How To Install A Septic Tank And Fill Lines?

  • Use a backhoe to dig trenches where you will install your septic lines. Make sure you dig to the required depth according to local regulations. Always leave enough room between center pieces while also allowing for adequate drops in the line. A typical trench is three-feet deep and one to three feet wide.

How much field line do I need for a septic tank?

A typical septic drainfield trench is 18 to 30 inches in depth, with a maximum soil cover over the disposal field of 36″; or per the USDA, 2 feet to 5 feet in depth.

How do you build a septic tank drain field?

Place a thick layer of gravel at least 1 foot deep along the entire length of the trench. One and a half feet of gravel would be better. Place perforated pipe into the trench on top of the gravel and, using a clamp, attach the pipe to the septic tank drain.

Can you have a septic tank without a leach field?

The waste from most septic tanks flows to a soakaway system or a drainage field. If your septic tank doesn’t have a drainage field or soakaway system, the waste water will instead flow through a sealed pipe and empty straight into a ditch or a local water course.

How deep should septic drain field be?

A typical drainfield trench is 18 to 30 inches in depth, with a maximum soil cover over the disposal field of 36 inches.

Can you add dirt on top of leach field?

Never add additional soil over the drain field unless it is a minimal amount used to restore an area that may have been eroded or pulled up by removing another plant. Try not to be overly zealous when tilling the soil for planting. Remember that the drain lines may be as close as 6 inches from the soil surface.

How do I calculate the size of my septic drain field?

Drainfield Size

  1. The size of the drainfield is based on the number of bedrooms and soil characteristics, and is given as square feet.
  2. For example, the minimum required for a three bedroom house with a mid range percolation rate of 25 minutes per inch is 750 square feet.

How far should a septic tank be from a house?

Most importantly, a septic tank must be at least seven metres from a house, defined as a ‘habitable property’. Septic tanks are built underground and release wastewater slowly into the surrounding environment. For this reason, they must be a set distance away from a home.

How is plumbing from house connected to septic tank?

The septic tank is connected to the house by a single main drainage pipe also called inlet pipe. The water waste from your home goes through it and into the septic tank where solid and liquid waste are separated from liquid.

How do you tell if your septic tank is full?

How to tell your septic tank is full and needs emptying

  1. Pooling water.
  2. Slow drains.
  3. Odours.
  4. An overly healthy lawn.
  5. Sewer backup.
  6. Gurgling Pipes.
  7. Trouble Flushing.

Can I install my own leach field?

You may also need to pull a permit to put in a new leach field. A leach field is an important part of a septic system. It disperses fluid from the septic system over a large area of soil adjacent to the building it services. Building your own leach field is physically difficult, but it can save you lots of money.

What kind of pipe is used for septic drain field?

Corrugated pipe is typically used for drain fields. Septic systems use drain fields to treat the septic tank effluent for the removal of impurities and contaminants. The field is made up of trenches typically containing washed “drainrock” or gravel.

Should you fill a new septic tank with water?

2 Answers. Yes the system should be filled with water and the installer should have done that. There is a good chance the tanks can float out of the hole if it rains heavy when they are first put in if you do not put water in them.

How to Install a Septic System

Documentation Download Documentation Download Documentation In rural regions of the nation where waste water treatment is not accessible, private on-site wastewater treatment systems (POWTS), also known as septic systems, are utilized largely to treat waste water. Gravity fed/conventional systems are divided into two broad categories: 1. gravity fed/conventional systems and 2. alternative (pump) systems, which include aerobic treatment units (ATUs.) In most cases, electric pumps are used in alternative systems.

However, in many health jurisdictions across the United States, it is still feasible for an individual property owner with heavy equipment operation skills to utilize a backhoe to establish a septic system on their land.

Steps

  1. 1 Make a plan and design for your system. Performing a site survey and conducting a percolation (soil) test on the area where the POWTS is to be placed are both required initial steps in any septic system installation. In order to create a system, it is necessary to first gather information from surveyors and conduct a soil test. It is then possible to submit an application for the necessary permissions and approvals.
  • The following are some of the conclusions from the site survey that have an impact on the design:
  • Available space
  • Terrain
  • Intended purpose and projected water demand depending on the size of the residence or building that the system will serve
  • Location of the well and/or nearby wells
  • And other factors.
  • The following are examples of soil test findings that have an impact on the design:
  • The soil type and layering (sand, clay, rock, and where it is placed in relation to depth)
  • The soil’s ability to drain and filter wastewater
  • And the soil’s ability to drain and filter wastewater
  1. 2Wait for clearance before proceeding. The system may be deployed once all of the relevant permissions and approvals have been obtained. Make certain that all of the steps listed below are carried out in accordance with all applicable laws, plumbing rules, and building codes. Advertisement

Please keep in mind that the following procedure assumes that the system is being installed for the first time and not as a replacement.

  1. 1 Assemble the equipment and tools that will be used throughout the dig. You will require the following items:
  • Backhoe, laser transit, and grade pole are all included. A 4″ Sch. 40 PVC pipe (and fittings, if necessary)
  • A 4″ ASTM D2729 perforated pipe
  • A 4″ASTM D3034 pipe and fittings
  • A 4″ Sch. 40 vent cap and test cap
  • PVC primer and adhesive
  • A 4″ Sch. 40 vent cap and test cap The following tools will be required: Saw (either hand saw or cordless reciprocating saw)
  • Hammer drill and bits (for drilling through walls if necessary)
  • The following items are required: hydraulic cement (to seal surrounding pipe if pipe is going through wall)
  • Shovel
  • Stone measuring an inch and a half and cleaned (amount varies depending on system size)
  • Tape measurements (both ordinary and at least a 100-foot-long tape)
  • Septic fabric (cut to 3′ length or less from a roll)
  • Septic tank and risers (concrete or plastic if allowed)
  • Riser sealant such as Con-Seal (for concrete) or silicone caulk (for plastic)
  • A septic filter (such as a Zoeller 170 or similar) if one is necessary
  • A distribution box (either concrete or plastic, if more than two laterals are being run)
  • And a septic tank.
  • 2 Determine the location of the entrance to the building in relation to the location of the septic tank. Make an excavation at least 2 feet deep and drill a hole through the wall, or go deeper and drill a hole beneath the footing, depending on your preference or the need. Because this is precisely what a gravity-fed system is designed to accomplish, expect the flow to continue to flow downhill from here. When transferring waste from the tank to the drain field, it does not employ any mechanical methods other than gravity.
  • The pipe should be 4″ Sch. 40 and should extend at least five feet outside the structure toward the tank, either through the wall or beneath it. Set it level where it will pass through a wall or under a footing, and from there, run it with approximately 1/8″ of pitch (slope) every foot of length toward the septic tank until it reaches the tank. If necessary, go even farther into the tank or all the way into the tank. If this is the case, switch to 4″ 3034 with the appropriate adaptor and pipe 3034 toward the tank.
  • Make sure you use a test cap on the end that will be entering the building. It is recommended that if you are going through a wall, you seal the area around the hole with hydraulic cement both inside and outside
  • Do not run too much pitch out to the tank. If there is an excessive amount, the water will run away quicker than the sediments, resulting in the solids remaining in the pipe. Additionally, depending on the depth of your drain field and how close it will be to the tank’s outflow, there may not be enough pitch to get to the drain field.
  • 3 Dig a hole large enough to accommodate the installation of the concrete aerobic tank below ground. Make use of the laser transit to “shoot” the top of the pipe that leads out to the tank with the laser. The distance between the top of the intake and the bottom of the tank is measured in feet and inches. To the number you fired off the top of the pipe, add this (go up on the grade pole) + 1 1/2″ to get the total. The depth of the grade pole has now been adjusted to the desired depth. Using this, continue to drill the hole to the desired depth
  • Prepare your leech field by laying it out and excavating it according to the results of the test performed during the permit application procedure. Maintaining a good flow between the tank and the drain field should be considered when planning out and digging the tank.
  1. 4Use “inch-and-a-half cleaned drain rock” from a neighboring gravel dump to surround the pipe, which is required in most areas. This is necessary in order to keep the pipe stable. For further information on the size of embedment and gravel required, check with your local health department. Five-inch perforated pipe in a gravity drain field does not have a slope from one end to another and has capped ends
  2. Once you have received a green sticker from the health inspector, you must cover the pipe and tank. All places, subject to the restrictions of the local health authority, will be required to cover the drain rock with a specific filter fabric, newspaper, four inches of straw, or untreated construction paper before backfilling. Advertisement
  1. 4Use “inch-and-a-half cleaned drain rock” from a neighboring gravel dump to surround the pipe, which is required by most authorities. Maintaining the pipe’s stability is essential. Determine the size of embedment and gravel needed by consulting your local health department. The perforated pipe in a gravity drain field has no slope from one end to the other and has capped ends. Once you’ve received a green sticker from the health inspector, you may begin covering the pipe and tank. The use of a specific filter cloth, newspaper, four inches of straw, or untreated construction paper to cover the drain rock prior to backfilling will be required in all regions, depending on the laws of the local health department. Advertisement
  • Set up the pump chamber in the same manner as you would a septic tank. The effluent pump and floats are housed in the pump chamber, and they are responsible for pumping the effluent out to the drain field at predetermined or scheduled intervals. This is a hermetically sealed system. To ensure that the electrical installation complies with state standards, it is frequently necessary to hire a qualified electrician. It is important to remember that in places with high groundwater, the pump chamber or additional ATUs may remain essentially empty for long periods of time, and that these tanks may need to be safeguarded from floating by the installation of additional weight or other protective features.
  1. Secondly, all construction details, including the layout of all sewers outside of the home, the location and depth of all tanks, the routing and depth of pressurized effluent lines, and other system components, such as the drain field and any additional ATUs, must be consistent with the septic system plans approved by the local county health department. Cover the tank and pressurized lines once the inspector has given his final clearance and the system has been turned on. Advertisement

Create a new question

  • Question I had a tank put, but it isn’t level with the ground. What will be the ramifications of this, and should it be leveled? It is necessary to keep the tank level. It is difficult to predict what it will have an impact on because we do not know which direction it is off level. Question Is it necessary to be concerned about tree roots growing into the drainage area when using a gravity flow kind of tank? Whether or whether you have lateral lines is dependent on the kind of trees that are growing close or above them. Tree species that tend to extend roots into the lateral lines and obstruct them are known as ramifications. Due to the fact that they are buried deep in the ground and surrounded by a pocket of gravel that allows waste water to drain out, they are rarely affected by grass, weeds, and shrubs. Question What is the maximum depth that a pipe may be lowered into the leech bed? The majority of systems require 12 volts “in the form of rock The perforated pipe should be suspended in the top area of the rock
  • It should not be touching the rock. Question Maintaining a lush green grass on or above your pitch is it safe, or is it a good practice? According to what I’ve heard, brown or dead grass is preferred so that your field can breathe more easily. It is necessary for your field to take a breath. The presence of green grass across your field indicates that it is functioning well. With lush grass covering your field, it will be able to breathe. There should be no planting of woody shrubs or trees over the leach field. Question What is the recommended distance between the septic tank and the house/boundary? A minimum of fifty feet is required. States have different laws, but this is the most common distance
  • Nonetheless, other states have stricter laws. Question What is the average amount of soil that goes into a residential leach field? It is dependent on how chilly it becomes. There are no less than 12 in the northern United States “in the leach field’s surface
  • Question Is it possible to build a septic system during the cold months? What you should do will depend on whether or not you reside in a place where the ground freezes. Question What amount of water should I put in the tank to get it going? None. A typical tank holds 1,000 gallons and will fill up quite quickly if used on a regular basis. When liquid effluent is discharged to the drain field, the goal is to catch and pre-treat particles that have accumulated. It is possible that a pump system will require water to prime the pump. Question There is a misalignment between my septic field’s underground line and the pipe on the tank. Is it OK to utilize a 90-degree elbow on my septic tank? As long as you have decent downhill flow, you should be fine. Instead of using a 90, I would use two 45s. Question If I’m installing a septic system, when should I contact an inspector? Immediately following system installation but before earth is used to cover the system in place Always check with the inspector ahead of time to verify that they can satisfy your inspection needs
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  • The use of aerobic bacterial additions (which are available at most DIY stores) to maintain a healthy and well functioning system, as suggested by producers on a periodic basis, is contentious. The septic tank is an anaerobic (wet) environment in which the majority of yeasts and other additions will have little or no effect on the sewage being processed. When it comes to installing septic tanks, some old school installers believe that placing an additive, a shovel of muck, or even a dead cat in an empty tank will “start” the process. What naturally enters the tank serves as the only thing that is necessary. The aerobic (wet or dry) component of the system consists of hundreds of square feet of drain field, where additives will do little help even if they make it all the way to the end of the system. The use of chemicals in septic systems has not been the subject of an independent research that has been published in a respectable scientific publication anywhere in the world, including this nation. This will mostly certainly be confirmed by your local health department. Each phase of the building process will almost certainly include an examination by a health inspector before the work can be completed or covered up. On pressurized lines, the use of a sand embedment is recommended in order to reduce the amount of damage caused by moving soil that has a high concentration of clay. When pumps are turned on and off, pressurized lines might move as well. Four inches (10.2 cm) of sand bedding on all four sides of the lines will prevent sharp pebbles from the ground or backfill from wearing holes in the pipe over time
  • And

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  • Keep the perforated pipe for the leech field in a vertical position while installing it to avoid having the holes in the pipe turn downward. It is necessary to lay the perforated drain field pipe ASTM 2729 dead level, so that the printed line on the pipe is facing up. The perforations on both sides of the pipe are on both sides of the pipe. All of the sections of perforated pipe are cemented together, and the ends of each leach line are capped to complete the installation. So, when waste water enters the pipe, it will fill the pipe to the height of the perforations and overflow from ALL of the holes, utilising the whole leach field as a means of treatment. In certain health authorities, you can utilize waste water to water grass or decorative plants, trees, vegetable gardens, and fruit trees if you place the perforated pipe on a slope. However, the water must first be cleaned by the system (tertiary treatment includes disinfection) in order to prevent pathogens (germs) from the septic system from being discharged into the environment throughout the process. Make sure to check with your local health authority to verify if the practice known as “reuse” is permitted in your community.

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Things You’ll Need

  • The following tools are required: backhoe tractor, trencher, shovel, contractor’s laser level and rod, or a surveyor’s transit. Septic tanks
  • s PVC perforated pipe
  • Material for embedding
  • PVC adhesive, PVC fittings, and a septic tank outlet filter are all included. Hand saw
  • Course file
  • Sandpaper If necessary, effluent pumps and floats are installed. If an alternate system is used, a control panel is installed.

About This Article

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The installation of a septic tank is not a do-it-yourself activity. Image courtesy of Kwangmoozaa/iStock/Getty Images. You shouldn’t try to build a septic system yourself unless you are a heavy equipment operator or a professional. Even if you have heavy gear at your disposal and are familiar with how to use it, you will still require a significant amount of expert assistance. There are many professionals you’ll need: a soil expert to assess the site, an engineer to design an acceptable system, a plumbing contractor to construct and connect pipes, and maybe an electrician to assist with the installation of any pumps or timers that may be necessary.

Septic System Design Variations

A total of nine different types of septic systems are listed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, and that doesn’t even include systems that are not gravity-fed and instead rely on a transfer pump. Septic tanks and a drain field sunk into the earth are the components of the traditional septic system. This is the system that most people envision, but it is only one option, and it is not always appropriate. Depending on soil quality, topography, drainage conditions, expected usage, and other factors, local health authorities may require a different system, which requires an engineer to design it and obtain the necessary permits in collaboration with the health authorities.

Some septic systems need the importation of filler materials such as sand, gravel, or other filler materials, as well as septic components other than the typical tank and perforated drain pipes, in order to function properly.

Installation Isn’t a Straight Shot

The designs are in hand, but it is not always a straight line from there to the actual installation for the homeowner who is working with an engineering firm. Mr. Rooter, in fact, gives the following advise to homeowners who are considering installing their own septic components: Don’t. Just too many things can go wrong with a system, leading to poor drainage, ineffective plumbing in the house, or contamination of the local water table, to mention. For those who are inclined to do it themselves, or for whom the circumstances demand that they do it themselves, and who have access to an excavator and crane, the installation of a standard system is quite straightforward to comprehend and execute.

Installing a Conventional Septic System

A traditional septic installation begins with the excavation of a hole for the tank in accordance with the placement specifications provided on your approved plan. After putting the tank into the hole, you link it to the building sewer using 3- or 4-inch waste pipe, which must maintain a minimum slope toward the tank, and you extend a drain pipe from the other end of the tank to a distribution box positioned in the drain field. After that, you’ll need to dig a series of parallel trenches that will extend from this box all the way across the drain field.

  1. Connect the pipes to the distribution box and cover the pipes with a sheet of plywood.
  2. In order for a gravity-fed septic system to function properly, the building and drain field must be on a consistent downhill slope.
  3. An alarm system that warns you if a fault occurs must be linked to the pump in addition to the power source.
  4. For this reason, having the pump installed by a professional electrician who can guarantee the job is highly advised.

Septic Tank Installation and Pricing

To process and dispose of waste, a septic system has an underground septic tank constructed of plastic, concrete, fiberglass, or other material that is located beneath the earth. Designed to provide a customized wastewater treatment solution for business and residential locations, this system may be installed anywhere. Although it is possible to install a septic tank on your own, we recommend that you hire a professional to do so due to the amount of expertise and specialized equipment required.

Who Needs a Septic Tank?

For the most part, in densely populated areas of the nation, a home’s plumbing system is directly connected to the municipal sewer system.

For more remote regions, municipal sewer connections aren’t available therefore sewage is treated with a septic tank. If you’re moving into a newly constructed house or onto land that doesn’t already have a septic tank, you’ll be responsible for putting in a septic system on your own.

How to Prepare for Your Septic Tank Installation

Here are a few pointers to keep in mind to make sure your septic tank installation goes as smoothly as possible.

Receive Multiple Estimates

Receiving quotations from licensed septic tank installers and reading reviews about each firm using trustworthy, third-party customer evaluations should be done before any excavation or signing of any paperwork is done. Examine your options for a contractor and make sure they have the appropriate insurance and license, as well as the ability to include critical preparations such as excavation and drain field testing in their quotation.

Test the Soil and Obtain a Permit

For septic systems to function properly, permeable soil surrounding the tank must absorb and naturally handle liquid waste, ensuring that it does not pollute runoff water or seep into the groundwater. The drain or leach field is the name given to this region. Before establishing a septic tank, you are required by law to do a percolation test, sometimes known as a “perc” test. This test indicates that the soil fits the specifications established by the city and the local health agency. In most cases, suitable levels of permeable materials, such as sand or gravel, are necessary in a soil’s composition.

Note: If you wish to install a septic tank on your property, you must first ensure that the ground passes the percolation test.

Plan for Excavation

Excavation of the vast quantity of land required for a septic tank necessitates the use of heavy machinery. If you are presently residing on the property, be careful to account for landscaping fees to repair any damage that may have occurred during the excavation process. Plan the excavation for your new home at a period when it will have the least influence on the construction process if you are constructing a new home. Typically, this occurs before to the paving of roads and walkways, but after the basic structure of the home has been constructed and erected.

The Cost of Installing a Septic Tank

There are a few installation charges and additional expenditures connected with constructing a new septic system, ranging from a percolation test to emptying the septic tank and everything in between.

Percolation Test

A percolation test can range in price from $250 to $1,000, depending on the area of the property and the soil characteristics that are being tested. Ordinarily, specialists will only excavate a small number of holes in the intended leach field region; however, if a land study is required to identify where to excavate, the cost of your test may rise.

Building Permit Application

A permit will be required if you want to install a septic tank on your property. State-by-state variations in permit prices exist, however they are normally priced around $200 and must be renewed every few years on average.

Excavation and Installation

When you have passed a percolation test and obtained a building permit, your septic tank is ready to be professionally placed.

The cost of a new septic system is determined by the size of your home, the kind of system you choose, and the material used in your septic tank. The following is a list of the many treatment methods and storage tanks that are now available, as well as the normal pricing associated with each.

Types of Septic Tank Systems

Septic system that is used in the traditional sense Traditionally, a septic system relies on gravity to transport waste from the home into the septic tank. Solid trash settles at the bottom of the sewage treatment plant, while liquid sewage rises to the top. Whenever the amount of liquid sewage increases over the outflow pipe, the liquid waste is discharged into the drain field, where it continues to disintegrate. This type of traditional septic system is generally the most economical, with an average cost of roughly $3,000 on the market today.

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Drain fields for alternative systems require less land than conventional systems and discharge cleaner effluent.

Septic system that has been engineered A poorly developed soil or a property placed on an uphill slope need the installation of an engineered septic system, which is the most difficult to install.

It is necessary to pump the liquid waste onto a leach field, rather than depending on gravity to drain it, in order to ensure that it is equally dispersed across the land.

Types of Septic Tanks

  • Concrete septic tanks are long-lasting and rust-proof, but they are difficult to repair if they are damaged. It is possible that concrete tanks will cost up to $2,000 depending on their size. Plastic —While plastic tanks are cost-effective, they are also susceptible to damage. They are around $1,200 in price. Fiberglass —While fiberglass septic tanks are more durable than their plastic counterparts, they are susceptible to shifting or displacement if the water table rises to an excessive level. Depending on the model, these tanks may cost up to $2,000

More information may be found at: Septic Warranty Coverage and Costs.

Using Your Septic Tank

It is important to maintain the area around your new septic tank’s drain field and to frequently check your tank using the lids included with it. Never use a trash disposal in conjunction with your septic tank since it might cause the system to clog. Additionally, avoid driving over the land where your septic tank is located or putting heavy gear on top of your septic tank or drain field to prevent damage. Most of the time, after five years of septic system use, you’ll need to arrange a cleaning and pumping of the system.

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Guide to Installing Septic Drainfield Piping on steep slopes

  • Send us a question or make a comment about how to construct a septic system on a steeply sloping lot.

InspectAPedia does not allow any form of conflict of interest. The sponsors, goods, and services described on this website are not affiliated with us in any way. Septic systems with steep slopes are known as steep slope drainfield systems. A septic drainfield or leach line is described in this article, which is applicable to tough terrain, such as steep slopes, where a property dispose of wastewater using an aseptic tank and a drainfield.

We also have anARTICLE INDEX for this topic, and you can use the SEARCH BOXes at the top and bottom of the page to obtain the information you need quickly and easily.

Guide to Septic Installations on Steep Slopes or Stepped Slopes

Sewer or septic line installation on steep sites is also covered, and for those who are inspecting or testing their septic system, DIFFICULT SEPTIC SITES is another good resource to consult. Technical reviewers are encouraged to participate and are noted under “References.” Allowable uses of this content include making a reference to this website and providing a brief quotation for the sole purpose of review. The author retains the right to use this content on other websites, in books, or in pamphlets that are available for purchase.

Apart from this text (which may be found below), readers interested in septic installation guidance for steeply sloping or rolling sites should study the following articles:

  • THE INSTALLATION OF Sewage OR SEPTIC LINES ON STEEP SITES is a term that refers to the installation of sewer or septic line pipes connecting a structure to its septic tank or sewer main on steep sites that slope down substantially between the structure and the septic tank. SYSTEMS DE DOSAGE For hilly sites where the drainfield must be located either uphill or downhill from a septic tank or structure, PRESSURE is a term that refers to pressure dosing systems that may be beneficial for disposing of sewage. GRAVELLESS SEPTIC SYSTEMS – Other gravelless systems are capable of handling mild bends required to follow rolling slope lines
  • However, some gravelless systems are not. Sewage pumps, sewage ejector pumps, grinder pumps, effluent pumps, sump pumps, septic pumping stations, and sewer pump alarms are examples of systems that will be required if the building or septic tank is located below the drainfield or sewer main. Installation of septic drainfields on steep or undulating terrain is described in detail in STEEP SLOPE DESIGNS(text found immediately below)

Guide to Installing Steep Slope Septic Drainfield Systems

The sketch at the top of the page illustrates one strategy for installing septic drainfields on a steep or rolling slope. Septic tank and seepage pit systems are seen in the photo above, which is placed in the flat region below the hillside and connected to a sewer line running down the steep slope. The question becomes, however, what to do when the septic effluent absorption system or soakbed itself must be placed down a steep hillside. Here are some details about the product.

  • Septic systems with a D-box for steep slopes: When septic effluent is clarified, it is discharged from the septic tank (or an effluent pumping station) and directed into a big distribution box. A larger D-box with more connection ports will be required than those used for a standard flat-area drainfield since each effluent line that will be installed across the hillside will need to be connected directly to the D-box. Separate effluent lines for steep slope septics are required: Individual septic effluent drain lines are connected to the distribution box, and each of these drain lines is directed to a separate gravel trench and perforated drainfield. Feeder pipes for effluent lines in steep slope septic systems include the following: It is not perforated, but rather solid pipe that connects the distribution box to the drainfield trench. Effluent lines for hillside or rolling land drainfields are placed along the slope, not uphill or downhill, and sloping gently (1/8″ to 1/4″ per linear foot) from the inlet end of each drainfield trench to the lowest point of the drainfield trenches.

Installing Septic Drainfield Piping on Steep Slopes Located Downhill from the Septic Tank – Rolling Land

  • For steep slope septics, flexible distribution pipe or gravelless systems are recommended: Because flexible effluent lines may be routed in a trench that must be curved in order to remain parallel to the fall line of the slope of rounded hilltops or rolling ground, flexible piping may be more convenient to construct than rigid pipe systems in areas where the land is rolling or contoured. Dosing with high pressure for steep slope septic systems: Septic effluent handling methods, such as pressure distribution systems, may be more forgiving of installation on steep or uneven sloping ground, and they may use rigid or flexible perforated pipe, depending on the application. Pressurized Septic Systems (also known as Pressure Dosing Septic Systems)
  • For septic system effluent dispersal, drip lines—which employ flexible distribution piping—might also be effective on some steep locations. Some aerobic systems that dispose of effluent using drip systems or spray systems, or that feed drip irrigation systems, can solve the problem of steep slope septic effluent disposal, according to the manufacturer. AEROBIC SEPTIC SYSTEMS, ATUs, ATUs-home Alternatively, see DESIGN AND INSTALLATION GUIDE FOR HOOT AEROBIC SYSTEMS DRIP DISPOSAL Alternatively, see “Guidance for the Design, Installation, and Operation of Subsurface Drip Distribution Systems as a Replacement for Conventional Title 5 Soil Absorption Systems for the Disposal of Septic Tank Effluent,” published by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection in 2006, which rewrites the state’s 310 CMR 15.240, 15.242, 15.247, and 15.280-15.289 regulations. Graywater disposal systems also include designs that can assist with effluent of graywater GREYWATER SYSTEMS are discussed more below.

Why Drainfield Effluent lines need to be properly sloped

Septic drainfields that use gravity to treat and dispose of cleared wastewater effluent must be correctly pitched and never slope too steeply to ensure effective operation. If this is not done, effluent will flow too fast to the low end of the drainfield line and gravel trench, where it is likely to simply break out onto the surface of the land. If you need to build a traditional perforated pipe and gravel trench drainfield on a steep slope, you’ll need to run the trenches parallel to the fall line or down the slope itself, descending down the slope from trench to trench as you go.

Steep Slope Septic Design Research

  • Gustafson, David M., James L. Anderson, Sara F. Heger, and Barbara W. Liukkonen published a paper in which they discussed their findings. Making the decision to install an alternative septic system on a home site with a steep incline (2000). Retrieved on March 30, 2021, from the University of Minnesota Extension. the original source is:

Reader CommentsQ A

On the 25th of May in the year 2020, by (mod) – Is it possible to have the leach lines for a septic tank go uphill from the tank? Although it is possible to place the drainfield above the septic tank, an effluent pumping system will be required. This is an excerpt from the previous remark. This is where the leach line will be put, as opposed to the lower level, where the septic system is buried. When you see the house, it will be on top of this embankment, on the right side of the house, as you approach.

  • Yes.
  • Do you think there will be any issues with this setup, and how long will a pump survive for this system, given that it is not built at the same level as an ordinary septic system?
  • When installing a septic system, may the leach area be constructed on an embankment behind the home?
  • The height of the embankment is equal to the top of the roof of the single-story home that is being constructed.
  • Because the leach area is located on a steep slope away from the septic system, how often will the pump need to be rebuilt and how expensive will this procedure be in the long run of owning your property be?
  • Essentially, you must maintain a slope of 1/8 to 1/4 inch every foot of horizontal flow in order to prevent all effluent from instantly rushing to the end of the system and overloading it.
  • Steve We are therefore discharging sewage into the environment throughout the winter; I agree that diverting surface runoff away from the drainfield could be a good idea.

If none of these options work, we (and by we, I mean you) may have to resort to a raised bed or mound septic system.

The drain field is located on a level part of a hill with a width of around 60 feet.

Should a french drain be installed in the flat area uphill from a drain field in order to sort of isolate the drain field and make it more or less operate as a mound at that point in time?

Thank you, Kelly.

This will ensure that the bottom of your drain field or effluent disposal system has enough soil beneath it that the affluent does not simply hit rock and flow down The Rock and into the lake.

A septic system is being considered for installation on an island that is largely solidrock (Canadian Shield) and slopes into a body of water (Lake Superior) (5 percent to 25 percent gradient in places).

How dependable would a septic system be under these circumstances and what are the difficulties I should be aware of?

How long do you think this system will be able to work before it breaks down?

What is the highest topographic slope that may be accommodated in a septic field servicing a single family property in Frederick County, Maryland?

Thank you so much for your rapid response.

Your solution requires me to install six drop boxes across a 100-foot distance!

A sewage pipe that is excessively steep may cause water to flow too quickly, leaving particles behind.

When using a stepped line method, it is preferable to make each turn through a D box to allow for easier cleaning access.

This is my problem: I’m putting a bathroom and kitchenette in my remote 2400 square foot woodworking shop, which I’m now in the midst of constructing.

I work as a carpenter, mason, and builder.

For the pre-existing septic tank, I have around 20′ of fall and approximately 100′ of run.

The house has been put on hold (waiting for more money).

I don’t live on the construction site, and it appears that it will be several years before I can begin construction on the house.

“the sewage line down to the septic tank should be laid out in a step-wise fashion?

Besides being built on granite bedrock, the septic tank and effluent pump to a drain field are situated on the property to fulfill both perc test criteria and to maintain a minimum distance of 100 feet from a river.

When not attached directly to bedrock, frost footings must have a minimum depth of 5′ to be considered.

Another concern is the presence of black water.

There will be a cleanout installed at the point where the pipe breaks through the foundation wall.

Steve, It’s astonishing to read of 50-year old drainfields that are genuinely still running well, though I have visited a few as well, including a sophisticated system built on an estate around 1920.

See also:  How Much Does It Cost To Replace A Septic Tank System? (Correct answer)

When a system is “functioning,” it implies that it appears to be effectively disposing of effluent – that is, there are no damp spots on the ground.

Nevertheless, in the absence of any failure data, almost no one would dig up and interfere with a drainfield.

It would be beneficial to include more specifics in this section.

Many of these were placed as long as 50 years ago and are still in good working order.

Diverse considerations, including the existence of impermeable strata, seasonal ground water, and slope stability, must be given careful attention.

This was quite beneficial.

It was, without a doubt, pricey.

I figured I’d best include this: Because the drainfield location will be well down-slope from the construction site and tank, a gravity-fed system or a syphon system may be employed.

Standard drain fields are not permitted on slopes more than 25 percent in my area.

This is excellent information.

I have a building site that is on a 24 percent to 30 percent slope. STEEP SITE INSTALLATION OF A SEWER OR SEPTIC LINE CONTINUES READING Alternatively, choose a topic from the closely related articles listed below, or browse the entireARTICLE INDEX. Alternatively, consider the following:

Steep Slope Septic System Articles

  • SEPTIC CONSULTANTS, DESIGNERS, ENGINEERS
  • SEPTIC SYSTEM DESIGN ALTERNATIVES-home
  • SEPTIC SYSTEM DESIGN BASICS-home
  • SEWER / SEPTIC LINES at STEEP SITES
  • STEEP SLOPE SEPTIC DESIGNS
  • SEPTIC CONSULTANTS, DESIGNERS, ENGINEERS
  • SEPTIC CONSULT

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SEPTIC DESIGNS WITH A HIGH SLOPE AT INSPECTION An online encyclopedia of building environmental inspection, testing, diagnosis, repair, and issue preventive information is available at Apedia.com. Alternatively, have a look at this.

INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES:ARTICLE INDEX to SEPTIC SYSTEMS

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How to Run a Septic Tank Line From Your House

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Locating the Septic Tank

The tank serves as the nerve center of the septic system. It is required to be situated between the residence and the drainage field. Each and every septic installation must begin with a soil test, and depending on the results, soil conditions may necessitate the placement of the tank in a less-than-ideal site for digging sewer lines. Also required are minimum setback distances from property borders, functioning wells, surface water and other obstructions to provide a safe working environment.

Tank Depth

A standard septic tank has a 4-inch intake at the top, which is positioned towards the bottom. Ideally, a 1/4-inch-per-foot slope toward the pipe from the house should be maintained by the pipe connecting to it. To put it another way, for every 10 feet of distance between a tank and a home, the inlet must be 2 1/2 inches lower than where the pipe departs the house at its lowest point. The pipe usually exits at ground level, although it may need to pass beneath a foundation footing or concrete pad in rare cases.

Digging the Trench

The trench for the septic pipe should be dug before the hole for the tank since you will need a backhoe to complete the work and the tank will get in your way if it is already in the ground. To allow rainfall to drain properly, the pipe should be placed on a 2- or 3-inch bed of drain rock, so remember to account for this extra depth when digging.

It is normal to use a four-inch pipe, and it should be installed far enough down to link with the main soil stack, which is a three-inch pipe that runs vertically past the main bathroom and through the roof of the home.

Precautions

Local building and health agencies will demand permits for a septic tank installation. You will also be required to submit a design plan before the permits will be provided, so prepare ahead of time. This layout should be developed in collaboration with a local builder who is familiar with the unique characteristics of the topography in your neighborhood. Stay away from planting trees or bushes near the tank, drainage field, or any of the pipe systems. They will be drawn to the pipes in their hunt for nutrition, and their roots will be able to successfully block them.

Removal may be both expensive and time-consuming.

How to Install Drain Pipes for a Septic Tank Yourself

Home-Diy Installing a septic tank is often done by a professional who has access to the necessary equipment. A concrete septic tank can weigh several thousand pounds, and the ordinary homeowner does not have the necessary tools to safely install it in the ground. if (sources.length) then this.parentNode.removeChild(sources); else this.onerror = null; this.src = fallback; if (sources.length) then this.parentNode.removeChild(sources); else if (sources.length) then this.parentNode.removeChild(sources); else if (sources.length) then this.parentNode.remove ‘/public/images/logo-fallback.png’) is a fallback logo image.

A concrete septic tank can weigh several thousand pounds, and the ordinary homeowner does not have the necessary tools to safely install it in the ground.

  • The following items are required: Shovel (backhoe is recommended)
  • Tape measure
  • Gravel
  • Rake PVC perforated pipe
  • PVC pipe cleaner
  • PVC pipe cement PVC pipe cleaner
  • Geotextile material
  • Hacksaw

Warning

Large bushes or trees should not be planted directly over drain lines.

  1. Inspect your property and get a percolation test performed. In most cases, you will need a copy of the perc test results in order to acquire a permit to build a septic system in your home. In order to assess how quickly the soil absorbs water, a perc test will be performed on your site by a licensed specialist on your behalf. The results of this test will be used to calculate the quantity of drain line that will be required for your system. Drain lines should be measured and marked out before installation. You can divide this down into many lines, but each line must be the same length, and there must be a minimum of six feet between each line in order to be considered complete. Prior to digging, mark the beginning and ending locations of each line, double-checking all measurements to ensure they are accurate. Dig each drain line to a depth of 30 inches and a width of 24 inches. However, while a pick and shovel may be used to do the task, a backhoe can complete it in a fraction of the time and with less strain on your back. To make the trenches as flat as possible, remove any large rocks or roots that may have accumulated in them. Each of these lines will be served by a pipe that will go from the distribution box to it. This is the location where the pipe from the distribution box enters the ditch and marks the beginning point of your drain line. Fill each drain line with gravel until it reaches a depth of 12 inches. Spread gravel over the area to be covered with drain pipes and smooth it up with your rake. Install a 4 inch PVC perforated pipe on top of the gravel to provide drainage. This pipe will be connected to the pipe that comes from the distribution box and will run the whole length of the drain line to connect to the drain. Pipe cleaner should be used to clean each pipe junction before applying pipe cement. Before continuing, double-check that all of the fittings are in place. To finish covering the drain lines, continue to pour additional gravel into the system until the pipes are covered by roughly 1 to 2 inches of material. Using a rake, smooth out the gravel. A layer of geotextile material should be rolled out to cover the whole length and width of the drain line in order to prevent dirt from filtering into the drain lines and to aid in keeping roots out of the drainage system. The drain lines should be backfilled somewhat to allow for some small mounding to compensate for the settling that will occur. Grass seed should be planted on top of drain lines to aid in the absorption process and to avoid erosion.

The Drip Cap

  • Installing a septic tank is often done by a professional who has access to the necessary equipment. A concrete septic tank can weigh several thousand pounds, and the ordinary homeowner does not have the necessary tools to safely install it in the ground. Dig each drain line to a depth of 30 inches and a width of 24 inches. Ensure that any large rocks or roots are removed from the trenches, and that the foundation is as level as possible
  • Fill each drain line with gravel until it reaches a depth of 12 inches. In addition, this pipe will link to the pipe that comes from the distribution box and will run the whole length of the drain line.

How Your Septic System Works

Underground wastewater treatment facilities, known as septic systems, are often employed in rural regions where there are no centralized sewage lines. They clean wastewater from residential plumbing, such as that produced by bathrooms, kitchen drains, and laundry, by combining natural processes with well-established technology. A conventional septic system is comprised of two components: a septic tank and a drainfield, often known as a soil absorption field. It is the septic tank’s job to decompose organic matter and to remove floatable stuff (such as oils and grease) and solids from wastewater.

Alternate treatment systems rely on pumps or gravity to assist septic tank effluent in trickling through a variety of media such as sand, organic matter (e.g., peat and sawdust), constructed wetlands, or other media to remove or neutralize pollutants such as pathogens that cause disease, nitrogen, phosphorus, and other contaminants.

Prior to discharging wastewater into the environment, several alternative systems are designed to evaporate or disinfect the effluent.

Specifically, this is how a typical conventional septic system works:

  1. Underground wastewater treatment facilities, known as septic systems, are typically found in rural locations that lack access to centralized sewage systems. They clean wastewater from residential plumbing, such as that produced by bathrooms, kitchen drains, and laundry, by combining natural processes with well-proven technology. One of the most common types of wastewater treatment systems is comprised of two parts: the septic tank and the drainfield, often known as a soil absorption field. It is the septic tank’s job to decompose organic materials and extract floatable substances (such as oils and grease) and solids from the wastewater. These systems discharge the liquid (referred to as effluent) from the septic tank into a series of perforated pipes buried in the soil or into chambers or other specific devices designed to gently release the effluent into the soil over time. Alternate treatment systems rely on pumps or gravity to assist septic tank effluent in trickling through a variety of media such as sand, organic matter (e.g., peat and sawdust), constructed wetlands, or other media to remove or neutralize pollutants such as pathogens that cause disease, nitrogen, and phosphorus, among other contaminants. Prior to discharging wastewater into the environment, several alternative systems are designed to evaporate or disinfect the waste.

The Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority has built an animated, interactive model of how a residential septic system works, which you can view here.

Do you have a septic system?

It’s possible that you’re already aware that you have a septic system. If you are not sure, here are some tell-tale symptoms that you most likely are:

  • You make use of well water. In your home, the water pipe that brings water into the house does not have a meter. In the case of a water bill or a property tax bill, you will see “$0.00 Sewer Amount Charged.” It is possible that your neighbors have a septic system

How to find your septic system

The water comes from a well. You do not have a meter on the water pipe that enters your home. Whether it’s on your water bill or your property tax statement, it says “$0.00 Sewer Amount Charged.” You have septic systems in your neighbors’ yards.

  • Taking a look at the “as constructed” drawing of your house
  • Making a visual inspection of your yard for lids and manhole covers
  • Getting in touch with a septic system service provider for assistance in locating it

Failure symptoms: Mind the signs!

A bad odor is not necessarily the first indicator of a septic system that is failing to work properly. Any of the following signs should prompt you to seek expert assistance:

  • Water backing up into the drains of homes and businesses
  • It is especially noticeable in dry weather that the drainfield grass is bright green and spongy. The presence of standing water or muddy soil near your septic system or in your basement
  • A strong stench emanating from the area surrounding the septic tank and drainfield

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