How To Find Your Old Fashion Septic Tank? (TOP 5 Tips)

In most cases, septic tank components including the lid, are buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underground. You can use a metal probe to locate its edges and mark the perimeter. If you do not find the lid by probing, shallow excavation with a shovel along the tank’s perimeter should reveal the lid.

Are septic tank locations public record?

Contact your local health department for public records. These permits should come with a diagram of the location where the septic system is buried. Depending on the age of your septic system, you may be able to find information regarding the location of your septic system by making a public records request.

How do I find out where my septic tank is located?

Follow the Main Sewer Line Look for a pipe that’s roughly four inches in diameter that leads away from your house. Remember the location of the sewer pipe and where the pipe leaves your home so you can find it outside. The sewer pipes will lead to where your septic tank is located.

How do you know what kind of septic tank you have?

Most septic tanks are around 10-25 feet away from your home, and cannot be closer than five feet. Once you feel the probe striking flat concrete, fiberglass or polyethylene, you will have located your tank. Another way to find the septic tank using the sewer pipe is to go through the pipe itself.

How do you find a septic tank in an old house?

Look for the 4-inch sewer that exits the crawl space or basement, and locate the same spot outside the home. Septic tanks are usually located between ten to 25 feet away from the home. Insert a thin metal probe into the ground every few feet, until you strike polyethylene, fiberglass or flat concrete.

How do I find out if my septic tank is registered?

Check if your septic tank is already registered You can check if your tank has already been registered by contacting your environmental regulator. If you are unsure then it is best to check and avoid making an unnecessary payment. The NIEA and SEPA have records of all registered septic tanks.

How do you find a metal detector with a septic tank?

6 Steps to Locate a Septic Tank

  1. Find Your Main Sewer Drain Line. Sewage from your toilets, sinks, and showers collects into a main drain line.
  2. Check Permits and Public Records.
  3. Determine Septic Tank Material.
  4. Time to Dig.
  5. Mark the Location for Future Maintenance.

How were old septic tanks built?

Many of the first septic tanks were concrete tanks that were formed out of wood and poured in place in the ground and covered with a concrete lid or often some type of lumber. In the 1960s, precast concrete tanks became more prevalent as the standard of practice improved.

How long do septic tanks last?

A septic system’s lifespan should be anywhere from 15 to 40 years. How long the system lasts depends on a number of factors, including construction material, soil acidity, water table, maintenance practices, and several others.

What happens if septic tank not pumped?

What Are the Consequences of Not Pumping Your Tank? If the tank is not pumped, the solids will build up in the tank and the holding capacity of the tank will be diminished. Eventually, the solids will reach the pipe that feeds into the drain field, causing a clog. Waste water backing up into the house.

Can I shower if my septic tank is full?

Only the water would get out into the leach field in a proper system unless you run too much water too fast. The thing to do is to run your shower water outside into it’s own drain area, but it may not be allowed where you are. Used to be called gray water system.

Can heavy rain affect septic tank?

It is common to have a septic back up after or even during a heavy rain. Significant rainfall can quickly flood the ground around the soil absorption area (drainfield) leaving it saturated, making it impossible for water to flow out of your septic system.

What are the 3 types of septic systems?

Types of Septic Systems

  • Septic Tank.
  • Conventional System.
  • Chamber System.
  • Drip Distribution System.
  • Aerobic Treatment Unit.
  • Mound Systems.
  • Recirculating Sand Filter System.
  • Evapotranspiration System.

How often should a septic tank be pumped?

Inspect and Pump Frequently The average household septic system should be inspected at least every three years by a septic service professional. Household septic tanks are typically pumped every three to five years.

Locating Septic Tanks the Old-Fashioned Way

When it comes to locating septic tanks, Ray Harrison prefers to utilize an old-fashioned listening rod.

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Receive articles, news, and videos about Systems/ATUs sent directly to your email! Now is the time to sign up. Systems/ATUs+ Receive Notifications The chances are good that when Ray Harrison is out on a job site, he will at some time unload a long steel rod from his truck. His response: “That’s something that we utilize very much on a regular basis.” “It’s a little out of the way. “A large number of individuals have converted to cameras.” In Chestertown, Maryland, on the eastern shore of the Chesapeake Bay, he owns and operates Raymond Harrison Septic Services, and the instrument that he cherishes the most is a sounding rod.

You can tell the difference between a concrete tank and a plastic tank.

  1. With a little practice, you can tell the difference between PVC and cast iron.
  2. Everything is dependent on how the earth or a subterranean structure reacts to the rod.
  3. PVC has a bounce to it, and it has a deeper sound than other materials.
  4. It’s impossible to move something after you strike it,” Harrison explains.
  5. Commercial sounding rods are available for purchase, but Harrison chooses to do the more inexpensive method.
  6. It performs exactly what its name indicates for electricians: it does what it says it will do.
  7. These rods are composed of galvanized steel, which ensures that they will survive for a long time, and they are available in a variety of lengths.

That’s the most manageable length.

It takes time and effort to become proficient with a sounding rod.

His father had taught him how to use the sounding rod, and he owed his success to him.

Maryland has a large number of septic systems, many of which are ancient, and Harrison receives calls from people who are unsure about the location of their septic system roughly every other week.

When utilizing any instrument to probe the earth, extreme caution should be exercised.

A “digger’s hotline” service should be installed on the electric, gas, and cable utilities prior to the arrival of workers on the job site. In the April edition of Onsite Installer, you can read a comprehensive profile of Raymond Harrison Septic Services.

How to Find Your Septic Tank

Many folks have contacted me through e-mail (typically from across the nation) to inquire about the location of their septic tank. “I have no idea,” I generally say as a helpful response to the question. I really want to add something like, “It’s just off your driveway, near that bushy thing,” or anything along those lines. But, truly, even for the most experienced searchers, septic tanks are difficult to come by. The following are some strategies you might employ to assist you in locating your tank.

  1. Precaution should be exercised before you get started.
  2. So, proceed with caution!
  3. Please let me know if you have any queries or need assistance.
  4. Get to know the beast!
  5. tanks are normally buried 4 inches to 4 feet below the surface of the ground.
  6. You might be astonished to hear that someone knows exactly where it is hidden in plain sight.
  7. It is against the law to dig or probe in your own yard without first locating and marking the underground services.

You will receive the following tools to aid you in your search: Measurement tape, tile probe, and a shovel (if you are ambitious) The following tools are required: a metal detector (borrow or rent one since septic tanks often include iron steel rebar in the lids), and a hoagie sandwich (because locating sewage tanks makes you hungry.trust me on this).

  1. Examine the basement wall to see where all of the pipes join together and exit through the basement ceiling.
  2. If you don’t have a basement, walk outdoors and check for the roof vents on your house.
  3. Ordinarily, the sewage line that leads to the septic tank will exit the home right below this ventilation opening.
  4. On sometimes, the ancient proverb “The grass is always greener on the other side of the septic tank” is true.

Your tank may be located by probing or digging for it, and with luck, you will locate it. Keep in mind that not everything that seems to be a septic tank actually is! It’s possible that you came upon one of the following instead:

  • Rubble buried in the ground (not to be confused with Barney Ruble)
  • SepticDrywell
  • An old foundation
  • In case you happen to live in a cemetery (which is spooky), you may use a grave vault to keep your belongings safe.

After a few hours of hopelessly digging about in your yard, it will be time to eat your hoagie and take a little sleep. Following that, it will be necessary to rent or borrow a metal detector. In the event that your next-door neighbor loves Star Wars action figures or has more than three unidentified antennae on his roof, there is a significant probability that you can borrow his metal detector. If you’re lucky, the metal detector will really assist you in finding your septic tank, rather than simply a bunch of old buried automobile parts.

  1. According to local legend, a pumper known as “Zarzar The Incredible” can locate sewage tanks using a metal measuring tape spanning 30 feet in length.
  2. Continue to press your commode (“commode” sounds sophisticated) tape deeper and farther down the pipes until he “feels” the bottom of the tank with his tape.
  3. I recently acquired locate equipment that can be used to locate septic tanks, and I’m excited about it.
  4. For further information, please contact me at 574-533-1470.
  5. After that, you may have a movie of the inside of your sewer pipes created!
  6. Related: Visit our Septic System Maintenance page for more information.
  7. Services provided by Meade Septic Design Inc.
  8. Both Clients and Projects are included.
  9. Send me an email!

How To Find My Septic Tank

  1. What is a septic tank
  2. How do I know if I have a septic tank
  3. And how do I know if I have a septic tank Identifying the location of your septic tank is critical for several reasons. The Best Way to Find a Septic Tank
  4. What to Do Once You’ve Discovered Your Septic Tank

You may have fallen in love with your new house because of its appealing good looks and characteristics, but there is almost certainly more to your new home than meets the eye. In many cases, the characteristics that make your house run more effectively and allow you to live a pleasant, contemporary life are not readily apparent. Septic tanks, for example, are an important part of your home’s infrastructure. A septic system is responsible for regulating and managing the wastewater generated by your home.

“How can I locate my septic tank?” is one of the most often requested inquiries we receive.

When your tank’s lid is difficult to locate – especially if you are not the original homeowner – you may be at a loss for what to do or where to look for the lid when you need it.

The majority of the time, all of the components of the septic tank are buried between four inches and four feet below ground level.

In order to do so, it is necessary to first comprehend the functions of septic tanks and septic systems and why it is important to know where yours is located.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank

Your septic tank’s location is not a closely guarded secret. There will be a method for you to locate it and make a note of its position for future reference, and below are a few examples of such methods.

What Is a Septic Tank?

Having a functioning septic tank is an important aspect of having an effective septic system. In the United States, around 20% of households utilize a septic system to handle their wastewater. Houses in rural parts of New England are the most likely to have a septic system, with residences in the Eastern United States being the most prevalent location for septic systems. When there are few and far between residences, it is typically more efficient and cost-effective to employ a septic system to manage wastewater rather than relying on a public sewage system to handle waste water.

  • Typically, a septic tank is a container that is waterproof and composed of a material such as concrete, polyethylene, fiberglass, or a combination of these.
  • An important function of a septic tank is to hold on to wastewater until any particulates in the water separate themselves from the water.
  • Any liquid that remains in the tank eventually drains into a leach field or a drainfield, where it is known as “effluent.” The dirt in the leach field aids in the filtering of the water and the removal of bacteria, viruses, and other pollutants that may be present in it.
  • Septic tanks erected in Onondaga County must contain input and outlet baffles, as well as an effluent filter or sanitary tees, in order to effectively separate particles from liquids during the treatment process.

How Do I Know If I Have a Septic Tank?

What is the best way to tell if your home has a septic tank? There are generally a few of different methods to tell. Examining your water bill might help you identify whether or not your house is served by a septic system or is part of the public sewage system in your neighborhood. If you have a septic system for wastewater management, you are likely to receive a charge from the utility provider for wastewater or sewer services of zero dollars. In the case of those who are fortunate enough to have a septic system, it is likely that they may not receive any water bills at all.

  • A lack of a meter on the water line that enters your property is typically indicative of the fact that you are utilizing well water rather than public utility water, according to the National Association of Realtors.
  • A septic system is likely to be installed in your home if you reside in a rather rural location.
  • Septic systems are likely to be installed in all of these buildings, which means your home is likely to be as well.
  • When a septic tank is present, it is common to find a mound or tiny hill on the property that is not a natural structure.

Checking your property records is a foolproof method of determining whether or not your home is equipped with a septic system. Your home’s building permit and drawings will almost certainly include details concerning the existence (or absence) of a septic tank on your site.

Why It’s Important to Know the Location of Your Septic Tank

What is the best way to determine whether or not your home has a septic system? The majority of the time, there are a few indicators. Examining your water bill might help you identify whether or not your house is served by a septic system or is part of the public sewage network. It is probable that the utility company will not charge you for wastewater or sewage services if you are utilizing a septic system to handle your wastewater management. Of course, if you have a septic system, there is a chance that you will not get a water bill at all!

  • There is a good chance that you are utilizing well water rather than public utility water if the water pipe leading into your home does not have a meter attached to it.
  • You are more likely to have a septic system in your home if you reside in a more rural setting.
  • The likelihood is that your home is also equipped with a septic system if all of your neighbors are.
  • It is common to find a mound or tiny hill on the property where a septic tank is installed that is not a natural structure.
  • Checking your property records is a foolproof method of determining whether or not your home has a septic system.
See also:  How Fast Is The Water Supposed To Come Out Today Septic Tank? (Question)

1. To Be Able to Care for It Properly

The first reason you should try to locate your septic tank is that knowing where it is will help you to properly repair and care for it in the future. The standard guideline is to avoid erecting structures or placing heavy objects on top of the septic tank. It’s possible that you don’t want to park your car or truck on top of it, and you don’t want visitors to your house to park their cars on top of it, either. Due to the weight of the automobiles, there is a possibility that the tank would collapse due to excessive pressure.

2. If You Want to Landscape or Remodel Your Property

If you want to build an addition to your home or perform some landscaping around your property, you will need to know where your septic tank is located. Nothing with deep or lengthy roots should be planted on top of or in the area of your tank, since this can cause problems. If roots are allowed to grow into the pipes of your septic system, it is conceivable that your system will get clogged. When you know where the tank is going to be, you may arrange your landscaping such that only shallow-rooted plants, such as grass, are in close proximity to the tank.

For starters, the tank’s weight might lead it to collapse due to the weight of the construction. A second issue is that getting access to the tank becomes more difficult if a permanent building has been constructed on top of it.

3. If a Problem With Your Tank Occurs

If you intend to build an addition to your home or perform some landscaping around your property, you must first determine the position of your septic tank. On top of, or in the area of, your tank, you should avoid planting anything with deep or lengthy roots. If roots are allowed to grow into the pipes of your septic system, it is conceivable that the system will get clogged. You may arrange your landscaping such that only shallow-rooted plants, such as grass, are in close proximity to the tank once you know where it is.

For starters, the tank’s weight might cause it to collapse due to the weight of the surrounding building.

4. Ease of Getting It Fixed

Once you have determined the location of your sewer system, you can quickly send a plumber to it in the event that something goes wrong with the system, saving everyone both time and money. Get in Touch With A Plumber Right Away

1. Use a Septic Tank Map

First and foremost, make use of a road map. Using a map is frequently the quickest and most convenient alternative. Most counties keep records of the installation of septic tanks at all of their residents’ residences. These maps should include schematics that illustrate the specific placement of the tank on the land, as well as measurements that allow you to measure and locate the tank’s exact location on the property. Never mind that landmarks may shift over time depending on when the tank was built, so if there are a few more shrubs or a tree nearby, don’t rule out that location as a possibility.

  1. If you are unable to locate a map or other paperwork that identifies the location of your septic tank, there are a few locations to try to see if you can obtain a map of the area.
  2. The county health department is responsible for keeping track of septic systems.
  3. A septic tank’s position could be depicted on a survey map, for example.
  4. The creation of your own map and documentation may be worthwhile if you cannot locate a map or blueprint of your property and nothing appears to be on file regarding it at the county health department or another municipal agency.

2. Follow the Pipes to Find Your Septic Tank

Whether or not there is an existing map of your septic tank on file, or whether or not you choose to develop one for future reference or for future homeowners, you will still need to track down and find the tank. One method of accomplishing this is to follow the sewer lines that lead away from your residence. The septic tank is situated along the sewage line that goes from your home and into the yard, as we’re sure you’re aware. Find a four-inch sewer pipe in your basement or crawl space. This is the line that will lead to your septic system and should be accessible from the ground level.

  1. In general, though, you’re searching for a pipe with a diameter of four inches or more that leaves your home via a basement wall or ceiling.
  2. By inserting a thin metal probe (also known as a soil probe) into the earth near the sewage line, you can track the pipe’s location.
  3. The majority of septic tanks are located between 10 and 25 feet away from your home, and they cannot be any closer than five feet.
  4. Going via the sewage line itself is another method of locating the septic tank utilizing it.
  5. Drain snakes are typically used to unclog clogs in toilets and drains, and they may be used to do the same thing.
  6. When the snake comes to a complete halt, it has almost certainly reached the tank.
  7. While drawing the snake back, make a note of how far it has been extended and whether it has made any bends or turns.
  8. When looking for your septic tank, you may use a transmitter that you flush down the toilet and it will direct you straight to the tank.

If you only want to keep an eye on the condition of your tank and don’t need to dig it up and inspect it, you may thread a pipe camera into the sewer pipe to see what’s happening.

3. Inspect Your Yard

Septic tanks are designed to be as unobtrusive as possible when they are erected. With the passage of time, and the growth of the grass, it might be difficult to discern the visual indications that indicated the exact location of your septic tank’s installation. However, this does not rule out the possibility of finding evidence that will take you to the location of your septic tank in the future. First and foremost, you want to rule out any potential locations for your septic tank, such as:

  • Under a road or similar paved surface, for example. Right up against the house (the tank must be at least five feet away)
  • Directly in front of the home Immediately adjacent to your well (if you have one)
  • In close proximity to trees or densely planted regions
  • In the shadow of a patio, deck, or other building

Once you’ve ruled out any potential locations for your tank, it’s time to start hunting for indications as to where it may be hiding in plain sight. Keep your eyes peeled as you go about your property, looking for any inexplicable high or low points that might suggest the presence of an underground tank. When looking at your property, you could see a hill or mound on the ground, which is frequently an indication that there is a septic tank nearby. One further item to consider while searching for the right septic tank for your home is the amount of grass or other foliage in your yard.

Alternatively, if the tank was not adequately buried, you may observe a “bald patch,” which is an area where the grass is struggling to grow in the vicinity.

4. Talk to Your Neighbors

If your neighbors have septic systems as well, they may be able to assist you in locating your tank. Inquire of your neighbors about the location of their septic tanks in relation to their residences. Having a polite conversation with your neighbors regarding septic systems not only provides you with a means to figure out where yours is, but it may also serve as a friendly introduction to the other residents of your community.

5. Look for Your Septic Tank Lid

It is only the first step in the process to discover where your septic tank is located. After you’ve located your tank, the following step is to locate the lid. You can locate it with the help of your soil probe. The majority of septic tanks are rectangular in shape and measure around five feet by eight feet. The perimeter of the tank should be marked with a probe once it has been probed around. A shallow excavation with a shovel within the tank’s perimeter and near the center (or broken into halves for a two compartment tank) should show the position of the lid or lids if you are unable to feel them by probing.

The tank itself is likely to be filled with foul-smelling vapors, if not potentially hazardous ones.

What to Do After You Find Your Septic Tank

Once you’ve determined where your tank is, it’s time to bring in the specialists. Trust us when we say that opening a septic tank is not something that just anybody wants to undertake. Concrete septic tank lids are extremely heavy and must be lifted using special lifting gear in order to be removed. Since the vapors are potentially dangerous due to the contents of the tank, please respect our advice and refrain from attempting to open the tank yourself. An exposed septic tank can be hazardous to anybody wandering around your property’s perimeter, and if someone were to fall into it, it might be lethal owing to the toxicity of the sewage in the tank.

However, before you send in a team of experienced plumbers, there are a few things you can do to ensure that others do not experience the same difficulty locating the tank and to make locating the tank in the future easier.

1. Mark Its Location

The likelihood is that you will not want to post a large sign in your yard that reads “Septic Tank Here!” but you will want to leave some sort of marking so that you can quickly locate the tank and lid when you need them. In an ideal situation, the marker will be substantial enough that it will not blow away in the wind and will not be readily moved by children who are playing in the yard. A patio paver, a potted plant, or a decorative gnome or rock are just a few of the possibilities. In addition to putting a physical sign beside the septic tank, you may draw a map or layout of the area around it to illustrate its position.

2. Take Care of Your Septic Tank

Taking proper care of your tank may save you hundreds of dollars over the course of its lifetime. The expense of maintaining your system could be a few hundred dollars every few years, but that’s a lot less than the thousands of dollars it might cost to repair or replace a damaged tank or a malfunctioning septic system. Two strategies to take better care of your septic tank and system are to avoid utilizing your drain pipes or toilets as garbage cans and to use less water overall. Things like paper towels, face wipes, and cat litter should not be flushed down the toilet since they are not designed to be flushed.

In addition, installing low-flow faucets and high-efficiency toilets can help you reduce the amount of water used in your home.

For example, you don’t want to be washing load after load of laundry or running your clothes washer at the same time as your dishwasher all at the same time.

Call a Professional Plumber

Maintenance of a septic system is not normally considered a do-it-yourself activity. In the Greater Syracuse region, whether your septic tank requires pumping out or cleaning, or if you want to replace your tank, you should use the services of a reputable plumbing firm to do the job right. If you’ve attempted to locate your septic tank on your own and are still unsure of its position, it may be necessary to enlist the assistance of a professional local plumber. Our team at Mr. Rooter Plumbing of Greater Syracuse can assist you with locating, maintaining, or replacing your home’s sewage tank.

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How to Find Your Septic Tank

Over time, all septic tanks become clogged with sediments and must be pumped out in order to continue functioning properly. Septic tank lids are frequently located at ground level. The majority of the time, they have been buried anywhere between four inches and four feet underground. In the event that you have recently purchased a property and are unsure as to where your septic tank is located, this article will give instructions on how to identify your septic tank.

Noteworthy: While every property is unique, septic tanks are usually typically huge and difficult to build. As a result, and due to the fact that it requires constant pumping, you’re very certain to discover it in a location that can be reached by a huge truck while looking for it.

5 Ways to Find Your Septic Tank

1. Check with the municipal records. The most straightforward method of locating your septic tank is to review the building plans for your home that were approved by the local government. You should have received an application from the business that installed the septic tank, which should contain schematics and specifications that will help you to locate the precise location where the septic tank was installed. 2. Look for highs and lows in your data. The majority of septic tanks are constructed in such a way that they are barely noticeable.

  • 3.
  • Almost usually, your septic tank will be constructed near where the main sewage line exits your property.
  • Septic tanks are typically positioned between ten and twenty-five feet away from a home’s foundation.
  • When you do, that’s when your septic tank comes into play!
  • Look for the Lid.
  • You will most likely find two polyethylene or fiberglass covers positioned on opposing sides of the perimeter of your septic tank if it was built after 1975 and installed after 1975.
  • Those areas should be excavated in order to disclose the lids.
See also:  How Can The Design Of A Septic Tank Fail?

Get in touch with the pros.

Lifting concrete lids will necessitate the use of specialized equipment.

A fall into an unprotected septic tank has the potential to be lethal.

Produce your own diagram of your yard, which you may file away with your other important house paperwork.

That’s all there is to it!

To book a plumbing service in Bastrop County, please contact us now!

How To Find Septic Tank Location: A Guide for Property Owners

The majority of individuals prefer to relax on their back patio or porch and take in the scenery rather than worrying about where their septic tank could be.

When you know exactly where your septic tank is, it will be much easier to schedule routine sewer line cleanouts and repair appointments. Continue reading to find out more about how to locate your septic tank.

Follow the Main Sewer Line

If you’re like most people, you like relaxing on your back patio or porch and taking in the scenery rather than worrying about where your septic tank could be. When you know exactly where your septic tank is, it will be much easier to schedule routine sewer line cleanouts and repairs. Learn more about how to locate your septic tank by continuing reading this article. 1.

Inspect Your Property

If you’re like most people, you prefer lounging on your back patio or porch and taking in the scenery, rather than worrying about where your septic tank could be. When you know exactly where your septic tank is, it will be much easier to schedule routine sewer line cleanouts and maintenance visits. Continue reading to discover more about locating your septic tank.

  • Paved surfaces
  • Unique landscaping
  • Your water well, if you have one
  • And other features.

Surfaces with pavers; special landscaping; your water well, if you have one; and other features.

Check the Property Records

Are you unsure about how to obtain this? Simply contact your county’s health department for further information. Check with your local health agency to see if they have a property survey map and a septic tank map that you can borrow. Perhaps you will be shocked to learn that there are a variety of options to obtain information about your property without ever leaving the comfort of your own residence. Building permits, for example, are frequently found in county records, and they may provide schematics with specifications on how far away from a septic tank a home should be, as well as other important information such as the size of the tank.

Most counties, on the other hand, keep records of septic tank installations for every address.

Don’t Try to Fix Septic Tank Issues Yourself

Septic tank problems should be left to the specialists. The Original Plumber can do routine maintenance on your septic tank and examine any problems you may have once you’ve located the tank. It is not recommended to open the septic tank lid since poisonous vapors might cause major health problems. Getting trapped in an open septic tank might result in serious injury or death. While it is beneficial to know where your septic tank is located, it is also beneficial to be aware of the potential health dangers associated with opening the tank.

Schedule Septic Tank Maintenance

Professionals should handle septic tank difficulties. The Original Plumber can do routine maintenance on your septic tank or examine any problems you may have once you’ve located the tank. Opening the septic tank lid might result in major health consequences due to the noxious vapors that are expelled. It is possible to sustain serious harm or even death if one falls into an open septic tank. Knowing where your septic tank is and how to locate it is beneficial, but it is also important to be aware of the potential health dangers associated with opening the tank.

Frequently Asked Questions

A septic system is a system for the management of wastewater. Simply said, wastewater will exit your home through pipes until it reaches your septic tank, which is located outside your home.

Septic tanks are normally located beneath the surface of the earth. Solids and liquids will separate in the septic tank as a result of the separation process. Eventually, the solids will fall to the bottom of the tank and the liquids will run out onto your leach field.

How do I know if I have a septic tank?

Even if there are no obvious signs of a septic tank in your yard – such as uneven landscaping – there are a few techniques to assess whether or not your home is equipped with an onsite sewage system. Checking your property records is the most reliable technique to ensure that you are utilizing the correct system. When you acquired your house, you should have received a copy of the septic system map with the property documents as well. Checking your electricity statement is another way to determine this.

If you’re also using well water, it’s possible that you won’t receive one at all.

What do I do once I locate my septic tank?

If there are no visible signs that you may have a septic tank – such as uneven landscaping in your yard – there are a few ways to find out if you do or do not have a septic tank. Checking your property records is the most reliable technique to ensure that you are utilizing the correct equipment. When you acquired your house, you should have received a map of the septic system with the property documents. Checking your utility statement is another approach to determine this information. The public utility services should not issue you a water bill because your septic system is part of your wastewater management system.

It is likely that you are connected to well water rather than the public sewer system if you do not have a meter linked to your water supply.

Septic Tank Pumping, Repair & Installation Services in Gainesville, FL

Do you require dependable septic system installation or repair? Get in touch with First Choice Plumbing Inc. Do you ever have a problem with your septic tank system at your house or place of business and find yourself thinking “where can I locate septic system installation near me”? There’s no need to look any further! Septic services provided by First Choice Plumbing Inc include everything from septic system installation to septic tank cleaning and maintenance. Contact us now for a free estimate!

We take great pleasure in our approach to customer service and always work with your best interests in mind!

Septic Tank Installation

Septic systems are generally classified into two categories that are currently in use. There are two types of septic systems: conventional septic systems and alternative septic systems. A drain field and a septic tank are the two most important components of any septic system. The septic tank is a holding tank for wastewater that is treated before being discharged into the drainage field. Conventional septic systems are the most fundamental of all systems. There are two types of typical systems: one that moves wastewater from the tank to the drain field using gravity, and another that moves wastewater from the tank to the drain field using a pump.

Alternative septic systems are becoming more popular.

Having worked for several years in the septic tank servicing industry, we are well-versed in explaining how each type of septic system works and which one is best for your house or business.

Signs It’s Time to Call for Septic Repair

When your septic tank experiences problems, it might mean doom for your residence or place of business. When your septic system fails, it can allow untreated or partially treated waste to be released into the surrounding environment. This poses a significant health concern and has the potential to pollute local supplies of drinking water. The smells emerging from a malfunctioning system can also constitute a nuisance to neighbors and properties in the nearby area. Here are several symptoms that your septic tank is in need of maintenance:

  • Having sewer scents in your home or yard
  • Hearing gurgling sounds in your yard
  • Sinks and toilets drain at a snail’s pace
  • Plumbing that is backed up
  • Soil that is wet or mushy
  • Water that has accumulated
  • Bacteria in drinking water

If you notice any of these indications in your house or yard, please notify us as soon as possible! You should have your septic tank system inspected and maintained on a regular basis to avoid significant breakdowns that can result in expensive repair bills. Pumping, maintenance, repair, and installation of septic tanks are all services we provide. See what makes our customers pick us by reading some of our most recent customer reviews and testimonials.

Why Choose Us for Septic Services?

Septic tank difficulties can result in expensive repairs as well as annoying situations for you to cope with. Treatment and disposal of wastewater may be accomplished with septic systems in an efficient and cost-effective manner. When it comes to maintaining, repairing, or installing a septic system for your home or company, call the experts at First Choice Plumbing Inc. We provide same-day service and free on-site quotes to our customers. When it comes to your plumbing and septic system, you should never settle for anything less than the finest.

Everything you need to know about your old cesspool

Acresspool, also known as a sump pit or a soakaway, is a hole in the ground enclosed by cement, stone, concrete, brick, or other material that is used to collect wastewater from a home or other structure. The material used to construct the pit wall may be perforated to enable wastewater to seep in from the sides in some instances. Cesspools, in other words, serve as a temporary holding facility for wastewater until it is absorbed into the earth. Originally, there was no connection between them and a septic tank.

  • In this case, the wastewater was discharged straight into the pit.
  • Solids and liquids could not be separated because they lacked a separation mechanism.
  • They also filled up far more fast and required more frequent emptying than other types of containers.
  • If, on the other hand, you purchase a house that was built decades ago, you may discover a cesspool.

How does a cesspool work?

As we have seen, the walls are constructed of a variety of materials, but they all have the characteristic of not being totally waterproof, allowing water to leak through. Wastewater will leak into the pit from the bottom and likely through the sides as well.

Most cesspools are also equipped with a septic tank. Solids are held back in the septic tank so that they don’t build up in the pit where they should not. The septic tank, not the cesspit, is the one that has to be pumped out on a regular schedule.

How to know if you have a cesspool on your property

It has already been established that while there is a variety of materials used in the construction of the walls, they all have one thing in common: they are not totally waterproof, allowing water to leak in. Wastewater will seep through the bottom of the pit and potentially through the sides as well. a Septic tanks are frequent in cesspools. In order to prevent sediments from building up in the pit, the septic tank must be properly installed and maintained. In fact, it is the septic tank, not the cesspit, that need regular pumping out.

Why were cesspools banned for new properties?

Previously used cesspools that were not linked to a septic tank were hazardous to the environment and blocked up in a short period of time. Because the wastewater was not treated prior to disposal, it ended up in the ground. A single location was used to collect and treat wastewater. Wetland runoff was far more likely to pollute the artesian well, the water table, and other surface waterways than dryland runoff. This has a variety of negative consequences for public health, as well as other unfavorable environmental consequences.

The absorption area, on the other hand, was quite restricted, and black sludge (biomat) built extremely rapidly.

This makes it much easier for the effluent to be treated as it infiltrates the receiving soil and before it reaches the groundwater.

How to know if you have a failed cesspool

A cesspool does not have to be entirely clogged for you to notice that it is no longer operating correctly, contrary to common perception. Despite the fact that this is one of the most evident symptoms, it is conceivable that the soakaway pit is still collecting wastewater despite the fact that it is no longer in perfect operating condition. When checking your cesspool, there are a few things you should look for.

  • To be sure that a cesspool is no longer operating correctly, it is not necessary for it to be entirely plugged, contrary to common opinion. Despite the fact that this is one of the most evident symptoms, it is conceivable that the soakaway pit is still collecting wastewater despite the fact that it is no longer in perfect working condition. When checking your cesspool, keep the following points in mind.
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A failed cesspool will contaminate the environment and may encourage the spread of viruses that cause a variety of ailments. Any indication of a system failure should be taken extremely seriously, and corrective action should be performed as soon as possible. Our recommendation is for a shock treatment, which is a means of injecting billions of bacteria into a cesspit by adding biological ingredients to the mixture. The bacteria will aid in the digestion of organic waste, allowing the system to return to its ideal functioning state as a result.

Should I replace my cesspool with a leaching bed?

Because it is a grandfathered right, the government will allow you to maintain your old cesspool as long as it is not harming the environment. It will be your obligation, however, to guarantee that the sump pit does not pollute groundwater in any manner. Having said that, it may be necessary to replace your old cesspool with a new septic system if you fall into one of the following categories:

  • Because it is a grandfathered right, the government enables you to maintain your old cesspool as long as it is not harming the environment and does not pollute the environment. Your obligation will be to guarantee that the sump pit does not pollute any groundwater, which will fall on your shoulders. It should be noted that replacing your existing cesspool with a new septic system may be required in the following circumstances:

How much does it cost to replace the cesspool?

The cost of replacing a cesspool with a new septic system is between $10,000 and $30,000 Canadian dollars. Sumps cannot be replaced with standard septic systems in all cases, though. It may be essential to build an advanced treatment system on tiny properties or those that are close to wells or other bodies of water. To further diminish the presence of fecal coliforms, you may need to employ a tertiary treatment system that includes a UV light.

Advanced systems treat the system at a deeper level than standard systems. They are more expensive than traditional systems. You will be advised by an engineer on the sort of septic system that is most appropriate for your property.

Conclusion

If your home was constructed before to the 1970s, there is a good probability that you have a cesspool on your property. As long as the sump is located a reasonable distance away from a drinking water source (at least 200 feet) and is not harming the environment, you should have no need to be concerned. Of course, you must be vigilant in monitoring your system and ensuring that it is properly maintained in order to avoid any type of malfunction. In any case, it’s a good idea to prepare for the replacement of your old cesspool with a new septic system, which will provide better treatment of your sewage.

A Beginner’s Guide to Septic Systems

  • Septic systems are used to dispose of waste from homes and buildings. Identifying the location of the septic tank and drainfield
  • What a Septic System Is and How It Works Keeping a Septic System in Good Condition
  • Signs that a septic system is failing include:

Septic systems, also known as on-site wastewater management systems, are installed in a large number of buildings and houses. It is easy to lose sight of septic systems, which operate quietly, gracefully, and efficiently to protect human and environmental health due to their burying location. Septic systems are the norm in rural regions, but they may also be found in a lot of metropolitan places, especially in older buildings. It is critical to understand whether or not your building is on a septic system.

Is Your Home or Building on a Septic System?

It is possible that the solution to this question will not be evident. If a structure looks to be connected to a sewage system, it may instead be connected to a septic system. It is fairly unusual for tenants to be unaware of the final destination of the wastewater generated by their residence. Some of the hints or signs listed below will assist in determining whether the facility is served by a septic system or whether it is supplied by a sewer system:

  • Sewer service will be provided at a cost by the city or municipality. Pay close attention to the water bill to see whether there is a cost labeled “sewer” or “sewer charge” on it. If there is a fee for this service, it is most likely because the facility is connected to a sewage system. Look up and down the street for sewage access ports or manholes, which can be found in any location. If a sewage system runs in front of a property, it is probable that the house is connected to it in some way. Inquire with your neighbors to see if they are connected to a sewer or septic system. The likelihood that your home is on a sewer system is increased if the properties on each side of you are on one as well. Keep in mind, however, that even if a sewage line runs in front of the structure and the nearby residences are connected to a sewer system, your home or building may not be connected to one. If the structure is older than the sewer system, it is possible that it is still on the original septic system. Consult with your local health agency for further information. This agency conducts final inspections of septic systems to ensure that they comply with applicable laws and regulations. There is a possibility that they have an archived record and/or a map of the system and will supply this information upon request

All property owners should be aware of whether or not their property is equipped with an on-site wastewater treatment system. Georgia law mandates that the property owner is responsible for the correct operation of a septic system, as well as any necessary maintenance and repairs.

Locating the Septic Tank and Drainfield

Finding a septic system may be a difficult process. They can be buried anywhere in the yard, including the front, back, and side yards. After a few years, the soil may begin to resemble the surrounding soil, making it impossible to distinguish the system from the surrounding soil. It is possible that in dry weather, the grass will be dryer in the shallow soil over the tank and greener over the drainfield, where the cleansed water will be released, but this is not always the case, especially in hot weather.

  1. The contractor who built the house should have presented the initial owner with a map showing the tank and drainfield locations, according to the building code.
  2. The installation of the system, as well as any modifications made to it, would have been examined by your local health authority.
  3. Unfortunately, if the system is very old, any records related with it may be insufficient or nonexistent, depending on the situation.
  4. Look for the point at where the wastewater pipes join together if the building is on a crawlspace or has an unfinished basement.
  5. The sewer line that runs through the structure is referred to as the building sewer.
  6. To “feel” for the tank, use a piece of re-bar or a similar metal probe.
  7. If you use this free service, you may avoid accidentally putting a rod through your gas or water line.

Try to locate the tank after a rainstorm, when the metal probe will be more easily maneuvered through moist dirt.

This should be done with care; extreme caution should be exercised to avoid puncturing the building sewer.

A tank is normally 5 by 8 feet in size, however the dimensions might vary.

Be aware that there may be rocks, pipes, and other debris in the area that “feels” like the tank but is not in fact part of the tank.

However, it is possible to have the lid or access port positioned on a riser in addition to being on the same level as the top of the tank in some cases.

Once the tank has been identified, make a rough drawing of its placement in relation to the house so that it will not be misplaced again!

It may be easier to discover the drainage lines now that the tank has been identified, particularly if the area has been subjected to prolonged periods of drought.

How a Septic System Works

Typical sewage treatment system (figure 1). It is composed of three components (Figure 1): the tank, the drain lines or discharge lines, and the soil treatment area (also known as the soil treatment area) (sometimes called a drainfield or leach field). The size of the tank varies according to the size of the structure. The normal home (three bedrooms, two bathrooms) will often include a 1,000-gallon water storage tank on the premises. Older tanks may only have one chamber, however newer tanks must have two chambers.

  1. The tank functions by settling waste and allowing it to be digested by microbes.
  2. These layers include the bottom sludge layer, the top scum layer, and a “clear” zone in the center.
  3. A typical septic tank is seen in Figure 2.
  4. It is fortunate that many of the bacteria involved are found in high concentrations in the human gastrointestinal tract.
  5. Although the bacteria may break down some of the stuff in the sludge, they are unable to break down all of it, which is why septic tanks must be cleaned out every three to seven years.
  6. In addition, when new water is introduced into the septic tank, an equal volume of water is pushed out the discharge lines and onto the drainfield.
  7. The water trickles out of the perforated drain pipes, down through a layer of gravel, and into the soil below the surface (Figure 3).
  8. A typical drainfield may be found here.
  9. Plants, bacteria, fungus, protozoa, and other microorganisms, as well as bigger critters such as mites, earthworms, and insects, flourish in soil.
  10. Mineralogical and metallic elements attach to soil particles, allowing them to be removed from the waste water.

Maintaining a Septic System

The most typical reason for a septic system to fail is a lack of proper maintenance. Septic systems that are failing are expensive to repair or replace, and the expense of repairs rests on the shoulders of the property owner (Figure 4). Fortunately, keeping your septic system in good working order and avoiding costly repairs is rather simple. Figure 4. Septic system failure is frequently caused by a lack of proper maintenance. It is in your best interests to be aware of the location of the system, how it operates, and how to maintain it.

  • You should pump the tank if you aren’t sure when the last time it was pumped.
  • It is not permissible to drive or park over the tank or drainage field.
  • No rubbish should be disposed of in the sink or the toilet.
  • It’s important to remember that garbage disposals enhance the requirement for regular pumping.
  • When designing a landscape, keep the septic system in mind.
  • It is also not recommended to consume veggies that have been cultivated above drainfield lines (see Dorn, S.
  • Ornamental Plantings on Septic Drainfields.

C 1030).

Any water that enters your home through a drain or toilet eventually ends up in your septic system.

Don’t put too much strain on the system by consuming a large amount of water in a short period of time.

Additives should not be used.

Various types of additives are available for purchase as treatment options, cleansers, restorers, rejuvenator and boosters, among other things.

To break up oil and grease and unclog drains, chemical additives are available for purchase.

Pumping out the septic tank is not eliminated or reduced by using one of these systems.

They remain floating in the water and travel into the drainfield, where they may block the pipes. Acids have the potential to damage concrete storage tanks and distribution boxes.

Signs a Septic System is Failing

A failed system manifests itself in the following ways:

  • Sinks and toilets drain at a snail’s pace
  • Plumbing that is backed up
  • The sound of gurgling emanating from the plumbing system House or yard aromas that smell like sewage
  • In the yard, there is wet or squishy dirt
  • Water that is gray in hue that has accumulated
  • An region of the yard where the grass is growing more quickly and is becoming greener
  • Water contaminated by bacteria from a well

If you notice any of these indicators, you should notify your local health department immediately. An environmentalist from the health department can assist in identifying possible hazards. There are also listings of state-certified contractors available from the local health department, who may do repairs. Repairs or alterations to the system must be approved by the health department and examined by an inspector. Keep an eye out for any meetings that may take place between a health department inspector and a contractor to discuss repairs to your system.

  1. Household garbage that has not been properly handled is released into the environment when systems fail.
  2. It has the potential to pollute surrounding wells, groundwater, streams, and other sources of potable water, among other things.
  3. The foul odor emanating from a malfunctioning system can cause property values to plummet.
  4. Briefly stated, broken systems can have an impact on your family, neighbors, community, and the environment.
  5. Septic systems are an effective, attractive, and reasonably priced method of treating and disposing of wastewater.

Figures 2 and 3 reprinted with permission from: CIDWT. 2009. Installation of Wastewater Treatment Systems. Consortium of Institutes for Decentralized Wastewater Treatment. Iowa State University, Midwest Plan Service. Ames, IA.

History of the current status and revisions Published on the 15th of August, 2013. Published on March 28th, 2017 with a full review.

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