How To Dig Up A Septic Tank Without A Excavator? (Correct answer)

  • This can be done with a rubber tire backhoe, then have the tank co. set the new one in hole with there crane truck. You may get by with a 120 size machine if your old and the new tank coming are a two piece tank.

How deep should a septic tank be in the ground?

The general rule of thumb is that most septic tanks can be buried anywhere from four inches to four feet underground.

Can you leave an old septic tank in the ground?

Tanks can be completely removed or they can be destroyed and buried in place. The decision depends on if you plan to use the land for something else, such as a home addition or pool, and need the remains of the tank out of the way.

How do I know my septic tank is full?

Here are some of the most common warning signs that you have a full septic tank:

  1. Your Drains Are Taking Forever.
  2. Standing Water Over Your Septic Tank.
  3. Bad Smells Coming From Your Yard.
  4. You Hear Gurgling Water.
  5. You Have A Sewage Backup.
  6. How often should you empty your septic tank?

How do I find out where my septic tank is?

Follow the Main Sewer Line Look for a pipe that’s roughly four inches in diameter that leads away from your house. Remember the location of the sewer pipe and where the pipe leaves your home so you can find it outside. The sewer pipes will lead to where your septic tank is located.

How deep are drain fields buried?

A typical drainfield trench is 18 to 30 inches in depth, with a maximum soil cover over the disposal field of 36 inches.

Can you have a septic tank without a leach field?

The waste from most septic tanks flows to a soakaway system or a drainage field. If your septic tank doesn’t have a drainage field or soakaway system, the waste water will instead flow through a sealed pipe and empty straight into a ditch or a local water course.

What does a buried septic tank look like?

Septic tanks are typically rectangular in shape and measure approximately 5 feet by 8 feet. In most cases, septic tank components including the lid, are buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underground. You can use a metal probe to locate its edges and mark the perimeter.

How do you bury an old septic tank?

Abandoning Septic Tanks and Soil Treatment Areas

  1. Remove and dispose of the tank at an approved site (normally a landfill).
  2. Crush the tank completely and backfill. The bottom must be broken to ensure it will drain water.
  3. Fill the tank with granular material or some other inert, flowable material such as concrete.

How do you crush an old septic tank?

Usually an old septic tank is broken up in-place using a backhoe. The backhoe operator may pull in the tank sides, crush them, and push the whole steel tank to the bottom then back-fill with soil and rubble. In a DIY project we might use a heavy steel wrecking bar to just punch holes in the old steel tank bottom.

Can you sell a house with an old septic tank?

If you’re selling a property with a septic tank, then you must be transparent with buyers about the fact the property uses a one and provide a detailed specification of the system. In fact, You are required by law to inform a buyer in writing about the presence of a septic tank.

Should old septic tanks be removed?

Septic tanks are decommissioned for safety reasons. If a tank is not going to be used any longer, the best decision is to render it inoperable. Tanks that were well constructed, as well as those that are surrounded by excellent soil for the drain field, can have a lifespan of 50 years.

What were septic tanks made of in the 1950s?

Many of the first septic tanks were concrete tanks that were formed out of wood and poured in place in the ground and covered with a concrete lid or often some type of lumber.

Dig (Excavate) to Locate Septic Tank or Drainfield

  • POSTPONE a QUESTION or COMMENTabout digging to locate a septic tank, drainfield, D-box, or septic pipe, or about any other septic system components
  • POSTPONE a QUESTION or COMMENTabout septic system components

InspectAPedia does not allow any form of conflict of interest. The sponsors, goods, and services described on this website are not affiliated with us in any way. The following are the times when it is necessary to dig to locate the septic system, tank or drainfield, soakaway beds or pipes, or D-box: We’d like not to have to dig up the entire yard in order to locate the septic tank or other septic components, wouldn’t you say? Septic system location videos are included with this article to demonstrate how to locate the leach field or drainfield component of a septic system, as well as situations in which digging or exploratory excavation is required and warranted.

(Septic drain fields are sometimes referred to as soil absorption systems or seepage beds in some circles.) For this topic, we also have anARTICLE INDEX available, or you may check the top or bottom of the page.

How to use Excavating to find Drainfield TrenchesTheir Condition

Part 7 of A Guide to Locating the Drainfield Based on the above-mentioned site observations, a homeowner could decide to drill a test hole in an area where he or she believes a leach line is located. The depth of a leach line may vary depending on the site circumstances, but it is typically 24″ or so. Alternatively, a septic contractor can just build a trench across the property, assuming that the soil cut will intersect the buried line. Digging over the whole property may be sensible only if we already know that the system has to be replaced, because the backhoe is likely to destroy any hidden piping it “discovers” when it is digging across the entire property.

Why we Like Digging by Hand First and Excavating by Backhoe Second

Equipment is preferred over shovels for digging on construction sites because it is faster, physically easier (using a machine is easier than wielding a shovel), and most importantly, it is more profitable. Undoubtedly, in many situations, a backhoe is the only feasible option for digging. However, wherever feasible, we prefer to dig by hand before using a machine. When hunting for septic components, hand excavation causes the least amount of harm to a construction site because:

  • Hand excavation causes the least amount of damage to the site, yard, plants, and other structures. Hand excavation can begin gradually, directly next to the building wall, without the need to wait for the arrival of heavy equipment
  • Hand excavation can be completed by a motivated owner or her companions (but first read about SEPTICCESSPOOL SAFETY)
  • Hand excavation helps to prevent harming steel septic tanks and covers (but first read about SEPTICCESSPOOL SAFETY)
  • It also saves time. As a result, hand excavation (or a cautious backhoe operator) will not result in a freshly “explored” but now completely ruined septic system, which means you will not be able to utilize the building plumbing and will be compelled to accept whatever repair quote the contractor gives. (Trying to obtain septic repair cost estimates prior to any excavation is difficult since the contractor understands that there are too many unknowns – but insist on upper fair cost boundaries)

Where to Excavate to Look for Septic or Sewer Components

However, at some point, it becomes necessary to excavate, either because your hand digging proved futile or because you’ve discovered that substantial investigation and septic repair are likely required. An experienced excavation contractor usually has a very good sense of where another excavator would have excavated to locate a drainfield trench, D-box, or other septic system component, and can make educated guesses. Walking around the site and ruling in or out potential excavation sites can help to drastically minimize the amount of excavation required.

How to Think First and Dig Second – Narrowing the Search for the Drainfield

Before you dig, read the sections VISUAL CLUES LOCATE THE SEPTIC TANK, Areas Not Likely, and Visual Clues to Location for further information on how to limit down your search for septic components before you dig.

Septic Excavation Case Illustrated – step by step excavation to replace a sewer line

Our sewer line case study demonstrates in detail the stages involved in locating and digging septic components at a property. Detailed instructions on when, how, and why to repair the underground drain line that connects a house to a septic tank are included in this procedure.

Digging up a Failed Drainfield

Of course, if the leach field is already in need of repair, it is likely that the end of a leach line may be identified by observing where effluent is leaking to the surface of the ground.

Septic Drainfield Location Articles

  • Clearance Disturbances, Septic System
  • Odors, Septic or Sewer
  • Locations of Septic Components
  • Septic Drainfield Inspection Test at Home
  • Septic Drainfield Location
  • Septic Drainfield Inspection Test at Work
  • LOCATION OF THE DRAINFIELD PIPE, EXACT
  • EXCAVATE TO LOCATE THE DRAINFIELD
  • REASONS FOR LOCATION OF THE DRAINFIELD
  • Recordings to LOCATE the DRAINFIELD
  • SURPRISING DRAINFIELD LOCATIONS
  • UNLIKELY DRAINFIELD LOCATIONS
  • VISUAL CLUES LOCATE the DRAINFIELD
  • VISUAL CLUES LOCATE the SEPTIC TANK
  • SERVING SEPTIC DRAINFIELDS
  • SEPTIC DRAINFIELD SIZE
  • SEPTIC DRAINFIELD Shape
  • SEPTIC DRAWINGS
  • SEPTIC DRAINFIELD RESTORERS

. Continue reading atREASONS to FIND THE DRAINFIELD, or choose a topic from the closely-related articles listed below, or see the completeARTICLE INDEX. Alternatively, read SEPTIC TANK, HOW TO FIND for further information on locating the septic tank, chamber, drywell, or seepage pit. LOCATION OF THE SEPTIC DRAINFIELD- HOUSE Inspection of septic drainfields at the residence Where to Look for the Septic Tank. Visit SEPTIC VIDEOS for more information on septic system location and maintenance.

Suggested citation for this web page

EXCAVATE in order to LOCATED DRAINFIELDatInspection An online encyclopedia of building environmental inspection, testing, diagnosis, repair, and issue preventive information is available at Apedia.com. Alternatively, have a look at this.

INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES:ARTICLE INDEX to SEPTIC SYSTEMS

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Technical ReviewersReferences

Citations can be shown or hidden by selecting Show or Hide Citations. InspectApedia.com is a publisher that provides references. Daniel Friedman is an American journalist and author.

Bringing a No-Dig Approach to Fixing Septic Systems

Derek Vesely, Kyle Jacobson, Mitch Fountain, and Tucker Schroeder are members of the Ken-Way crew, seen from left to right. A Cat mini-excavator may be seen in the background.

Interested in Excavating?

Receive Excavating articles, news, and videos delivered directly to your email! Now is the time to sign up. Excavating+ Receive Notifications The three partners who purchased Ken-Way Excavating were seeking for a niche in the sites installation industry when they purchased the company. They discovered their niche in pipe bursting for the replacement of old septic service pipes. Keeping the task underground rather than on the surface reduces fuel usage, allowing them to prolong the work season in their chilly zone around Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and making customers happy by reducing the amount of debris left behind by trench construction.

“When I returned home to Iowa from Denver, I discovered that sewer contractors were performing this service on a daily basis,” he recalls.

Additionally, the concept might be expanded to incorporate pipelines that transport water or natural gas.

From simple gravity systems, maybe with a sand filter, to systems that use Ecoflo Biofilters (Premier Tech Aqua) for more limited settings, the task is diverse.

Bursting Out

Ken-Way now employs pipe bursting equipment manufactured by HammerHead Trenchless Equipment. They have a PB30 pipe replacement machine for replacing 4-inch pipe. It is a compact machine that is well suited for confined locations. Other-sized machines are used for larger-scale sewer main work. Furthermore, despite usual demonstrations or web films show equipment busting clay pipe, the equipment is capable of far more than that. Using a device from Connectra Fusion Technologies, technicians link HDPE SDR-17 replacement pipes to form a seamless connection.

  • Not every work lends itself to being blown apart.
  • According to Fisher, when the replacement has a bigger diameter, the volume of dirt displaced may become a concern as well.
  • Sandy material is simpler to remove than glacial tills, although hard-packed sand might potentially be a problem due to its ability to compact.
  • It is those other pipes that may be compromised as a result of the shifted dirt.
  • For bursting, further preparations are necessary.
  • It is possible to replace a pipe with an offset junction or a pipe that has collapsed.
  • After the work is completed, Ken-Way televises the line once more to check that the task has been completed correctly.

Many Advantages

According to Fisher, bursting is far superior to excavating a trench in situations where it is possible. The reasoning goes as follows: “Why have an open trench 60 feet long when you can have two pits?” You may securely prepare two trenches without having to lug a trench box around behind you. Bursting takes approximately the same amount of time as replacing a pipe, but it is far less risky for the personnel involved. He explains that while purchasing bursting equipment increases your expenditures, “this is countered by the reduced danger and lower fuel costs because you are not burning as much as you would when digging.” Customers are also happier as a result of the reduced amount of property damage.

  • It was important to the owners not to harm any of the trees in their yard, so they did not dig around them.
  • Pipe bursting is especially useful in narrow spaces where an excavator arm, even a mini-excavator, is unable to swing about freely.
  • Ken-Way personnel installed pipe bursting equipment in the basement and rebuilt the pipe leading from there to the septic tank instead of tearing down and replacing it with a deck.
  • In addition, the company’s hydroexcavator contributes.
  • An excavator was unable to operate due to the restricted space on the job site.
  • We were able to put up the pipe bursting equipment in four hours after the crew finished cutting a pit,” Fisher explains.

The boys cannot be sent out on days when the high is in the single digits because we cannot justify it. When the weather is like that, equipment fail and nothing goes as planned. “However, during the coldest months of January or February, we normally just take a few days off,” he explains.

We’re Cat Lovers

Fisher believes that bursting is far superior to trenching in situations when it is possible. When you have two pits, there’s no reason to dig an open trench 60 feet long.” Because you are not hauling a trench box, you may safely prepare two pits. Bursting takes approximately the same length of time as replacing a pipe, but it is far less risky for the guys involved in the process. He explains that while purchasing bursting equipment increases your expenditures, “this is mitigated by the lower danger and lower fuel costs because you are not burning as much as you would when digging.” Clients are also pleased as a result of the reduced amount of property damage they experience.

  1. It was important to the owners not to harm any of the trees in the yard, so they avoided excavating around the roots.
  2. When working in confined spaces where an excavator arm, even a mini-excavator, is unable to swing, pipe bursting is an excellent solution.
  3. Ken-Way workers installed pipe bursting equipment in the basement and rebuilt the pipe leading from there to the septic tank instead of tearing down the deck.
  4. The hydroexcavator owned by the corporation also contributes.
  5. An excavator was unable to operate due to the restricted space on the job site, We brought in a hydroexcavator as well as hydraulic shoring to help with the excavation.
  6. Despite the lack of a hydroexcavator, we are able to complete our work throughout the winter every year.
  7. The boys cannot be sent out on days when the high is in the single digits because it is not safe.
  8. “However, we only take a few days off during the coldest months of January or February,” he explains.
See also:  How Often Should You Put Rid X In A Septic Tank? (Solution)

Taking Care of Business

Dan Zamastil is in charge of the shop and the equipment used by the firm. When something goes wrong at the firm, the employees are aware that they must contact Dan. A large portion of the maintenance is completed in-house, including jobs such as repairing a bulldozer. If one of the vehicles’ transmissions fails, Dan arranges for it to be repaired by a third-party shop outside the company. Pat, his brother, is in charge of operations and scheduling. Fisher is in charge of the administrative tasks, as well as estimating and reviewing contracts.

  1. We regard one another more as brothers than as business partners.” Building a successful firm requires the development of a talented team.
  2. They are looking for someone who will fit in with the team and who is ready to learn, since the proper individual can be taught the abilities he or she will need to accomplish the job well.
  3. “We now have a fantastic set of gentlemen.” Several of them have been with us for a significant amount of time, and we have every intention of retaining them for a significant amount of time.” He asserts that competitive remuneration is unquestionably a factor in employee retention.
  4. Every year, the firm performs performance evaluations with each of its staff members.
  5. Going on business trips may also provide benefits to the organization.
  6. Because “we’re only as good as our staff,” Fisher explains, “paying tuition is an investment in our future.” Ken-Way is already a well-known brand with a positive image, according to Fisher.
  7. Relationships between the firm and local plumbers are also important considerations.
  8. Ken-Way also provides opportunities for education.
  9. Example: A presentation may include how septic tanks function or what real estate agents should look for in an existing system — age, kind of system, pipe materials, and so on — that could have a favorable or negative impact on a buyer or seller’s decision to buy or sell.
  10. As well as representatives from their own company, Ken-Way also brought in representatives from HammerHead and a pipe manufacturer.

After the workshop, one of the engineering companies in attendance contracted Ken-Way for a huge sewage replacement project, but the information shared at the workshop was beneficial to more than just Ken-Way.

Business Transition

The three business partners all grew up on the same street in the same town as one another. According to Fisher, “we’ve been involved in the industry since we were little children, via family members, through high school, through college, and after college.” The former owner of Ken-Way was a family friend, and when he was ready to retire from the firm, he approached Fisher and the Zamastils about purchasing it from him and his family. They crunched the data, devised a strategy, and sealed the transaction over the phone in a matter of minutes.

septic, sewage, and water business owned and operated by a family.

A number of functions were also relocated inside the organization.

“We have grown significantly, but we do not rely just on expansion.” According to Fisher, “our aim is expansion and strength – being stronger inside the niches that we have established thus far.” That entails emphasizing services such as hydroexcavation and pipe bursting, which are not typically performed by most excavation businesses on their own.

In Fisher’s opinion, “if we could identify a demand for three additional hydroexcavators in our region, it would be the best place for us to expand.” That does not necessarily imply that this is where they will develop.

“What it boils down to,” Fisher explains, “is that you have to be willing to grow in order to take advantage of the chances that present themselves.”

DIY Technology Focuses on the Necessitites

Ken-Way Excavating is owned and operated by Charlie Fisher and his partners, who like to keep everything in-house for more control and efficiency. Similar thinking is at work when it comes to how the organization makes use of technological resources. Fisher uses QuickBooks for general accounting and cost monitoring, but he prefers to design his own bespoke templates for specific projects. According to Fisher, “we utilize a lot of Excel spreadsheets for anything from estimation to a lot of our different forms that we’ve designed in-house.” “It is clear to me what I want a daily work sheet for our personnel to complete when I am putting one up.

  • He may open his spreadsheet template and make whatever changes he sees fit, such as changing the layout or adding things that are special to that particular work.
  • Each page is labeled with a task code.
  • We have several that are specifically for people who drive dump trucks.
  • There’s also a separate set for the professionals who will be installing the systems on-site “Fisher expresses himself.
  • Additionally, there are distinct codes for each type of service, such as commercial work or hydroexcavation, which are shown below.

“It is possible for me to retrieve a cost report at any moment and see how much money we are making or losing on septic repairs in particular. It’s possible for me to break it down further per job if you’re interested.”

Tired of Digging Up Your Septic Tank Lid? Install a Riser. – Advanced Septic Services Inc

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  • Are you tired of digging up your septic tank lid every time it rains? Install a stair riser.

December292017InBlog Depending on where they are located in the ground, septic tanks can be anywhere from a few inches to several feet below the surface of the earth, necessitating the excavation of the septic tank lid every time it has to be repaired. Hand digging can be tiresome and back-breaking job, and it is something that many people prefer to avoid at all costs. The avoidance of digging frequently results in a septic system that has been neglected, and in severe cases, has failed. Many homeowners are not aware of the potential improvements that may be done to their septic tank in order to avoid the need to excavate entirely from their property.

  • What exactly is a riser?
  • In many circumstances, the installation is rapid, simple, and reasonably priced.
  • We usually replace the old concrete lid with a green, plastic cover that is affixed to the riser pipe itself, rather than the riser pipe itself.
  • A septic tank preventer may save you time, effort, and money in the long run.
  • Make contact with our staff at Advanced Septic Services by calling (717) 789 – 4548 or using our online form to schedule your riser installation.
  • All intellectual property rights are retained.

Excavation Services

Approximately 80% of the septic repair and replacement services provided by Lentz Wastewater entail digging up the ground.

Septic Tank Removal/Abandonment

It is critical to properly remove or leave un-used septic tanks in order to avoid very major safety issues such as caving in, falling in, or collapsing, among other things. It is necessary to do the following tasks when a septic system has been abandoned:

  • Eventually, a septic pumping business will be required to empty the tank. Existing tank should be crushed and the previous tank hole should be filled with compacted earth, concrete, or other acceptable materials. To prevent soil settling, compact the soil. Keep a record of the position of the filled inseptictank in case there are any future construction operations.

Septic Pipe Replacement

The cost of repairing or replacing a septic pipe varies depending on a variety of factors, including the length of the line, the size of the pipe, and any nearby impediments. We will take care of you if any pipes in your septic or sewer system need to be replaced by Lentz Wastewater Services.

Access To Deep Septic Tanks

When it comes to older septic tanks, they are sometimes placed considerably below ground level, making them difficult to reach for maintenance and pumping. Pumping firms are unable to access the tanks by hand, and as a result, an excavator is required to dig the tank out of the ground.

Lentz Wastewater has access to your tank for the purpose of doing routine maintenance and pumping. You might consider placing a riser on tanks that are difficult to reach with your hands.

Septic Tank Excavation Services

Septic tanks are simply one of the ways we conduct business in South Central Pennsylvania, and they have been for as long as we can remember – even before Smith’s Sanitary Septic Service began tank excavation, drain field management, and waste water system installation in 1959. Ownership of a home with access to a dependable septic tank excavation contractor is an absolute must for people who live in or around the areas of Adams County PA, Dauphin County, the city of York, or down in Westminster MD– and that excavator must have the experience to perform regular and emergency repair, re-location, and replacement of septic systems in accordance with health department requirements and regulations.

Customers who use the services of Smith’s Sanitary Septic as their preferred septic tank installation service are getting the services of a small, family-owned business that has been serving much of Pennsylvania and a large portion of Maryland for more than 60 years from its headquarters in Hanover, Pennsylvania.

And when you work with Smith’s, you’re working with the best local specialist in septic tanks in South Central Pennsylvania, a company that is committed to providing the highest level of customer satisfaction.

Can You Dig It? Once In a While, You May Have To

The term “excavation” is frequently heard in the context of Smith’s Sanitary Septic Service, maybe because we perform a significant amount of excavation for both old and new septic tanks, as well as for new drainage system lines and drain field trenches. The design of your septic system is influenced by the gravitational pull of our old buddy Gravitation. In order for wastewater to flow into your external below-ground septic tank, the pipe apparatus connecting your home, warehouse, processing plant, or other buildings to the tank must be sloped downward – usually to a two percent gradient, but sometimes even more inclined – to allow gravity to guide wastewater through the piping and into the tank.

In order to get the angle just right – and to get your tank located in the best possible location, sufficiently far from the wastewater’s source – you’ll need high-quality excavators, such as those provided by Smith’s Sanitary Septic Service.

Contact us now to learn more.

Septic Excavation By Experienced Septic System Engineers

A significant level of professional skill is required in order to complete a competent septic tank excavation job. First and foremost, techniques must be used to locate the septic tank on the site, which may entail the installation of electronic detecting sensors. Afterwards, we must assess the state of the site, taking into consideration the aspects that will determine the most efficient removal of the old tank and the most appropriate placement of the new tank and its components – the materials for which we will decide in conjunction with the homeowner.

Then our expert inspector will need to check the new septic tank system to confirm that it is installed at the right depth, that the concrete covers are adequate, and that it complies with all health and safety regulations.

On Call For Septic Tank Emergencies

Having problems with your home’s septic tank system is one scenario that you just must allow to spiral out of hand. It doesn’t matter when the building was built or when the equipment was installed; everything, from the sewage pipes and valve gear to the space in the yard where the effluent drains, has to be checked on a regular basis. If you see any indicators of a problem with your drainfield pump, leach field, tank, toilets, or internal plumbing, don’t take any chances with the health of your family or the environment by failing to call the experienced specialists at Smith’s Sanitary Septic Service as soon as possible.

We will answer your questions, assess the situation, and get to work on repairs or new leach fields, as well as if necessary, begin the complex excavation process of your septic tank system.

Want a Septic Tank Excavation Evaluation? Call Smith’s!

Contacting Smith’s Sanitary Septic Service when the buildup of trash and other solids from your home’s sinks, washing machines, garbage disposals, and toilets becomes too much of a problem is a wise decision. To obtain your FREE estimate, please contact us by phone at 717-637-5630 or by filling out our online contact form. Whenever you mention our website SmithsSepticHanoverPA.com you’ll receive two (2) complimentary cans of sewage treatment fluid! (For more information on this deal, please contact Smith’s Sanitary Septic Service.) If you live in or around Hanover, York, Gettysburg, New Oxford, East Berlin, Spring Grove, Abbottstown, Shrewsbury PA, or Westminster MD and need a septic service, Smith’s is the only name you need to know.

Allow Smith’s Sanitary Septic Service to assist you in taking care of business at your residence.

How to Install Your Own Septic System

Riser and lid for a septic tank “Is it possible for me to construct my own septic system?” The phrase “I constructed this house” has a very different meaning in rural Indiana than it does in urban areas. No, this does not imply that you hired someone to construct your home. Instead, it indicates that you are familiar with the structure of floor joists and the inner workings of a nail gun. When anything goes wrong in Goshen, instead of turning to the yellow pages, residents go to the local hardware shop to get the replacement parts and tools they need to fix it.

  1. People frequently inquire as to whether or not they can construct their own septic system (usually a replacement system).
  2. Unless you are knowledgeable and comfortable with heavy machinery, I recommend that you hire a local professional to complete the task correctly and efficiently.
  3. Lastly, a word about safety: It is essential to first and foremost ensure the safety of yourself and others around you when installing a septic system.
  4. This is only one of the many reasons why I recommend that you do not install your own operating system.
  5. Another important consideration is that all underground utilities be clearly marked before any digging can begin.
  6. These services are usually always provided for free, and it is required by law.
  7. It’s also worth noting that these utility marking businesses will not often label private utilities lines.
See also:  How Long A Septic Tank Will Lat? (TOP 5 Tips)

Gravity is a marvelous force that works in our favor.

As gravity draws your belly button closer to the earth with each passing year, it also acts on the dirt in the walls of your newly excavated trench, resulting in frustrating cave-ins.

The soil is really heavy.

Cave-ins become more common and deadly as the soil grows sandier and the depth of the excavation increases.

Some septic systems, such as sand mounds, might be difficult to construct, even for a seasoned digger with extensive experience.

Let’s pretend that you’re going to try to establish a normal gravity flow septic system.

Consider the following scenario: you’ve determined that establishing your own septic system is a suitable match for you because of your membership in a Hoosier Militia or the fact that your brother-in-law “borrowed” a backhoe from the State Highway Department for the weekend, among other reasons.

  • The primary steps are as follows: 1 – On-site evaluation of the project Second, determine what the system requirements are.
  • 4 – Permitting (Do not install anything until you have obtained all of the necessary permits beforehand).
  • A costly and time-consuming installation error, such as digging trenches too deep or utilizing the incorrect pipe schedule or slope, can be avoided by following these simple guidelines.
  • My septic designs are frequently employed by do-it-yourselfers who want to install their own systems without a lot of hassle.
  • The design also makes it possible to breeze through the permits and plan submission processes (where others can get hung up for weeks revising plans).
  • In addition to a backhoe or a compact track hoe (with a bucket that is 2-3′ broad), you will require a number of smaller tools and pieces of equipment.

The majority of these things may be obtained from your local concrete precaster (septic tank maker) and are as follows:

  • Septic tank (which will be delivered at your location)
  • Gravity sewer, effluent sewer, and perforated pipe are all made of PVC. If you decide to utilize chambers in the trenches, you’ll need: plastic chambers for the trenches (if you want to use chambers)
  • If you are utilizing stone ditches, you will need to cover them with geo-textile fabric
  • Otherwise, you will need to use plastic sheeting.

Make sure to check with your local health agency to see what inspections are required and when they may be completed. Make sure you understand what the health department expects from the inspection. Is it necessary to leave all of the freshly installed trenches accessible for inspection, or is it OK to only partially cover them? Is it necessary to expose all piping so that the ASTM ratings can be read, or is it OK to cover the pipes? If at all possible, try to be there when the health department does the examination.

Here are a few frequent trench system inspection infractions to stay away from:

  • The distribution box isn’t perfectly level. The piping has not been primed or bonded
  • Using the incorrect pipework type (scheduled, ASTM-D number)
  • The level of the septic tank is not fixed
  • No or insufficient tank inlet and outflow baffles, or baffles of insufficient or incorrect length The intake baffle or tee of the distribution box has not been placed or has not been glued
  • The riser for the septic tank was not installed. The septic tank riser is either not tall enough or is poorly sealed. It’s too deep in the trenches (Ouch! If you stick to your plan, this will not happen)
  • And Poor slopes or even uphill travel are encountered in piping. faulty or insufficient sealing at the septic tank or distribution box
  • Pipes that have not been properly bedded (per the manufacturer’s installation instructions)

Once your system has passed inspection, it will be time to cover it up and protect it from the elements. It is important to back-fill around chambers according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. The results of a bad back-filling project will be an unattractive settling in your yard as well as an irritated spouse. You are not finished with your task until you have established a grass cover. Adding a layer of dark loamy soil to the top of your system will aid in the growth of your new grass.

Even though it is more expensive, it will eliminate labor for you and ensure that you have some quickly growing grass.

Related: How to properly maintain your septic system Is it necessary to pump your septic tank on a regular basis?

Indiana Septic System Installation and Permit Procedure Guide

See mySeptic Inspection Page for more information about my inspection services. The following are the five steps involved in installing a new septic system in Indiana:

  • Step One – On-site Evaluation
  • Step Two – System Requirements
  • Step Three – Design
  • Step Four – Permitting and System Bids
  • Step Five – Completion of the Project
  • Installation and inspection of a septic system is the fifth step.

Step One – On-Site Evaluation: In Indiana, the majority of county health offices demand an assessment of the soil by a soil scientist. Soil scientists use a hand auger to carefully evaluate your soils to a depth of 5-6 feet, which allows them to get a better understanding of them. During this inspection, s/he will pay close attention to the soil texture and structure, as well as any signs of a seasonal high water table, inadequate filtration, or compacted till. This information is then utilized by your local health agency to calculate the bare minimum criteria for septic systems in accordance with local and state septic rules.

If this is something that you are interested in, please consider joining them in your backyard.

In Indiana, each county health department is responsible for providing rules for residential septic systems.

Please keep in mind that certain counties may also perform their own soil borings!

In this section, I’ve included some Indiana County Health Department contact information for your convenience. An alphabetical list of Indiana Soil Scientists can be foundHERE. Septic system regulations that you will obtain from your county sanitarian will contain information such as the following.

  • System Type, System Size, Trench Depth, Perimeter Drain Requirements, Septic Tank Size, Dosing Tank Size are all important considerations.

Phase Three: System Design: The third and last step in your septic system journey is the system design. My detailed septic system designs have aided hundreds of homeowners, excavators, and builders through the septic system installation process. The design of the septic system is the most significant aspect of the entire procedure! There are several advantages to having a design that is exact, thorough, and well thought out:

  • Making wise design decisions might help you save money. Reduces the complexity of the permitting and bidding processes
  • Excavators all submitted bids based on the same plan. Due to the fact that the system is designated on site, the excavator has an easier time installing it. The design identifies each and every component of the system. Because of this, an unethical excavation company will not try to “save money” by employing subpar materials. All elevations and bench marks for the system are provided, ensuring a flawless installation. During new construction, the contractor who pours the walls, the excavator, and the builder all work from the same blueprint. There is a reduction in the likelihood of costly blunders
  • Effluent/sewage pumps that are properly sized guarantee that they operate within their design parameters, allowing them to operate for much longer periods of time. You, the homeowner, are the owner of the design and the building permission. Before a permit may be obtained, the Health Department demands a design, which must be approved by them.

For additional information, please see my services page or my commercial design page. Permitting and System Bids are the fourth and final step. The septic permit will be issued once the design and application have been accepted by the Health and Human Services Department. Counties have varying policies about when an application should be filed to the state. Applications are filed with soil boring reports from soil scientists, while others are submitted with a design, depending on the circumstances.

The permit has now been approved based on the design that was submitted; the next step is to obtain estimates for the system’s installation.

All that is required of you is to sit back and wait for friendly excavators to contact you with price information.

The following are some of the questions that a contract should provide answers to:

  • What is the duration of the contract
  • When will the work begin
  • And what is the cost of the contract. What date the project is expected to be completed
  • The day on which payment is due
  • Is it the homeowner’s responsibility to repair the sprinkler system if it is damaged? After the task is completed, who is in charge of the final grading and seeding? What impact may the weather have on the installation schedule? While the system is being built, would I be able to run water and flush the toilets? If the new system necessitates the installation of a pump, who is responsible for the accompanying electrical work?

Installation and inspection of a septic system is the fifth step. The day of installation has finally arrived, and we are overjoyed! The excavator has completed the installation of your system and is now awaiting approval from the health authorities before backfilling. Your yard has now become a lot greater disaster than you could have ever anticipated. It would look as though an entire battle was waged inside the limits of your own backyard. Make an effort to psychologically prepare for this.

Following that, your local county health department sanitarian will do a septic examination on your property.

  • Soil borings were carried out in the vicinity of the system that had been installed. Whether or whether there are any wells within 50 feet of the system

Gravity sewer running between the house and the septic tank is comprised of the following components:

  • In a 4′′ diameter pipe, the minimum fall is 4′′ in 25′ and the greatest slope is 36′′ in 24′ (in a 4′′ diameter pipe). Acceptable is the pipe’s schedule (specifications), or is it not? Are pipe joints properly prepared and cemented together?

Septic Tank (also known as a septic tank):

  • Ensure that the septic tank is at least ten feet away from the home. Is the tank equipped with the required inlet and outlet baffles? Check to see if your tank is the right size. Is there a riser that connects the tank to the ground surface? Was the tank filled to the proper level? Whether or not the tank’s inlet and exit pipes are linked to it in a watertight manner
  • The tank and riser look to be watertight, therefore check for a watertight seal between them
  • The tank itself appears to be watertight.

Effluent Sewer System:

  • Whether or whether the effluent sewer meets the required specifications. If so, does it have enough connections to the septic tank and distribution box? Are pipe joints properly prepared and cemented together?

Boxes for distribution:

  • Is the D-box setting at a comfortable level? Is there a tee or elbow fitted at the entrance of the D-box to prevent the inlet flow from becoming obstructed? Does the D-box appear to be stable (when placed on solid ground)? Are there any unwelcome critters making themselves at home in there?

Trench Header Pipes: Trench header pipes are pipes that run along the top of a trench.

  • The pipes meet all of the required specifications. Are the pipes level with the trench laterals or do they have a slope to them?
  • Is the level of all trench bottoms consistent along their length? Is the stone the proper size (.5′′ – 2.5′′) and clean, and is it in good condition? Ensure that the perforated lateral pipe meets all applicable specifications. Is there 6 inches of stone under the pipe and 2 inches of stone above the pipe? Has geotextile cloth been placed over the stone to block the dirt from getting through

Dosing Tank (also known as the pump tank):

  • Is the tank of the proper size and capacity? Was the tank filled to the proper level? Are you sure you have the proper pump installed (in accordance with the approved design)
  • Whether or not the electrical connections are built in a gas-tight manner. Are the on/off floats properly configured? Is there an audible and visible alarm system in place? Is the connection between the intake and output watertight? Is there a riser to the ground surface that is large enough to allow the pump to be serviced? Is there a check valve and a weep hole in the system? Is the major driving force behind a suitable specification
  • Whether or not there is a watertight seal between the tank and the riser
  • Is there a second lid on the container? Is there a slope in the force main that allows the water to flow back to the dosing tank between doses?

Drainage along the perimeter:

  • The drain must be at least 2 feet deep and have a minimum slope of 100 feet from the point of inlet to the point of exit. Is the drain system encircling the system or is it only on one side of the system? Was the drain trench properly backfilled with the appropriate material and at the appropriate depth? The pipe at the bottom of the trench should not rise and fall in the trench in an incorrect manner. Whether or not the tile has an outlet to another tile, and whether or not that tile is free flowing. If the tile has an outlet to a ditch, does it have an outlet that is higher than the average high water mark in the ditch? If the tile outlets to the roadside ditch were approved by the County Highway Department, it is possible that the tile outlets were installed without authority. The County Surveyor’s Office gave authorization to connect the tile outlets to a county-regulated drain or ditch if they were connected to a county-regulated drain or ditch.

Inspection of the Mound System:

  • Is the soil wetter than the permissible level of moisture (plasitc limit) for plowing? Is the mound on a sloping plane? Is there a slope in the force main that allows the water to flow back to the dosing tank between doses? Is the plow layer up to the task? Furrows were turned up the slope. Has it been tested to meet the sand highway standard 23 (as required by code)
  • Was the sand applied in such a way that it did not get compacted? Is the gravel cleaned and clean (diameters ranging from 0.5′′ to 2.5′′)
  • Are the force main, laterals, and manifolds of a specification that is permitted
  • Are you going to run the pump through a squirt test to make sure it’s the right size? A geotextile cloth was put on the top of the gravel bed to protect it. In your opinion, was the final cover enough (6′′ of clayey textured soil topped with 6′′ of loamy textured soil)
  • Whether or not the mound maintains a maximum slope of 3:1. Was the mound planted and shielded from erosion in any way?
See also:  What To Look For When Having Septic Tank Pumped?

Once the system has been examined and authorized, a representative from the health department will give some form of permission ticket and then go for lunch. If there are any infractions, the county sanitarian will leave a letter explaining what has to be done to correct the situation. If the inspection is not authorized, the sanitarian from the health department will need to return for a follow-up inspection. Excavator will cover up system with approval letter (also known as a green tag) in hand and swiftly ask you for any money that is still owed to the company.

Services provided by Meade Septic Design Inc. Meade Septic Design, Inc.’s Commercial Clients and Projects may be viewed here. Do you have any queries about septic systems? Please get in touch with me!

Don’t Dig Around a Septic Tank Until You Talk to a Professional

Certain considerations must be taken into consideration if you have a septic system on your property. One of the most fundamental laws of septic tank ownership is that you should never dig around your system. Even if you know the precise position of your tank, you may be lacking important information such as the location of the pipes or other components that are connected to it. Before you embark on any landscaping or construction project on your home, you should always speak with a professional.

  1. While landscaping, use extreme caution if you have a septic system on your property.
  2. Certain shrubs should be avoided, particularly bushes with invasive root systems, according to the experts.
  3. Remove any trees that are near your septic tank that you feel are causing an issue.
  4. Tree roots might be difficult to remove when you don’t know where they came from or where they are going.
  5. Some of your pipes may not be located where you expect them to beYour septic system is built to accommodate the size of your house.
  6. There are a number of components that are also positioned below ground level.
  7. Before beginning any digging, for whatever reason, it is critical to contact with a specialist who is familiar with the structure of your system.
  8. Do you have a project that requires excavating on your property?
  9. Give us a call right now!

How to Choose the Right Excavator for Your Job

After you’ve been awarded a new work as a result of a successful bid, it’s important to ensure that you have all of the necessary equipment. An excavator is one of the most frequent pieces of construction equipment that businesses require in order to execute new projects. However, with so many options available, selecting the most appropriate excavator may be a difficult task. Fortunately, this article will assist you in learning how to select an excavator that will fulfill the precise requirements of your task.

Make certain that you have all of the feature support you may want for future assignments covered.

Your construction supply firm should match all of the requirements listed below and instill confidence in you that you made the right decision. Take a look at our Excavators for Sale.

Perform to Your Standards

This is the most important factor to consider when selecting the proper excavator: it must be able to complete the task at hand. Examine the hydraulic systems and testing choices available for your next excavator to ensure that you have enough power for your operation. Many will highlight the capabilities of their system, as well as the amount of work that can be accomplished in a single workday as a result of that capability. More powerful hydraulic systems enable you to enhance your efficiency and productivity by matching the power you require to the task at hand.

  • When choosing your selection, take into consideration all of the tasks that your excavator will be required to complete.
  • Working near to dig sites, walls, and other impediments in a safe way is made possible via the use of these setups.
  • When turning, the zero-swing for housing helps to keep your operator from contacting the front and sides of your excavator while it’s in motion.
  • However, this design results in a broader excavator, which is not always appropriate for a construction site.
  • This helps your operator to better handle the machine while also establishing a sturdy basis that requires less movement.

Match It to Your Site

Though a standard or big excavator is required for some applications, power is not always the most important factor when it comes to specific tasks. Mini excavators have various benefits over their bigger counterparts, the most notable of which are as follows:

  • There will be less of an influence. Mini excavators create fewer track traces and cause less ground damage than larger excavators since they are smaller and lighter. Reduced environmental impact. Compact mini excavators are more convenient to use on a small or busy work site, such as a parking lot. Transport is simple. It is possible to put mini excavators onto the back of a utility vehicle or onto a reasonably small trailer for easy transportation between job sites. Lightweight for transporting. With an operational weight of less than 10,000 lbs., some Cat mini excavators are capable of towing and hauling, which means you may be allowed to trailer and tow with a basic Class C California driver’s license.

Mini excavators are perfect for operations that need the use of a small amount of space. Getting things done in the backyard requires maneuvering through gates and around a constrained space, to name a few of examples. When compared to regular excavators, mini excavators are more compact and can execute the same functions on a smaller scale. This can greatly reduce the time it takes to complete operations that would normally need manual digging. Take a look at our Mini Excavators.

When to Use a Mini Excavator

What is the purpose of a tiny excavator? Mini excavators may be equipped with a wide range of attachments, allowing them to be extremely flexible.

Mini excavators have a wider range of applications than you may anticipate, because to their lightweight structure and compact size. Here are four examples of occupations in which this sort of equipment would be an excellent choice.

What is the purpose of a tiny excavator? Mini excavators may be equipped with a wide range of attachments, allowing them to be extremely flexible. Mini excavators have a wider range of applications than you may anticipate, because to their lightweight structure and compact size. Here are four examples of occupations in which this sort of equipment would be an excellent choice.

1. Utility Line Install or Repair

Excavators are excellent tools for excavating trenches for the installation or repair of utility lines. With an excavator, you are looking directly into the trench that you are digging, but with a trencher you are looking into the trench that is behind you. In addition, you will be able to lay your spoil where you want it rather than along the side of the trench, where you may be required to employ another tractor to transfer the spoil.

2. Excavation

When it comes to digging up a large area, an excavator may be a very useful instrument. With the excavator, you have the ability to rotate the machine 360 degrees, allowing you to dump the material anywhere you wish. Excavation and landscaping for the pool Excavators conduct nearly all of the work associated with construction pad excavation. Excavators have another benefit over other types of machines in that when you need to over-excavate a pad for compaction, you can easily meter in the material to the necessary thickness for effective compaction.

3. Demolition

For those who are taking down concrete patios or other structures, small excavators might come in quite helpful. A hydraulic thumb can be installed on the machine to hold debris in place while it is being loaded into a truck or trailer to be hauled away by a truck or trailer. You may also use a hydraulic hammer or breaker to break up concrete slabs or boulders if the situation calls for it.

4. Drilling Holes

Because of the mini excavator’s capacity to travel in confined places, it is an indispensable instrument on construction sites where it is necessary to drill holes in a variety of problematic locations. The use of a small excavator eliminates the need for personnel to resort to manual shoveling or the use of other hand tools to drill holes in the ground. In addition, the small excavator allows you to reach over barriers and drill at virtually any angle. The auger is hydraulically operated, which means that you may drill a hole wherever the end of the excavator stick is located.

When to Use a Mini Excavator

What is the purpose of a tiny excavator? Mini excavators may be equipped with a wide range of attachments, allowing them to be extremely flexible. Mini excavators have a wider range of applications than you may anticipate, because to their lightweight structure and compact size. Here are four examples of occupations in which this sort of equipment would be an excellent choice. What is the purpose of a tiny excavator? Mini excavators may be equipped with a wide range of attachments, allowing them to be extremely flexible.

Here are four examples of occupations in which this sort of equipment would be an excellent choice.

1. Utility Line Install or Repair

Excavators are excellent tools for excavating trenches for the installation or repair of utility lines. With an excavator, you are looking directly into the trench that you are digging, but with a trencher you are looking into the trench that is behind you.

In addition, you will be able to lay your spoil where you want it rather than along the side of the trench, where you may be required to employ another tractor to transfer the spoil.

2. Excavation

When it comes to digging up a large area, an excavator may be a very useful instrument. With the excavator, you have the ability to rotate the machine 360 degrees, allowing you to dump the material anywhere you wish. Excavation and landscaping for the pool Excavators conduct nearly all of the work associated with construction pad excavation. Excavators have another benefit over other types of machines in that when you need to over-excavate a pad for compaction, you can easily meter in the material to the necessary thickness for effective compaction.

3. Demolition

For those who are taking down concrete patios or other structures, small excavators might come in quite helpful. A hydraulic thumb can be installed on the machine to hold debris in place while it is being loaded into a truck or trailer to be hauled away by a truck or trailer. You may also use a hydraulic hammer or breaker to break up concrete slabs or boulders if the situation calls for it.

4. Drilling Holes

Because of the mini excavator’s capacity to travel in confined places, it is an indispensable instrument on construction sites where it is necessary to drill holes in a variety of problematic locations. The use of a small excavator eliminates the need for personnel to resort to manual shoveling or the use of other hand tools to drill holes in the ground. In addition, the small excavator allows you to reach over barriers and drill at virtually any angle. The auger is hydraulically operated, which means that you may drill a hole wherever the end of the excavator stick is located.

Operator Comfort Is Important

When it comes to selecting the correct excavator, it is important to match the excavator to your demands. This should also involve matching the appropriate excavator with the appropriate operators in your fleet. Many versions are designed with the operator’s comfort in mind, and ergonomic seats and controls are employed in many of them. Make sure that the excavator’s cab has enough of space and that it has simple access to all of the machine’s controls and functions. Work comfortably in an adjustable seat with lateral mobility, which allows you to easily adapt to changing operators.

These ought to be powerful enough to keep the temperature comfortable in your area.

Observe them and make certain that the controls are simple to grasp.

The longer your operators will be required to operate the excavator in a single sitting, the more the importance of comfort should be placed on this factor in your decision.

When deciding on how to purchase an excavator, consider one that will aid in the preservation of performance rather than work against it.

The Right Tools for the Job

Make sure you get your hands on the excavator itself and put it through its paces before making a purchase. Before you grant financing for a machine, you should have extensive hands-on experience with it. Given the fact that each excavator is unique, this step is as as vital as deciding on the model to purchase. When evaluating your possible excavator, be sure to look for the following characteristics:

  • Take note of how it begins to operate. In order for the engine to start immediately and not require time to draw power from the battery, it is necessary to inspect the vehicle for leaks or smoke. While some water may leak from an air conditioning system and engines may emit a little bit of smoke, it is always a good idea to double-check that these are within the normal range for the equipment. Check for any fluid leaks and ensure sure they are not affecting a critical system. Examine the oil and other fluids in the machine to see whether they are in good shape. Ideally, these should be new, but it may be an indication that someone is trying to sell you an old equipment that has old hydraulic or other fluids in it. Open the hood and take a brief check at the engine and electrical loom. You want everything to seem to be in good condition, and you want the wiring to be professional-looking. Electrical tape all over the place might serve as a warning indication
  • Examine the characteristics and equipment. For example, you may check the slew ring wear by raising the boom and moving the body with your hands and wrists. While it comes to swivel booms, a little play in the swivel mechanism is acceptable
  • However, excessive movement or visible wear should be avoided when moving the boom.

A comprehensive inspection may save you a great deal of problems, repairs, and money in the future. Additionally, it assists you in keeping your employees safe, which is the most important benefit of all.

Choosing the Right Excavator

Learning how to purchase an excavator is an exercise in patience, as you must ensure that you satisfy every need of your firm. Because of its versatility and utility throughout the whole building cycle, an excavator may be an excellent addition to your equipment fleet. Excavators are constantly present in the construction yard, doing tasks such as grading for your foundation and lifting items for your personnel, as well as supplying power for your demolition. Whether you are finalizing your choices or defining your job needs, Quinn Company, your trusted provider since 1919, can assist you.

Consider factors such as available space, optional features, attachment support, and other factors to narrow your selection.

The perfect partner may make the decision even more straightforward.

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