How To Know Where Is The Filter Tank Septic In My House? (Solution found)

Filters are usually located in the septic tank near the end where the effluents leave the tank and flow to the leach field. A filter will help trap small particles of suspended solids and particle matter that was not caught in the portion of the tank where the majority of the sludge and scum is found.Filters are usually located in the septic tank near the end where the effluents leave the tank and flow to the leach fieldleach fieldThe drain field typically consists of an arrangement of trenches containing perforated pipes and porous material (often gravel) covered by a layer of soil to prevent animals (and surface runoff) from reaching the wastewater distributed within those trenches.https://en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Septic_drain_field

Septic drain field – Wikipedia

. A filter will help trap small particles of suspended solids and particle matter that was not caught in the portion of the tank where the majority of the sludge and scum is found.

  • Look for the septic tank map, if you have one. This is the easiest way to find where the septic tank is constructed in your property. This is usually a diagram that shows the precise location of the tank.

How do I find my septic tank filter?

Most septic tank filters are located inside of the baffle of the tank. For this reason the filters are very important, since they help regulate the flow to the area of drainage. The septic tank filters are very important in situations where waste is actually being delivered from the septic tank to the drainage area.

How do I know if my septic filter is clogged?

Signs of a Clogged Septic Tank Filter or Graywater Filter

  1. Sluggish drainage.
  2. Gurgling noises at building sinks or tubs.
  3. High effluent levels in the septic tank.
  4. Dirty septic filter.
  5. Drainfield abnormally dry.
  6. Septic filter monitors.

Do all septic tanks have an outlet filter?

In theory, the only thing that ends up in the leach field is water. Unfortunately, in practice hair, grit and, worse, sewage solids can find their way there. That’s why every septic tank system needs an outlet filter.

How do you tell if your septic tank is full?

How to tell your septic tank is full and needs emptying

  1. Pooling water.
  2. Slow drains.
  3. Odours.
  4. An overly healthy lawn.
  5. Sewer backup.
  6. Gurgling Pipes.
  7. Trouble Flushing.

How often do I need to clean my septic tank filter?

As a rule of thumb, you should always clean the septic tank filter when doing your routine pumping. But since this will typically be after a couple of years, you should inspect the filter twice a year – just before winter and right after winter. It is best to use a filter that has an alarm.

How do you tell if a septic pump is working?

To test if the pump is working, first turn the pump on by turning the second from the bottom float upside down. While holding that float upside down, turn the next float up (that would be the second from the top), upside down. You should hear the pump turn on.

How do you keep a septic tank filter from clogging?

Screening Device. The screening device, made of slotted plastic, is installed in the outlet of a septic tank and helps prevent anything other than liquids from getting into (and potentially clogging) the drainfield. The slots are small enough that it allows the liquid to pass through while the larger solids will remain

Do I really need a septic tank filter?

The answer to the question “Do I need a septic tank filter?” is two-sided. Your septic will function normally without an effluent or wastewater filter. However, if your intentions are to reduce premature repair and replacement of the leach field, then you should definitely install an effluent/wastewater filter.

When did septic tanks start having filters?

The Beginnings of Waste Treatment John Gibb of Scotland was the first to address this problem with sand filters in 1804. He started with trying to desalinize ocean water by pouring the water through sand and having it filter out contaminates.

Do septic systems have filters?

Effluent filters are installed inside of septic tanks, and they are designed to replace or enhance exit baffles. All of the wastewater that leaves your tank runs through the effluent filter, which prevents any solids from getting dumped into the drainfield.

How do you clean sludge out of a septic tank?

How to Reduce Sludge in a Septic Tank Without Pumping

  1. Install an aeration system with diffused air in your septic tank.
  2. Break up any compacted sludge.
  3. Add a bio-activator or microbe blend.
  4. Maintain the aeration system.
  5. Add additional Microbes as required.

How much is a septic tank filter?

On most residential septic systems, the cost of an effluent filter will range from $100 to $300 depending on the unit and installation charges.

How much does it cost to pump a septic tank?

How much does it cost to pump out a septic tank? The average cost is $300, but can run up to $500, depending on your location. The tank should be pumped out every three to five years.

Septic Tank Filter: Does Yours Have One & Where Is It?

First and foremost, not all septic tanks are equipped with a filter, particularly older septic tanks. Many government organizations now mandate or encourage the installation of a filter when a septic tank is constructed. Filter cleaning is distinct from pumping out and cleaning a septic tank, which are two completely separate tasks.

A Septic tank filter

When it comes to septic tanks, filters are often found towards the end of the tank, where the effluents are discharged and flow to the leach field. When a filter is used, it will aid in the capture of small particles of suspended solids and particle matter that were not captured by sludge and scum in the region of the tank where the bulk of scum is present. Essentially, a filter aids in the reduction of particulate matter and suspended particles prior to their entry into the leach field.

Filters extends the life and efficiency of a leach field

Clogging of a drain field will be reduced as a result of the filter, which will also assist to boost the efficiency of the field. With adequate maintenance and suitable soil for percolation, the life expectancy of a septic leach field can be extended to 10 to 20 years, with some systems lasting much longer, such as 30 years or more. Septic tanks have a life expectancy of 40 years or more. Another reason why many communities require that a second leach field area be included on designs before they would issue a permit is to prevent contamination of groundwater.

Septic failure or slow draining sinks and toilets may be related to a filter issue

Depending on whether or not the filter is completely or partially blocked, it may be preventing effluent water from the tank from flowing into the drain (leach) field. The tank and sewage line may not be able to drain correctly, resulting in a backup. Toilets that are clogged and sinks that are reluctant to drain are signs of a clogged drain.

How often should you clean a septic filter?

This varies from system to system, depending on the type of filter and how it is used. Some people believe that every time you have the tank pumped, you should also have the filter cleaned. This is something that many septic providers routinely perform as part of their service. However, if you examine your filter six months after you originally installed it or six months after the first pumping of the tank in a property you purchased and it is rather clean, you could consider waiting a year before inspecting it again.

How often should you pump out a septic tank?

The answer varies; it normally ranges between 2 and 5 years, with the majority of systems requiring pumping every 3 or 4 years, depending on usage. The fact that there are so many factors explains why it fluctuates so much. The size of the tank, the number of people living in the house, the family’s dietary and culinary habits (for example, do they cook with a lot of oils and fats), and whether or not they have a trash disposal that they use frequently are all factors to consider. As a result of the subject matter of some of our articles, we include links to goods that we believe may be of interest to readers.

If you decide to purchase a product or service after clicking on one of our affiliate links, we will get a small compensation, but the pricing will remain the same for you and us.

How to locate your septic tank and your drainfield

Septic systems on-site are used for accepting and treating wastewater in homes that are not linked to the municipal wastewater management system. A septic system is comprised of three components: a septic tank, a drain field, and piping. As a homeowner, it is your responsibility to properly operate and maintain your septic system in order to avoid system failure. For example, depending on the legislation in your area, you may be compelled to pump it on a regular basis. It is impossible to perform maintenance operations, however, if you do not know where the tank is located.

Steps to follow to locate your septic tank and drain field

The contractor that designed and constructed the septic tank on your property should have submitted an as-built diagram with the local health authority before starting work on the project. In the event that you have the contractor’s contact information, you can ask them for a schematic, which you can then use to pinpoint the location of your septic tank. If you do not have a copy of the schematic, you can request one from the local authorities. Depending on whether the installed system included electrical components, the schematic may be available at the regional building department offices.

  1. If you are unable to locate the tank using this diagram, you will need to do more research on the land in order to determine its position.
  2. This pipe is commonly found in the basement of a home, and it is a 4″ black pipe with a cleanout at the bottom.
  3. Simply look for possible access coverings or a structure that might be concealing it.
  4. These pumps are used to remove waste from the building.
  5. It is supposed to be connected to the sewage output pipe.
  6. As soon as you’ve discovered the sewer outlet in your basement, you may use it to figure out where the sewer line departs your home through an outside wall.
  7. As a result, it is probable that the tank will be positioned around the corner from the building.

Tips for locating your septic tank

Septic tank lids should be visible from the outside. An underground riser may have been added, which will make it simple to find your septic tank in some instances.

However, it is conceivable that the septic tank cover is buried underground, which is especially true for older homes. Following are some pointers to assist you in locating the septic tank in this and other similar situations.

  • It may be possible to discover the septic tank lid underneath using a metal detector if it is buried. Prevent wearing footwear that contains steel or any other metal in order to avoid interfering with the readings of the detector
  • Instead, you can use a flushable transmitter that is flushed down the toilet and then tracked with a receiver. When it comes to septic tanks, the strongest signal will be seen close to the intake region of the tank.

Depending on whether the septic tank is above or below ground, you may have to dig to get to it. Construction materials for septic tanks include concrete, fiberglass, or plastic, and their shapes can range from oblong to cylindrical to rectangular. The majority of modern septic tanks will have their lids positioned in the center of the tank, and the lid should be within three feet of the ground surface in most cases. However, depending on a variety of conditions, such as farming and other human activities on the property, it is conceivable that it will be significantly deeper.

Additionally, you may use a small steel rod to probe the earth in order to pinpoint exactly where the tank is located as you continue digging.

Inspecting the tank

It is critical to thoroughly inspect and evaluate your septic tank and its contents when it has been identified. First and foremost, you may unscrew the lid to inspect the scum and sludge layer beneath it. In addition, the use of tracer dye tablets allows you to check the septic tank without having to dig it up. If you use tracer dye pills, all you have to do is flush them down the toilet and wait for a maximum of two days. Because of the way the tablets dissolve in water, if there is a problem with the septic system, you will see that the leach field has a glowing green hue surrounding it.

It is possible that someone will fall into the tank, causing significant damage or possibly death.

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Conclusion

You can identify your septic tank without assistance from a professional, but it is a good idea to have someone who is properly educated in septic tank maintenance examine and maintain your septic tank on your behalf. The effluent filter in your tank should be washed into the open septic tank rather than on the ground in your yard if your tank has one. It may also be a good idea to make a note of the position of the septic tank when it has been discovered. This will be beneficial to anyone else who may require access to the septic tank in the future.

Septic tanks release combustible and hazardous gases, and as a result, they must be located in an open area.

How To Find My Septic Tank

  1. What is a septic tank
  2. How do I know if I have a septic tank
  3. And how do I know if I have a septic tank Identifying the location of your septic tank is critical for several reasons. The Best Way to Find a Septic Tank
  4. What to Do Once You’ve Discovered Your Septic Tank

You may have fallen in love with your new house because of its appealing good looks and characteristics, but there is almost certainly more to your new home than meets the eye. In many cases, the characteristics that make your house run more effectively and allow you to live a pleasant, contemporary life are not readily apparent. Septic tanks, for example, are an important part of your home’s infrastructure. A septic system is responsible for regulating and managing the wastewater generated by your home.

“How can I locate my septic tank?” is one of the most often requested inquiries we receive.

When your tank’s lid is difficult to locate – especially if you are not the original homeowner – you may be at a loss for what to do or where to look for the lid when you need it.

The majority of the time, all of the components of the septic tank are buried between four inches and four feet below ground level.

In order to do so, it is necessary to first comprehend the functions of septic tanks and septic systems and why it is important to know where yours is located.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank

Your septic tank’s location is not a closely guarded secret. There will be a method for you to locate it and make a note of its position for future reference, and below are a few examples of such methods.

What Is a Septic Tank?

Having a functioning septic tank is an important aspect of having an effective septic system. In the United States, around 20% of households utilize a septic system to handle their wastewater. Houses in rural parts of New England are the most likely to have a septic system, with residences in the Eastern United States being the most prevalent location for septic systems. When there are few and far between residences, it is typically more efficient and cost-effective to employ a septic system to manage wastewater rather than relying on a public sewage system to handle waste water.

  1. Typically, a septic tank is a container that is waterproof and composed of a material such as concrete, polyethylene, fiberglass, or a combination of these.
  2. An important function of a septic tank is to hold on to wastewater until any particulates in the water separate themselves from the water.
  3. Any liquid that remains in the tank eventually drains into a leach field or a drainfield, where it is known as “effluent.” The dirt in the leach field aids in the filtering of the water and the removal of bacteria, viruses, and other pollutants that may be present in it.
  4. Septic tanks erected in Onondaga County must contain input and outlet baffles, as well as an effluent filter or sanitary tees, in order to effectively separate particles from liquids during the treatment process.

How Do I Know If I Have a Septic Tank?

What is the best way to tell if your home has a septic tank? There are generally a few of different methods to tell. Examining your water bill might help you identify whether or not your house is served by a septic system or is part of the public sewage system in your neighborhood. If you have a septic system for wastewater management, you are likely to receive a charge from the utility provider for wastewater or sewer services of zero dollars. In the case of those who are fortunate enough to have a septic system, it is likely that they may not receive any water bills at all.

  1. A lack of a meter on the water line that enters your property is typically indicative of the fact that you are utilizing well water rather than public utility water, according to the National Association of Realtors.
  2. A septic system is likely to be installed in your home if you reside in a rather rural location.
  3. Septic systems are likely to be installed in all of these buildings, which means your home is likely to be as well.
  4. When a septic tank is present, it is common to find a mound or tiny hill on the property that is not a natural structure.

Checking your property records is a foolproof method of determining whether or not your home is equipped with a septic system. Your home’s building permit and drawings will almost certainly include details concerning the existence (or absence) of a septic tank on your site.

Why It’s Important to Know the Location of Your Septic Tank

You might wonder why you should bother trying to discover out where your septic tank is. There are several important reasons for this:

1. To Be Able to Care for It Properly

The first reason you should try to locate your septic tank is that knowing where it is will help you to properly repair and care for it in the future. The standard guideline is to avoid erecting structures or placing heavy objects on top of the septic tank. It’s possible that you don’t want to park your car or truck on top of it, and you don’t want visitors to your house to park their cars on top of it, either. Due to the weight of the automobiles, there is a possibility that the tank would collapse due to excessive pressure.

2. If You Want to Landscape or Remodel Your Property

If you want to build an addition to your home or perform some landscaping around your property, you will need to know where your septic tank is located. Nothing with deep or lengthy roots should be planted on top of or in the area of your tank, since this can cause problems. If roots are allowed to grow into the pipes of your septic system, it is conceivable that your system will get clogged. When you know where the tank is going to be, you may arrange your landscaping such that only shallow-rooted plants, such as grass, are in close proximity to the tank.

For starters, the tank’s weight might lead it to collapse due to the weight of the construction.

3. If a Problem With Your Tank Occurs

Knowing where your tank is buried might also assist you in identifying problems as soon as they arise. Consider the following scenario: you wake up one morning and see that there is flooding or ponding water in the region surrounding your septic tank – a sign that your system is overwhelmed and that an excessive amount of water is being utilized all at once.

4. Ease of Getting It Fixed

Once you have determined the location of your sewer system, you can quickly send a plumber to it in the event that something goes wrong with the system, saving everyone both time and money. Get in Touch With A Plumber Right Away

1. Use a Septic Tank Map

First and foremost, make use of a road map. Using a map is frequently the quickest and most convenient alternative. Most counties keep records of the installation of septic tanks at all of their residents’ residences. These maps should include schematics that illustrate the specific placement of the tank on the land, as well as measurements that allow you to measure and locate the tank’s exact location on the property. Never mind that landmarks may shift over time depending on when the tank was built, so if there are a few more shrubs or a tree nearby, don’t rule out that location as a possibility.

  • If you are unable to locate a map or other paperwork that identifies the location of your septic tank, there are a few locations to try to see if you can obtain a map of the area.
  • The county health department is responsible for keeping track of septic systems.
  • A septic tank’s position could be depicted on a survey map, for example.
  • The creation of your own map and documentation may be worthwhile if you cannot locate a map or blueprint of your property and nothing appears to be on file regarding it at the county health department or another municipal agency.

In this way, if you ever decide to sell your property, you will be able to supply the new owner with everything they will need to locate the tank and properly manage their septic system.

2. Follow the Pipes to Find Your Septic Tank

Whether or not there is an existing map of your septic tank on file, or whether or not you choose to develop one for future reference or for future homeowners, you will still need to track down and find the tank. One method of accomplishing this is to follow the sewer lines that lead away from your residence. The septic tank is situated along the sewage line that goes from your home and into the yard, as we’re sure you’re aware. Find a four-inch sewer pipe in your basement or crawl space. This is the line that will lead to your septic system and should be accessible from the ground level.

  • In general, though, you’re searching for a pipe with a diameter of four inches or more that leaves your home via a basement wall or ceiling.
  • By inserting a thin metal probe (also known as a soil probe) into the earth near the sewage line, you can track the pipe’s location.
  • The majority of septic tanks are located between 10 and 25 feet away from your home, and they cannot be any closer than five feet.
  • Going via the sewage line itself is another method of locating the septic tank utilizing it.
  • Drain snakes are typically used to unclog clogs in toilets and drains, and they may be used to do the same thing.
  • When the snake comes to a complete halt, it has almost certainly reached the tank.
  • While drawing the snake back, make a note of how far it has been extended and whether it has made any bends or turns.
  • When looking for your septic tank, you may use a transmitter that you flush down the toilet and it will direct you straight to the tank.

3. Inspect Your Yard

Septic tanks are designed to be as unobtrusive as possible when they are erected. With the passage of time, and the growth of the grass, it might be difficult to discern the visual indications that indicated the exact location of your septic tank’s installation.

However, this does not rule out the possibility of finding evidence that will take you to the location of your septic tank in the future. First and foremost, you want to rule out any potential locations for your septic tank, such as:

  • Under a road or similar paved surface, for example. Right up against the house (the tank must be at least five feet away)
  • Directly in front of the home Immediately adjacent to your well (if you have one)
  • In close proximity to trees or densely planted regions
  • In the shadow of a patio, deck, or other building

Once you’ve ruled out any potential locations for your tank, it’s time to start hunting for indications as to where it may be hiding in plain sight. Keep your eyes peeled as you go about your property, looking for any inexplicable high or low points that might suggest the presence of an underground tank. When looking at your property, you could see a hill or mound on the ground, which is frequently an indication that there is a septic tank nearby. One further item to consider while searching for the right septic tank for your home is the amount of grass or other foliage in your yard.

Alternatively, if the tank was not adequately buried, you may observe a “bald patch,” which is an area where the grass is struggling to grow in the vicinity.

4. Talk to Your Neighbors

If your neighbors have septic systems as well, they may be able to assist you in locating your tank. Inquire of your neighbors about the location of their septic tanks in relation to their residences. Having a polite conversation with your neighbors regarding septic systems not only provides you with a means to figure out where yours is, but it may also serve as a friendly introduction to the other residents of your community.

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5. Look for Your Septic Tank Lid

It is only the first step in the process to discover where your septic tank is located. After you’ve located your tank, the following step is to locate the lid. You can locate it with the help of your soil probe. The majority of septic tanks are rectangular in shape and measure around five feet by eight feet. The perimeter of the tank should be marked with a probe once it has been probed around. A shallow excavation with a shovel within the tank’s perimeter and near the center (or broken into halves for a two compartment tank) should show the position of the lid or lids if you are unable to feel them by probing.

The tank itself is likely to be filled with foul-smelling vapors, if not potentially hazardous ones.

What to Do After You Find Your Septic Tank

Once you’ve determined where your tank is, it’s time to bring in the specialists. Trust us when we say that opening a septic tank is not something that just anybody wants to undertake. Concrete septic tank lids are extremely heavy and must be lifted using special lifting gear in order to be removed. Since the vapors are potentially dangerous due to the contents of the tank, please respect our advice and refrain from attempting to open the tank yourself. An exposed septic tank can be hazardous to anybody wandering around your property’s perimeter, and if someone were to fall into it, it might be lethal owing to the toxicity of the sewage in the tank.

However, before you send in a team of experienced plumbers, there are a few things you can do to ensure that others do not experience the same difficulty locating the tank and to make locating the tank in the future easier.

1. Mark Its Location

The likelihood is that you will not want to post a large sign in your yard that reads “Septic Tank Here!” but you will want to leave some sort of marking so that you can quickly locate the tank and lid when you need them. In an ideal situation, the marker will be substantial enough that it will not blow away in the wind and will not be readily moved by children who are playing in the yard. A patio paver, a potted plant, or a decorative gnome or rock are just a few of the possibilities. In addition to putting a physical sign beside the septic tank, you may draw a map or layout of the area around it to illustrate its position.

2. Take Care of Your Septic Tank

Taking proper care of your tank may save you hundreds of dollars over the course of its lifetime. The expense of maintaining your system could be a few hundred dollars every few years, but that’s a lot less than the thousands of dollars it might cost to repair or replace a damaged tank or a malfunctioning septic system. Two strategies to take better care of your septic tank and system are to avoid utilizing your drain pipes or toilets as garbage cans and to use less water overall. Things like paper towels, face wipes, and cat litter should not be flushed down the toilet since they are not designed to be flushed.

In addition, installing low-flow faucets and high-efficiency toilets can help you reduce the amount of water used in your home.

For example, you don’t want to be washing load after load of laundry or running your clothes washer at the same time as your dishwasher all at the same time.

Call a Professional Plumber

Maintenance of a septic system is not normally considered a do-it-yourself activity. In the Greater Syracuse region, whether your septic tank requires pumping out or cleaning, or if you want to replace your tank, you should use the services of a reputable plumbing firm to do the job right. If you’ve attempted to locate your septic tank on your own and are still unsure of its position, it may be necessary to enlist the assistance of a professional local plumber. Our team at Mr. Rooter Plumbing of Greater Syracuse can assist you with locating, maintaining, or replacing your home’s sewage tank.

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How Your Septic System Works

Underground wastewater treatment facilities, known as septic systems, are often employed in rural regions where there are no centralized sewage lines. They clean wastewater from residential plumbing, such as that produced by bathrooms, kitchen drains, and laundry, by combining natural processes with well-established technology. A conventional septic system is comprised of two components: a septic tank and a drainfield, often known as a soil absorption field. It is the septic tank’s job to decompose organic matter and to remove floatable stuff (such as oils and grease) and solids from wastewater.

Alternate treatment systems rely on pumps or gravity to assist septic tank effluent in trickling through a variety of media such as sand, organic matter (e.g., peat and sawdust), constructed wetlands, or other media to remove or neutralize pollutants such as pathogens that cause disease, nitrogen, phosphorus, and other contaminants.

Prior to discharging wastewater into the environment, several alternative systems are designed to evaporate or disinfect the effluent.

Specifically, this is how a typical conventional septic system works:

  1. All of the water that leaves your home drains down a single main drainage pipe and into a septic tank. An underground, water-tight container, often composed of concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene, serves as a septic system’s holding tank. Its function is to retain wastewater for a long enough period of time to allow particles to sink to the bottom and form sludge, while oil and grease float to the surface and produce scum. Sludge and scum are prevented from exiting the tank and moving into the drainfield region by compartments and a T-shaped outlet. After that, the liquid wastewater (effluent) exits the tank and flows into the drainfield. The drainfield is a shallow, covered hole dug in unsaturated soil that serves as a drainage system. Porous surfaces are used to release pretreated wastewater because they allow the wastewater to pass through the soil and into the groundwater. In the process of percolating through the soil, wastewater is accepted, treated, and dispersed by the soil, finally discharging into groundwater. Finally, if the drainfield becomes overburdened with too much liquid, it can flood, causing sewage to flow to the ground surface or resulting in toilet backups and sink backups. Finally, wastewater percolates into the soil, where it is naturally removed of harmful coliform bacteria, viruses, and nutrients. Coliform bacteria are a kind of bacteria that may be found in the intestines of humans and other warm-blooded animals, with humans being the most common host. As a result of human fecal contamination, it is a sign of this.

The Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority has built an animated, interactive model of how a residential septic system works, which you can view here.

Do you have a septic system?

It’s possible that you’re already aware that you have a septic system. If you are not sure, here are some tell-tale symptoms that you most likely are:

  • You make use of well water. In your home, the water pipe that brings water into the house does not have a meter. In the case of a water bill or a property tax bill, you will see “$0.00 Sewer Amount Charged.” It is possible that your neighbors have a septic system

How to find your septic system

You can locate your septic system once you have confirmed that you have one by following these steps:

  • Taking a look at the “as constructed” drawing of your house
  • Making a visual inspection of your yard for lids and manhole covers
  • Getting in touch with a septic system service provider for assistance in locating it

Failure symptoms: Mind the signs!

A bad odor is not necessarily the first indicator of a septic system that is failing to work properly. Any of the following signs should prompt you to seek expert assistance:

  • Water backing up into the drains of homes and businesses
  • It is especially noticeable in dry weather that the drainfield grass is bright green and spongy. The presence of standing water or muddy soil near your septic system or in your basement
  • A strong stench emanating from the area surrounding the septic tank and drainfield

How Much Water Can My Septic System Handle?

Jones PlumbingSeptic Tank Service hears two typical queries from customers:How long does a sewage system last? andHow much does a septic system cost. And, what is the capacity of my septic tank? The short and long answers are both: it depends on the situation. The amount of water you and others in your household consume on a daily basis has a significant impact on the answers to these questions.

How A Septic Tank Moves Water

Wastewater is defined as water that has been discharged via a domestic faucet and into a drain. If you have water or other liquids in your tank, they will most likely run through the tank and past a filter and into the leach field. Water goes through a tank, and sediments tend to settle to the bottom as it moves through. However, when the tank gets a big volume of water at once — as is the situation while hosting guests — the solids may rush toward and clog the exit pipes.

How Many People Can A Septic Tank Handle?

It all boils down to how much water you use on a daily basis. Typical domestic water storage tanks have capacities that range from 750 gallons to 1,250 gallons, with the average individual using between 60 and 70 gallons of water each day. Specifically, when septic systems and tanks are constructed, contractors typically pick plumbing hardware based on the size of the home. This is a concern because Following an aseptic tank assessment, Jones PlumbingSeptic Tank Service can establish the suitable volume of your septic tank.

3 Tips For Caring For Your Septic System

Living with an aseptic tank is not difficult or time-consuming, but it does need preparation and patience in order to reap the benefits of the system’s full lifespan. To help you maintain your septic system, Jones PlumbingSeptic Tank Service has provided three suggestions.

1. Understand How Much Water Your Daily Activities Use

While older fixtures consume more water than modern, high-efficiency fittings, many homes have a blend of the two types of fixtures in place. Assume that old vs new water-appliances and fixtures consume approximately the same amount of water, based on the following calculations.

  • 1.5 to 2.2 gallons per minute for bathroom sinks, 4–6 gallons each cycle for dishwashers, and 2–5 gallon per minute for kitchen sinks are recommended.
  • For example, showers use 2.1 gallons per minute, or 17.2 gallons per shower
  • Toilets use 1.28 gallons to 7 gallons every flush
  • Washing machines use 15 gallons to 45 gallons per load
  • And sinks use a total of 2.1 gallons per minute.

2. Set Up A Laundry Plan

Scheduling numerous loads over the course of a week is beneficial to the aseptic tank. Washing bedding and clothing in batches allows you to get other home duties done while you wash. Solids have time to settle and water has time to filter out in your septic tank system if you spread your water use over many days.

3. Fix Leaky FaucetsFixtures

Did you know that a running toilet may waste as much as 200 gallons of water each day if left unattended?

It is possible that the sheer volume of water will produce too much water in the septic system, resulting in other problems like standing water in the yard.

Schedule Professional Septic System Care

Have you noticed that your drains are backing up in your home? Alternatively, are damp patches emerging in your yard? If this is the case, it is time to contact Jones PlumbingSeptic Tank Service to arrange for septic tank services. While most septic tanks are capable of handling a significant volume of water, they can get overwhelmed, resulting in painful consequences. To arrange an appointment with us if your system is having difficulty keeping up with household demand or if you believe it is time for a septic tank cleaning, please call us now.

When Should You Replace Your Septic Tank Filter?

You may have forgotten about your septic tank filter, just as you would have forgotten about any other minor item doing a significant task. The need to clean or replace it on a regular basis cannot be overstated. Let’s take a deeper look at what’s going on.

Why It’s Important to Change Your Septic Tank Filter

The following benefits accrue to you and your septic system as a result of replacing your septic tank filter.

  • Improve the efficiency of your septic system
  • Extend the life of your septic system
  • Preventing unanticipated issues from happening is essential. Prevent your pipes from becoming clogged. Save money on repairs and replacements by doing it yourself.

How Often Should You Replace Your Septic Tank Filter?

The longevity of your septic filter is determined by a variety of factors, including the manufacturer, your degree of septic system upkeep, and the amount of people that live in your home. The rule of thumb is to change your filter every 3-5 years, or as frequently as you need to have your septic tank professionally drained.

See also:  How Many People Will A 1200 Gallon Septic Tank Support? (Solution)

How to Change or Clean a Septic Tank Filter

So, what precisely is the procedure for replacing a septic tank filter? Fortunately, it’s a really simple process. Simply follow the instructions outlined below.

1. Unscrew and open the tank.

First and foremost, the lid must be removed. In certain cases, concrete is used for the tank’s lid, while in other cases, plastic is used for the lid. It must be unscrewed or lifted from the tank in order to reach the filter.

2. Remove the filter from the baffle.

The “baffle” of a septic tank refers to the area where the pipes enter and exit the tank. Using the filter, you can keep thick sludge from combining with your effluent and escaping via your pipework. To remove the septic tank filter, you can either use a rake or gloved hands to do it. Wear clothing that you don’t mind getting soiled if you want to participate. Examine the plastic filter for broken pieces or other signs of wear and tear. Because a faulty filter may have difficulty performing its function, it is critical to replace broken filters rather than simply clean them.

4. If cleaning, hose filter off with water.

To clean your filter if it simply need cleaning and not replacement, use a spray nozzle to wash out the extra waste. You have the option of rinsing the waste directly into the septic tank. Prepare yourself for some retaliation by wearing protective eye and mouth protection.

5. If changing, safely dispose of filter.

Remember to rinse the filter well before properly disposing of or recycling the plastic component if you are completely replacing it. Take your new filter and insert it into the baffle in the same manner that it was taken out of it.

Additional Septic Maintenance Tips

You can also take good care of your septic system by doing regular maintenance on it.

1. Schedule professional septic system inspections.

Annual septic system tune-ups may save you a lot of money in the long run by preventing costly repairs. Septic system pumping should be performed every three to five years as well.

2. Be kind to your plumbing.

Please refrain from flushing goods that are not flushable, such as paper towels, baby wipes, and feminine products, down the toilet.

Other than gray water, avoid flushing anything down your toilet or sink drains.

3. Nip small problems in the bud.

Making repairs as soon as possible helps to avoid the development of long-term difficulties. This helps you save money while also extending the life of your system. Septic tank cleaning and septic tank pumping services are provided by Norway Septic Inc., a service-oriented company devoted to delivering outstanding septic tank cleaning and septic tank pumping services to households and business owners throughout the Michiana area. We take great delight in finishing the task that others have left unfinished.

Frequently Asked Questions

Our Septic System FAQ page is designed to provide answers to many of the more frequently asked concerns about septic systems. If you have a question that is not answered here, please do not hesitate to contact us and we will do our best to answer it as soon as possible.

  • What exactly is a Septic System as-built
  • What is the best way to locate the position of my septic tank lids and other septic system components
  • What effect would saving water have on my septic system? The following items should not be disposed of in your septic system: Can I use my garbage disposal in conjunction with my septic system? What does it indicate when my drains are slow
  • What should I do if my septic system is backing up
  • And other questions. What should I do if the power goes out and my septic system is dependent on a pump
  • Is it necessary to install a filter in my septic tank? How often should I clean the filter in my septic tank? Can I have the lids of my septic tank placed so that they are flush with the surface of the ground? How do I know what it means when my septic alarm goes off
  • Are you obligated to get your Septic System assessed if you are planning to sell your home? Are there any restrictions on planting over my drain field or reserved drain field? Is it legal for me to drive or park on my drain field? Was the drain field replaced, and how big was the reserve area? Does using additives reduce the frequency with which I have to pump my septic tank
  • The frequency with which I should empty my septic tank and pump tank
  • The expense of a new septic system or drain field
  • And the frequency with which I should empty my pump tank Exactly what is the difference between a drain field and a leach field
  • Where can I locate a Septic designer
  • And other questions.

What exactly is a Septic System as-built? It is a drawing of your Septic System that shows the position of the various septic system components in relation to the various structures on the site. The SepticAsbuilt is normally finished after the Septic System is installed or repaired by the Septic Designer or Installer, which is typically when the Septic System is constructed. return to the top of the page What is the best way to locate the position of my septic tank lids and other septic system components?

  • In most circumstances, your local Health District will have an Asbuilt design available for you to review.
  • Utilize the resources offered to connect with the local Health Department in your county and then proceed as directed by the instructions to locate your Septic Affidavit.
  • If there is a design on file, look through it to see where the lids or other components that you need to identify are located.
  • Then you may use a metal rod to probe the ground in a grid pattern, looking for the tank if you can’t find it immediately.
  • If there are any more components that need to be discovered, we can locate them as well, using methods such as probing, electrical locating, and other approaches.
  • Yes, lowering your water use will aid in extending the life of your septic system and ensuring that it continues to function effectively.
  • This quantity varies depending on the kind of soil and the number of bedrooms in the house being constructed.

Septic systems should never be used to dispose of goods that are toxic or hazardous to the environment.

Please see the link below for a printable document including a detailed list of these products as well as alternative Septic System maintenance procedures.

Although it is not suggested to use your waste disposal, many new houses are equipped with one at the time of construction.

A waste disposal should also be installed, and its filter should be cleaned on a regular basis, as the installation of a garbage disposal will cause the effluent filter to become clogged more frequently.

Slow drains might be one of the first signs that your septic system is having problems, and they can be quite frustrating.

It is advised that you contact us, and we would be happy to assist you with troubleshooting your system.

If your septic system is backing up, you should immediately turn off all water to the house and contact a professional for assistance.

In any case, we can assist you in getting your system back on track.

If your septic system is powered by one or more pumps, you should be cautious about how much water you use whenever the electricity goes out.

For scenarios like as power outages, certain older systems, on the other hand, may only have a limited amount of storage space.

If this is the case, it is usually a good idea to contact someone as soon as the alarm has been hushed.

return to the top of the page Should I put in a filter in my septic tank to keep the odors down?

The use of a filter considerably decreases the amount of sediments that would otherwise block the drain field, hence extending the life of the septic tank.

Most manufacturers recommend that you clean the effluent filter in your Septic Tank once every six months to ensure that it operates properly.

It is usually advisable to perform some regular filter cleaning to keep the septic tank from backing up into the home and causing flooding.

Yes, adding lids that rise to the surface, commonly known as “risers,” is incredibly beneficial in keeping your septic system in good working condition.

They also make cleaning the filter in the Septic Tank (if one is installed) a matter of minutes rather than hours.

return to the top of the page The sound of my Septic Alarm indicates that something is wrong.

If you find yourself in this position, you should get your septic system tested right away.

In any case, it should most likely be evaluated as soon as possible in order to avoid a potential backlog or to avoid incurring further expenses.

return to the top of the page I’m getting ready to put my house on the market; do I need to get my septic system assessed first?

With a few exceptions, King County mandates that every property sale or transfer be subjected to a mandated inspection, which may be found here.

However, virtually all lenders need a home inspection before approving a loan and finalizing the transaction.

return to the top of the page Are there any restrictions on planting over my drain field or reserve drain field?

Generally speaking, if the reserve drain field has never been de-brushed, it is absolutely OK to keep it as is.

Over time, plants and trees will become aware of the nutrient-rich effluent that is being released into your drain field and sprout roots either in the drain field or around the components, preventing the effluent from dispersing correctly.

return to the top of the page Is it legal for me to drive or park on my drain field?

The majority of the time, there is no long-term harm to light automobiles under extremely limited scenarios.

return to the top of the page Was the drain field replaced or was there a backup plan in place?

Although the reserve area is not necessarily the only location where a replacement drain field may be installed, it is the area that was chosen as a result of a variety of considerations at the time of the initial design.

Yes, even if you use additives, you will still need to pump your septic tank on a regular schedule.

In rare cases, additives may be beneficial, but in the majority of Septic Systems, there are enough bacteria present naturally that they are not required.

The frequency with which your Septic Tank has to be pumped might vary based on a number of factors, including the size of your home, the size of your Septic Tank, how often you use your trash disposal, the age of your Septic System, and other considerations.

return to the top of the page How often should I empty the contents of my Pump Tank?

On average, most homeowners using Pump Tanks should pump their septic tanks roughly every third time they do so.

return to the top of the page What is the cost of a new Septic System / drain field installation?

Despite the fact that each system is custom-designed for its specific location, there is a standard range of septic system and drain field expenses.

Prices might vary greatly depending on whether the property is an existing home in need of renovation or a vacant piece of land with no structure on it.

Installation of a new system normally costs between $8,000 and $30,000.

Although there may always be exceptions to these prices, both on the high and low ends of the spectrum, this can at the very least provide a general notion of what the costs might be in a given situation.

The region where a septic system’s waste is disposed of is referred to as a drain field or a leach field, among other names.

The soil is often the final step in the process of cleaning and removing toxins from water before it is returned to the environment as a freshwater source.

We have a number of excellent designers with whom we collaborate on a regular basis.

In certain cases, depending on where you live and the circumstance you are in, there may be a designer who is more appropriate for your needs. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you require a reference depending on your circumstances. return to the top of the page

How to Clean Your Septic Systems Filter

Six months have flown by, isn’t it amazing how fast time passes? Following these nine simple steps will allow you to clean your filter when it is necessary! Let’s get this party started.

Need extra help? Watch Curtis from our parent company explain how to do this via video:

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