How Much Is A Septic Tank Permit In The State Of Ohio? (Question)

The state and local department of health will charge up to $75 for a permit to install a new system, and $34 to alter a system. An operation permit will now be required for all homeowners. However, it could take years before the operation permit requirement comes into fruition depending on the local health district.

  • The new regulations now also require permit fees. The state and local department of health will charge up to $75 for a permit to install a new system, and $34 to alter a system. An operation permit will now be required for all homeowners.

Do septic tanks need a permit?

Most small sewage treatment systems and septic tanks will be eligible for an exemption from Permit, but this does depend upon various factors (for example, if your property is close to a nature conservation area the Environment Agency may require that you obtain a permit) details of which can be obtained from the

How much does a new septic system cost in Ohio?

On average, the cost of installing a new septic tank system is $3,900. The price ranges from $1,500 to $5,000 for a typical 1,250-gallon tank, which is an ideal size for a three- or four-bedroom home. This cost is inclusive of the tank itself, which costs $600 to $2,100 or more, depending on the type.

What type of septic systems are allowed in Ohio?

Finally with updated rules, Ohio is catching up to the rest of the country and is able to use more modern onsite wastewater treatment systems. Mound systems, bioreactors and drip irrigation systems are just some of the types of systems used throughout the country that can now be used in Ohio.

What are the new rules on septic tanks?

According to new regulations passed in 2015, if your septic tank discharges to surface water such as a ditch, stream, canal or river, you will have to upgrade your system to a sewage treatment plant or install a soakaway system by 1 January 2020.

Are septic tanks still legal?

Septic Tanks Explained… Septic tanks cannot discharge to surface water drains, rivers, canals, ditches, streams or any other type of waterway. you are required to upgrade or replace your septic tank treatment system to a full sewage treatment plant by 2020, or when you sell a property, if it’s prior to this date.

Can I sell my house with an old septic tank?

If you’re selling a property with a septic tank, then you must be transparent with buyers about the fact the property uses a one and provide a detailed specification of the system. In fact, You are required by law to inform a buyer in writing about the presence of a septic tank. The age of the system.

What is the cheapest septic system?

Conventional septic system These conventional septic systems are usually the most affordable, with an average cost of around $3,000.

What are the 3 types of septic systems?

Types of Septic Systems

  • Septic Tank.
  • Conventional System.
  • Chamber System.
  • Drip Distribution System.
  • Aerobic Treatment Unit.
  • Mound Systems.
  • Recirculating Sand Filter System.
  • Evapotranspiration System.

Can you have a septic tank without a leach field?

The waste from most septic tanks flows to a soakaway system or a drainage field. If your septic tank doesn’t have a drainage field or soakaway system, the waste water will instead flow through a sealed pipe and empty straight into a ditch or a local water course.

Can I install my own septic tank in Ohio?

The state and local department of health will charge up to $75 for a permit to install a new system, and $34 to alter a system. An operation permit will now be required for all homeowners. The ODH said the operation permit is to track maintenance on septic systems.

Are plastic septic tanks legal in Ohio?

Ohio Septic Tanks Save up to 50% on plastic septic tanks. These septic tanks are state approved for use in the state of Ohio.

Do you have to have a septic tank in Ohio?

Ohio’s new sewage rules will NOT require everyone in the state to automatically replace their septic system. The new sewage rules are going into place for several reasons: • They haven’t been updated since 1977. While some counties have modernized their own rules since then, other counties have not.

How far should a septic tank be from a house?

Most importantly, a septic tank must be at least seven metres from a house, defined as a ‘habitable property’. Septic tanks are built underground and release wastewater slowly into the surrounding environment. For this reason, they must be a set distance away from a home.

Does heavy rain affect septic tank?

It is common to have a septic back up after or even during a heavy rain. Significant rainfall can quickly flood the ground around the soil absorption area (drainfield) leaving it saturated, making it impossible for water to flow out of your septic system.

How long do septic tanks last?

A septic system’s lifespan should be anywhere from 15 to 40 years. How long the system lasts depends on a number of factors, including construction material, soil acidity, water table, maintenance practices, and several others.

Operation Permit

The 23rd of October, 2019 – Please be warned that, owing to an increase in the number of requests for Operation Permit Public Records, turn back times may be delayed by up to 10 working days at this time. The SCPH Operation Permit program began in May of 2015 and will run until December of that year. According to amendments to the Ohio Administrative Code, no individual shall operate a Home Sewage Treatment System unless they have a valid Operation Permit in their possession. For the time being, SCPH Operation Permit prices vary from $10 to $30 per annum.

Permission to Operate Frequently Asked Questions are included below.

Operation Permit Maintenance Forms

The service providers or installers who are responsible for executing the mandatory maintenance checks must complete the form.

  • Form for Service Provider Inspection Report (for known STS types)
  • Form for System ID Maintenance Report (for unknown STS types)
  • Form for Service Provider Inspection Report (for known STS types).

Operation Permit System Maintenance Requirements

  • Discharging Aerobic Treatment
  • Discharging Filter Bed
  • Drip Distribution
  • Low Pressure Distribution
  • NPDES System
  • Peat BiofilterOperation Permit Maintenance Requirements
  • Pretreatment to Evaporation Trench or Leaching Component
  • Sand Filter
  • Septic Tank to Leaching Component
  • Spray Irrigation
  • Unknown System
  • Discharging Aerobic Treatment
  • Peat BiofilterOperation

Septic Tanks Get New Rules in Ohio

The state of Ohio did something it hadn’t done in almost 40 years earlier this year: it approved new regulations controlling septic tanks. Prior to 2015, Ohio had the nation’s oldest standards controlling the installation, usage, and maintenance of septic tanks, which were in effect for almost 100 years.

Septic tanks now require proof of regular maintenance

What are the implications of the new rules for you? If you have a septic tank and take proper care of it, you may not have to do anything. To run your septic tank, you’ll need to obtain a permission from the local government. These licenses, which may be obtained from the local health department and are valid for periods ranging from one year to 10 years, are available. The duration of the permission varies from county to county. There may also be variations in the cost of the permission. What’s important is to demonstrate that your septic system is part of a “routine maintenance plan.” In certain counties, submitting a receipt from a certified septic tank maintenance provider that demonstrates that your tank has been drained lately may be sufficient proof of compliance.

  1. In addition, the State of Ohio will levy a supplemental cost of about $75 when new septic tanks are installed, and a fee of approximately $35 when existing septic tanks are modified beginning in 2016.
  2. Contrary to common perception, you are not need to replace your septic tank under the new laws.
  3. If homeowners are able to fix these issues without having to replace their septic tanks, they should consider keeping their old system.
  4. Alternatively, if you need to replace your old septic system, you may still choose for the classic septic system option.
  5. In addition, contrary to common opinion, you are still permitted to keep a leach field under the current regulations.
  6. Maintaining your septic system on a regular basis will help you get the most out of your investment.
  7. With the aid of Clear Drain Cleaning, you can keep your septic system in good working order.

If you are experiencing backflow issues with your septic tank, we can determine if the problem is with the line or the septic system. Call us at (330) 343-7146 if you have any questions!

Licensing & Permits for Sewage Treatment/Septic Systems

Hamilton County Public Health is responsible for the approval of plans, the issuance of permits, and the performance of inspections for all residential sewage treatment systems and small flow onsite sewage treatment systems that are situated within the jurisdiction of the county (all of Hamilton County excluding cities of Cincinnati, Norwood, and Springdale). The Environmental Health Specialists at the Health District are available to assist you whether you have an existing system, need to replace a failing system, want to expand on to your property, or are building a new house or business that will not be linked to a sanitary sewer system.

If you are purchasing a home and want to ensure that the septic system is in perfect functioning order, please see this page for information on Real Estate Transfers.

Select the option that best describes your situation:

To find out the current status of your application or permit, click here. The installation of an on-site wastewater treatment system is required when building a house or company that will not be linked to the sanitary/public sewer system (septic system). Environmental Health Specialists from the Health District examine all new subdivision plans as well as individual plots that are unable to connect to sanitary sewage systems. Specialists in environmental health examine the soil and topography of the plot and provide advice on the sort of system that should be placed on the property.

In the last several decades, sewage treatment system technology has advanced significantly, and Hamilton County Public Health maintains a globally renowned inspection program for sewage treatment systems.

The following information should be of use to you as you proceed through the process of planning and implementing a new sewage treatment system.

Requirements for design of a septic system

Hire a residential sewage treatment system designer who is knowledgeable with the regulations of the State of Ohio as well as any extra requirements imposed by this office, says Hamilton County Public Health (HCPH). This office has compiled a list of designers of domestic sewage treatment systems who have come to their attention.

  • Clearcreek Environmental can be reached at 800-299-4257
  • StreamKey, Inc. can be reached at 513-792-9225
  • Evans Engineering can be reached at 513-321-2168
  • Area Wide SepticService can be reached at 937-453-2656
  • SCS Engineers can be reached at 513-421-5353

My current septic system must be replaced.

In Hamilton County, there are two alternatives for the treatment of domestic wastewater: sewers or household sewage treatment systems (septic systems). Septic systems clean wastewater from your house (dishwasher, showers, toilets, washing machine, sinks, and so on) via soil absorption, aeration, and septic tanks, among other methods of treatment. Hamilton County Public Health inspects septic systems in the county to ensure that they are in proper functioning order and that they are not causing a public health hazard to the public.

It is the responsibility of the Metropolitan Sewage District (MSD) to manage and operate the county’s sanitary sewer system, which handles all wastewater generated within Hamilton County.

Property Owner Requirements

Homes within a specific distance of a sanitary sewage system are required to connect to the system, regardless of whether or not the residence has a fully operating septic system, according to Ohio law and Hamilton County Policies and Standards (PCS). A letter from the Health District outlining the procedures you need to take and the time frame in which you must complete them will be delivered to your home if you are needed to connect to a sanitary sewer system. In the majority of circumstances, these stages are as follows:

  • Obtain a sewage tap permit from the Metropolitan Sewerage District. MSD may be reached at (513) 244-1330. In order to decommission your present domestic sewage treatment system, you must get an abandonment permit. Call the Plumbing Division of the Health District at (513) 946-7854 for further information. Have the sewer system in your house or building immediately linked to the sanitary sewer system that is accessible on your land

Property Owner Costs

The Hamilton County Commissioners pay the building of municipal sewers by levying a “assessment” on the properties that will be served by the sewers. The amount of a construction assessment is determined by the actual building expenses of the sewage system. The following building expenditures will be incurred by the property owner:

  • Local sewer construction assessment
  • Charges for connecting to the sewage system by a plumber
  • Charges for filling and sealing an onsite septic system There is a tap-in cost as well as numerous permission expenses.
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Financial Assistance

Homeowners in Hamilton County who are compelled to connect to a sanitary sewer system may be eligible for a financial assistance program. Please see the Financial Aid Fact Sheet to see whether you are eligible for financial assistance.

  • Assessment Assistance– The Hamilton County Board of County Commissioners has made it a policy to encourage the use of public sewers and to assist in the funding of sewage upgrades in the county. Special assessments will be imposed on properties that will reap the benefits of public sewage rehabilitation projects. The Metropolitan Sewer District is responsible for funding the real expenses of the local public sewer project, which total more than $12,000 per benefiting property. Additionally, property owners have the option of paying the assessment (plus finance costs) over a 20-year period if they so want. For further information, please see the website. Awards for Water and Sewer Connection Fees– The Hamilton County Planning and Development Water and Sewer Grant Program gives one-time grants of up to $6,500 to property owners who meet certain income requirements. Residents of Hamilton County, who live outside the city limits of Cincinnati, are the only ones who are qualified. It is only when connecting to public sewers that the loan or grant is applied toward the assessment fees, and not toward the sewer tapping charges. Prior to beginning construction, the homeowner must be authorized for the grant. For further information, please contact us at 513-946-8230.

I am repairing or altering my current sewage treatment system

If your system requires repairs or modifications in order to function correctly again, you may be required to get a permit before you can begin work. To find out more, call the Water Quality team at (513) 946-7863 for additional information about your options. The following are examples of situations in which you will require a septic system modification permit. There may be other scenarios that arise.

  • Replacing a section of pipe in your system that is 20 feet or longer
  • Any tank in your system that has to be replaced
  • Relocating a component of your system’s infrastructure
  • Changing the location of a discharge line

Additional Resources

  • A Homeowner’s Guide to Septic Systems
  • Septic System Additions
  • Application to Construct or Replace a Household Sewage Treatment System
  • And Septic System Maintenance. The application for a sewage treatment system (also known as a gray water recycling system) and a permit to install or modify the system
  • A request for an STS or GWRS review of a proposed property improvement or modification
  • A Fact Sheet is a document that contains information on a topic. How Property Owners Can Document Sewage Treatment System Operation, Monitoring, and Maintenance in the Absence of a Health Department Inspection
  • Find an STS Service Provider or a Hauler in your area. Septic System Replacement and Sewer Connections are eligible for financial assistance. Hamilton County Policies and Standards pertaining to OAC 3701-29
  • The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency’s Semi-Public Sewage Treatment System Inspection Program
  • And more. The STS and GWRS have established Operation and Maintenance Program Standards. Inquire about an inspection
  • Resources for Septic Smart Homeowners from the Environmental Protection Agency
  • Plan for the management of the sewer treatment system (STS)
  • Change Request from OAC 3701-29
  • Water Quality PWS Fee Schedule
  • Water Quality STS Fee Schedule
  • Variance Request from OAC 3701-29

New Ohio septic rules require regular maintenance

  • Throughout Ohio, raw sewage is escaping treatment and posing a threat to ground water, rivers, and lakes, in part due to the lack of strict enforcement of a patchwork of regulations. State and local health authorities expect that recently passed laws will contribute to reducing the anticipated failure rate of more than 30% of the 628,000 household sewage treatment systems in Ohio, according to state and local health officials. Those guidelines, which became effective this year, will ultimately require all septic system owners to demonstrate that their systems are in adequate functioning order and are receiving regular maintenance. Despite the fact that it has always been the legal for household sewage systems to function correctly, there have been instances where there have been no checks to verify compliance. The director of environmental health for Marion County, Tyler Pigman, explained that in the past, the county issued an installation permit (for a septic system), the homeowner built it, and the county never saw them again. People will be expected to maintain their sewage treatment systems, but health officials have emphasised that they will not be compelled to replace their existing systems unless their current systems cannot be fixed. Local health officials in Marion County, among other places, were unaware that a system was malfunctioning until they got a complaint about it. In addition to contributing to algal blooms from runoff, Pigman stated that malfunctioning systems might also lead to pollution of drinking water wells in the vicinity if they were to collapse. Changing the laws governing septic systems, when thousands of dollars might be at stake, is a challenging political proposition. As a result, Ohio’s previous regulations were in effect since 1977, making them the country’s oldest. The state actually passed new restrictions in 2007, only to have them revoked by the legislature a short time later because they were seen to be excessively burdensome. The Ohio Department of Health’s Assistant Chief for Environmental Health Rebecca Fugitt noted that some counties passed stronger standards, while others did not, resulting in a confusing mix of laws for developers and house purchasers throughout the state. Following the rejection of the 2007 rules, the legislature established a panel to investigate potential revisions. The fact that individuals were not adequately caring for their septic systems was one of the most serious problems, according to Fugitt. “That was the primary factor contributing to our failure rate,” she explained. Although permits were always necessary for system upgrades or installations, there were no regular operating permits to verify that those systems were kept up and running. When it comes to septic systems in older homes constructed before 1970, health authorities in Licking County, for example, aren’t even aware where they’re all situated because there was no recording of their installation, according to Health Commissioner Joe Ebel. Residents will be required to demonstrate that their system is a part of an operation and maintenance program under the new state law. Ebel explained that this may include anything from paying a professional to evaluate and fix the system on a regular basis to a homeowner receiving training to perform the examination themselves. County health authorities will also conduct inspections of systems, but due to staffing restrictions, they will not be able to check all of the residences. Homeowners will face new expenses, which may vary based on where they live. For example, in Licking County, operational permits cost $15, but in Marion County, they cost $20. Permits for mechanical systems are valid for one year, whereas permits for gravity-fed systems are valid for two years. This is based on the assumption that mechanical systems require more maintenance. County maintenance programs will automatically enroll new systems and large improvements, but it is up to counties to select how to access old systems and systems that have been upgraded. Ebel estimates that it will take decades to connect all 30,000 systems in Licking County, while Pigman estimates that it will take 20 years to connect all 9,000 systems in Marion County. As Ebel explained, “it makes logical to attempt to check that all of the systems are operational.” This is a massive endeavor, to put it mildly. Licking County has prioritized the places it intends to target based on the locations of septic problems that have occurred in the county in the past. Pataskala Township, Granville Township, and Licking Township are among the subdivisions included in this grouping. Ebel estimates that it will take many years to complete all of the high-priority locations, which will be completed in phases. Fugitt acknowledged that some individuals would be apprehensive about paying a new cost, but she pointed out that people who use septic systems do not have to pay monthly sewer rates. In addition, she stated that rural residents should make preparations for the day when their septic system fails, just as they would make preparations for the day when they purchase a new roof or furnace. In addition, the new guidelines allow health authorities the authority to order repairs or system replacements if they are deemed essential. Health authorities urged residents to consult with their local health agency, which may be able to provide financing alternatives if a fully new system is required in the future. In addition, Ebel stated that the inspections might result in some households being required to connect to local sewer systems if they do not comply. In addition, Fugitt believes that eradicating failing septic systems is a goal that everyone should work toward. “You’re going to be annoyed when the sewage from your neighbor’s property comes into your yard,” she said. The septic system is in charge. Q AQ. Q AQ. Q AQ. Q AQ. Will the new requirements necessitate the installation of a new septic system? The current state of your system is OK as long as there is no sewage on top of the ground, no missing components or pieces, and no backup in your home. In fact, even if your system is malfunctioning, it may only require modest adjustments to bring it back into conformity with the law. Q.Can you tell me how much this will cost me? A.The state will charge up to $75 for the installation of a new system and $34 for the modification of an existing system. In order to guarantee that systems are operating effectively, local health agencies would most likely levy a regular operational permit fee. Your county determines the amount of this charge, which might range from $15 in Licking County to $20 in Marion County, for example. Q. Will leech fields continue to be permitted? In accordance with the current guidelines, septic tank/leach field systems are still permitted, and they are the preferred method in areas where soil conditions are favorable. In accordance with the current state regulations, soil testing is required to guarantee that the suitable system is implemented as part of new construction. Q.Can the state compel me to make repairs to my septic system? A. Yes, despite the fact that having a failing septic system has long been prohibited. People who have failing systems, according to health experts, should contact their local health departments to discuss funding possibilities or to devise a strategy for repairing the system over time. Is it permissible for health officials to come onto my premises and investigate my system without my consent? A.Yes, although this is unlikely if you can demonstrate to them that the system is being maintained on a regular basis. County officials may still conduct infrequent inspections to ensure that maintenance performed by contractors or homeowners is effective. According to the Ohio Department of Health and Gannett Ohio’s investigation Plan for sewer inspection Since these neighborhoods have a history of high septic system failure rates, the Licking County Health Department has designated them as its top priorities for septic system inspections. Dogwood Lakes is a neighborhood in Bowling Green Township. Knoll Drive is located in Granville Township. Sunset Drive is located in Granville Township. Cole Estates is located in Jersey Township. Kirby Drive is located in Licking Township. Sandy Drive is located in Licking Township. Pataskala is located on Christy Lee Drive. Pataskala is located on Helen Drive. Woodside Drive is located in Pataskala. Derringer Court is located in the St. Albans Township. Sycamore Road in Union Township is where the Licking County Health Department may be found.

Household Sewage Systems

Geauga Public Health’s Environmental Health Division is responsible for regulating all home sewage treatment systems (HSTS) in accordance with Chapter 3701-29 of the Ohio Administrative Code and any other resolutions made by the department. This covers all single-family, two-family, and three-family residential residences supplied by an individual home sewage treatment system. Approximately 70% of the estimated 32,350 dwelling units in Geauga County rely on domestic sewage systems to dispose of waste water, according to county estimates.

  • 3701-29 Supplements to Section 6
  • 3701-29-24 Inclement Weather Occupancy Permit
  • 3701-29-25 For Sale of Property Evaluation
  • 3701-29-29 Supplements to Section 6
  • 3701-29- 3701-29-26 Land Application of Septage Rules
  • 3701-29-27 Rules for Land Application of Septage
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Part 3701-29, Section 6 Supplements; Part 3701-29-24, Inclement Weather Occupancy Permit; Part 3701-29-25, Property Evaluation for the Purposes of Sale; Part 3701-29, Section 6; Part 3701-29, Section 6 Supplements; Part 3701-29, Section 6 Supplements; Part 3701-29, Section 6 Supplements; Part 3701-29, Section 6 Supplements; Part 3701-29-24, Inclement Weather Occupancy Land Application of Septage; 3701-29-26 Land Application of Septage Rules; 3701-29-27 Land Application of Septage

Septic – Mahoning County Public Health

  • Septic Tank Abandonment, Records Request, and Complaints are all topics covered in the Buying or Selling a Home section. New Home Septic Sites and the New Home Septic Permit Process are covered in the Alteration or Replacement section. Resources, Licensing/Registration, Commercial Septic System,

Septic Tanks for Residential Use Septic systems are used by about one-fifth of all American households to handle their wastewater, and failing to manage a septic system can result in backups, malfunctions, and early failures, which can result in expensive repairs and replacements later on. Regulation of sewage treatment systems in Ohio is carried out by the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) under legislative authority created under Ohio Revised Code (ORC) Chapter 3718 and Ohio Administrative Code Chapter 3701-29, both of which were modified and began effective on January 1, 2015.

One-, two-, and three-family houses, as well as small-flow on-site sewage treatment systems, are examples of sewage treatment systems (facilities that treat up to 1,000 gallons per day).

It is critical to have proper system siting and design as well as soil evaluation, system owner education as well as operation inspections and maintenance of systems in order to assist prevent future pollution and public health hazards.

Click Here to Viewthe New MCPH OperationMaintenance Program Presentation(PDF)

If you would want an evaluation done in line with Ohio Administrative Code 3701-29 and The Mahoning County General Health Districts Supplemental Sewage Treatment Rules, the following information must be given to the health department. Activities carried out before to submitting an application: Make sure your soil has been thoroughly evaluated by an appropriately qualified professional before you submit your application.

  • A list can be accessed on the internet at the following address: The use of a registered installer or a designer to collaborate with a soil assessor for the HSTS installation is highly recommended
  • Nevertheless

2. Delineate the borders of the land and the locations of all proposed buildings and homes. The following documents must be included with the site review application: (This must be obtained in person at the office.) 1. A completed site review application (which must be received in person at the office), as well as the required site review charge (fee schedule below). 2. A copy of the soil evaluation report completed by the certified soil evaluator. 3. Site plan, which includes (but is not limited to) the following:

  • The primary and secondary septic fields, assuming they have already been constructed by the installer or designer
  • The north direction arrow
  • For all structures, roadways, hardscapes, wells, ponds, streams, rivers, and flood plain, the distance between them and the next structure should be calculated. Each and every lot measurement, whether existent or prospective

After reviewing the application, a site inspection will be conducted by the health department to determine compliance with Ohio Administrative Code 3701-29 and the Mahoning County General Health Districts Supplemental Sewage Treatment Rules. It is valid for five years from the date of “approval” to get a site approved. It is not necessary to pay a re-inspection fee if the wastewater treatment system permit is received within the first year of operation. It will be necessary to conduct an extra site inspection and charge a fee if the installation permit is acquired in years 2-5 to confirm that the site has not been changed or disturbed.

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New Septic Installation Permit Process:

In order to get a permit for the installation of a residential sewage treatment system, the applicant must present the following things once the site review has been completed and authorized by the city: Before a septic installation and downspout permission can be acquired, the following elements must be filed, completed, and authorized by the local government:

  • Floor plan of planned residence to verify that the number of bedrooms or prospective bedrooms is accurately represented on the plan
  • If the website of the Auditors is unable to verify ownership, proof of ownership must be provided. document with the owner’s signature on it (see affidavit form below)
  • “Acknowledgement of Regulations” form with the owner’s signature Permit for zoning variance (where applicable)
  • A street address assigned by zoning or a 911 dispatch center
  • The drawing/layout plan of the installation, scaled to scale, with the installer’s signature and registration number
  • On the building site, a secure field fence is necessary. If appropriate, a National Pollution Discharge Elimination Permit (NPDES) issued by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA).

The Sanitarian from the health department will analyze the site information and perform a site visit (if necessary) to confirm state and local regulatory compliance prior to issuing or denying the installation permission or alteration permit, depending on the outcome of the review. Once the installation permission has been received, the HSTS can be installed by the licensed installer as soon as the ground conditions are deemed appropriate. An installation permit is valid for one year from the date of issuance and can be transferred if the property is sold within that time period.

In the event that a permit is not obtained while an installation is underway, a 25 percent penalty of the permit cost will be assessed.

A new installation or alteration permit (depending on the system) will be subject to enrollment in the Mahoning County Public Health’s Operation and Maintenance Program before being issued. Back to the top of the page

Existing Septic Alteration or Replacement Site Review and Permit Application Process:

When updating or replacing an existing HSTS, the following information must be reported to the health department in compliance with OAC 3701-29-09: 1. A completed site review application (which must be received in person at the office), as well as the required site review charge (see attached fee schedule A below). 2. Soils that have been evaluated and classified by a soil scientist or soil classifier accredited by the Soil Science Society of America (SSSA). (If judged essential by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency or the Sanitarian District) It is valid for five years from the date of “approval” to get a site approved.

It will be necessary to conduct an extra site inspection and charge a fee if the installation permit is acquired in years 2-5 to confirm that the site has not been changed or disturbed.

Before an installation permission may be given, the following things must be submitted and authorized by the appropriate authorities:

  • Scaled installer’s drawing/layout plan with signature and registration number of installer
  • “Acknowledgement of Regulations” form with owner’s signature (affidavit form below)
  • If appropriate, a National Pollution Discharge Elimination Permit (NPDES) issued by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA). If applicable, or at the discretion of the Sanitarian, erect a field fence around the work site.

Once the installation permission has been received, the HSTS can be installed by the licensed installer as soon as the ground conditions are deemed appropriate. An installation permit is valid for one year from the date of issuance and can be transferred if the property is sold within that time period. The health department may extend the permit duration for permits issued in accordance with this regulation by an additional six months if the department determines that it is necessary. In the event that a permit is not obtained while an installation is underway, a 25 percent penalty of the permit cost will be assessed.

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Additional Structures on Lot With Septic:

Inspection of a site by the health department, as well as of the sewage system An inspection by a sanitary engineer is necessary before any addition that:

  • Increases the quantity of available sleeping spaces. It alters the footprint of the current home or dwellings
  • Include other structures such as a garage, shed, outbuilding, in-ground or above-ground swimming pool, among other things. Those structures that are subject to a construction permit Structures that are free from agricultural taxation

Before a permit or license may be issued, the following items must be submitted and authorized by the appropriate authorities: 1. A completed site review application (which must be received in person at the office), as well as the required site review charge (fee schedule below). 2. A site plan that includes the following elements (see site plan form below):

  • Before a permit or permission may be issued, the following items must first be submitted and approved: The site review application (which must be received in person) and the site review fee (which must be paid in advance) (fee schedule below). Site planning should include the following elements (see sample site plan below): 2.

Before a permit or permission may be issued, the following items must be submitted and approved: 1.

A completed site review application (which must be received in person at the office), as well as the appropriate site review charge (fee schedule below). 2. A site plan that includes the following information (see site plan form below):

Existing Septic Structure Replacement and Platting:

Inspection of a site by the health department, as well as of the sewage system Before a structure may be replaced with another one, it must first be deemed sanitary and safe. Before a permit or license may be issued, the following items must be submitted and authorized by the appropriate authorities: 1. A completed site review application (which must be received in person at the office), as well as the required site review charge (fee schedule below). 2. A site plan that includes the following elements (see As-Built form below):

  • All current or projected lot measurements
  • A north direction arrow
  • For all structures, roadways, hardscapes, wells, ponds, streams, rivers, and flood plain, the distance between them and the next structure should be calculated. Both the primary and secondary septic fields are included. Layout of the planned new structure’s floor plan
  • Place a stake in the ground to mark the site of the proposed new construction. If appropriate, a zoning permission must be obtained. Permits for downspouts and plumbing, if any are required. All extra regulations established by the Board of Health

The Sanitarian from the health department then evaluates the information supplied above and conducts a site inspection to check that all requirements have been met. *** The proposed additional lots will proceed (with deeds registered) with permitting in accordance with the New HSTS-Site Review Application Process, which is mentioned above. It is not necessary to submit a site review application or pay a fee to the health department in order for the plan or re-plat to be signed by the health department for vacant lots labeled on the plat map as: “Not considered a buildable lot until it conforms to the requirements of OAC 3701-29 and the Health Department Regulations or is accessible to sewer.” Back to the top of the page

Buying or Selling a Home:

Prior to the sale of a home, the Mahoning County Public Health Department mandates that all septic systems and wells be examined.

  • Real Estate Sale Evaluation Form
  • Real Estate Waiver Form
  • Real Estate Sale Evaluation Form

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Financial Resources for Septic Systems:

Water Pollution Control Loan Fund (WPCLF): The WPCLF is a loan fund for water pollution control projects. water pollution control loan fund (WPCLF): The Water Pollution Control Loan Fund (WPCLF) is a loan fund for water pollution control projects.

  • There is a problem with the Household Sewage Treatment System at the moment. Please complete the application to calculate the size of the family and the total combined income of the household members. Please keep in mind that this application has to be notarized. Verification of all sources of income, as specified in the application, must be submitted. Provide a copy of the deed to prove that you are the owner

There is a problem with the Household Sewage Treatment System right now. Please complete the application to calculate the size of the family and the total combined income of the household. Thank you for your assistance. Please keep in mind that this application will need to be notarized. Fill out the application and attach documentation proving all of your income sources. In order to establish ownership, a copy of the deed must be provided. Back to the top of the page

Abandoning a Septic:

It is necessary to get a septic tank abandonment form from our office. The fee is $80. (cash, check, money order) If you are connecting to a sanitary sewer, you will also need to get a clear water plumbing permit from the city office. There is a $60 charge (cash, check, money order). Back to the top of the page

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Records Request:

You must come into our office and fill out a septic tank abandonment form. It costs $80 to participate in the program (cash, check, money order) An additional permit for clear water plumbing must be obtained in office if you are connecting to a sanitary sewage system. There is a $60 charge for participating (cash, check, money order). Getting Back to the Beginning of the Page

Complaints:

To make a complaint, please visit this page. Back to the top of the page

LicensingRegistration:

3701-29-03 Installers, service providers, and septage haulers must be registered with the state. The Administrative Code states that, “Except as provided in paragraph (M) of this rule, only persons registered by the health department as an installer, septage hauler, or service provider are authorized to perform the duties defined in paragraphs (FFF), (JJJJ), or (OOOO) of rule3701-29-01, respectively.” (FFF)”Installer” refers to any individual who is engaged in the business of installing or changing sewage treatment systems or gray water recycling systems, or who, as an employee of another, installs or adjusts sewage treatment systems or gray water recycling systems.

(JJJJ) As used in this definition, a “septage hauler” is defined as someone who is involved in the collection, transportation, disposal, and/or land application of domestic septage.

(OOOO) “Service provider” refers to any individual who performs maintenance, monitoring, evaluation, or sampling on sewage treatment systems or gray water recycling systems, but does not install or change the systems.

The following are the requirements and applications: Installers

  • 3701-29-03 Installers, service providers, and septage haulers must all be registered with the city of Chicago. The Administrative Code states that, “Except as provided in paragraph (M) of this rule, only persons registered by the health department as an installer, septage hauler, or service provider are authorized to perform the duties defined in paragraphs (FFF), (JJJJ), and (OOOO) of rule3701-29-01, respectively.” The term “installer” refers to any individual who is engaged in the business of installing or changing sewage treatment systems or gray water recycling systems, or who is employed by another to install or alter sewage treatment systems and gray water recycling systems. (JJJJ) Those involved in the collection, transportation, disposal, and/or land application of domestic septage are referred to as “septage haulers.” A septage hauler may also inspect and report on the condition of any tanks that they are responsible for pumping out of service. (OOOO) In this definition, “service provider” refers to any individual who performs services such as maintenance, monitoring, evaluation, and sampling on sewage treatment systems or gray water recycling systems, but does not install or modify the systems. a homeowner who performs maintenance on his or her own system to fulfill the requirements of a service contract for product approval or the demonstration of maintenance for an O M program established pursuant to rule3701-29-19of the Administrative Code is considered a service provider for purposes of this chapter. A brief description of the requirements and applications is provided below: Installers
  • A cover letter for septage hauler registration
  • A septage hauler application
  • And a septage hauler cover letter.

Service Providers are those who provide services.

  • Cover Letter for Service Provider Registration
  • Service Provider Application
  • Service Provider Cover Letter

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Commercial Septic:

  • Real Estate Sale Evaluation Request for Commercial Property
  • Commercial Wastewater Site Evaluation Inspection Form (EPA Form)
  • Real Estate Sale Evaluation Request for Residential Property

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Resources:

Forms for the MCPHInformation:

  • The fee schedule for septic wells
  • A site plan
  • A list of registered household sewage treatment system installers
  • A list of registered household sewage treatment system service providers
  • And a list of registered household sewage treatment system installers Liste des Septage Haulers (Pumpers) who have been registered

Wastewater Registrants can find information about training and continuing education credits here. Rules for the Sewage Treatment System Back to the top of the page

Septic Systems in Ohio

In Ohio, homeowners who live in locations without centralized water treatment must purchase and install a system that will contain and treat wastewater before they may use their water. This procedure safeguards the groundwater supply from pollution and contributes to the preservation of public health and safety.

Regulations

Local Health Districts in Ohio, in collaboration with the state Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), are responsible for regulating the licensing and usage of septic systems in their respective jurisdictions. The Ohio EPA can issue two types of licenses: residential use permits and National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits, which are provided for industrial and municipal sewage disposal systems. Additionally, the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency mandates that homeowners use a qualified expert when designing and installing an aseptic system.

Specifications for Residential Tanks

Local Health Districts in Ohio, in collaboration with the state Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), are responsible for regulating the licensing and usage of septic systems in their jurisdictions. Residential licenses are issued by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, while National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permits are issued by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency for industrial and municipal sewage treatment plants. To make matters even more complicated, the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency requires that homeowners hire a qualified specialist to design and install an aseptic system.

  • Bedrooms one to two: 1000 gallons
  • Three to five bedrooms: 1500 gallons
  • Six or more bedrooms: 2500 gallons
  • One to two baths: 1000 gallons

Installation and Care of a Septic System

It is recommended by the state of Ohio that landowners refrain from constructing new structures or parking automobiles in areas above underground sewer lines and septic fields. This is done in order to minimize damage to the septic system, which would force the need for costly repairs. Homeowners should also divert any surface water away from their septic system in order to avoid overloading the drainage capacity of the soil that supports the septic system.

Local Health District and EPA Resources

In order to obtain information on septic system installation and maintenance in your area, please contact the offices listed below. (614) 644-2001 (Div. of Surface Water) (614) 644-3020 (Central Office Southwest)122 South Front StreetColumbus, Ohio 43215 (614) 644-2001 (Div. of Surface Water) (General Information)

Sewage Programs – Perry County Health Department

HOME SEWAGE TREATMENT SYSTEMSWhere public or central sewage works are not available, such as in rural regions with a high concentration of population, individual sewage treatment systems must be erected with the consent of the health authority.

Waste water systems established with the consent of the health department must adhere to severe state laws, and the health department must guarantee that no nuisances are permitted to jeopardize the health and well-being of the residents of Perry County and the surrounding areas.

Septic Permit Lookup Mapping 2014-2021 Septic Permits available for review.

SiteEvaluation a contract with a soil contractor to create a soil report is entered into (See List of Soil Contractors Below) Take a copy of the soil report to the Perry County Health Department so that they may examine it. The Engineers Office can be reached at (740) 342-2191 for assistance in obtaining an assigned county engineer’s address for your property. 4. Complete and submit a Site Evaluation Application ($125.00) with your payment. *** As a result of the soil scientist’s evaluation, the Perry County Health Department will analyze all of the information and determine what sort of system you need to install at this point in the process.

  1. Permit for Septic System 1.
  2. Complete yourSeptic Permit Application ($324.003) in its entirety.
  3. *** When you reach this stage, you will be issued with a SEPTIC PERMIT as well as an OPERATION PERMIT.
  4. Following the completion of the installation and approval, an as-built drawing packet (See Form Below) in accordance with Ohio Administrative Code 3701-29-10 must be provided.
  5. Following the completion of the system, an examination will be carried out every 12 months.

Soil Contractors

Name Address Phone Email
Terry Priest PO Box 53Corning, OH 43730 740-767-3982 [email protected]
Larry Tornes 811 State Route 61Sunbury, OH 43074 740-965-3254
SoilEnv Consulting, INCSteven Miller PO BOX 172Kilbourne, OH 43032 614-579-1164 [email protected]
ROXOLKyle Baldwin 976 McIntire Ave.Zanesville, OH 43701 740-704-1879 [email protected]

Septic Installers List

If you are searching for a licensed septic installation, please select one from the following list:.

Name Address Phone Number Email
A J Services/Zane Undergound 1115 Putnam AvenueZanesville, OH 43701 740-819-4405 [email protected]
A. Browning ConstructionExcavating LLC 785. S Hopewell Road Hopewell, OH 43746 740-319-3307
Ashbaugh TruckingExcavating 2780 Bethel RoadBremen, OH 43107 740-569-4896
BB Plumbing Inc. 2531 Hopewell Indian Road Bremen, OH 43107 740-404-0440
B.N.M Services Inc. 5644 Mainesville RoadGlenford, OH 43739 740-808-1869
Beagle Hill Services LLC 11333 Hamby Hill RoadFrazeysburg, OH 43822 740-828-9852 [email protected]
Big John LLC 10210 Wesley Chapel Road Mount Perry, OH 43760 740-819-6052
Bob Heavener ExcavatingRobert Heavener PO Box 908New Lexington, OH 43764 740-342-5080
Champion Services 3165 Ellerman Road Zanesville, OH 43701 740-452-7647 [email protected]
ClaggettSons Inc. 3396 Sharon Valley RoadNewark, OH 43055 740-366-5241 [email protected]
Earl Riggs Excavating 10104 Coakley RoadLogan, OH 43138 740-385-4720
Fairview Construction 14219 Pleasant Valley Road Logan, OH 43138 740-385-4445
Flowers ExcavatingJesse Flowers PO Box 191Glenford, OH 43739 740-405-1196 [email protected]
Huffman Excavating 414 North AvenueNew Lexington, OH 43764 740-342-3310
Jack Miller Contracting PO Box 303Junction City, OH 43748 614-313-1926
Jacks Septic Tank Manuel Diaz 247 South 6th StreetNewark, OH 43055 740-366-3255 [email protected]
James Heavener Excavating 2398 Jamestown Road Crooksville, OH 43731 740-342-4835 [email protected]
JR’s Construction and Excavating 27541 West Belpre Pike Coolville, OH 45733 740-667-6162
KN Excavation LLC 1966 Millerburg RoadUtica, OH 43080 740-668-3870
LM Excavating 3400 North Finley RoadMalta, OH 43758 740-962-6312
M.E. GoodSonsMark Good 14897 State Route 595Logan, OH 43138 740-380-2667
Matheny Excavation 6945 Hunter RoadAmanda, OH 43102 740-974-3305 [email protected]
McKosing Construction 2990 Township Road Junction City, OH 43748 740-607-7394
Mock Excavating 4061 Foxfire DriveZanesville, OH 43701 740-849-2561
Ricketts Excavating PO Box 912Lancaster, OH 43130 740-687-0338
Sams Excavating Unlimited, Inc. 4324 St. Paul RoadAshville, OH 43103 740-983-6589
Snider Equipment Rental 6726 Buckeye Valley RoadSomerset, OH 740-605-0905
Spohn ExcavatingTom Spohn 4285 State Route 668Junction City, OH 43748 740-605-6264
Steve Ferguson PO Box 115Crooksville, OH 43731 740-342-9976
Storts ExcavatingJim Storts 6150 Bohemian RoadCorning, OH 43730 740-394-2619
Swartz Excavating 7575 Buckeye Valley RoadSomerset, OH 43783 740-404-0457
Ultimate Enterprises 4961 Township Road 22Glenford, OH 43739 740-659-2515
Wilkins Excavating LLC 3368 Lowe LaneMcConnelsville, OH 43756 740-868-6553
Zemba Bros. 3401 East PikeZanesville, OH 43701 740-452-1880

Information for Contractors

Information on how to register with the Ohio Department of Health Service Provider Registration Application Master Leaching Design As Built Packet Septic Installers Registration Application Septage Hauler Registration Application Service Provider Registration Application

Site Evaluation Form

Informatics about registering with the Ohio Department of Health Service Provider Registration Application Master Leaching Design As Built Packet Septic Installers Registration Application Septage Hauler Registration Application Septage Hauler Registration Application Service Provider Registration Application

Septic Permit Form

If you would like to apply for a Septic Permit, please download and complete the following form. Application for a Septic Permit

Septage Haulers List

Business Address Phone
Ace SepticEric Winters 3750 Chandlersville RoadZanesville, OH 43701 740-454-7867
Affordable Septic Service 918 State Route 93 N.Logan, OH 43138 740-385-9082
Affordable Waste Services PO Box 39 Pataskala, Oh 43062 740-366-7624
Agree Septic ServicesJoe Walton 8060 Oak Hill RoadBreman, OH 43107 740-569-7018
B B Plumbing 2531 Hopewell Indian Road Glenford, OH 43739 740-404-0440
BSS Waste Disposal PO Box 879 Logan, OH 43138 740-756-9100
Green Up SanitationGreg Altier 6775 Congo RoadCorning, OH 43730 740-347-4484
Jacks Septic Tank Cleaning 274 South 6th StreetNewark, OH 43055 740-366-3255
K.G. Helber 16550 Burcham RoadLogan, OH 43138 740-603-5966
Porta Kleen 1030 Millpark AveLancaster, OH 43130 740-689-1886
The Waterworks 550 Schrock RoadColumbus, OH 43229 614-496-4343
Zemba Inc. 3401 East PikeZanesville, OH 43701 740-452-1880
Sickles Sanitation LLC 1035 Pleasant Hill Road Athens, OH 45701 740-592-3480

Lot Split Assessment

* Denotes the presence of real estate inspectors.

Name Address Phone Email
Affordable Waste Services PO Box 39 Pataskala, OH 43062 740-366-7624
Benchmark Environmental Labs, INC PO Box 14740Columbus, OH 43214 614-267-4588 [email protected]
*Fairview Construction 14219 Pleasant Valley RoadLogan, OH 43138 740-385-4445
*Independent Health Services Inc. 223 East 5th AveLancaster, OH 43130 614-267-4222740-974-8848 [email protected]
Jacks Septic, LLC 274 S. 6th StreetNewark, OH 43055 740-366-3255 [email protected]
*M.E. Good and Sons 14897 State Route 595Logan, OH 43138 740-380-2667
Pattison Aerator Repair LLC 65641 Cabin Hill RoadNew Concord, OH 43762 740-432-5809 [email protected]
Sickles Septic Tanks 10637 Oxley RoadAthens, OH 45701 740-593-8302
J.K. Precast 1000 Armbrust AveWashington Court House, OH 43160 740-335-2188

Sewage Treatment Rules

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