How To Check Your Junction Box On Your Septic Tank? (Perfect answer)

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  • Check the inlet and the outlet of the septic tank for any blockage due to solid wastes, scum and so on. Remove the block and check for easy flow. Check the distribution box located between the septic tank and the percolators.

How do I find my septic junction box?

The D-box will at or near end of the drainfield area that is closest to the septic tank. Look at the site layout for where the D-box could possibly be located. For example, if the drainfield site is level and rectangular, the D-box would typically be at or near the edge of the drainfield closest to the septic tank.

What is a septic junction box?

A septic tank’s distribution box (or D-box) is a container (typically concrete) that receives the septic tank effluent and re-distributes it into the network of attached drain fields and pipes. To put it simply, its job is to evenly distribute the wastewater into the leach field.

Can a distribution box get clogged?

One of the most common septic tank problems arises when the distribution box is damaged or clogged, preventing the flow of water from the septic tank into the drainfield. In most cases, a qualified plumber can fix this problem quickly and easily before it becomes a serious issue for the household septic tank system.

How far is your distribution box from your septic tank?

It’s usually somewhere near the edge of your drain field on the end that’s closest to your septic tank. Distribution boxes are usually only about 6 inches to 2 feet deep. This narrows your search, but you’ll need some other clues to help you find the exact location.

How much does it cost to replace a distribution box on a septic system?

Septic Distribution Box Replacement Cost Replacing a septic distribution box costs between $500 and $1,500. This component is also called the D-box. It is very important, responsible for controlling the even distribution of wastewater into the leach field.

What are signs of septic tank problems?

7 Warning Signs Your Septic System Is Failing

  • Gurgling Pipes. They would occur when you run water in the house (e.g. when using the sink or shower) or flush the toilet.
  • Bad Odours. It’s never a pleasant experience when this occurs.
  • Water At Ground Level.
  • Green Grass.
  • Slow Drainage.
  • Blocked Pipes.

How do I know if my septic drain field is bad?

8 Signs of Septic System Failure

  1. Septic System Backup.
  2. Slow Drains.
  3. Gurgling Sounds.
  4. Pool of Water or Dampness Near Drainfield.
  5. Nasty Odors.
  6. Unusual, Bright Green Grass Above Drainfield.
  7. Blooms of Algae in Nearby Water.
  8. High Levels of Coliform in Water Well.

How can you tell if your septic is clogged?

Signs of Septic System Clogging: Water and sewage from toilets, drains and sinks backing up into your home. Bathtubs, showers, and sinks draining slowly. Gurgling sounds present in the plumbing system. Bad odors coming from the septic tank or drain field.

Should a distribution box be full of water?

A septic system distribution box should not be full of water. As effluent water leaves the septic tank towards the drain field, it first enters the distribution box. If the distribution box is full, there is a problem with clogged leach lines or a failing drain field.

Are dishwashers bad for septic tanks?

DON’T. use your dishwasher, shower, washing machine and toilet at the same time. All the extra water will really strain your septic system. put items down your sink or toilet that can easily be thrown into the trash.

Do you need a distribution box for a septic tank?

If you have recently had your septic tank inspected and pumped but are still experiencing plumbing problems, you may want to take a look at your distribution box. Your distribution box must be level to function properly. If the box is disrupted, it can cause problems for the system.

How do I find my septic lateral lines?

Call your local electric utility provider or gas company to locate buried gas or utility lines before digging. A septic tank probe can also help you find the location. Stick the long, thin metal probe into the ground until you feel it hit the tank and feel the edges of the tank.

What can I do about a saturated septic field?

Additional ways to help keep the soil in your drain field from becoming over-saturated include:

  1. Avoid using too many water fixtures in the home at once.
  2. Ensure all home gutter downspouts are directed away from the drain field.
  3. Don’t point lawn sprinklers toward drain field.

Does a septic tank always have water in it?

A septic tank should always be “filled” to its normal liquid level, or the bottom of the outlet pipe which carries effluent to the absorption area. This normal liquid level is usually between 8” to 12” from the top of the tank on average (see picture at right).

How to Find the Distribution Box of a Septic Tank

Credit: Mint Images/Mint Images RF/Getty Images for the image.

In This Article

  • What is a distribution box
  • Why should you look for one
  • And how to locate one

When your septic tank is operating well, it is out of sight and out of mind, and you may not be aware of all of the subterranean components, such as the distribution box, until something goes wrong. One of the numerous septic tank inquiries that many homeowners have is where the various pieces are located. The ability to understand what this little but critical component performs, where to find it, and what sort of care it required can assist you in keeping your septic tank in good working order.

What Is a Distribution Box?

Distribution box is a tiny box that is installed after the septic tank but before the drain field to distribute wastewater. In most cases, they are composed of either polymer plastic or concrete, and they have many apertures on various sides where the drain field lines are connected to the box. As an example, consider it to be a connection point for the lines that go throughout the leach field. The actual size and style of your system will be determined by your system. In order to ensure that the effluent from the septic tank is distributed uniformly over the drain field, it has been designed to do the following: In order to take advantage of gravity, the distribution box is often placed slightly downhill from the septic tank.

  • In addition, the box is often equipped with spinning components that aid in the distribution of consistent volumes of wastewater in different sections of the leach field.
  • The wastewater might gather in an uneven manner if this is not done, with some portions of the leach field receiving all of the wastewater and other regions receiving none.
  • Regular inspections of the distribution box as part of normal septic tank maintenance can help to verify that everything is going well.
  • You may also inspect the distribution box for damage and assess whether it is necessary to replace it.
  • Things such as driving over the box, tree roots growing into it, heavy sludge accumulation, and other damage to the box might compel you to replace it sooner than you would have otherwise thought necessary.
  • Due to its role in moving effluent from the septic system’s tank to the septic drain field, it seems logical that the box should be installed between them.
  • Distribution boxes are typically just 6 inches to 2 feet deep, depending on the manufacturer.
  • Site plans or a drawing of the authorized system design should still be available if you have them, and the distribution box should be clearly noted on them.
  • Be aware that some smaller systems may not have distribution boxes, while most systems do have distribution boxes.
  • It is possible to notice parallel depressions that represent the leach lines and can direct you to the distribution box in rare occasions.

By running a plumbing snake from the septic tank outlet to where it stops, which should be the distribution box, you may get a general estimate of how far it is to the distribution box.

How to find the septic tank, D-box, Drainfield: probable vs unlikely locations, clues, procedures

  • Fill out the form below to ask your question or to share your thoughts on what you learned about how to search for septic system components when doing a system inspection or test.

InspectAPedia does not allow any form of conflict of interest. The sponsors, goods, and services described on this website are not affiliated with us in any way. For purposes such as inspection, maintenance, troubleshooting, or repair, or as part of the Septic Loading and Dye Test procedure for testing the function of septic systems, the information in this septic system inspection article will teach you where to look for and how to locate septic system components. The photo at the top of this page depicts a newly-formed mound of rocky dirt that has been pushed against trees and over the position of a septic tank on a rural property.

We also have anARTICLE INDEX for this topic, and you can use the SEARCH BOXes at the top and bottom of the page to obtain the information you need quickly and easily.

LOOK FOR SEPTIC COMPONENTS

Conflicts of interest are not tolerated at InspectAPedia.com. No affiliation exists between us and any sponsors, products, or services mentioned on this website. For purposes such as inspection, maintenance, troubleshooting, or repair, or as part of the Septic Loading and Dye Test procedure for testing the function of septic systems, the information in this septic system inspection article will teach you where to look and how to locate various septic system components. At a rural property, a newly-created mound of rocky earth has been pushed against trees and over the position of a septic tank, as shown in the photo at the top of this page.

We also have anARTICLE INDEX for this topic, and you can use the SEARCH BOXes at the top and bottom of the page to obtain the information you need quickly and efficiently.

How to Find the Septic Tank

  • Sites of Potential Septic Tanks: Where are the most likely locations for a septic tank to be found? For further information on how to locate the septic tank, see SEPTIC TANK, HOW TO FIND. Check out the SEPTIC TANK LOCATION SKETCH for examples of how people may have kept track of where the septic tank was located on a property. Septic systems that are shared On the land, where are all of the viable spots for a tank to be placed? Perhaps there is almost none, or perhaps there is room for a tank but not for an absorption system. Do not make the assumption that all septic components are equally distributed around the land. The septic systems on some older properties were shared with other properties, or separate tanks and a common leach field. It’s possible that later owners were never informed that their leach field was on another person’s land, and vice versa. Refer to SEPTIC DRAINFIELD LOCATION for complete instructions on how to locate the property’s septic drainfield or leaching bed (also known as soakaway field)

See the following articles for one or more techniques of locating the septic tank, cesspool, drywell, or seepage pit: locating the septic tank, cesspool, drywell, or seepage pit

  • WHAT IS THE SEPTIC TANK LOCATION
  • HOW TO FIND THE MAIN WASTE LINE EXIT
  • DISTANCE TO SEPTIC TANK
  • POSSIBLE SEPTIC TANK LOCATIONS
  • VISUAL CLUES TO LOCATE THE SEPTIC TANK
  • SEPTIC TANK DEPTH
  • SEPTIC TANK LOCATING EQUIPMENT
  • SEPTIC TANK LOCATION SKETCH

How to Find the Septic D_box – Distribution Box

  • SEPTIC D-BOX INSTALLATION, LOCATION, AND REPAIR where we explain where to look for the drop box, D-box, or distribution box, as well as how to inspect and repair it depending on what you find there

How to Find the Septic Drainfields or Leaching Beds or Soakaway Pits

For more information on fiddling the septic drainfield using one or more of the following methods, see the following articles:

  • Separate article
  • EXCAVATE TO FIND THE DRAINFIELD- separate article
  • REASONS FOR FINDING THE DRAINFIELD- separate article
  • RECORDS to DETERMINE THE LOCATION OF THE DRAINFIELD—a separate article
  • A separate post will be written about the SURPRISING DRAINFIELD LOCATIONS, and a another article will be written about the UNLIKELY DRAINFIELD LOCATIONS. SEPTIC DRAINFIELD SIZESEPTIC DRAINFIELD SHAPE- separate articles
  • VISUAL CLUES LOCATE the DRAINFIELD- separate articles
  • VISUAL CLUES LOCATE the SEPTIC TANK- separate articles
  • Is there enough room for septic fields? Is there enough space on this site to accommodate a typical tank and drainfield? The presence of a septic tank and drainfield is improbable on a tiny property, although it is possible that a cesspool is being used instead. It’s important to remember that when it comes to septic repair, it may not be possible to employ a cesspool or other non-conforming septic system since it has been “grandfathered.” Does the property have any site encumbrances that could make the installation or replacement of the septic system difficult or expensive, such as nearby streams or lakes or storm drains and trees, rocky or steep site conditions (see our septic failure case examples), or restricted distances from a well or property boundary? During and after the dye test, make sure to examine surrounding streams and lakes for contamination. Whether or if there are pipelines flowing from the property into a neighboring stream, perhaps discharging septage, should be investigated. The site seen in this photograph was the only one accessible for the installation of a septic system. An ordinary septic system would not be effective on such an uneven and steep terrain (however specific steep slope septic system designs are available). Our initial inspection revealed that the system was failing
  • We observed water, most likely septic effluent, rushing over a rock right below the claimed (new) septic tank when we arrived for our inspection. That it came from the septic system was established by the color we used. Once again, this is the identical granite ledge that enhanced effluent flow as soon as we began our septic testing. Septic wastewater from this system had been discharging to the surface through an overflow pipe or from the bottom of a tiny, home-made seepage pit, which itself was lying on solid rock for decades, delivering septic effluent downstream to Wappingers Creek and then to the Hudson River. The agent advised us that the system was in fine operating order, but that the owners had just added a new septic tank solely for the purpose of improving the “curb appeal” of the property. Unfortunately, a whole steep slope system was required to handle the wastewater, which proved to be too expensive. The money spent by the vendor was a poor investment.
See also:  How Does A Bear Get In A Septic Tank? (Perfect answer)

These pages are part of our SEPTIC DYE TEST PROCEDURE, which is used to test the function of a septic system. Technical evaluation by industry experts has been completed and is now in progress – a list of reviewers can be found atREFERENCES. Comments and recommendations for new material are always appreciated.

Reader CommentsQ A

Aaron I’ll be more than happy to assist you. Now let’s go back to SEPTIC D-BOX INSTALLATION, LOCATION, AND REPAIR where I talk about how to locate the distribution box Examine these recommendations and get in touch with me if you have any queries or want to provide an update. I can’t seem to find where my septic system’s distribution box is supposed to be. If anyone has any suggestions, please share them with me because my yard has turned into a giant quarry as a result of the digging I’ve done in an attempt to locate my D-box without luck.

What is the distance between my house and the septic tank, pipe, D-box, or drainfields?

The shortest possible distance between the house and the septic system Steve In comparison to digging up individual drainfield lines, digging at the D-box is a convenient step since it is simple and diagnostic.

If this is the case, you may be able to temporarily close off one line.

I would look for signs of effluent break-out throughout the rest of the drainfield area; you could also have a plumber run a camera down the drainfield lines to see if they have collapsed or broken; if they haven’t, we’re back to my diagnosis above, and unfortunately, it’s time to replace the drainfield.

  1. On one occasion, it was advised that I dig up and inspect D box for blockages.
  2. Do you have any recommendations?
  3. Most jurisdictions need a setback of various septic components from property borders, however the actual distance required varies depending on the jurisdiction and the kind of component being installed.
  4. What is the legal need for the distance between septic sprinklers and our common property line?

Continue reading at the SEPTIC DRAINFIELD LOCATION website. Alternatively, choose a topic from the closely related articles listed below, or browse the entireARTICLE INDEX. Alternatively, consider the following:

Recommended Articles

  • FINDING BURIED OIL TANKS
  • CLEARANCE DISTANCES, SEPTIC SYSTEM
  • SEPTIC DRAINFIELD LOCATIONS
  • SEPTIC DRAWINGS
  • SEPTIC TANK DEPTH
  • SEPTIC TANK FINDING
  • SEPTIC VIDEOS
  • SEPTIC to POOL DISTANCE
  • WELL CLEARANCE DISTANCES
  • WELL CONSTRUCTION MAINTENANCE
  • WELL DEPTH

Suggested citation for this web page

Inspection of septic components atInspect A pedia.com, an online encyclopedia of building environmental inspection, testing, diagnosis and repair assistance as well as issue prevention. Alternatively, have a look at this.

INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES:ARTICLE INDEX to SEPTIC SYSTEMS

Alternatives include asking a question or searching InspectApedia using the SEARCH BOXfound below.

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During a septic system inspection or test, you may have questions, answers, or comments regarding how to check for septic system components. We encourage you to use the search box just below, or if you prefer, you may make a question or remark in theCommentsbox below and we will get back to you as soon as possible. InspectApedia is a website that allows you to search for things. Please keep in mind that the publication of your remark below may be delayed if it contains an image, a web link, or text that seems to the program to be a web link.

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Technical ReviewersReferences

Citations can be shown or hidden by selecting Show or Hide Citations. InspectApedia.com is a publisher that provides references. Daniel Friedman is an American journalist and author.

Finding distribution box & leach field

Over 680,000 strictly plumbing related postsWelcome to Plbg.com the PlumbingForum.com. We are the best online (strictly) PLUMBING advice, help, dyi, educational, and informational plumbing forum. Questions and discussions about toilets, sinks, faucets, drainage, venting, water heating, showers, pumps, water quality, and other exclusively PLUMBING related issues. Please refrain from asking where to purchase a product, or any business, pricing, or legal questions, or for contractor referrals, or any other questions not related to plumbing. Keep all posts positive and absolutely no advertising. Our site is completely free, without ads or pop-ups. We do not sell your information. We are made possible by:
Finding distribution boxleach field
Author:Anonymous UserIf I know the location of the septic tank, what is the easiest way to find the distribution box and, if possible, the leach field?I do not have the “as built” drawings, and my local Board of Health only has the proposed house plans including the septic system; the proposed septic system location is not where it was built.
Post Reply
Re: Finding distribution boxleach field
Author:Anonymous UserGet a plumber with a video Camera with built in locator like a Micro Engeering type with duel frequency’s so you can double check theexact location so your not digging up power lines that mat have given you a false signal.Ta Dumm
Post Reply
Re: Finding distribution boxleach field
Author:hj (AZ)There is no hard and fast rule, but the distribution box would normallybe straight out from the tank’s outlet within ten feet. It will also be down at the level of the outlet opening on the tank.
Post Reply
Re: Finding distribution boxleach field
Author:Septic Tank Yank (CO)Richard, remove the soil over the outlet access hole of the septic tank and lift the access hole cover.Do this in advance of contacting a plumber/drain cleaner so that he or she does not have to spend the time required to excavate the soil.If the outlet pipe isaccessable then follow Master Plumber Sylvan Tieger’s advice to hire a plumber/drain cleaner “with a video Camera with built in locator like a Micro Engeering type” to locate the effluent pipeline from the tank to the distribution box. The probe can be inserted into the outlet pipe through the top of the sanitary tee outlet baffle.The older septic tanks, and some newer tanks, are fitted with concrete outlet baffles.The concrete outlet baffles also allow access to the effluent pipeline for insertion of the probe.If the outlet pipe is not easily accessable, then expose the effluent pipeline outside of the tank so that the technician can cut the pipeline to insert the probe.After the distribution box is located, remove the soil over it and then the plumber/drain cleaner can insert the probe into the distribution pipes of the leach field.After the system is located, install 20-inch diameter plastic or concrete risers over the septic tank access hole and over the distribution box.I use Tuf-Tite plastic risers with secure lids and bring the risers to the ground surface to facilitate easy future access to the system.If the outlet baffle is a 4-inch sanitary tee insert into it a SIM/TECH bottlebrush type septic tank efflent filter.The filter will improve the quality of the effluent being applied to the leach field.The filter can be cleaned or replaced easily on an annual basis.If the tank has two compartments, I recommend that risers be installed over the first compartment access hole also, to facilitate easy access for sludge removal.If the tank has only a single compartment, the sludge can be removed from the outlet access hole.Photograph the improvements and prepare an as-built drawing.Prepare an operation manual which contains the photos, the as-built plan, a description of the maintenance requirements, a copy of the original permit, and a maintenance log.This document will be quite useful when the time comes to sell your home.Post Edited
Post Reply
Re: Finding distribution boxleach field
Author:Anonymous UserGREAT POST Amazing advice when TWO trades come together for doing the job properly.Also becareful what chemicals you put down your drains as you do not want to destroy theanaerobic gems inside this system which are the key to keeping the system healthy and happy.SylvanLMPAuthor: Septic Tank Yank (CO)Richard, remove the soil over the outlet access hole of the septic tank and lift the access hole cover. Do this in advance of contacting a plumber/drain cleaner so that he or she does not have to spend the time required to excavate the soil.If the outlet pipe is accessable then follow Master Plumber Sylvan Tieger’s advice to hire a plumber/drain cleaner “with a video Camera with built in locator like a Micro Engeering type” to locate the effluent pipeline from the tank to the distribution box. The probe can be inserted into the outlet pipe through the top of the sanitary tee outlet baffle. The older septic tanks, and some newer tanks, are fitted with concrete outlet baffles. The concrete outlet baffles also allow access to the effluent pipeline for insertion of the probe. If the outlet pipe is not easily accessable, then expose the effluent pipeline outside of the tank so that the technician can cut the pipeline to insert the probe.After the distribution box is located, remove the soil over it and then the plumber/drain cleaner can insert the probe into the distribution pipes of the leach field. After the system is located, install 20-inch diameter plastic or concrete risers over the septic tank access hole and over the distribution box. I use Tuf-Tite plastic risers with secure lids and bring the risers to the ground surface to facilitate easy future access to the system.If the outlet baffle is a 4-inch sanitary tee insert into it a SIM/TECH bottlebrush type septic tank efflent filter. The filter will improve the quality of the effluent being applied to the leach field. The filter can be cleaned or replaced easily on an annual basis.If the tank has two compartments, I recommend that risers be installed over the first compartment access hole also, to facilitate easy access for sludge removal. If the tank has only a single compartment, the sludge can be removed from the outlet access hole.Photograph the improvements and prepare an as-built drawing. Prepare an operation manual which contains the photos, the as-built plan, a description of the maintenance requirements, a copy of the original permit, and a maintenance log. This document will be quite useful when the time comes to sell your home.
Post Reply
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How to Check Your Septic Panel and Pump Chamber

It is recommended that you inspect your pump chamber once a year to ensure that everything is in proper working order. Follow the 11-step procedure outlined below to complete this task on your own! (Do you require further assistance? Alternatively, you may watch our instructional video below.)

‍ 1. Let’s start by inspecting the panel. Make sure the power is on by verifying the power switch to the panel is on.

The following items should be included in this general overview: The electrical box may be seen in the lower left corner of the image below, starting at the bottom of the image. Check to verify that all of the cables are firmly connected before using it. Next, take a look at the lower right corner of the shot, where you can see the discharge pipe for the pump. Check to see if it is operational (valve should be lined up with pipe). It’s now time to have some fun!

‍ FIRST.PUT ON GLOVES!That is one step you DO NOT want to miss. Remove the float tree (the pipe with a pvc handle located upright left in our picture) and pull up the alarms.

*Please keep in mind that these instructions are for a 4-float system. Some systems contain only two or three floats.

If you don’t hear an alarm, this is cause for concern. Starting at the top, I will explain the floats and how to ensure each one is working.

NOTE: If your water supply is depleted, you may need to replenish it. Fill it up a little with water from a yard hose.

7. Continue testing.

Check that the pump is operating properly by flipping the second float from the bottom upside down and then turning it back around. With your other hand, turn the next float up (which would be the second from the top) upside down while still holding the first float. You should be able to hear the pump start up. As soon as you have confirmed that the pump is operational, just release these two floats. There’s one more float to go. The top float serves as an alert in case of high water. Turn it over down to see whether this is the case.

8. Now is the time to inspect the power cords.

Check to see that everything is securely tied to the float tree and not just hanging free. Zip ties can be used to reattach any stray cables.

9. Securely return the float tree to its holder and coil any dangling cords so that they are out of the water.

HOME SEWAGE TREATMENT SYSTEMSWhere public or central sewage works are not available, such as in rural regions with a high concentration of population, individual sewage treatment systems must be erected with the consent of the health authority.

Waste water systems established with the consent of the health department must adhere to severe state laws, and the health department must guarantee that no nuisances are permitted to jeopardize the health and well-being of the residents of Perry County and the surrounding areas.

Septic Permit Lookup Mapping 2014-2021 Septic Permits available for review.

SiteEvaluation a contract with a soil contractor to create a soil report is entered into (See List of Soil Contractors Below) Take a copy of the soil report to the Perry County Health Department so that they may examine it. The Engineers Office can be reached at (740) 342-2191 for assistance in obtaining an assigned county engineer’s address for your property. 4. Complete and submit a Site Evaluation Application ($125.00) with your payment. *** As a result of the soil scientist’s evaluation, the Perry County Health Department will analyze all of the information and determine what sort of system you need to install at this point in the process.

  • Permit for Septic System 1.
  • Complete yourSeptic Permit Application ($324.003) in its entirety.
  • *** When you reach this stage, you will be issued with a SEPTIC PERMIT as well as an OPERATION PERMIT.
  • Following the completion of the installation and approval, an as-built drawing packet (See Form Below) in accordance with Ohio Administrative Code 3701-29-10 must be provided.
  • Following the completion of the system, an examination will be carried out every 12 months.

Soil Contractors

Name Address Phone Email
Terry Priest PO Box 53Corning, OH 43730 740-767-3982 [email protected]
Larry Tornes 811 State Route 61Sunbury, OH 43074 740-965-3254
SoilEnv Consulting, INCSteven Miller PO BOX 172Kilbourne, OH 43032 614-579-1164 [email protected]
ROXOLKyle Baldwin 976 McIntire Ave.Zanesville, OH 43701 740-704-1879 [email protected]

Septic Installers List

If you are searching for a licensed septic installation, please select one from the following list:.

Name Address Phone Number Email
A J Services/Zane Undergound 1115 Putnam AvenueZanesville, OH 43701 740-819-4405 [email protected]
A. Browning ConstructionExcavating LLC 785. S Hopewell Road Hopewell, OH 43746 740-319-3307
Ashbaugh TruckingExcavating 2780 Bethel RoadBremen, OH 43107 740-569-4896
BB Plumbing Inc. 2531 Hopewell Indian Road Bremen, OH 43107 740-404-0440
B.N.M Services Inc. 5644 Mainesville RoadGlenford, OH 43739 740-808-1869
Beagle Hill Services LLC 11333 Hamby Hill RoadFrazeysburg, OH 43822 740-828-9852 [email protected]
Big John LLC 10210 Wesley Chapel Road Mount Perry, OH 43760 740-819-6052
Bob Heavener ExcavatingRobert Heavener PO Box 908New Lexington, OH 43764 740-342-5080
Champion Services 3165 Ellerman Road Zanesville, OH 43701 740-452-7647 [email protected]
ClaggettSons Inc. 3396 Sharon Valley RoadNewark, OH 43055 740-366-5241 [email protected]
Earl Riggs Excavating 10104 Coakley RoadLogan, OH 43138 740-385-4720
Fairview Construction 14219 Pleasant Valley Road Logan, OH 43138 740-385-4445
Flowers ExcavatingJesse Flowers PO Box 191Glenford, OH 43739 740-405-1196 [email protected]
Huffman Excavating 414 North AvenueNew Lexington, OH 43764 740-342-3310
Jack Miller Contracting PO Box 303Junction City, OH 43748 614-313-1926
Jacks Septic Tank Manuel Diaz 247 South 6th StreetNewark, OH 43055 740-366-3255 [email protected]
James Heavener Excavating 2398 Jamestown Road Crooksville, OH 43731 740-342-4835 [email protected]
JR’s Construction and Excavating 27541 West Belpre Pike Coolville, OH 45733 740-667-6162
KN Excavation LLC 1966 Millerburg RoadUtica, OH 43080 740-668-3870
LM Excavating 3400 North Finley RoadMalta, OH 43758 740-962-6312
M.E. GoodSonsMark Good 14897 State Route 595Logan, OH 43138 740-380-2667
Matheny Excavation 6945 Hunter RoadAmanda, OH 43102 740-974-3305 [email protected]
McKosing Construction 2990 Township Road Junction City, OH 43748 740-607-7394
Mock Excavating 4061 Foxfire DriveZanesville, OH 43701 740-849-2561
Ricketts Excavating PO Box 912Lancaster, OH 43130 740-687-0338
Sams Excavating Unlimited, Inc. 4324 St. Paul RoadAshville, OH 43103 740-983-6589
Snider Equipment Rental 6726 Buckeye Valley RoadSomerset, OH 740-605-0905
Spohn ExcavatingTom Spohn 4285 State Route 668Junction City, OH 43748 740-605-6264
Steve Ferguson PO Box 115Crooksville, OH 43731 740-342-9976
Storts ExcavatingJim Storts 6150 Bohemian RoadCorning, OH 43730 740-394-2619
Swartz Excavating 7575 Buckeye Valley RoadSomerset, OH 43783 740-404-0457
Ultimate Enterprises 4961 Township Road 22Glenford, OH 43739 740-659-2515
Wilkins Excavating LLC 3368 Lowe LaneMcConnelsville, OH 43756 740-868-6553
Zemba Bros. 3401 East PikeZanesville, OH 43701 740-452-1880

Information for Contractors

Information on how to register with the Ohio Department of Health Service Provider Registration Application Master Leaching Design As Built Packet Septic Installers Registration Application Septage Hauler Registration Application Service Provider Registration Application

Site Evaluation Form

If you would like to request a Site Evaluation, please complete and submit the Site Evaluation Request Form found here.

Septic Permit Form

If you would like to apply for a Septic Permit, please download and complete the following form. Application for a Septic Permit

Septage Haulers List

Business Address Phone
Ace SepticEric Winters 3750 Chandlersville RoadZanesville, OH 43701 740-454-7867
Affordable Septic Service 918 State Route 93 N.Logan, OH 43138 740-385-9082
Affordable Waste Services PO Box 39 Pataskala, Oh 43062 740-366-7624
Agree Septic ServicesJoe Walton 8060 Oak Hill RoadBreman, OH 43107 740-569-7018
B B Plumbing 2531 Hopewell Indian Road Glenford, OH 43739 740-404-0440
BSS Waste Disposal PO Box 879 Logan, OH 43138 740-756-9100
Green Up SanitationGreg Altier 6775 Congo RoadCorning, OH 43730 740-347-4484
Jacks Septic Tank Cleaning 274 South 6th StreetNewark, OH 43055 740-366-3255
K.G. Helber 16550 Burcham RoadLogan, OH 43138 740-603-5966
Porta Kleen 1030 Millpark AveLancaster, OH 43130 740-689-1886
The Waterworks 550 Schrock RoadColumbus, OH 43229 614-496-4343
Zemba Inc. 3401 East PikeZanesville, OH 43701 740-452-1880
Sickles Sanitation LLC 1035 Pleasant Hill Road Athens, OH 45701 740-592-3480

Lot Split Assessment

* Denotes the presence of real estate inspectors.

Name Address Phone Email
Affordable Waste Services PO Box 39 Pataskala, OH 43062 740-366-7624
Benchmark Environmental Labs, INC PO Box 14740Columbus, OH 43214 614-267-4588 [email protected]
*Fairview Construction 14219 Pleasant Valley RoadLogan, OH 43138 740-385-4445
*Independent Health Services Inc. 223 East 5th AveLancaster, OH 43130 614-267-4222740-974-8848 [email protected]
Jacks Septic, LLC 274 S. 6th StreetNewark, OH 43055 740-366-3255 [email protected]
*M.E. Good and Sons 14897 State Route 595Logan, OH 43138 740-380-2667
Pattison Aerator Repair LLC 65641 Cabin Hill RoadNew Concord, OH 43762 740-432-5809 [email protected]
Sickles Septic Tanks 10637 Oxley RoadAthens, OH 45701 740-593-8302
J.K. Precast 1000 Armbrust AveWashington Court House, OH 43160 740-335-2188

Sewage Treatment Rules

In the event that your septic alarm goes off, it may surely create some anxiety and uncertainty; and if you happen to be experiencing this right now, then you’ve arrived to the correct location! Don’t be concerned; it does not necessitate urgent action. Instead, take your time to go through this full essay so that you will be prepared to act now or in the future if the situation arises. What Septic Systems Are and How They Work The alarm works in conjunction with the septic system to alert you when the water level within the pump tank has increased to an unsafe level or has decreased to an unsafe level.

The timer is in charge of regulating the time intervals during which the pump is permitted to pump wastewater into the drainage system.

Thus, during periods of excessive water use, the drain field is kept from getting overflowing, which might cause damage to the drainage system.

A large amount of water is injected into the system in between pumping cycles for whatever cause, and the water has nowhere else to go but back into the system’s pump tank.

Depending on how much water was and continues to be put into the system and how the pump is set up to operate on a timer, it may take many pumping cycles until the water levels are returned to normal. Causes of the alarm going off in the first place

  1. There is an excessive amount of water being put into the septic system. This is the result of excessive water use, which might be caused by multiple loads of laundry, an excessive quantity of dishwashing, or a disproportionate number of long showers.
  1. Somehow, groundwater is making its way into the system. If there is an excessive amount of standing water surrounding the septic tanks, whether generated by rain or another source, the water may seep into the tanks and cause the internal water level to rise.
  1. It’s possible that one of the components of the septic system is malfunctioning. If anything goes wrong with your system — including the pump and floats — the alarm and timer will go off and the septic system will stop working correctly.

An issue with one of the components of the septic system might be present, for example. Anything, including the pump, floats, alarm, and timer, might be defective, causing the septic system to malfunction and fail to function correctly.

How To Tell If Your Septic System Needs Repair Or Replacement

In most cases, homeowners and business owners who utilize a septic system do not consider about their system until there is a problem. Jones PlumbingSeptic Tank Service specializes in the installation, maintenance, and repair of septic systems of the highest quality. In order to discover whether or not you will need to replace your current system, contact us immediately to arrange septic tank services.

Common Indicators Of Septic System Repair

It is inevitable that a septic system will require repairs, and it is critical to schedule these repairs as soon as the problem first manifests itself. Hopefully, by taking preventive measures, you will be able to extend the life of your sewage treatment system.

Slow Drains

If your drains begin to slow down or clog, it’s likely that you have a problem with your septic system. Keep in mind that a septic system relies on clear pipes and plumbing to work correctly, and that neglecting a sluggish drain might set off a series of events that would necessitate a costly repair down the road.

Sewage Backups

Because the goal of drains is to transport waste away, if the waste returns in the form of backed-up sewage, you will want emergency septic service. Even while frequent tank pump-outs are normally helpful in avoiding this predicament, a sudden backup indicates that there is an issue.

Putrid Odors

When there is an accumulation of waste — both solid and liquid — in the septic tank, the scents associated with it become more obvious. However, if the scents suddenly arise, it is possible that there is a blockage in the plumbing system, which will impact the entire plumbing system.

Common Types Of Septic Tank Repairs

The distribution box is the name given to the location where the drain field pipes link to the tank in most septic systems. The distribution box is responsible for uniformly spreading liquid waste into the pipes. If it collapses or is somehow damaged, too much or too little liquid might reach the drain field, resulting in clogging of the pipes. Depending on the age of the system, the box may be constructed of concrete, which is susceptible to deterioration by the gases that circulate inside the septic tank during operation.

Defective Septic Tank Seal

The distribution box is the name given to the location where the drain field pipes link to the tank in the majority of septic system configurations. The distribution box is responsible for uniformly spreading liquid waste into the pipes. If it collapses or is somehow damaged, too much or too little liquid may reach the drain field, resulting in clogging of the pipes. It is possible that the box is composed of concrete, which will degrade with time due to the presence of gases inside the septic tank, depending on the age of the system in question.

Damaged Pipes

An animal burrowing deep enough to reach and destroy septic tank pipes, or a vehicle driving or parking over a septic tank system, can both cause damage to septic tank pipes.

Additional harm to a septic system might result from tree roots growing too close to the system.

Warning Signs Of Septic Tank Replacement

Septic tank businesses such as Jones PlumbingSeptic Tank Service know how to detect when it is time to replace a system, despite the fact that most systems endure for several decades on average. The following are the most prevalent signals that a system needs to be replaced that we encounter.

Puddles Form In The Yard Overnight

Overnight appearances of puddles or marshy spots in the yard are classic indicators that it is time to rebuild the septic system. The most fundamental duty of any system is to transport wastewater via the drain field, where it subsequently percolates into the surrounding soil to be treated. Clogs or cracks in the pipe, as well as a damaged tank, prevent water from passing through and instead cause it to slowly rise to the top of the water.

Household Size Has Increased

The size of the tank is determined by the number of persons that routinely contribute to the septic system. If the size of your household has changed — or if you’re purchasing a property with a tank that is smaller than suggested — your system should be modified to accommodate the increasing needs.

System Needs Frequent Repairs

Just as with any other type of maintenance, there comes a point at which the expense of regular repairs outweighs the cost of replacing the system. Furthermore, a system that requires recurrent maintenance is likely to be a deteriorating system that will require replacement in the near future.

Well Water Is Contaminated

Water quality testing for wells and other potable water sources is included in the majority of septic system examinations. It is likely that if impurities such as bacteria and/or nitrates are discovered and a septic system is close, the attention would move to inspecting the system for leaks and repairing any damage. It is critical to address any pollution as soon as possible in order to minimize or lessen environmental and health consequences.

Inspection Reveals An Incorrect Tank

An examination is the only method to determine whether or not your present septic tank is acceptable for your location. Unless the tank is situated at a sufficient soil depth, gravity will be unable to properly transfer waste in the majority of situations. According to other parameters such as soil structure, our professionals can decide which type of septic tank would be most appropriate for the site and your requirements. A commitment to providing high-quality service is shared by Jones PlumbingSeptic Tank Services.

We can help you restore the functionality of your septic system if it has stopped working.

What is a Septic Distribution Box?

Riverside, California 92504-17333 Van Buren Boulevard Call us right now at (951) 780-5922. The bulk of your septic system is buried beneath the surface of the earth. The fact that it is out of sight means that many homeowners are not concerned with their garbage collection.

However, whether you are planning a septic installation for new construction or feel that there is a problem with the drainage on your property, you should get familiar with the features of your existing system.

What Is a Septic Distribution Box?

The distribution box (or D-box) of a septic tank is a container (usually made of concrete) that absorbs septic tank effluent and re-distributes it into the network of drain fields and pipes that are connected to the tank. To put it another way, its function is to ensure that wastewater is distributed uniformly into the leach field.

How Does it Work?

The distribution box of a septic tank system is responsible for distributing wastewater from the septic system to the dispersion field in an even and consistent manner. When used in conjunction with other pipes, the D-Box links the septic tank as well as absorption devices, such as the drain field leach lines, to the drain field. The distribution box, like the majority of your septic system, is powered by gravity. It is known that liquid waste enters the box through a single pipe and is split equally in order to escape the box through the drain system.

In addition, the box features many holes that are equipped with spinning devices.

This function is essential for a properly functioning and dependable septic system.

This can cause the region to become overburdened, reducing the overall efficiency of the field.

How Do I Find My Septic Tank Distribution Box?

  • The position of the distribution box is mostly determined by the amount of space available and the configuration of the septic system’s drain field. Your distribution box is most likely to be positioned near the border of the drain field, closest to where the septic tank is located if your layout is comprised of a rectangular and level drain site
  • Otherwise, your layout is not likely to be comprised of a rectangular and level drain site. A couple of feet in diameter dip in the earth between the septic tank and drain field can also be found
  • This is another option.

While a D-box does not require frequent pumping in the same way as a septic tank does, it should be examined to ensure that it is in proper operating order. Checking your system periodically helps to verify that it is operating correctly before severe problems arise or warning flags appear. By using a proactive approach, you may make tiny tweaks or fixes as needed, so avoiding significant difficulties, failures, or backups that might otherwise occur. A concrete D-box may normally endure for up to 20 years in most conditions.

The following are some critical points to check on your distribution box:

  1. Outlet Apertures– The majority of well-designed systems will enable the outlet openings to be altered in order to regulate the flow if it is necessary. If a D-box has tilted or tipped, this might result in distribution to just one area of leach fields, which could result in overflow of effluent to the surface, or a backup of effluent into the system or a blockage. Inside– Issues with your system (past or current) might be indicated by the interior of your distribution box, such as flood lines.

COMMON DISTRIBUTION BOX PROBLEMS

Take note if you see flooding in a particular section of your drainfield. It’s possible that your distribution box has been damaged or obstructed, and it will need to be fixed or replaced. This can occur for a variety of causes, including the following:

  • Natural wear and tear
  • Sludge accumulation
  • Improper septic system maintenance
  • Invading tree roots
  • Driving heavy machinery over the box
  • Flooding and other severe weather conditions
  • And other factors

It is also possible for the pipes running to or from the box to get blocked or broken. Additionally, the spinning devices that are attached to the holes may malfunction, resulting in an unequal distribution of liquid.

How Can You Keep Your Distribution Box Functioning?

A correctly installed distribution box is critical to the proper operation of the device. It should be totally flat and no more than a foot below the surface of the earth in any direction. In addition, the system should be installed in accordance with the septic tank’s manufacture standards, whether those specifications call for a fiberglass, plastic, or concrete connection box. Pumping and inspecting your septic system on a regular basis might help your distribution box work effectively. Licensed professionals may inspect the box to make sure wastewater is being distributed appropriately throughout the drainage system.

If you see any symptoms of deterioration, such as crumbling walls, floods, or leaks, you should get a replacement placed as soon as possible. If you address distribution box concerns as soon as possible, you may be able to protect your home and septic system from damage such as floods.

Call West Coast Sanitation Today!

We at West Coast Sanitation understand that you are busy and do not have time to deal with septic issues. One of the most effective methods to maintain this balance and ensure that your septic system continues to function properly is to have your tank pumped on a regular basis. Please contact us as soon as possible at (951) 780-5922. Thank you. If you have any questions, we have specialists standing by to help you resolve them and get your system back up and running.

Types of Septic Systems

Septic system design and size can differ significantly from one neighborhood to the next, as well as throughout the country, due to a variety of variables. Household size, soil type, slope of the site, lot size, closeness to sensitive water bodies, weather conditions, and even municipal ordinances are all considerations to take into consideration. The following are 10 of the most often encountered septic system configurations. It should be noted that this is not an exhaustive list; there are several additional types of septic systems.

  • Septic Tank, Conventional System, Chamber System, Drip Distribution System, Aerobic Treatment Unit, Mound Systems, Recirculating Sand Filter System, Evapotranspiration System, Constructed Wetland System, Cluster / Community System, etc.

Septic Tank

This tank is underground and waterproof, and it was designed and built specifically for receiving and partially treating raw home sanitary wastewater. Generally speaking, heavy materials settle at or near the bottom of the tank, whereas greases and lighter solids float to the surface. The sediments are retained in the tank, while the wastewater is sent to the drainfield for further treatment and dispersion once it has been treated.

Conventional System

Septic tanks and trench or bed subsurface wastewater infiltration systems are two types of decentralized wastewater treatment systems (drainfield). When it comes to single-family homes and small businesses, a traditional septic system is the most common type of system. For decades, people have used a gravel/stone drainfield as a method of water drainage. The term is derived from the process of constructing the drainfield. A short underground trench made of stone or gravel collects wastewater from the septic tank in this configuration, which is commonly used.

Effluent filters through the stone and is further cleaned by microorganisms once it reaches the soil below the gravel/stone trench, which is located below the trench.

Chamber System

Gravelless drainfields have been regularly utilized in various states for more than 30 years and have evolved into a standard technology that has mostly replaced gravel systems. Various configurations are possible, including open-bottom chambers, pipe that has been clothed, and synthetic materials such as expanded polystyrene media. Gravelless systems can be constructed entirely of recycled materials, resulting in considerable reductions in carbon dioxide emissions during their lifetime. The chamber system is a type of gravelless system that can be used as an example.

The key advantage of the chamber system is the enhanced simplicity with which it can be delivered and built.

This sort of system is made up of a number of chambers that are connected to one another.

Wastewater is transported from the septic tank to the chambers through pipes. The wastewater comes into touch with the earth when it is contained within the chambers. The wastewater is treated by microbes that live on or near the soil.

Drip Distribution System

An effluent dispersal system such as the drip distribution system may be employed in a variety of drainfield configurations and is very versatile. In comparison to other distribution systems, the drip distribution system does not require a vast mound of dirt because the drip laterals are only placed into the top 6 to 12 inches of soil. In addition to requiring a big dosage tank after the sewage treatment plant to handle scheduled dose delivery of wastewater to drip absorption areas, the drip distribution system has one major disadvantage: it is more expensive.

Aerobic Treatment Unit

Aerobic Treatment Units (ATUs) are small-scale wastewater treatment facilities that employ many of the same procedures as a municipal sewage plant. An aerobic system adds oxygen to the treatment tank using a pump. When there is an increase in oxygen in the system, there is an increase in natural bacterial activity, which then offers extra treatment for nutrients in the effluent. It is possible that certain aerobic systems may additionally include a pretreatment tank as well as a final treatment tank that will include disinfection in order to further lower pathogen levels.

ATUs should be maintained on a regular basis during their service life.

Mound Systems

Using mound systems in regions with short soil depth, high groundwater levels, or shallow bedrock might be a good alternative. A drainfield trench has been dug through the sand mound that was erected. The effluent from the septic tank runs into a pump chamber, where it is pumped to the mound in the amounts recommended. During its release to the trench, the effluent filters through the sand and is dispersed into the native soil, where it continues to be treated. However, while mound systems can be an effective solution for some soil conditions, they demand a significant amount of land and require regular care.

Recirculating Sand Filter System

Sand filter systems can be built either above or below ground, depending on the use. The effluent is discharged from the septic tank into a pump compartment. Afterwards, it is pushed into the sand filter. The sand filter is often made of PVC or a concrete box that is filled with a sand-like substance. The effluent is pushed through the pipes at the top of the filter under low pressure to the drain. As the effluent exits the pipelines, it is treated as it passes through the sand filtering system.

However, sand filters are more costly than a standard septic system because they provide a higher level of nutrient treatment and are thus better suited for areas with high water tables or that are adjacent to bodies of water.

Evapotranspiration System

Evaporative cooling systems feature drainfields that are one-of-a-kind. It is necessary to line the drainfield at the base of the evapotranspiration system with a waterproof material. Following the entry of the effluent into the drainfield, it evaporates into the atmosphere. At the same time, the sewage never filters into the soil and never enters groundwater, unlike other septic system designs. It is only in particular climatic circumstances that evapotranspiration systems are effective. The environment must be desert, with plenty of heat and sunshine, and no precipitation.

Constructed Wetland System

Construction of a manufactured wetland is intended to simulate the treatment processes that occur in natural wetland areas. Wastewater goes from the septic tank and into the wetland cell, where it is treated. Afterwards, the wastewater goes into the media, where it is cleaned by microorganisms, plants, and other media that eliminate pathogens and nutrients. Typically, a wetland cell is constructed with an impermeable liner, gravel and sand fill, and the necessary wetland plants, all of which must be capable of withstanding the constant saturation of the surrounding environment.

As wastewater travels through the wetland, it may escape the wetland and flow onto a drainfield, where it will undergo more wastewater treatment before being absorbed into the soil by bacteria.

Cluster / Community System

In certain cases, a decentralized wastewater treatment system is owned by a group of people and is responsible for collecting wastewater from two or more residences or buildings and transporting it to a treatment and dispersal system placed on a suitable location near the dwellings or buildings. Cluster systems are widespread in settings like rural subdivisions, where they may be found in large numbers.

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