How To Drill A 55 Gallon Drum Septic Tank? (Best solution)

  • Make 45 degree angles from either side of the centerline and mark it on the second drum. Use a poly drum and set it up the same way u would a large septic. Lower the 55 gallon plastic barrel into the hole and fit the black pvc leach line pipe. Cover the leach line with black plastic and a thick layer of cinders.

Can you use a 55-gallon drum for a septic tank?

In areas with no zoning or building restrictions, 55-gallon drums or barrels may still be used as a temporary solution before other more permanent methods of waste containment are put in place. Dig a hole in line with the bathroom 10 feet away from the structure that needs a temporary septic tank.

Can you drill into a septic tank?

You can’t. You have to connect to the pipe from the house. Most septic tanks have a 6″ baffle pipe that the house sewer feeds into. Making a second inlet hole anywhere in the tank would bypass that baffle and create a lot of problems with the tank in the future.

What size septic tank do I need for a tiny house?

Tiny homes typically require a 500 to 1,000-gallon septic tank. Though, it’s not always possible to implement a tank of this size. In some states, for example, the minimum tank size is 1,000 gallons. There may be exceptions to this rule if your home is on wheels.

How do you tap into an existing septic tank?

Use a 4-inch pipe to connect the two septic tanks. Place this pipe into the inlet hole of your new septic tank before you lower it into the ground. After you’ve lowered your new septic tank, insert the other end of the pipe into your old septic tank’s outlet hole.

Can you have a septic tank without a leach field?

The waste from most septic tanks flows to a soakaway system or a drainage field. If your septic tank doesn’t have a drainage field or soakaway system, the waste water will instead flow through a sealed pipe and empty straight into a ditch or a local water course.

What is the cheapest septic system to put in?

Conventional septic system These conventional septic systems are usually the most affordable, with an average cost of around $3,000.

How do you handle a 55 gallon drum?

Move your shoulders low and close to the drum. Slowly push forward with your legs until you feel the drum reach its balance point. When using the drag/pull method, place your hands at the near position at shoulder width. Brace the drum with your foot to prevent it from sliding, and shift your weight to the rear foot.

How much water pressure does a 55 gallon drum have?

A 55 gallon drum is a little less than a meter tall. So the pressure at the bottom of the barrel would be about the same as a column of water 20 m tall. That’s about 2 atm of pressure. So the pressure difference acting across the walls of the drum at the bottom would be about 30 psi.

What gauge steel are 55 gallon drums?

55 Gallon Steel Drums – Dimensions and Specifications The standard thickness of the steel is between 0.9 and 1.5 mm (20-16 gauge steel), and the drums are often reinforced with ribs or rolling hoops at both the top and bottom of the barrel as well as at each third of the barrel’s height.

How to Make a Septic Tank With a 55 Gallon Drum

Home-Diy Temporary septic tanks were formerly constructed from whatever materials were available at the time, such as 55-gallon drums or barrels, according to legend. Despite the fact that these drums or barrels had a limited capacity, they performed well and provided a quick solution to the problem of holding untreated sewage.

  • The following items are required: jigsaw
  • 1-by-10-foot-long 3-inch-diameter black PVC pipe
  • 1-by-10-foot-long leach-line pipe
  • 55-gallon plastic drum or barrel with lid
  • Cinders.

Tip

Invest in a natural septic digester, which can be purchased at any ranch supply store, to supplement your temporary septic tank.

Warning

It is not permitted to drive or park on top of the temporary septic tank. While 55-gallon drums or barrels may still be utilized as a temporary solution in places where there are no zoning or building limitations, they should only be used as a temporary solution until other more permanent measures of waste containment are put in place.

  1. Dig a hole 10 feet away from the structure that requires a temporary septic tank, in line with the bathroom and 10 feet away from the toilet. For optimal gravity flow while flushing the toilet and to avoid sewage backlog, dig down at least 8 feet. To keep the building from being damaged, dig a ditch 2 feet below right in front of the hole. The trench should be a minimum of 10 feet long. This will be the leach line for your system. Take the jigsaw and cut a hole in the side of the plastic barrel 4 inches below the top to accommodate the 10-foot-long leach line, which is made of 3-inch-diameter PVC black pipe. Make certain that the hole is large enough to accommodate the pipe. Drop in the 55-gallon plastic barrel and insert the black PVC leach-line pipe into the hole you just dug. Cover the leach line with a coating of black plastic and a thick covering of cinders to prevent it from leaking. The soil you took from the leach line when excavating it should be used to re-fill it. Attach the other 10-foot length of solid PVC pipe to the structure and insert it into the bung hole at the top of the drum or barrel, if applicable. Place a black plastic sheet over the whole drum or barrel lid and backfill with earth until it reaches ground level.

Make Your Own Gray Water Dry Well 55-Gallon Drum

It is possible to dispose of wastewater created by sinks and laundry appliances using a 55-gallon drum as part of a dry well, which does not have an adverse effect on the sanitary sewage system. Essentially, a dry well is a basic construction designed to allow water to seep away beneath the surface of the earth. The dry well is supported by a 55-gallon drum, which also serves as a storage container for water during the soaking process. Most do-it-yourselfers will be able to complete the job, which will need some excavating and piping but is within their skills.

Step 1

Make a hole in the earth near the spot where the dry well will be installed. Excavate enough earth to form a hole as least as deep as the height of the 55-gallon drum, plus any dirt covering that will be used to cover the grass in the future. Create a hole that is slightly bigger all around than the circumference of the drum. Even though many individuals use a shovel to dig a hole in the ground, renting an excavator needs the least amount of physical exertion.

Step 2

Drill around a dozen 1-inch holes around the circumference of the 55-gallon drum’s bottom. The drum can also be positioned such that its open bottom is facing down.

Step 3

Fill the bottom of the hole with approximately 6 inches of 1-inch gravel.

Step 4

Insert the drum into the opening. Using additional of the 1-inch gravel, fill in any empty spaces around the drum. Using a hose, connect the drum to the gray water outlet in your home. This pipe, which is often made of PVC, extends through a hole in the drum’s wall and allows gray water to flow into the drum.

Step 5

Landscape cloth or tar paper should be used to cover the top of the drum as well as the gravel surrounding it. In this method, the dirt or soil is prevented from making its way into the gravel, where it might clog up the holes in the drum.

Step 6

Cover the barrel and the rest of the pit with top soil, then replant grass over the dry well to provide a natural barrier.

Septic tank for camper

I had to relocate my camper, and the new location does not have a holding tank. The previous location, as well as the others, are supposed to contain 55-gallon barrels, although no one is certain of this. Has anyone ever attempted to accomplish this with drums buried in the ground? Because our camp is located on a sand slope, water will drain quickly. That’s something I’ve heard about but have never tried. It would be one of those plastic water tanks in a cage if I had my pick. Yes, numerous 3/8-inch holes should be drilled “Plastic drum with holes in the bottom.

  • Fill the bottom of the container with gravel.
  • Some people would put carpet or a liner around the perimeter to keep the sand out.
  • Cover the area with soil.
  • If you don’t reside there, it’ll last for several years.
  • Plastic.
  • There was no digging involved.
  • That’s exactly what Like stated.

We’d had one buried for years at our hunting camp, but it was only used by one camper at a time.

I used a 55-gallon drum, which lasted for around ten years.

A previous one had been in place for 5 years, but tree roots had gotten into it.

It was decided to position the input hole on the side wall, towards the top, and the outflow hole on the other side, about 3 inches lower.

I connect a perforated plastic drain pipe to the outlet side of the barrel and wrap it around it.

I know folks who have drilled drainage holes in the bottom of barrels, but they have found that with minimal use, the water tends to pile up in the bottom and not drain.

For the past ten years or so, I’ve been utilizing a 55 gallon drum.

I don’t make any holes in the bottom of the container.

You want to make sure that your “tank” always has liquid in it so that bacteria can perform their work.

There have been no concerns with trees or roots since I relocated from the area.

Except if it is utilized on a regular basis, I would not advocate that configuration.

Set up hole diggers and excavate an open pit for the waste.

I used a number three or four “Drain pipe with perforations This is similar to the sort of cap that you install on the end of down spouts.

I agree with the notion of placing gravel around the barrel, however I didn’t have any on hand.

Wishing you the best of luck with yours.

One of those bags was used by my father-in-law for his store, and it is still in excellent condition.

Look for septic chambers if you can.

I had to relocate my camper, and the new location does not have a holding tank.

Has anyone ever attempted to accomplish this with drums buried in the ground?

If you’re using a 55-gallon drum, you’ll need to build a concrete top to protect the lid.

I used to have one for my dog enclosure, but after approximately ten years of usage, the top rusted away and I ended myself knee deep in water with one foot.

Don’t leave the drain valve on your camper open while you’re away.

Please do not use it as a sink or shower drain.

Don’t leave the drain valve on your camper open while you’re away.

Please do not use it as a sink or shower drain.

Inside the drum, I buried a plastic 55 gallon drum with the inlet going in the top and the exit approximately 2 inches below the top, as well as a 90-degree elbow and a 10-inch length of pipe pointing down.

This will only be used for the toilet, shower, and sink; everything else will be located elsewhere.

Gray water drains into a pipe that is not connected to the camp.

The previous location, as well as the others, are supposed to contain 55-gallon barrels, although no one is certain of this. Has anyone ever attempted to accomplish this with drums buried in the ground? Because our camp is located on a sand slope, water will drain quickly. The drums are excellent.

How to Construct a Small Septic System

Documentation Download Documentation Download Documentation There are two main sections to most private septic systems: the holding and digesting tanks, and the dispersion field or leach field. As the liquid waste in the first holding tank fills up, it will be transferred to the second holding tank. Once the second tank is completely filled with liquid, the liquid will dissipate into the earth underneath it. The system displayed here is a modest system that is intended for limited use by two persons who do not need to do laundry.

  1. When compared to a conventional house septic system, this system employs two 55 US gallon (210 L) drums, rather than the 1,000–2,000 US gallon (3,800–7,600 L) tanks that are utilized in a standard home septic system.
  2. Property owners considering installing a system similar to this one should be advised that this system would fail inspections by any public health department in the United States, and that the owner may be liable to a fine if the system was discovered in operation by a health official.
  3. Toilets that conserve water nowadays utilize less than two litres of water every flush.
  4. It might be a lifeline for those who live in areas where septic treatment is not available.

Part 1 of 3: Cutting the Tanks

  1. 1Cut a hole in the center of the top of each drum that is the same size as the outer measurement of the toilet flange. Take the outside diameter of the toilet flange that you’re using and multiply it by two. Place the hole close to the edge of the drum so that you may simply connect them to pipes in the near future. Cut the drums using a saber saw to make them lighter
  2. 2 Each hole should be capped with a 4 in (10 cm) toilet flange. Push the flanges into the top of each tank until they are flush with the surface. As soon as the flanges are in position, tighten them down so they don’t move or shift once they are in place. Advertisement
  3. s3 Cut a hole in the first drum that is 4 in (10 cm) in diameter on the opposite side of the drum from the hole in the top. Placing the hole approximately 4–5 inches (10–13 cm) below the top of the drum and ensuring that it lines up with the hole on the top of the tank are the most important steps. 4 Make a hole in the wall with a saber saw or a hole saw. Cut two holes in the side of the drum at 45-degree angles to the center of the hole on the top, one on each side of the drum. The center line is the line that runs through the middle of the hole on the top of the drum. Make 45-degree angles from either side of the centerline, then mark them on the second drum using a permanent marker. Make your holes in the barrel by cutting through the side with a saber or a hole saw and drilling them out. Advertisement
See also:  How To Replace A Conventional Septic Tank? (TOP 5 Tips)

Part 2 of 3: Placing the Tanks Underground

  1. 1 Dig a trench that is 4 ft 26 ft 3 ft (1.22 m 7.92 m 0.91 m) in length and width. Excavator or shovel are both good options for digging a hole in the ground where you wish to put your tank. Continue excavating until the hole measures 4 feet (1.2 m) in width, 26 feet (7.9 m) in length, and 3 feet (0.91 m) in depth.
  • Excavators for excavating are often available for hire from a heavy machinery supply company. Look for equipment rentals on the internet
  1. 2Place the drum at the end of the trench, with one side hole drilled in it. When you place the drum on the floor, make sure it is level. Check to see sure the drum’s top is at least 4 inches (10 cm) below the surface of the water. 3 Dig a hole that is one foot (30 cm) deeper than the first to accommodate the positioning of the second drum in front of the first. In order to ensure a tight fit and prevent the drum from shifting, make your hole the same diameter as the drum you’re inserting in it. 4 The hole should be leveled with gravel until a 90-degree curve can be made to connect the top drum’s hole on one side to the toilet flange on the other. Check the alignment of the holes in the 90-degree bend between the two drums by dry fitting it between the two drums. If you need to improve the alignment of the pipe line, dig the hole a little deeper. 5 To make the bend, cut 31 2in (8.9 cm) pieces of ABS pipe and adhere them to the bend with epoxy or hot glue. With a hacksaw, cut the ABSpipe parts, also known as nipples. 6 Insert the pieces into the bend and hold them in place using PVC adhesive. Check the fit between the two drums to ensure that they are in alignment. Insert the end of the 21 2in (6.4 cm) nipple into the side hole of the first drum and tighten the nut. 7Glue the end of the 31 2in (8.9 cm) nipple into the toilet flange on the second tank, making sure that the nipple on the other end aligns with the hole on the top of the second drum. To hold the bent in place, apply PVC adhesive to the inside of the curve. Don’t be concerned about the link to the first drum just yet
  2. You’ll make that connection later. 8. Glue a Y-bend to a 31 2in (8.9 cm) nipple, and then bend the angled piece of the Y-bend at a 45-degree angle. Using your PVC adhesive, attach a nipple to the end of the Y-bend and let it dry. Assemble the Y-bend and align the angled pipe on it so it meets the incoming waste line, then glue it onto the toilet flange. 9 21 2in (6.4 cm) nipples are cut and glued to one end of the 45-degree bends at the bottom of the lower drum, and they are then inserted into the side of the lower drum. Directional bends are defined as those that are perpendicular to the bottom of the trench at their ends. Advertisement

Part 3 of 3: Connecting the Drain Pipes

  1. Put a stake into the ground and level it with the bottom of each of the 45-degree bends. 2Put a stake into the ground and level it with the top of the 45-degree bends. It doesn’t matter what sort of stakes you use since they all work. Use a mallet or hammer to pound the stakes into the ground. Attach a one-inch-wide block to the end of a four-foot-long (1.2-meter-long) level using duct tape. This will assist you in ensuring that you create sloped drain pipes so that your tanks can empty
  2. 3Place another stake approximately 37 8ft (1.2 m) down the trench from the first one
  3. 4Place another stake approximately 37 8ft (1.2 m) down the trench from the first one
  4. 5Place another stake approximately 37 8ft (1.2 m) down the trench from the first one. Drive the stake down until it is the same height as the first one using your hammer or mallet
  5. 4 Place the end of the level without the block on the first stake and the block on the second stake to complete the level without the block. Continue to pound the second stake into the ground until the level is balanced. 1 inch (2.5 cm) lower than the previous post, or 1 inch (0.64 cm) lower per 1 foot (30 cm)
  6. 5Repeat this method until you have stakes running the whole length of the trench
  7. Continue to place stakes down the rest of the trench every 37 8feet (1.2 m) from the last one, ensuring that the stakes slope away from the drums
  8. 6Place gravel in the trench until the top of the gravel is level with the top of the stakes
  9. 7Place gravel in the trench until the top of the gravel is level with the top of the stakes The gravel will now slope away from the drums at a rate of 1 4 inch (0.64 cm) per 1 foot (30 cm) of horizontal distance
  10. 7Place 20 ft (6.1 m) of perforated drain pipe into each hole on the second drum
  11. 8Place 20 ft (6.1 m) of perforated drain pipe into each hole on the third drum
  12. 9Place 20 ft (6.1 m) of perforated drain pipe into each hole on the fourth drum
  13. 10P Insert the ends of the drain pipes into the 45-degree bends on the lower drum to complete the installation. 9Make certain that the perforations in the pipes are facing down so that liquids may soak back into the earth
  14. 8checking the pipes with a level to ensure that the 1 4in (0.64 cm) slope is consistent throughout the length of the pipe. Fill up any gaps in the slope by adding or removing gravel under the pipe. Seal the 45-degree and 90-degree bends that connect the lower and top drums, respectively, with silicone. For the greatest seal possible on your drain pipes, use a two-part epoxy or silicone caulk. For this purpose, consider utilizing flex pipe, which will yield a little bit if the ground changes. Tenth, fill the lower drum halfway with water to keep it from collapsing under the weight of all the gravel. Place the remaining gravel over the trench and into the bottom drum, covering it completely. 11Lay landscape fabric over the top of the gravel. As a result, the dirt will not be able to seep into the gravel and you will be able to keep proper drainage on your tanks
  15. 12Fill the remaining trench area with soil, compacting it to the original grade. When you have finished filling up the area with your dirt, check to see that the ground is level. 13Fill the upper drum with water, leaving the top pipe from the first tank exposed so that you can readily reach the tanks if you need to drain them later. 14Fill the lower drum with water. Fill the top drum with water and pour it directly down the exposed pipes on the bottom drum. Continue filling the drum until it is completely filled, then secure the top with a cap to keep out the elements. Advertisement

Community Q A

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  • Question What is considered a low level of use? Low consumption is defined as less than 125 gallons per day. Question Was the ‘y’ elbow on the first tank’s tank for any particular reason? Is it left open or sealed when it has been completed? Isn’t it going to stink if it’s left open? The clean out requires a threaded cap or plug, which is provided. Question What kind of water do you use to fill it? “Fill” is the most important term here. Continue to fill the drum with water until the level does not rise any more
  • Question Suppose I neglected to attach a slip coupler to the perforated pipe and only had 10 feet of it. Is it still possible to use this? Yes, however you will need to raise the depth of the field in order to get the same cubic feet of capacity
  • Nevertheless Question What is the best way to find out if something is legal in my state? This is a quick and easy approach that is unlikely to be appropriate for long-term usage in the majority of states. It is possible that the property owner and/or the installation will be penalized if this is uncovered. Question Is it possible to utilize two or three 275-gallon water totes instead, or a water tote and barrel combination? It doesn’t matter either direction you go. It’s best to utilize a single tote and a barrel as a digestion tank and a distribution box if you have only one tote. Question What is the purpose of filling the higher barrel with water? You fill the top barrel with water so that when sewage waste is introduced into the barrel, it flows into a sufficient amount of water to initiate the anaerobic digestion process. Question What is the best way to clean up this system? If there is enough bacteria in it, it will clean itself with minimal effort. If it starts to fill up, you may call a septic service to have it emptied
  • If it doesn’t, you can do it yourself. Question What is the correct grade slope of the drain field for every ten feet of length of the drain field? It is possible for the field’s bottom to be level. When running away from the drums, the pipe system should be sloped at 2 percent, or 2.5 inches every 10 feet. Question Is it possible for this system to freeze in the winter? And might I use antifreeze in the mix as well? Antifreeze will destroy the beneficial bacteria that are required for the process to function properly. The process is biological, and it will generate some of its own heat as part of the process. It’s always possible to dig a little deeper to get a little more insulation above it.

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  • The horizontal side of the “Y” links to the waste source, and it should be fitted with a connector that is compatible with the source supply line
  • Instead of using a 90° elbow, you should join two of them together to produce a U-shaped connection. In this manner, the end that is in the first barrel will be pointed towards the bottom of the tank, rather than the top. This should be reinforced with a short segment of straight pipe that is several inches deeper towards the bottom. Solids either float or sink depending on their density. They don’t seem to congregate in the middle. As a result, only the broken down liquid waste makes it to the second tank, and the solids are never seen again. The same procedure should be followed for each of the drainage pipes that originate from the second barrel. Just to be completely certain that no solids find their way into the global drain field, the waste is dumped into the first tank, with the solids settling to the bottom of the first tank. Whenever the liquid level exceeds the outfall to the second tank, it is drained into the tank below it. If there are any solids present, they will sink to the bottom. Whenever the liquid from the second tank reaches one of the two outfalls, it is transported to the gravel leaching field for dispersion. Over time, the vast majority of the solids will liquefy and disperse. Solids may accumulate at the top of the tank after many years, necessitating the removal of the solids. Thirty percent of the waste is absorbed into the earth, with the remaining seventy percent being dissipated by sunshine. It is important not to compress the soil since this would interfere with the evaporation process
  • The vertical side of the “Y” will be used to pump out the tank after it is entirely filled with solids
  • The depth of the trench should be proportional to the depth of the waste source line. If the line is deeper or higher than the one depicted, you will need to dig the trench deeper or shallower to suit the new line depth or height. It’s not that difficult to find out. In the event that you have a septic system that is too shallow, it may be more susceptible to damage. After a period, you may discover that the ground has sunk below the trench’s location. Fill it in with extra dirt and compact it
  • It is assumed that you are familiar with working with ABS plastic pipe. In addition, you must have the necessary tools to dig the trench (or be ready to put in a lot of effort).
See also:  Hiw Do I Oniw Where My Septic Tank Is? (Solved)

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Warnings

  • This is a system with a relatively limited capacity. This is not intended to suit the demands of a big family or group of people. It is intended for use with a modest travel trailer and two individuals. In order to extend the life of this little septic system, it is recommended that you do not place anything else in it but water, trash, and toilet paper. You may have to pump the upper drum once or twice a year if you don’t do so. During the course of five years, the system depicted here will only require pumping twice. Do not drive through the area where the drums are located. When establishing a septic system, make sure to adhere to all applicable municipal regulations. It is against the law to establish a septic system without first obtaining a permission. In the permission, you can find information on the local regulations for installing a septic system. You should avoid situating a septic system too close to trees since tree roots will grow into your lines, block them, and eventually cause damage to your system.

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Things You’ll Need

  • 3/4 or 1 1/2 crushed rock or blue metal
  • 80 square feet (7.4 m 2) of landscaping fabric
  • 9 cubic yards (6.9 m3) of 3/4 or 1 1/2 crushed rock or blue metal 55 US gal (210 L) plastic drums
  • 10 feet (3.0 m) of ABS plastic pipe with a diameter of 4 in (10 cm)
  • 4 in (10 cm) ABS 90-degree bend
  • 4 in (10 cm) ABS Y-bend
  • 3 ABS 45-degree bends with sizes of 4 in (10 cm)
  • 2 55 US gal (210 L) plastic drums A total of 40 feet (12 meters) of 4 inch (10 cm) perforated drain pipe
  • Two 4 inch (10 cm) diameter drain pipe couplers
  • And two toilet flanges with 4 inch (10 cm) diameters are included. PVC glue, two-part epoxy or silicone sealant, a level, and ten wood stakes are all required. 1 in (2.5 cm) thick wood block
  • Duct tape
  • 4 in (10 cm) ABS detachable cap
  • 1 in (2.5 cm) thick wood block

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If you go purely by the language of the Internet on the matter, it appears that you are not permitted to be a homesteader want tobe until you fantasize about building a septic system out of 55-gallon barrels. I’m not sure how often they’re really constructed compared to how frequently they’re spoken about. In the beginning, I was apprehensive to utilize one since there were so many plans, but so few long-term reviews on the Secret Lair’s website. In any case, when long-time commenter Phssthpok brought it to my attention this morning, it gave me the impetus to accomplish something I’d been intending to do for quite some time.

  • That said, I’ll point you that the instructions, in my opinion, include one significant error.
  • Before you bury the barrels, you should make sure that they are completely filled.
  • Mine has been in operating since sometime in 2011, and has never given me a single problem.
  • My situation is ideal because I’m a single individual with no guests, making me the ideal test subject.
  • I walked outside and dipped my probe into the higher tank, and my probe clunked straight to the bottom with absolutely little resistance.
  • Everything is turning into soup fairly rapidly, and there are no solids accumulating in the pot.
  • I recommend that anyone who is planning to build one of these take some time to learn how to lay out a leach field, because that is really the key to success.

I had to make some impromptu decisions that I now regret, but there isn’t even the slightest indication that anything is wrong. It appears to be draining properly. So, in my not so humble view, this is a good concept to pursue further.

About Joel

You should know better than to ask these kinds of inquiries to a paranoid recluse, you know. It was filed under Uncategorised on this particular day. This entry was posted in Uncategorized.

Trying to build a DIY redneck style septic tank.

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02-09-2020, 04:09 PM 1
MemberJoin Date: Dec 2019Location: Stapleton, AlabamaPosts: 41 Trying to build a DIY redneck style septic tank.


Does any one have experience with building DYI septic tanks with plastic barrels for an Rv?So I have one empty plastic barrel and I’m considering drilling some holes in it.Just dug a 5 ft hole.I’m considering putting rocks on the bottom and around the sides of the barrel.Would this work? If not, what would you recommend?Click image for larger versionName: 20200209_150337.jpeg Views: 259 Size: 163.6 KB ID: 274702Click image for larger versionName: 20200209_150353.jpeg Views: 308 Size: 124.3 KB ID: 274703

Join the1 RV Forum Today – It’s Totally Free!iRV2.com RV Community -Are you about to start a new improvement on your RV or need some help with some maintenance? Do you need advice on what products to buy? Or maybe you can give others some advice? No matter where you fit in you’ll find that iRV2 is a great community to join. Best of all it’s totally FREE!You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with other RV owners,see fewer ads, upload photographs, create an RV blog, send private messages and so much, much more!
02-09-2020, 04:13 PM 2
Senior MemberJoin Date: Sep 2007Location: Grasonville, MD – Golden, COPosts: 6,203 Quote:Originally Posted byethan1Does any one have experience with building DYI septic tanks with plastic barrels for an Rv?So I have one empty plastic barrel and I’m considering drilling some holes in it.Just dug a 5 ft hole.I’m considering putting rocks on the bottom and around the sides of the barrel.Would this work? If not, what would you recommend?Attachment 274702 Attachment 274703Simple -Need a couple barrels to do it right.Best of Luck,_Busskipper Location – Grasonville, Maryland – and/or – Superior, Colorado 2005 Travel Supreme 42DS04 – GX470 Toad
02-09-2020, 04:42 PM 3
Registered UserJoin Date: Oct 2011Posts: 2,183 Do a percolation test first.You can add course stone for a french drain, drain’s if need be.Aeration Aerobic medium activity creats a working system more odor free.
02-09-2020, 04:49 PM 4
Senior MemberJoin Date: Aug 2016Location: payson, azPosts: 924 how about checking with the local building authority (city / county) to determine how to proceed?
02-09-2020, 04:52 PM 5
Senior MemberJoin Date: Jun 2017Posts: 2,807 I have a 3 barrel system for the bathroom in my shop with a single 40 foot drain field.I also have a single barrel system for the RV with a single 20 foot drain field.Dig the barrel hole over a foot deeper than the height of the barrel the inlet pipe should go down to about 6″ from the bottom of the barrel. The effluent pipe comes out of the top of the barrel and turns 90 degrees to the drain field pipe. You can put some small holes around the sides of the top of the barrel as well. If you do this use rocks to back fill the barrel as well as in your drain field trench. Cover both with dirt and sod for the last 2″ to 3″ at least.
02-09-2020, 04:55 PM 6
Senior MemberJoin Date: Jun 2017Posts: 2,807 Quote:Originally Posted bybigchickhow about checking with the local building authority (city / county) to determine how to proceed?That’s an easy way to get immediately shut down. Most have a minimum septic tank size in the hundreds to over a thousand gallons, require a soil scientist to do a soil test, and have minimum drain field size requirements; all based on a multi-bedroom house size, not an RV holding tank.
02-09-2020, 04:56 PM 7
Senior MemberJoin Date: Sep 2007Location: Grasonville, MD – Golden, COPosts: 6,203 Quote:Originally Posted byethan1Does any one have experience with building DYI septic tanks with plastic barrels for an Rv?So I have one empty plastic barrel and I’m considering drilling some holes in it.Just dug a 5 ft hole.I’m considering putting rocks on the bottom and around the sides of the barrel.Would this work? If not, what would you recommend?Attachment 274702 Attachment 274703Built a few of these Just larger in my day -Check to see if the ground Drains – important or nothing will work.If this is a 55 gallon tank it will not meet any code so don’t waste yours and their time asking.Needs to be deep enough to get into some Sand – percolating soil – often this is DEEP more than a shovel can dig.The Wiki system will work with a good soil but as you can see it requires Stone and some real Digging to get all the parts to work.Best of Luck,Will be interesting to watch what follows for advice._Busskipper Location – Grasonville, Maryland – and/or – Superior, Colorado 2005 Travel Supreme 42DS04 – GX470 Toad
02-10-2020, 06:19 AM 8
Junior MemberJoin Date: Aug 2018Location: IndianaPosts: 11 Search on You tube several very good options that work very well and are I expensive to make!
02-10-2020, 08:23 AM 9
Senior MemberJoin Date: Sep 2012Location: Palm Coast FloridaPosts: 10,776 My initial though is that is not going to work and is illegal.How far are you from a state park with a dump station. Also can you have a sewage truck come and pump you out?Here is what I do camping on my unimproved wooded property. I alternate between using the state park and a pump out truck. I bought a 35 gallon sewage tote. I use that the for the 1st black tank dump. Then for the second dump I call a company to come pump out the tote and pump out the trailer.or depending on my mood I will pull my trailer 9 miles to the state park dump station and pay $9 to dump. While there I fill my fresh water tank and my fresh water containers.If you do the research you will find the land needs to perk. If it perks then you need a large sewage system. Probably 15k to do it right.Looks like you have improved property. If so, get a small tote that you can carry into the house to dump in the toilet. I would worry my neighbors would report a illegal sewage dumping situation if I did not do it the way I do. Plus I do not want to stink up my camp area.
02-10-2020, 09:05 AM 10
Senior MemberJoin Date: Feb 2020Posts: 325 Ask your county first. There may be issues you’ve not considered. Maybe neighbors with wells? If you feel compelled to do something illegal, you probably shouldn’t post about it on the internet.
02-10-2020, 09:23 AM 11
Senior MemberJoin Date: Jan 2020Posts: 431 I have been to a campground that had/has the plastic barrel thing, he is grandfathered, campground has a well, no one is dead yet. They last for a long time, and when goes bad, he rents a small excavator and digs up and puts in a new barrel, leaves old one where it is. Another option is the composting toylet, or outhouse, make it look like a shed. Good luck.
02-10-2020, 10:20 AM 12
Senior MemberJoin Date: Jul 2014Posts: 29,451 Don’t tell anybody in charge, but my summer house has a 55 gallon drum septic system. It has a pump in it that leads to the river but its not wired anymore. Built in the 40s when no one worried.It started flooding over so I dug a 10″ deep trench and layed 30 ft of 3″ leaching pipe in it. I dropped a solid section of the pipe into the top of the barrel and haven’t had a problem since.While wrenching, by hand, I discovered the old leaching pipe that had been chopped off by the trench for city water installation. Hey, it passed some kind of septic test when I bought it.I plan in burying another barrel or two, on the other side of the yard, so I can dump my RV in, and maybe add a second bathroom to the house some day.Until the Town tells me to upgrade to a modern system, I’ll use what I got.
02-10-2020, 10:29 AM 13
Senior MemberJoin Date: Sep 2007Location: Grasonville, MD – Golden, COPosts: 6,203 Quote:Originally Posted bytwinboatDon’t tell anybody in charge, but my summer house has a 55 gallon drum septic system. It has a pump in it that leads to the river but its not wired anymore. Built in the 40s when no one worried.It started flooding over so I dug a 10″ deep trench and layed 30 ft of 3″ leaching pipe in it. I dropped a solid section of the pipe into the top of the barrel and haven’t had a problem since.While wrenching, by hand, I discovered the old leaching pipe that had been chopped off by the trench for city water installation. Hey, it passed some kind of septic test when I bought it.I plan in burying another barrel or two, on the other side of the yard, so I can dump my RV in, and maybe add a second bathroom to the house some day.Until the Town tells me to upgrade to a modern system, I’ll use what I got.Just try to stay at least 75′ from the well – oh you have public water- I did a knock down/demo of an old house a few years back and they had half a dozen 55 gallon double tanks in the yard that we dug up – was just one person in the house so as long as the water usage is low they will work. Just be sure you add the drain field to the tank and give it time to work before running a great volume of water._Busskipper Location – Grasonville, Maryland – and/or – Superior, Colorado 2005 Travel Supreme 42DS04 – GX470 Toad
02-10-2020, 11:18 AM 14
Senior MemberJoin Date: Oct 2016Posts: 1,035 you don’t say, but are you going to live in the R/V or is it just to dump your holding tanks when you’ve come back form a camping trip. what ever you do DON’T tell anybody what your doing. it could cost you thousands. Jay D.
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Medina CountyGroundwater Conservation District (GCD)Help/FAQPhone Office: (830) 741-3162Fax: (830) 741-3540Groundwater Conservation District (GCD)Help/FAQ Mail/Location Medina County GCD1607 Avenue KHondo, TX 78861 Medina County GCD1607 Avenue KHondo, TX 78861 Below are resources for learning about aquifers and groundwater in Medina County, as well as answers to frequently asked questions. In Medina County, there are aquifers and strata that may be found in GCDGCD publications. What is an EXEMPT (domestic/livestock) well and how does it work?

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In order to register an EXEMPT (domestic/livestock) well, what is the procedure to follow?

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What is the fee for drilling an EXEMPT (domestic/livestock) well and how much is it?

What is a NON-EXEMPT well, and how does it differ from other wells?

If I want to dig a NON-EXEMPT well, is there a certain place I should choose?

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Deer camp septic system

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Deer camp septic system719809406/15/1801:17 AM
OPTHF Trophy HunterJoined:Jun 2008Posts: 7,433 Anyone on here build a DIY septic at deer camp?If so, would you mind sharing any input on design, build details and any lessons learned.Considering building one with a water tote, plastic barrel and leech line at our lease.
Re: Deer camp septic system720040806/17/1809:41 PM
Joined:Oct 2009Posts: 10,485HalfadozenTHF Celebrity
THF CelebrityJoined:Oct 2009Posts: 10,485 We used a 55 gallon black plastic barrel with a screw on lid.I drilled about 30 1″ size holes all around the bottom quarter of the barrel (barrel laying down of course).Unscrewed the lid, cut a hole in the top of the barrel and fastened a pvc flange that accepts the size of my sewer hose from the trailer.Rented a small backhoe and dug a hole twice as deep and wide as the barrel.Threw some gravel in the bottom, a couple of boxes of lime in the hole and set the barrel in the center of the hole.Then glued a riser on the pvc flange so it was about 2″ above ground level.Back filled the dirt.Added another box of lime through the riser.In place 5 years now with no issues. I do have a cap for the riser so in the off season I will just store the septic hose, put the cap on and cover it with a 5 gallon bucket with a large rock on top.


Freedom is a fragile thing.Those who have known freedom, and then lost it, have never known it again.- Ronald Reagan

Re: Deer camp septic system720071006/18/1803:11 AM
Joined:Jan 2008Posts: 1,259CouzinPro Tracker
Pro TrackerJoined:Jan 2008Posts: 1,259 Dig hole, build outhouse, fill it up, move outhouse to new hole.Worked fine for couple hunnert years.More modern would be a five gallon bucket with box of trash bags next to it for liners.Course you gotta pack that out but hey.


�Only at the end do you realize the power of the Dark Side.�

Re: Deer camp septic system720091506/18/1802:09 PM
Joined:Nov 2009Posts: 90,174bill oxnerTHF Celebrity
THF CelebrityJoined:Nov 2009Posts: 90,174 I was on one lease where the rancher simply dug a hole and covered it with plywood.The sewer simply leached into the ground.The hole never filled.He ran the grey water onto into the yard.


Quail hunting is like walking into, and out of a beautiful painting all day long.Gene Hill

Re: Deer camp septic system720147806/18/1811:15 PM
Joined:Apr 2011Posts: 28,173WesternTHF Celebrity
THF CelebrityJoined:Apr 2011Posts: 28,173 Used the 55 drums as well (similar to Halfdozen) with good results. We used 2 drums since we had family members out a lot. We didn’t use the lime, but did throw a bottle of the enzymes in once a month or so.


If at first you dont succeed, then skydiving is not for you.”Don’t trust everything you read on the Internet”- Abraham LincolnDennis

Re: Deer camp septic system720159806/19/1812:59 AM
Joined:Nov 2011Posts: 6,636unclebubbaTHF Trophy Hunter
THF Trophy HunterJoined:Nov 2011Posts: 6,636 I dug a hole about 4 feet deep, 3 feet wide, and 4 feet long. covered it with some tin roof (cause that’s what I had on hand) and reinforced it with 2×4. Covered the whole thing with about a foot of dirt and put a rail around it so nobody would fall in. hose from the RV went in one end, and had a piece of 1″ PVC sticking out of the ground at the other end for venting purposes. ran grey water and black water in there for five years. Never had an issue. If you don’t vent it, the stench will back up into the RV.
Re: Deer camp septic system720457006/22/1812:34 AM
Joined:Nov 2009Posts: 90,174bill oxnerTHF Celebrity
THF CelebrityJoined:Nov 2009Posts: 90,174 Don’t get caught doing the 55 gallon drum.It not a legal septic systemThey can’t see it from city hall.


Quail hunting is like walking into, and out of a beautiful painting all day long.Gene Hill

Re: Deer camp septic system720457306/22/1812:40 AM
Joined:Nov 2010Posts: 5,570scalebusterTHF Trophy Hunter
THF Trophy HunterJoined:Nov 2010Posts: 5,570 I put in a 55gal plastic barrel with 4 holes cut in the bottom sides standing upright in a hole for a barn toilet 30 years ago. It�s still working.No gravel or anything else. This was in caliche.
Re: Deer camp septic system720476206/22/1804:37 AM
Joined:May 2015Posts: 3,838Dalee7892Extreme Tracker
Extreme TrackerJoined:May 2015Posts: 3,838 If I was going to do a Camp site septic. This would be my thought, just like my 2-500 gal regular. Dig hole install 2 plastic barrels, connect the second with PVC pipe about 1/4 The distance from top with holes around bottom sides with gravel around outside. Hook up to first barrel to TT or cabin top of barrel. Just my 2 cts.
Re: Deer camp septic system720658706/23/1810:41 PM
Joined:Jun 2008Posts: 7,433bigjoe8565OPTHF Trophy Hunter
OPTHF Trophy HunterJoined:Jun 2008Posts: 7,433 Thanks for the feedback.I think we�re going with a water tote for solids and connect a 55 gallon plastic barrel for liquids.We�ll run a pipe out of the barrel into a trench and pit filled with gravel and sand.
Re: Deer camp septic system720722106/24/1807:37 PM
Joined:Jul 2008Posts: 19,823Texas DanTHF Celebrity
THF CelebrityJoined:Jul 2008Posts: 19,823 Thanks for the feedback.I think we�re going with a water tote for solids and connect a 55 gallon plastic barrel for liquids.We�ll run a pipe out of the barrel into a trench and pit filled with gravel and sand.Because it’s just me and a friend who each have our own trailers, we use this. Buries easily and includes a protective sock that helps keep the holes working in the pipe. And every once in a while, we’ll drop one of those bacteria packets into the toilet.


“Some people will never like you because your spirit irritates their demons.”

Re: Deer camp septic system720722506/24/1807:42 PM
Joined:Jul 2008Posts: 19,823Texas DanTHF Celebrity
THF CelebrityJoined:Jul 2008Posts: 19,823 Don’t get caught doing the 55 gallon drum.It not a legal septic systemThey can’t see it from city hall.Never understood why it’s such a concern when a lot of deer leases are near pastures covered with cow patties.


“Some people will never like you because your spirit irritates their demons.”

Re: Deer camp septic system720817906/25/1808:31 PM
Joined:Jan 2016Posts: 7,759snake oilTHF Trophy Hunter
THF Trophy HunterJoined:Jan 2016Posts: 7,759 I put in a 55gal plastic barrel with 4 holes cut in the bottom sides standing upright in a hole for a barn toilet 30 years ago. It�s still working.No gravel or anything else. This was in caliche.This is what we had t the deer lease.�.


“You may all go to hell and I will go to Texas”.

Re: Deer camp septic system723382807/24/1806:39 AM
Joined:Aug 2004Posts: 17,450TxduckmanTHF Celebrity
THF CelebrityJoined:Aug 2004Posts: 17,450 We put one in at our place but it was solid rock past 2 feet down so jackhammer was used. 2 plastic barrels burried and a septic pump in second one so guess it is aerobic. When 2nd barrel is full I water the lawn at the breaker and turn off when empty. No smell and clean so far. Probably should put some chemical in first tank to dissolve toilet paper but been fine for 5 years now.
Re: Deer camp septic system724310508/02/1806:27 PM
Joined:Aug 2008Posts: 14,126don kTHF Celebrity
THF CelebrityJoined:Aug 2008Posts: 14,126 Don’t get caught doing the 55 gallon drum.It not a legal septic systemIf they are worried about that then whatever agency they work for has either too many employees or too much time on their hands.
Re: Deer camp septic system727021308/28/1806:18 PM
Joined:Aug 2009Posts: 2,664twinbubbaVeteran Tracker
Veteran TrackerJoined:Aug 2009Posts: 2,664 There are only 2 of us on our lease so we dig a new hole each trip with post hole digger and cover it with our home made port-a-potty I built out of EMT, tarps and ball bungies. We keep it steaked down behind our trailer when we are not there.


2017 Chevy Colorado Z71, 09 Yamaha Rhino 450 Camo,

Re: Deer camp septic system730767110/07/1810:35 PM
Joined:Jan 2013Posts: 296Jon BBird Dog
Bird DogJoined:Jan 2013Posts: 296 If I was going to do a Camp site septic. This would be my thought, just like my 2-500 gal regular. Dig hole install 2 plastic barrels, connect the second with PVC pipe about 1/4 The distance from top with holes around bottom sides with gravel around outside. Hook up to first barrel to TT or cabin top of barrel. Just my 2 cts.I may or may not have done something similar at an undisclosed location. Basically copied the residential septic system using two 55 gallon plastic drums with screw down kayak hatches on top. I have them joined together with 3″ PVC and then I ran 35′ of 3″ perforated drain line. I have heard it has worked great for 5 years and counting. The only thing it service is the commode and sink in the barn.


I wish stupidity was not so handsomly rewarded.

Re: Deer camp septic system733960011/06/1803:52 PM
Joined:Aug 2008Posts: 1,549Ron HPro Tracker
Pro TrackerJoined:Aug 2008Posts: 1,549 Search DIY septic system. One of them uses two barrels and pipes.We did one barrel and two pipes. We’re in sandy soil and it has lasted for several years without attenion. I started dumping grey water on ground.
Re: Deer camp septic system735944111/27/1802:46 PM
Joined:Feb 2007Posts: 599dawgkllrTracker
TrackerJoined:Feb 2007Posts: 599 Ya’ll are way over thinking this!Just dig a pit a couple of feet deep and about 4×4 10-15-20 ft from your RV/ Cabin, etc.Buy a joint or two of thin wall PVC pipe from Home Repo and extend it from the discharge to the pit. Make sure you have a little fall in the pipe from the discharge to the pit and insert the flex hose in the end of the pipe (I use baling wire to secure it in place when the brown nuggets start flowing).Throw a couple of pieces of tin over the top of the pit so no one can watch the brown trout swimming and put a hog panel around the pit to keep you or your buddies from taking a swim.You’re done, now back to relaxing, hunting and telling a few lies around the campfire. I don’t suggest growing any Romaine lettuce or anything around the pit but the grass will always be green around it


That old crackheaded commie (Bernie Sanders) has lost his damn mind. in 1983

Re: Deer camp septic system738518412/23/1806:02 PM
Joined:Oct 2008Posts: 13,482TbarTHF Celebrity
THF CelebrityJoined:Oct 2008Posts: 13,482 I used two blue plastic drums.The first to catch the major solids and the second to catch what the first missed before going to the field line.

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