How To Find Septic Tank At Old Farm House? (Solved)

  • Clues to Find Your Septic Tank: Look for an unusual mound of earth or a hill which indicated the presence of a septic tank around the property. Look for unusual greenery in any area.

How do you find a septic tank in an old house?

Look for the 4-inch sewer that exits the crawl space or basement, and locate the same spot outside the home. Septic tanks are usually located between ten to 25 feet away from the home. Insert a thin metal probe into the ground every few feet, until you strike polyethylene, fiberglass or flat concrete.

How do I find out where my septic tank is located?

Follow the Main Sewer Line Look for a pipe that’s roughly four inches in diameter that leads away from your house. Remember the location of the sewer pipe and where the pipe leaves your home so you can find it outside. The sewer pipes will lead to where your septic tank is located.

Are septic tank locations public record?

Contact your local health department for public records. These permits should come with a diagram of the location where the septic system is buried. Depending on the age of your septic system, you may be able to find information regarding the location of your septic system by making a public records request.

Will metal detector find septic tank?

If it’s Concrete or Steel, Use a Metal Detector. Based on your conclusions in Step 3, if your septic tank is likely made from concrete or steel, a metal detector can make the task of locating it much easier. But not just any metal detector will do.

How do septic tanks look?

Septic tanks are typically rectangular in shape and measure approximately 5 feet by 8 feet. In most cases, septic tank components including the lid, are buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underground. You can use a metal probe to locate its edges and mark the perimeter.

How were old septic tanks built?

Many of the first septic tanks were concrete tanks that were formed out of wood and poured in place in the ground and covered with a concrete lid or often some type of lumber. In the 1960s, precast concrete tanks became more prevalent as the standard of practice improved.

What are the signs that your septic tank is full?

Here are some of the most common warning signs that you have a full septic tank:

  • Your Drains Are Taking Forever.
  • Standing Water Over Your Septic Tank.
  • Bad Smells Coming From Your Yard.
  • You Hear Gurgling Water.
  • You Have A Sewage Backup.
  • How often should you empty your septic tank?

How do I find out if my septic tank is registered?

Check if your septic tank is already registered You can check if your tank has already been registered by contacting your environmental regulator. If you are unsure then it is best to check and avoid making an unnecessary payment. The NIEA and SEPA have records of all registered septic tanks.

What is OWTS?

An Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems (OWTS) is a privately owned and maintained sewage disposal system. They are commonly referred to as septic systems. All OWTS have two basic components: a two-compartment septic tank and a disposal field.

Do I have to change my septic tank?

Under the new rules, if you have a specific septic tank that discharges to surface water (river, stream, ditch, etc.) you are required to upgrade or replace your septic tank treatment system to a full sewage treatment plant by 2020, or when you sell a property, if it’s prior to this date.

Can you use a metal detector to find sewer lines?

Using a Plumbing Pipe Detector to Locate Underground Pipes. As a property owner there will be times when, for a variety of reasons, you will need to locate underground metal objects. For example, using a pipe locator metal detector you can easily pinpoint leaking underground pipes quickly.

Are septic tanks metal?

Steel Septic Tank—Steel septic tanks are the least durable and least popular tank option. Designed to last no more than 20-25 years, they can be susceptible to rust even before that. Steel top covers can rust through and cause an unsuspecting person to fall into the tank.

Are septic tanks made of metal?

The majority of septic tanks are constructed out of concrete, fiberglass, polyethylene or coated steel. Typically, septic tanks with a capacity smaller than 6,000 gallons are pre-manufactured. Larger septic tanks are constructed in place or assembled on-site from pre-manufactured sections.

How To Find My Septic Tank

  1. What is a septic tank
  2. How do I know if I have a septic tank
  3. And how do I know if I have a septic tank Identifying the location of your septic tank is critical for several reasons. The Best Way to Find a Septic Tank
  4. What to Do Once You’ve Discovered Your Septic Tank

You may have fallen in love with your new house because of its appealing good looks and characteristics, but there is almost certainly more to your new home than meets the eye. In many cases, the characteristics that make your house run more effectively and allow you to live a pleasant, contemporary life are not readily apparent. Septic tanks, for example, are an important part of your home’s infrastructure. A septic system is responsible for regulating and managing the wastewater generated by your home.

“How can I locate my septic tank?” is one of the most often requested inquiries we receive.

When your tank’s lid is difficult to locate – especially if you are not the original homeowner – you may be at a loss for what to do or where to look for the lid when you need it.

The majority of the time, all of the components of the septic tank are buried between four inches and four feet below ground level.

In order to do so, it is necessary to first comprehend the functions of septic tanks and septic systems and why it is important to know where yours is located.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank

Your septic tank’s location is not a closely guarded secret. There will be a method for you to locate it and make a note of its position for future reference, and below are a few examples of such methods.

What Is a Septic Tank?

Having a functioning septic tank is an important aspect of having an effective septic system. In the United States, around 20% of households utilize a septic system to handle their wastewater. Houses in rural parts of New England are the most likely to have a septic system, with residences in the Eastern United States being the most prevalent location for septic systems. When there are few and far between residences, it is typically more efficient and cost-effective to employ a septic system to manage wastewater rather than relying on a public sewage system to handle waste water.

Typically, a septic tank is a container that is waterproof and composed of a material such as concrete, polyethylene, fiberglass, or a combination of these.

An important function of a septic tank is to hold on to wastewater until any particulates in the water separate themselves from the water.

Any liquid that remains in the tank eventually drains into a leach field or a drainfield, where it is known as “effluent.” The dirt in the leach field aids in the filtering of the water and the removal of bacteria, viruses, and other pollutants that may be present in it.

Septic tanks erected in Onondaga County must contain input and outlet baffles, as well as an effluent filter or sanitary tees, in order to effectively separate particles from liquids during the treatment process.

How Do I Know If I Have a Septic Tank?

Having a functioning septic tank is an important aspect of maintaining an effective septic system. A septic system is used to handle wastewater in around 20% of residences in the United States. Houses in rural parts of New England are the most likely to have a septic system, with residences in the eastern United States being the most prevalent location for septic systems. When there are few and far between residences, it is typically more efficient and cost-effective to employ a septic system to manage wastewater rather than relying on a public sewage system to handle waste water management.

  • Typically, a septic tank is a container that is waterproof and composed of a material such as concrete, polyethylene, fiberglass, or any combination of these materials.
  • The purpose of a septic tank is to hold on to wastewater until any particles in the water separate from the water and disappear.
  • Any liquid that remains in the tank eventually drains into a leach field or a drainfield, where it becomes known as “effluent.” The dirt in the leach field aids in the filtering of the water and the removal of bacteria, viruses, and other pollutants that may have gotten into the system.
  • For septic tanks erected in Onondaga County, baffles, an effluent filter, or sanitary tees must be installed to separate particles from liquids at the intake and output baffles.

Why It’s Important to Know the Location of Your Septic Tank

You might wonder why you should bother trying to discover out where your septic tank is. There are several important reasons for this:

1. To Be Able to Care for It Properly

The first reason you should try to locate your septic tank is that knowing where it is will help you to properly repair and care for it in the future. The standard guideline is to avoid erecting structures or placing heavy objects on top of the septic tank. It’s possible that you don’t want to park your car or truck on top of it, and you don’t want visitors to your house to park their cars on top of it, either. Due to the weight of the automobiles, there is a possibility that the tank would collapse due to excessive pressure.

2. If You Want to Landscape or Remodel Your Property

If you want to build an addition to your home or perform some landscaping around your property, you will need to know where your septic tank is located. Nothing with deep or lengthy roots should be planted on top of or in the area of your tank, since this can cause problems. If roots are allowed to grow into the pipes of your septic system, it is conceivable that your system will get clogged. When you know where the tank is going to be, you may arrange your landscaping such that only shallow-rooted plants, such as grass, are in close proximity to the tank.

For starters, the tank’s weight might lead it to collapse due to the weight of the construction. A second issue is that getting access to the tank becomes more difficult if a permanent building has been constructed on top of it.

3. If a Problem With Your Tank Occurs

Knowing where your tank is buried might also assist you in identifying problems as soon as they arise. Consider the following scenario: you wake up one morning and see that there is flooding or ponding water in the region surrounding your septic tank – a sign that your system is overwhelmed and that an excessive amount of water is being utilized all at once.

4. Ease of Getting It Fixed

Knowing where your tank is buried might also assist you in identifying problems as soon as they arise. Consider the following scenario: you wake up one morning and see that there is flooding or ponding water in the region surrounding your septic tank – a sign that your system is overwhelmed and that an excessive amount of water is being used all at once.

1. Use a Septic Tank Map

First and foremost, make use of a road map. Using a map is frequently the quickest and most convenient alternative. Most counties keep records of the installation of septic tanks at all of their residents’ residences. These maps should include schematics that illustrate the specific placement of the tank on the land, as well as measurements that allow you to measure and locate the tank’s exact location on the property. Never mind that landmarks may shift over time depending on when the tank was built, so if there are a few more shrubs or a tree nearby, don’t rule out that location as a possibility.

  1. If you are unable to locate a map or other paperwork that identifies the location of your septic tank, there are a few locations to try to see if you can obtain a map of the area.
  2. The county health department is responsible for keeping track of septic systems.
  3. A septic tank’s position could be depicted on a survey map, for example.
  4. The creation of your own map and documentation may be worthwhile if you cannot locate a map or blueprint of your property and nothing appears to be on file regarding it at the county health department or another municipal agency.

2. Follow the Pipes to Find Your Septic Tank

First and foremost, make use of a map to navigate your way. Using a map is frequently the quickest and most convenient method. Most counties keep records of the installation of septic tanks at all of its constituents’ addresses. They should contain schematics that show you where the tank will be located in relation to the rest of the land, as well as dimensions that allow you to measure and locate the tank. Also, keep in mind that landmarks may shift over time depending on when the tank was built, so even when there are some additional shrubs or a tree close, you shouldn’t rule out that location.

  1. If you are unable to locate a map or other paperwork that identifies the location of your septic tank, there are a few locations to try to see if you can obtain a copy of a map for free.
  2. A septic system’s records are kept by the county’s health departmentsoften.
  3. The position of a septic tank may be included on a survey map for convenience purposes.
  4. The creation of your own map and documentation may be worthwhile if you cannot locate a map or blueprint of your property and nothing appears to be on file about it with the county health department or another municipal agency.

In this way, if you ever decide to sell your property, you will be able to supply the new owner with everything they will need to locate the tank and manage their septic system on their own.

3. Inspect Your Yard

Septic tanks are designed to be as unobtrusive as possible when they are erected. With the passage of time, and the growth of the grass, it might be difficult to discern the visual indications that indicated the exact location of your septic tank’s installation. However, this does not rule out the possibility of finding evidence that will take you to the location of your septic tank in the future. First and foremost, you want to rule out any potential locations for your septic tank, such as:

  • Under a road or similar paved surface, for example. Right up against the house (the tank must be at least five feet away)
  • Directly in front of the home Immediately adjacent to your well (if you have one)
  • In close proximity to trees or densely planted regions
  • In the shadow of a patio, deck, or other building
See also:  How A Septic Tank Works In A Private Home? (Correct answer)

Once you’ve ruled out any potential locations for your tank, it’s time to start hunting for indications as to where it may be hiding in plain sight. Keep your eyes peeled as you go about your property, looking for any inexplicable high or low points that might suggest the presence of an underground tank. When looking at your property, you could see a hill or mound on the ground, which is frequently an indication that there is a septic tank nearby. One further item to consider while searching for the right septic tank for your home is the amount of grass or other foliage in your yard.

Alternatively, if the tank was not adequately buried, you may observe a “bald patch,” which is an area where the grass is struggling to grow in the vicinity.

4. Talk to Your Neighbors

If your neighbors have septic systems as well, they may be able to assist you in locating your tank. Inquire of your neighbors about the location of their septic tanks in relation to their residences. Having a polite conversation with your neighbors regarding septic systems not only provides you with a means to figure out where yours is, but it may also serve as a friendly introduction to the other residents of your community.

5. Look for Your Septic Tank Lid

It is only the first step in the process to discover where your septic tank is located. After you’ve located your tank, the following step is to locate the lid. You can locate it with the help of your soil probe. The majority of septic tanks are rectangular in shape and measure around five feet by eight feet. The perimeter of the tank should be marked with a probe once it has been probed around. A shallow excavation with a shovel within the tank’s perimeter and near the center (or broken into halves for a two compartment tank) should show the position of the lid or lids if you are unable to feel them by probing.

The tank itself is likely to be filled with foul-smelling vapors, if not potentially hazardous ones.

What to Do After You Find Your Septic Tank

It is only the beginning of the effort to locate your septic tank. Following the discovery of the tank, the following step is to locate the lid. Your soil probe will be able to help you track it down. The majority of septic tanks are rectangular in shape and measure around five feet by eight feet in length and width. Investigate the tank’s circumference to determine its edges and mark them with a marker. A shallow excavation with a shovel within the tank’s perimeter and near the center (or broken into half for a two compartment tank) should show the position of the lid or lids if you are unable to feel them with your fingers.

A foul odor, if not deadly, vapors, are likely to emanate from within the tank itself. Keep your joy at having located your tank, but leave any maintenance or repair work on it to a team of experienced plumbers.

1. Mark Its Location

The likelihood is that you will not want to post a large sign in your yard that reads “Septic Tank Here!” but you will want to leave some sort of marking so that you can quickly locate the tank and lid when you need them. In an ideal situation, the marker will be substantial enough that it will not blow away in the wind and will not be readily moved by children who are playing in the yard. A patio paver, a potted plant, or a decorative gnome or rock are just a few of the possibilities. In addition to putting a physical sign beside the septic tank, you may draw a map or layout of the area around it to illustrate its position.

2. Take Care of Your Septic Tank

Taking proper care of your tank may save you hundreds of dollars over the course of its lifetime. The expense of maintaining your system could be a few hundred dollars every few years, but that’s a lot less than the thousands of dollars it might cost to repair or replace a damaged tank or a malfunctioning septic system. Two strategies to take better care of your septic tank and system are to avoid utilizing your drain pipes or toilets as garbage cans and to use less water overall. Things like paper towels, face wipes, and cat litter should not be flushed down the toilet since they are not designed to be flushed.

In addition, installing low-flow faucets and high-efficiency toilets can help you reduce the amount of water used in your home.

For example, you don’t want to be washing load after load of laundry or running your clothes washer at the same time as your dishwasher all at the same time.

Call a Professional Plumber

Maintenance of a septic system is not normally considered a do-it-yourself activity. In the Greater Syracuse region, whether your septic tank requires pumping out or cleaning, or if you want to replace your tank, you should use the services of a reputable plumbing firm to do the job right. If you’ve attempted to locate your septic tank on your own and are still unsure of its position, it may be necessary to enlist the assistance of a professional local plumber. Our team at Mr. Rooter Plumbing of Greater Syracuse can assist you with locating, maintaining, or replacing your home’s sewage tank.

Request an Estimate for the Job

Is The Septic System For Your Vintage Farmhouse A Mystery? 3 Tips To Find Out Its History – Choosing More Effective Septic Services

Older farmhouses have a special charm that gives the impression that you are taking a step back in time. However, while you may have fallen in love with the history of your home, one of the drawbacks of owning an older property is that you may not have all of the information you need to keep up with the upkeep and repairs. Septic systems that were established decades ago may be difficult to figure out at first, but you can use these suggestions to unravel the mystery and maintain your home’s plumbing in good condition.

  1. Farmhouses, on the other hand, that have been vacant for years or that have been passed down through the family may not have owners who are aware of their past.
  2. Although this record should have been sent to you with the inspection papers when you purchased your house, you may not have had access to it if you inherited the home.
  3. Whether this is the case, contact your local county clerk or health department to see if such a map is available.
  4. Locate this line and use a thin, metal rod to probe the dirt every few feet until you come across metal or concrete, at which point stop probing.
  5. It is also possible that the ground near the system is somewhat lower than the surrounding region.
  6. Schedule an Inspection When purchasing a home, your septic system should be evaluated.
  7. During an assessment of an older septic system, a professional may determine whether or not it is the appropriate size for the needs of the new residence.

The septic system, which pumps waste away from your home, is critical to your health and well-being. Knowing how to get to the bottom of your septic tank mystery will allow you to build up a good sanitation system that will keep your property free of potentially toxic waste for years to come. Share

How Do I Find My Septic Tank

What is the location of my septic tank? Natalie Cooper is a model and actress who has appeared in a number of films and television shows. 2019-10-24T 02:52:07+10:00

How Do I Find My Septic Tank

Whether or not my property has a septic tank is up in the air. If you live on an acreage or in a rural region, it is highly probable that you have a septic tank or a waste water treatment system in your home. What Is the Appearance of a Septic Tank? The great majority of septic tanks are 1600L concrete tanks, which are common in the industry. They feature a spherical concrete top with a huge lid in the center and two little lids on the sides. They are made out of concrete. Although the lids of these tanks may have been removed or modified on occasion, this is a rare occurrence.

A tiny proportion of septic tanks have a capacity of 3000L or more.

Our expert lifts the hefty lid of a 3000L septic tank and inspects the contents.

If you have discovered a tank or tanks that do not appear to be part of a waste water treatment plant system, it is possible that you have discovered a septic tank system.

How Can I Find My Septic Tank?

According to standard guidelines, the septic tank should be positioned close to the home, preferably on the same side of the house as the toilet. It can be found on the grass or within a garden bed, depending on its location. Going outdoors to the same side of the home as the toilet and performing a visual check of the septic tank is a smart first step to taking in order to discover where your septic tank is. The location of the toilets from outside can be determined if you are unfamiliar with the location of the toilets (for example, if you are looking to purchase a property).

Unfortunately, the position of septic tanks can vary widely and is not always easily discernible from the surrounding landscape.

In cases where the septic tank is no longer visible, it is likely that it has become overgrown with grass, has been buried in a garden or has had a garden built over it, that an outdoor area has been added and the septic tank has been paved over, or that a deck has been constructed on top of the tank.

  • They should indicate the position of your septic tank, as well as the location of your grease trap and greywater tank, if any.
  • Alternatively, if we have previously serviced the property for a different owner, our helpful office staff can examine our records to see if there are any notes pertaining to the site.
  • A specific gadget is used to locate the location of the septic tank, and our professional will mark the location of the tank so that it may be exposed and cleaned out.
  • Using an electronic service locator, you may locate a septic tank.
  • In the event that you’re not experiencing any problems, the toilets are flushing normally, and there are no foul odors, you may ponder whether it’s best to leave things alone rather than attempting to locate and unburden a hidden septic tank.
  • Although you could wait until there is a problem, this would almost certainly result in a significant amount of additional charges.
  • Does it make sense for me to have many toilets and also multiple septic tanks?

It is decided by the number of bedrooms, which in turn determines the number of people who are anticipated to reside in the house, that the size of the septic tank should be. The following is the relationship between septic tank volumes and the number of bedrooms:

  • Septic tanks should generally be placed close to the home, on the same side of the house as the toilet, as a general rule. It can be found on the grass or within a garden bed, depending on where it is placed. It is a good idea to start by going outside to the same side of the home as your toilet and performing a visual check to see whether your septic tank can be seen there. If you are unfamiliar with the position of the toilets (for example, if you are considering purchasing the property), you may determine the location of the toilets from the outside by checking for the breather pipe or stink pipe, which will be visible on the exterior of the home. Due to their inconsistency and lack of visibility, septic tanks are often difficult to locate. When older houses were designed, the accessibility of the grease trap was not always taken into consideration. Septic tanks that are not visible may have been overgrown with grass, hidden in a garden or built over the top of
  • They may have been expanded to include an outdoor space and the septic tank paved over
  • Or they may have been constructed on top of a deck that is overhanging the tank. If you are unable to identify the septic tank with a visual investigation, you should consult the plumbing drawings for your property, if you have any. If relevant, they should include the position of your septic tank, as well as the location of your grease trap and greywater tank. If you do not have access to the plumbing blueprints, please contact us so that we may assist you in locating your septic tank. If we have previously serviced the property for a different owner, our helpful office staff can go over our records to see if there are any comments about the location in our records. Alternately, if we do not have any records of your property, we can execute an electronic service finding operation. A unique gadget is used to determine the location of the septic tank, and our specialist will mark the location of the tank so that it may be exposed. For an estimate on electronic service finding, please contact us right away! A septic tank may be found using an electronic service locator. If my septic tank is buried, do I have to dig it up and replace it? In the event that you’re not experiencing any problems, the toilets are flushing normally, and there are no foul odors, you may ponder whether it’s best to leave things alone rather than attempting to locate and unburden a hidden septic tank or leach field. Inevitably, the majority of septic tanks that are in operation will require pumping and maintenance. It is possible to postpone the task until a problem emerges, but doing so will almost always result in a significant increase in costs. For additional information on the necessity of keeping your septic tank in good condition, please check our article on Maintaining and Cleaning Septic Tanks Is it necessary to have numerous septic tanks if I have multiple toilets? It is possible that you have more than one toilet and are wondering if they are all linked to the same septic system or if they are all connected to different septic systems. It is defined by the number of bedrooms, which in turn determines the number of people who are anticipated to reside in the house, how large the septic tank should be. It is as follows: the ratio between the number of gallons in the septic tank and the number of bedrooms is
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As a general rule, the septic tank should be positioned on the same side of the house as the toilet, and not too far away from the house. It can be found in the grass or in a flower bed. A smart initial step in locating your septic tank is to walk outdoors to the same side of the home as the toilet and conduct a visual investigation to see if the septic tank can be found. If you are unfamiliar with the position of the toilets (for example, if you are considering purchasing the property), you may determine the location of the toilets from the outside by checking for the breather pipe or stink pipe, which will be visible on the exterior of the home.

  1. Older buildings, in particular, were frequently designed without consideration for the accessibility of the grease trap.
  2. If you are unable to identify the septic tank with a visual inspection, you should consult the plumbing drawings for your property, if you have them.
  3. We can assist you in locating your septic tank if you do not have access to the plumbing drawings.
  4. Alternatively, if we do not have records of your property, we can do electronic service finding.
  5. For a price on electronic service finding, please contact us immediately.
  6. Is it necessary to locate my septic tank if it is buried?
  7. The unfortunate reality is that all septic tanks that are in operation will ultimately require pumping and maintenance.
  8. Maintaining and cleaning your septic tank is extremely important, as you can see on our page on Septic Tank Maintenance.
  9. Many people who have more than one toilet worry if they are all connected to the same septic system or if they each have their own individual septic tanks.

It is defined by the number of bedrooms, which in turn determines the number of people who are anticipated to reside in the house, how big the septic tank should be. The following is the litres per bedroom to the number of bedrooms ratio for a septic tank:

How to Find Your Septic Tank

Many folks have contacted me through e-mail (typically from across the nation) to inquire about the location of their septic tank. “I have no idea,” I generally say as a helpful response to the question. I really want to add something like, “It’s just off your driveway, near that bushy thing,” or anything along those lines. But, truly, even for the most experienced searchers, septic tanks are difficult to come by. The following are some strategies you might employ to assist you in locating your tank.

  1. Precaution should be exercised before you get started.
  2. So, proceed with caution!
  3. Please let me know if you have any queries or need assistance.
  4. Get to know the beast!
  5. tanks are normally buried 4 inches to 4 feet below the surface of the ground.
  6. You might be astonished to hear that someone knows exactly where it is hidden in plain sight.
  7. It is against the law to dig or probe in your own yard without first locating and marking the underground utilities.

You will receive the following tools to aid you in your search: Measurement tape, tile probe, and a shovel (if you are ambitious) The following tools are required: a metal detector (borrow or rent one since septic tanks often include iron steel rebar in the lids), and a hoagie sandwich (because locating sewage tanks makes you hungry.trust me on this).

  • Examine the basement wall to see where all of the pipes join together and exit through the basement ceiling.
  • If you don’t have a basement, walk outdoors and check for the roof vents on your house.
  • Ordinarily, the sewage line that leads to the septic tank will exit the home right below this ventilation opening.
  • On sometimes, the ancient proverb “The grass is always greener on the other side of the septic tank” is true.

Your tank may be located by probing or digging for it, and with luck, you will locate it. Keep in mind that not everything that seems to be a septic tank actually is! It’s possible that you came upon one of the following instead:

  • Rubble buried in the ground (not to be confused with Barney Ruble)
  • SepticDrywell
  • An old foundation
  • In case you happen to live in a cemetery (which is spooky), you may use a grave vault to keep your belongings safe.

After a few hours of hopelessly digging about in your yard, it will be time to eat your hoagie and take a little sleep. Following that, it will be necessary to rent or borrow a metal detector. In the event that your next-door neighbor loves Star Wars action figures or has more than three unidentified antennae on his roof, there is a significant probability that you can borrow his metal detector. If you’re lucky, the metal detector will really assist you in finding your septic tank, rather than simply a bunch of old buried automobile parts.

  1. According to local legend, a pumper known as “Zarzar The Incredible” can locate sewage tanks using a metal measuring tape spanning 30 feet in length.
  2. Continue to press your commode (“commode” sounds sophisticated) tape deeper and farther down the pipes until he “feels” the bottom of the tank with his tape.
  3. I recently acquired locate equipment that can be used to locate septic tanks, and I’m excited about it.
  4. For further information, please contact me at 574-533-1470.
  5. After that, you may have a movie of the inside of your sewer pipes created!
  6. Related: Visit our Septic System Maintenance page for more information.
  7. Services provided by Meade Septic Design Inc.
  8. Both Clients and Projects are included.
  9. Send me an email!

Caring for Septic Systems

However, while it may appear that maintaining a septic system is more difficult than maintaining a sewer system, it is just a little amount of effort to avoid big repair or replacement expenditures in the future. Photograph courtesy of Josh Reynolds Is it possible for you to explain what happens when you flush the toilet? In a metropolis, people seldom give the question much attention because their wastes are normally channeled via a central sewage system and then to a wastewater treatment facility.

  1. Because a breakdown in their system might have serious consequences for their property and possibly contaminate their drinking water, they must pay close attention to what is happening.
  2. As a result, it is completely up to you to ensure that your system is properly cared for and maintained.
  3. Cesspools are enormous vaults made of brick, stone, or concrete in which solids can collect and settle.
  4. A privy is a simple structure built over a hole in the ground that may be relocated once it has been filled.
  5. Anaerobic bacteria break down organic waste in septic tanks, which function as reservoirs for the bacteria.
  6. Plastic is being used in the manufacture of newer tanks (as illustrated above).
  7. Wastes are transported from the toilet, sink, shower, or washer to the septic tank through the indoor plumbing system.
  8. The tank is located underground.
  9. Solid wastes disintegrate over time as a result of anaerobic bacteria (bacteria that can survive in the absence of oxygen).
  10. If any liquid leaks out of a tank, it is distributed to the ground via disposal beds, which are perforated or open-jointed pipes buried in shallow, gravel-filled ditches.

Although the liquid has reached this condition, it still includes a huge amount of hazardous bacteria and organic materials. In order for the liquid to reach underground water supplies, it must first pass through the soil and be absorbed.

Why Do Septic Systems Fail?

However, while it may appear that maintaining a septic system is more difficult than maintaining a sewer system, it is just a little amount of effort to avoid costly repairs or replacements in the future. Josh Reynolds provided the image. Is it possible for you to explain what happens when you flush a toilet. In a metropolis, people seldom give the question much attention because their wastes are often channeled via a central sewage system and then to a wastewater treatment facility. Residential wastewater systems are more common in suburban and rural settings.

  • On-site systems, as opposed to sewers, collect, treat, and dispose of wastewater generated by your home on your own premises.
  • A standard septic system is installed in the majority of older homes, while some may still have a cesspool or even a privy on their property.
  • Before the 1950s, they were widely used; however, they are now illegal in most parts of the nation due to government regulations.
  • However, you may be able to discover a few in distant rural locations, as they are not normally considered illegal.
  • Tanks constructed of steel or concrete are commonly seen in older buildings as a single chamber design.
  • Services provided by ports on top of the list The illustrations are by John Van Pelt.
  • Wastes are transported to the septic tank by the interior plumbing system, which includes the toilet, sink, shower, and washing machine.
  • If solid wastes are allowed to sink to the bottom of a tank, then only liquid wastes are allowed to travel through to the outlet pipes.
  • With each run through the tank, lighter particles and grease rise to the surface and congeal to the surface, generating an imperceptible floating film that remains in the tank.

Although the liquid has reached this phase, it still includes a significant amount of dangerous bacteria and organic materials. In order for the liquid to reach subsurface water supplies, these impurities must first be absorbed by the soil.

Maintaining Your Septic System

The disposal field (also known as the leaching bed) is set out in the shape of a pitchfork on level ground. The leaching bed may zig-zag downwards in areas where the home is situated on a rise. Many homeowners, particularly those who live in older homes, are unsure about the exact location of their tank and field in relation to their home. It is critical that you identify the location of the tank since it will ultimately require service. First, locate the pumpout and observation openings on the equipment.

  1. To gently probe the soil for the tank and distribution box, you can also use a slender steel rod with a 1/8-inch diameter to gently probe the earth.
  2. Once you’ve located the tank, look for the dumping field, which is normally accessible by a distribution box fanning from it.
  3. Please be aware that identifying the laterals can be difficult—in fact, in some situations even septic professionals have problems locating all of the components of the system.
  4. The most important thing to remember is to empty your tank on a regular basis.
  5. Depending on the size of the tank and the number of people that it serves, the frequency will vary.
  6. A septic tank requires cleaning on average every three to five years if it is used and cared for correctly (more if you use a sink-mounted garbage disposal unit).
  7. Expect to spend around $200 for each pumpout, depending on the size of the tank and your geographic location.
See also:  How Much Does It Cost To Get A Septic Tank Cleaned Out? (Question)

In addition, while the tank is open, the technician can inject some water into the distribution box to obtain an idea of how effectively the leach field is performing.

Additionally, even just glancing into the tank, you should use caution.

Depending on the tree, roots can grow up to 30′ to 40′ from the base of the tree and burst or dislodge the distribution box, connecting pipes, and laterals.

Don’t even think of driving cars or heavy equipment over the dumping area.

Because of this, solids will ascend to the top of the tank and block the laterals, overloading the tank.

Installing water-saving toilets and showerheads is one technique to limit the quantity of water that enters the system.

Don’t attach sump pumps to your septic system until you’ve fixed any leaky toilets and faucets.

After being clogged with sediments or having their integrity compromised by tree roots or automobiles, laterals begin to collapse.

Cooking oils, fats, and grease should not be poured down the kitchen sink drain.

Please do not flush non-biodegradable things such as disposable diapers, clumps of cat litter, filtered cigarettes, feminine hygiene products or plastic tampon applicators, paper towels, condoms, or other similar materials.

These chemicals have the potential to harm beneficial microorganisms in the tank and the soil, as well as pollute groundwater supplies.

None of these goods has been shown to be of considerable benefit in terms of enhancing performance or preventing failures.

Many over-the-counter septic system cleaning products include chemicals that are potentially harmful and are not biodegradable, as is the case with many household products.

Experts advise against using cleansers that contain sodium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide, or hydrogen peroxide.

Use of any product containing toxic chemicals in excess of one percent by weight is prohibited, including trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, methylene chloride, benzene, carbon tetrachloride, toluene, napthalene, trichlorophenol, pentachlorophenol, acrolein, acrylonitrile, and benzidine.

How To Tell If Your System Is Failing

While there are no 100-percent accurate ways for spotting a malfunctioning septic system, you should be on the lookout for the following signs of a potential problem: In the event of a toilet backup into the house: To begin, rule out the possibility of a clogged soil line or other interior plumbing issues. Drainage system failure due to sewage or effluent leaking into the structure or basement: The water resulting from this condition will have a distinct odor. In the vicinity of the disposal field, there is a puddle of effluent on the soil surface.

It is not recommended that the grass above the septic field be too green in a healthy system.

It is important to remember that wastewater on the ground is a major health danger and should be addressed as soon as is practical.

What To Do If The System Fails

If you have any reason to believe that your system is failing, contact your local health department. In addition, you should seek the services of a skilled septic system installer. Then collaborate with both of these parties to build a strategy for moving forward. It is not unusual to find a septic system that is either underdesigned for the current level of use required by the residents, incorrectly placed, or at a position that will no longer sustain the sort of system that is already installed in an older home.

While a new septic system installation can be expensive (usually between $4,000 and $10,000), a properly operating septic system is critical to the running of your home as well as the health and safety of you and your loved ones.

As with so many other aspects of an old property, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure when it comes to septic systems.

Locating Septic Tanks the Old-Fashioned Way

When it comes to locating septic tanks, Ray Harrison prefers to utilize an old-fashioned listening rod.

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Receive articles, news, and videos about Systems/ATUs sent directly to your email! Now is the time to sign up. Systems/ATUs+ Receive Notifications The chances are good that when Ray Harrison is out on a job site, he will at some time unload a long steel rod from his truck. His response: “That’s something that we utilize very much on a regular basis.” “It’s a little out of the way. “A large number of individuals have converted to cameras.” In Chestertown, Maryland, on the eastern shore of the Chesapeake Bay, he owns and operates Raymond Harrison Septic Services, and the instrument that he cherishes the most is a sounding rod.

  1. You can tell the difference between a concrete tank and a plastic tank.
  2. With a little practice, you can tell the difference between PVC and cast iron.
  3. Everything is dependent on how the earth or a subterranean structure reacts to the rod.
  4. PVC has a bounce to it, and it has a deeper sound than other materials.
  5. It’s impossible to move something once you hit it,” Harrison explains.
  6. Commercial sounding rods are available for purchase, but Harrison chooses to go the more inexpensive route.
  7. It does exactly what its name implies for electricians: it does what it says it will do.

These rods are made of galvanized steel, which ensures that they will last for a long time, and they are available in a variety of lengths.

That’s the most manageable length.

It takes time and effort to become proficient with a sounding rod.

His father had taught him how to use the sounding rod, and he owed his success to him.

Maryland has a large number of septic systems, many of which are old, and Harrison receives calls from people who are unsure of the location of their septic system about every other week.

When using any tool to probe the ground, extreme caution should be exercised.

A “digger’s hotline” service should be installed on the electric, gas, and cable utilities prior to the arrival of workers on the job site. In the April issue of Onsite Installer, you can read a comprehensive profile of Raymond Harrison Septic Services.

What size of septic tank do I need?

Probably one of the last things on your mind when you are constructing a new house is the location of your septic system. After all, shopping for tanks isn’t nearly as entertaining as shopping for cabinetry, appliances, and floor coverings. Although you would never brag about it, your guests will be aware if you do not have the proper septic tank placed in your home or business.

septic tanks for new home construction

Probably one of the last things on your mind when you are constructing a new house is the installation of an adequate septic system. In the end, shopping for tanks isn’t nearly as entertaining as shopping for cabinetry, appliances, and floor coverings, respectively. Nonetheless, even if you never show it off, your guests will be able to tell if you don’t have the proper septic system in place.

planning your drainfield

When you are constructing a new house, one of the last things on your mind is likely to be your septic system. After all, shopping for tanks isn’t quite as exciting as shopping for cabinetry, appliances, and floor coverings. Nonetheless, even if you never show it off, your guests will be aware if you do not have the proper septic tank built.

  • Vehicles should not be allowed on or around the drainfield. Planting trees or anything else with deep roots along the bed of the drain field is not recommended. The roots jam the pipes on a regular basis. Downspouts and sump pumps should not be discharged into the septic system. Do not tamper with or change natural drainage features without first researching and evaluating the consequences of your actions on the drainage field. Do not construct extensions on top of the drain field or cover it with concrete, asphalt, or other materials. Create easy access to your septic tank cover by placing it near the entrance. Easy maintenance and inspection are made possible as a result. To aid with evaporation and erosion prevention, plant grass in the area.

a home addition may mean a new septic tank

Do not make any big additions or renovations to your house or company until you have had the size of your septic system assessed. If you want to build a house addition that is more than 10% of your total floor space, increases the number of rooms, or necessitates the installation of new plumbing, you will almost certainly need to expand your septic tank.

  • For a home addition that will result in increased use of your septic system, your local health department will require a letter from you that has been signed and authorized by a representative of your local health department confirming that your new septic system is capable of accommodating the increase in wastewater. It is not recommended that you replace your septic system without the assistance of a certified and competent contractor.

how to maintain your new septic system

Septic tank cleaning and septic tank pumping services are provided by Norway Septic Inc., a service-oriented company devoted to delivering outstanding septic tank cleaning and septic tank pumping services to households and business owners throughout the Michiana area. “We take great delight in finishing the task that others have left unfinished.” “They pump, we clean!” says our company’s motto. Septic systems are something we are familiar with from our 40 years of expertise, and we propose the following:

  • Make use of the services of a qualified specialist to develop a maintenance strategy. Make an appointment for an annual examination of your septic system. Utilize the services of an effluent filter to limit the amount of particles that exit the tank, so extending the life of your septic system. Waste items should be disposed of properly, and energy-efficient appliances should be used. Make sure you get your septic system professionally cleaned every 2 to 3 years, or more frequently if necessary, by an experienced and qualified expert
  • If you have any reason to believe that there is an issue with your system, contact a professional. It is far preferable to catch anything early than than pay the price later. Maintain a record of all septic system repairs, inspections, and other activities

common septic questions

Here are some of the most frequently asked questions by our septic customers.

How do I determine the size of my septic tank?

If you have a rectangular tank, multiply the inner height by the length to get the overall height of the tank. In order to find out how many gallons your septic tank contains, divide the number by.1337.1337

How many bedrooms does a 500-gallon septic tank support?

Calculate the internal height of a rectangular tank by multiplying it by its length. To find out how many gallons your septic tank can contain, multiply the figure by.1337.

How deep in the ground is a septic tank?

Your septic system is normally buried between four inches and four feet underground, depending on the climate.

HOW TO SAFELY ABANDON AN OLD SEPTIC TANK ON YOUR PROPERTY

If you’ve recently purchased an older house, it’s possible that a septic tank is located on the property. This is true even if your home is currently linked to the municipal water and sewer systems. A prior owner may have abandoned the ancient septic system and connected to the city sewage system when it became accessible at some time in the past. Despite the fact that there are standards in place today for properly leaving a septic tank, it was typical practice years ago to just leave the tanks in place and forget about them.

The old tank may either be demolished or filled with water to solve the problem.

It is possible that permits and inspections will be required.

They are dangerous because curious children may pry open the lid and fall into the container.

Falls into a septic tank can be lethal owing to the toxicity of the contents and the fact that concrete can collapse on top of you while falling into a tank.

Eventually, this approach was phased out due to the fact that the steel would corrode and leave the tank susceptible to collapse.

When it comes to ancient septic tanks, they are similar to little caves with a lid that might collapse at any time.

The old tank is crushed and buried, or it is removed from the site.

If it is built of steel, it will very certainly be crushed and buried in its current location.

After that, the tank can be completely filled with sand, gravel, or any other form of rubble and buried.

Tanks can either be entirely dismantled or destroyed and buried in their original location.

The abandonment has been documented and plotted on a map.

It’s possible that you’ll forget about the tank once it’s been abandoned.

As a result, you might wish to sketch a map of the area where the old tank used to stand.

If you can demonstrate that an old septic tank was properly decommissioned, you may be able to increase the value of your property, and the new owners will enjoy knowing that large chunks of concrete are buried underground before they start digging in the yard to put something in it.

It may take some detective work to discover about the history of your land and what may be lying beneath the surface of the earth.

Upon discovering an old septic tank on your property that is no longer in service, contact Total Enviro Services for propertank abandonment procedures that meet with local standards and protect your family, pets, and farm animals from harm or death.

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