorous quality control system, as well as specific methods that are commensurate with the technology used in septic tanks. All of the pipe connections, including the inlet and output, are gasket-sealed. While in operation, the septic tanks and septic tank systems are non-toxic and environmentally friendly, since they protect groundwater and are long-lasting. The use of concrete septic tanks provides for a longer exit flow time while also lowering velocity across a vast region and requiring a lower liquid level for effluent.

The septic tank also has the capacity to run the pipe for both high and low pressure.

REASONS TO CHOOSE CONCRETE ​SEPTIC TANKS

There are a large number of households that require the usage of a septic tank. If you find yourself in such a situation, you should think about what Southport Concrete Corp. can do to help. We can install septic systems for you, and we’ve been in business in Southport for almost two decades. We can come to your area and assess it in order to construct a septic system that is ideal for your anticipated demands, providing you with long-lasting plumbing solutions. WHICH TYPE SHOULD YOU SELECTMost septic alternatives will feature a holding unit made of either plastic or concrete.

Because of its decreased weight, it typically results in lower construction and installation expenses.

Plastic units have several disadvantages, including the tendency to float, low effluent levels, and vulnerability to damage.

Concrete provides the advantages of tremendous strength and durability, as well as a substantial weight that prevents floatation and excessive effluent levels.

A precast tank takes it a step further by becoming stronger over time and by taking use of the pressure exerted by the surrounding earth.

After a simple phone call to 910-457-4441, we can take care of your septic issues in Southport and the surrounding areas from Leland to Oak Island.

We are a concrete firm that prioritizes the needs of our customers, so you can rely on us to look after you from the very beginning to the very end.

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