How Much Does The Home Owner Septic Tank Test Cost In Wv? (Best solution)

  • The owner of the deptic system is required to pay a $30.00 registration fee for each tank in the system and to complete the septic tank registration form found in the Septic Systems Registration Fees pamphlet. DWWM collects the fees and registration forms.

How much does a perc test cost in WV?

Perc testing typically costs $750 to $1,850 or $1,300 on average. On the high end, you might pay as much as $3,000 depending on local regulation and the size of the leach field or infiltration basin needed. A basic assessment costs $150 to $300 for a hand dug hole without specialized equipment.

How long is a perc test good for in WV?

These certifications are valid for five years.

Do I need a certificate for my septic tank?

The General Binding Rules were designed to simplify the regulation of small sewage discharges. Septic tanks and small sewage treatment plants no longer need to be registered and there is no legal requirement to keep records of maintenance (although this is advisable).

How do you get a perc test?

If you’ve gotten to the point where you’re ready to hire a pro to evaluate your property, all you need to do is call your county Health Department (just Google the county name and then “Health Department” to find their phone number) and ask them what the requirements are to properly conduct a perc test.

What is the alternative to a septic tank?

Mound systems work well as alternatives to septic tanks when the soil around your home or building is too dense or too shallow or when the water table is too high. Although they are more expensive and require more maintenance than conventional systems, mound systems are a common alternative.

How do you know if land will perk?

Suitability can be determined through a perc or perk test, formally known as a Percolation Test. This test determines the rate at which water drains through the soil. If the property does not pass the perk test, than a standard septic system cannot by installed. There are alternatives, but they can be very expensive.

Can a homeowner install a septic system in WV?

Regulations for New Septic Systems Before installing a new septic system, a contractor or homeowner must obtain a permit. An application must be submitted to the local Department of Health. Applications and permit requirements are available through the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources.

Can I install my own septic system in West Virginia?

A homeowner or landowner who wishes to install their own sewer system is not required to be certified as a Class I installer, but must pass a written examination demonstrating knowledge of applicable rules. The homeowner’s examination may be taken and graded at any local health department.

How do I get a perk test in WV?

Perform the actual test – Fill the hole with water to a level 12 inches above the gravel; then time how long it takes for the water to fall to a level 6 inches above the gravel. Some authorities require you to perform this test three times on each hole, and even if yours doesn’t, it’s a good idea to do it anyway.

Are septic tanks still legal?

Septic Tanks Explained… Septic tanks cannot discharge to surface water drains, rivers, canals, ditches, streams or any other type of waterway. you are required to upgrade or replace your septic tank treatment system to a full sewage treatment plant by 2020, or when you sell a property, if it’s prior to this date.

Is it legal to sell a house with a septic tank?

If you’re selling a property with a septic tank, then you must be transparent with buyers about the fact the property uses a one and provide a detailed specification of the system. In fact, You are required by law to inform a buyer in writing about the presence of a septic tank.

Can you sell a house with a non-compliant septic tank?

If you are selling the property, it is your responsibility to install a sewage treatment system compliant with the general binding rules. Being non-compliant will not only detract potential buyers but you may also be subject to enforcement action by the Environment Agency.

What is a good perc rate?

A good perc rate for a septic system is between 1 and 30 minutes per inch. Between 30 and 60 minutes per inch might require hydraulic analysis for installing a septic system. Anything under 1 minute per inch or over 60 minutes per inch is not an ideal perc rate.

Can you have a septic tank without a leach field?

The waste from most septic tanks flows to a soakaway system or a drainage field. If your septic tank doesn’t have a drainage field or soakaway system, the waste water will instead flow through a sealed pipe and empty straight into a ditch or a local water course.

2022 Average Septic Inspection Cost (with Price Factors)

In rural locations where there are no centralized sewer systems, homes that have toilets, kitchens, and laundry facilities rely on septic systems to handle wastewater from these sources. A septic system is typically comprised of two components: a septic tank and a drainfield, both of which are placed underground and out of sight. A septic system should be inspected at least once a year, and more frequently if a house is placed up for sale. Annual inspections will verify that the system is in correct working order, so extending its lifespan and eliminating major health dangers that may be presented by the waste it handles.

A septic system inspection is less expensive than replacing or repairing it and helps to keep the value of the house intact as well.

Preparing for the inspection

Before the inspectors come, homeowners should find and excavate to expose any hidden septic tank lids, pump chamber covers, or other similar structures. While some inspectors may include the expense of digging up the covers in the inspection fee, others may charge an additional fee for making the covers accessible. Before you hire an inspector, be sure you understand the criteria and charges. Expect the inspection to take between 2-2.5 hours to complete. If required, the inspector will work with the septic pumper at no additional charge.

Inspection costs

Most septic system checks cost between $100 and $250, depending on the location of the residence. This is a little price to pay when compared to the expense of rebuilding a drainfield, which may range from $2,500 to $10,000. A second inspection fee of $50 to $250 may be charged if the inspector uncovers the tank. The amount charged will depend on the depth of the tank.

Environmental Service Fees

Service Provided Fee
Evaluation of existing onsite sewage system $50.00
Evaluation of existing onsite water system $50.00
Septic system permit re-issue fee $35.00
Request for file information $10.00
Individual onsite sewage system application (conventional) $185.00
Individual onsite sewage system application (alternative) $375.00
Individual onsite water system application $125.00
DEP septic tank seal fee (transferable for existing septic tanks installed) $30.00

Re-inspection Fee

Service Provided Fee
Follow-up inspection of permitted establishment due to noncompliance or incomplete work $75.00

Plan Review (new or extensively remodeled)

Service Provided Fee
Small establishment (restaurant 25 or less seats, day care center, bedbreakfast, etc.) $125.00
Medium establishment (restaurant 25-75 seats hotels 50 rooms or less) $225.00
Large establishment (restaurant75 seats, hotel 50 rooms or more) $325.00

Printable fee lists and other information can be downloaded below:

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Reinspection Fee Handout

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Sewage Program – Mid-Ohio Valley Health Department

Among the responsibilities of the MOVHD Sewage Program are the approval and inspection of on-site, subsurface sewage disposal areas. When the initiative began in July 1970, pipe and gravel systems were considered to be cutting-edge technology. In the previous 35 years, there has been a growth in the number of sewage disposal techniques. Furthermore, the research that underpins these disposal strategies has gotten increasingly particular and complex. The West Virginia Sewage Regulations contain a variety of criteria for properties wishing to install an on-site, subsurface sewage system.

  1. Percolation tests, on the other hand, are necessary in all circumstances in order to evaluate the property.
  2. The price for this exam is $50 per try, and we ask that you phone and notify the office assistant that you intend to take the exam at least one working day before you plan to take it.
  3. It is possible to get the names and phone numbers of these folks on our website, SEWAGE SYSTEM INSTALLERS, by searching for them.
  4. * The purpose of this test is to determine the ability of the earth to absorb water.

What is the proper way to do a perc test?* You will require four (4) test holes in the region where the planned installation will be located. The hole sites must be distributed evenly over the whole region. The following holes must be filled:

  • Under the MOVHD Sewage Program, on-site, subsurface sewage disposal fields are permitted and subjected to inspection. PVC pipe and gravel systems were state-of-the-art when the initiative officially began in July of 1970. The number of sewage disposal methods has expanded dramatically during the previous 35 years. Furthermore, the research that underpins these disposal processes has gotten increasingly precise and complex. Different criteria for properties wishing to install an on-site, subsurface sewage system are specified in the West Virginia Sewage Regulations. Each property’s tax assessment will be different depending on its size, the year it was built, and the sort of institution it will serve. Percolation tests, on the other hand, are necessary in all circumstances in order to evaluate the property in question. The “Homeowner’s Exam” is required for every homeowner who want to do a perc test or install a system on their own. Open-book testing is available at any of our six county offices, and you may take it at your convenience. It costs $50 to take this test once, and we ask that you phone and notify the office assistant that you intend to take the exam at least one working day before you plan to take it. You must have a “Certified Sewage System Installer” licensed by the State of West Virginia if you intend to have someone else install your system. THESESEWAGE SYSTEM INSTALLERS can be contacted using the information provided on this website, which includes their names and phone numbers. The Soil Percolation (Perc) Test entails measuring the amount of water that can percolate through a soil sample. A test to determine the ground’s ability to absorb water is performed here. As the name implies, it depicts how the absorption field will function. What is the proper way to do a perc test*? Four (4) test holes will be required in the region of the proposed installation. The placements of the holes must be distributed evenly over the whole region. In order to close the gaps, the following must be accomplished:

For a 4-hour period, fill the holes with water and keep the water level above the nail. After 4 hours, lower the water level to the nail (a total of 6 inches of water). Count the amount of time it takes for EACH hole to completely drain its 6″ of water* Record this information on the SS-182 Application Form *A 6 foot bore hole is an excavation to assess the depth to rock and water on relatively level ground* The hole is positioned in the center of the four perc test holes on relatively level ground.

  • Fill out the SS-182 Application Form with the results of your tests.
  • * Once completed, the SS-182 Application Form should be sent to the local health department office* for consideration.
  • The charge for a septic system permit is $100.
  • The amount for a subdivision permit, if one is required, is depending on the number of properties being considered for development.
  • What Should I Do If I Have a Question about Something?

The West Virginia Sewage Regulations also handle the issue of’subdivisions.’ Despite the fact that the term can have a variety of meanings depending on the context, the Sewage Regulations define a subdivision as follows: “A tract of land that has been divided into two (2) or more lots, tracts, parcels, plats, sites, areas, units, interests, or any other division for the purpose of dwelling or establishment development and includes the division of land by deed, metes and bounds description, lease, map, plat, or other instrument, or by act of construction.” The Sewage System Rules (64 CSR 9) govern the operation of sewage systems.

The date of implementation is May 1, 1998.

Furthermore, it is the “creator” of the lot(s) who is responsible for submitting an application to the health department for subdivision permission.

A number of amendments to the Sewage Regulations have been implemented in tandem with adjustments to the conditions for subdivision approval.

  • If 2 acres are required, the original installation and replacement areas must be adequate. If the land is 2 acres, it must have an adequate 10,000 square foot reserve space for a conventional system.

The original installation and replacement area must be a minimum of 2 acres in size. The reserve space for the basic system must be at least 10,000 square feet if the land is two acres.

  • It is necessary to have a proper initial installation and replacement area if the land is 2 acres. If the land is two acres, it must have an adequate 10,000 square foot reserve space for a conventional system.

* “Responsible Person” refers to the individual who “made” the lot (s)

  • It is your responsibility to get MOVHD Subdivision Approval.

* If the “Responsible Person” is not the current owner of the lot(s), the following steps must be taken:

  • To determine who is the “Responsible Person,” go back one (1) owner prior to the current owner. If this results in the identification of the “Responsible Person,” they must file the subdivision application. If this does not result in the production of the “Responsible Person,” then: Plus, the current owner is accountable for conducting research in order to find the “Responsible Person,” OR+ the current owner can be accepted as the “Responsible Person” pending approval
  • And

* If the “Responsible Person” is not the current owner and refuses to secure the necessary subdivision permission, the following will happen:

  • When gaining subdivision clearance, the current owner might be regarded as the “Responsible Person.”

In the event that the current owner is the true “Responsible Person,” and the current owner refuses to get the necessary approval:

  • There will be no Subdivision Approval granted
  • There will be no issuance of a Septic Tank Installation Permit

Based on perc tests, a six-foot hole, and the needed reserve space as of May 1983, these lot assessments were created. On or about December 31, 2005, the following subdivision of one (1) lot and two (2) acres was completed: * Beginning on January 1, 2006, any lots requiring Subdivision Approval will be required to pay the applicable charge. * * The present owner may install the system if the necessary examination is passed. * The Subdivision Fee Approval Schedule is available (as currently approved in the Fees for Permit Rule)

  • 1 – 5 lots are $62.50
  • 6 – 10 lots are $100.00
  • 11 – 18 lots are $10.00 per site (maximum)
  • 19 and up lots are $187.50
  • And 20 and up lots are $187.50.

If you have any concerns about the Subdivision Approval criteria or procedure, you should speak with the Sanitarian at your local health department office, which may be found here. Office hours are from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. Additional resources are available at:

  • Please contact the Sanitarian at your local health department office if you have any concerns about the requirements or process for Subdivision Approval. The office is open Monday through Friday, from 8:00 a.m to 4:00 p.m. the following link:

Real Estate Septic & Well Inspection

Tri-County Pumps provides thorough real estate septic and well inspections, yield testing, and all essential water tests to ensure that your real estate transactions in Maryland and West Virginia are completed successfully. It is possible to ascertain the amount of gallons per minute produced by a well system via the use of timed tests such as a Well Yield Test. For the length of the test, water will be released from the pressure tank at 15-minute intervals from the beginning to the end of the test.

  1. The counties of Frederick, Washington, and Montgomery, in the states of Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia are served by our real estate septicwell inspection service for conventional, VA, and FHA loans.
  2. Radon testing, radium testing, lead testing, and all other types of water testing are examples of this.
  3. For any water-related issues, complete Water Treatment Systems are available for purchase.
  4. Contact us today.
  • Perc tests for property
  • Septic inspections and pumping
  • Water well system inspections
  • Water treatment system inspections
  • Water testing
See also:  How To Wire A Septic Tank Pump To An Electrical Panel? (Question)

We have a few pointers here to help you make these inspections go smoothly.

  • Make an effort to designate a single point of contact for our employees to communicate with. This will aid in the organization of communication and scheduling. Also, if we are servicing your septic tank, please include the billing information for the party who will be paying the charge.
  • Consider designating a single point of contact for our employees to communicate with. Communicating and scheduling will be easier as a result of this. If we are servicing your septic tank, please include the billing information for the person that is paying the charge.
  • If we are doing a water test, please refer to the table below to help you understand how long you should expect to wait for the findings. Please keep in mind that water samples might be expedited if requested in advance.

Septic Tank Inspections for Real Estate Transfers

Septic system maintenance can identify whether or not your septic system is in proper functioning order. Maintenance inspections of your septic wastewater system on a regular basis are one of the most effective strategies to dramatically extend the life of your system. Septic systems that fail are extremely expensive to repair or replace, and inadequate maintenance is the most common cause of failure. A septic system that is unworkable or malfunctioning can decrease the value of your home and may expose you to legal risk.

  • The inspector will first determine the location of the septic system and its components.
  • To guarantee that your domestic plumbing is in perfect operating order, the inspector will remove the tank’s lid and inspect the ports and connections.
  • You will be able to obtain a more exact notion of how often it should be pumped as a result of this.
  • Inspections on a regular basis might discover issues before they become serious.
  • Our highly trained personnel have the skills and understanding to detect even the smallest indicators of a septic system malfunction.
  • We will ask you questions about the functioning of your septic system, as well as whether or not your toilet or sink backs up when you flush or wash your clothes.
  • The upkeep of your septic system should be documented thoroughly, and this should include a drawing of the area where your septic system is located.

Being prepared with this information ahead of time for future service visits will help you save time and money. ntl Please complete the form below to request a property inspection at a future date. Thank you!

What the Heck is a “Perc Test” (and How Much Does it Really Matter)?

I came upon an interesting essay written by Seth Williams. Please take the time to read; you will be pleased you did! You should be aware of one concern before spending a lot of money on a piece of unoccupied land. It may seem small at first appearance, but it has the power to make or break your property purchase. “The Perc Test,” as it is known. When doing a Perc Test (also known as a “Perk Test,” and more technically known as a Percolation Test), you’re measuring how quickly water drains through soil (also known as percolation rate).

  1. Performing a perc test consists of drilling or excavating a hole in the ground, pouring water into the hole, and then watching the rate at which the water is absorbed by the soil.
  2. What is the purpose of a Perc Test?
  3. If a vacant lot is located within reach of an existing sewer hookup, it is typically not necessary to install a septic system because the existing sewage system will suffice.
  4. It is necessary to investigate the viability of installing a septic system if there is no existing sewer system in the immediate vicinity.
  5. The majority of septic systems across the globe are constructed in such a manner that an additional septic drain field, often known as a “leach field,” is required to remove any surplus water.
  6. A typical septic system and drain field are depicted in the following illustration.
  7. Essentially, this is accomplished by the process of percolation – but it also occurs through the processes of evaporation, transpiration, consumption by plant roots, and finally, the residual water re-enters the groundwater and/or surface water system.
  8. In order to comprehend the significance of a perc test, it is necessary to first grasp the fundamentals of how a septic system operates.

According to the majority of jurisdictions, a perc test is carried out when an official from a county health department meets with the owner of the property and/or an excavating contractor to dig a hole and test the drainage rate of the soil on-site (they literally pour water in a hole and time how long it takes to drain through).

A perc test can be extremely easy and affordable, or it can be relatively involved and expensive, depending on the criteria of the Health Department, the location of the property, the building plans, and the makeup of the soil.

Again, the intricacy of the procedure is greatly influenced by the requirements of the Health Department, the location of the property, the plans for the site, and the composition of the soil.

I’ve discovered that, while most county health departments adhere to the same broad concepts of how a perc test works, several of them handle key portions of the procedure in a very different way than I expected.

Just looking at the counties where I’ve worked, each one has had a distinctly different set of requirements when it comes to:

  • What level of supervision was necessary
  • What the cost of the perc test would be
  • The degree to which the standards were strict
  • In the event that the perc test failed, what kind of alternatives were permitted

Despite the fact that the same fundamental concepts apply almost everywhere, the specific procedures required in one county can be very different from the procedures required in another – so it’s critical to ensure that the test is carried out in accordance with the rules and authorities in your area before proceeding. To get the solution, you’ll need to ask yourself a few questions, including:

1. What is my plan for the property?

There are many different reasons why people purchase land. A spot to hunt, farm, camp, and participate in other outdoor activities are among the desires of some people. If this is the reason you’re purchasing land, a perc test (for the purpose of installing a septic system) generally shouldn’t be at the top of your list of priorities when purchasing land. The majority of individuals, on the other hand, purchase unoccupied land with the intention of constructing anything on it. Furthermore, even if you do not intend to construct anything, there is an excellent probability that the buyer after you will do so in the future.

If you answered “yes,” the situation boils down to the following:

  • There will be no septic permit issued until a valid perc test is performed. There will be no septic system if a septic permit is not obtained. There can be no housing of any type if there is no septic system in place. If the owner is unable to construct any type of residence on the site, the value of the property will decrease significantly.

Is it still possible to use and value a property even if it does not have a septic system or a residence on it? Yes, without a doubt! Even so, you’ll want to be thoroughly educated about a property’s “percability” BEFORE you put your life’s money into it in the majority of circumstances. The last thing you want to do is make a financial choice based on erroneous assumptions about the future.

2. How much am I paying for the property?

Depending on the amount you’re paying for a home, it may or may not be worthwhile to spend the additional time and effort to do a perc test on the property. As a real estate investor, I’ve purchased the majority of my properties free and clear from sellers who were really keen to sell. For the average home, the purchase price ranges from $100 to $5,000, and when you’re purchasing a home at this price, it’s not always easy to justify the additional time, money, and bother necessary to do an underground utility survey.

In this case, I’ve been able to relax since there are multiple externally observable characteristics that have provided me with sufficient reason to assume that the property has a high likelihood of passing a perc test (we’ll go into more detail about this shortly).

3. How big of a problem will it be if this property isn’t buildable?

For the most part, this is a basic exercise. Simply said, whatever you intend to do with the property, and whatever amount you are considering paying, consider the worst-case scenario for a moment before proceeding. What happens if you buy something, order a perc test, and it fails? What do you do then? Is this property destined to become a financial disaster, or is everything still in working order? If it isn’t a deal-breaker, it is usually acceptable to forgo the perc test altogether. However, if the property’s “buildability” is a substantial contributing element to its value (which it frequently is) and if it would be extremely detrimental to make a false prediction on this, why take the risk of guessing wrong?

  • Peace of mind may go a long way in a stressful situation!
  • Price ranges from $150 to $1,500 (although in my experience, the lower end of that range is more common).
  • Need everything is said and done, if you’re only after a general idea of a property’s propensity to percolate, you don’t absolutely need to shell out the $1,500.
  • In the end, the only way to be absolutely certain of a property’s potential to percolate is to order a perc test with the appropriate local government authority.

For example, the following are some clearly visible elements to take into consideration:

  • Take a look at the other properties that are next to yours. Is there a home on these neighbouring properties, or are they just vacant land? Given that these shipments passed the perc test, there’s a good possibility (but not a guarantee) that yours will as well
  • Is there any body of water in the immediate vicinity? If this is the case, the property may have a high water table, it may have wetlands, or it may be located in or near a flood zone. Despite the fact that these elements are not necessarily associated with a property’s capacity to perc, they may serve as a cause to exercise greater care (as well as provide you with some additional information to consider) when considering whether or not to spend the money on a perc test.
  • Is there any body of water in the immediate area? If this is the case, the property may have a high water table, it may have wetlands, or it may be located in or near a flood plain or flood plain. They are not necessarily associated with a property’s capacity to perc, but they may serve as a cause to exercise greater caution (and provide you with some additional information to consider) when determining whether or not it is worthwhile to spend the money on a perc test.

If your property fails the perc test, don’t get too worked up over it. A failing perc test does not necessarily spell the end of the narrative for a property. In order to identify what options could be accessible, start asking some questions.

  • It is not necessary to be alarmed if your property fails the perc test. In the case of any property, a failing perc test does not always spell doom. In order to identify what options could be accessible, start by asking some questions.
  • Inquire about the possibility of appealing the findings of the prior perc test, as well as the circumstances under which they would revisit their original verdict.
  • Find out when the failed perc test was done and at what time of year it failed. It is common in many regions that the water table is higher during certain seasons and lower during others (for example, winter vs summer), which might have an impact on the soil drainage rate.
  • It may be worth contemplating a modified septic system on the site if the first few measures do not yield results. Some alternative septic systems can be cheaply priced (depending on the property’s circumstances and local standards) and even ecologically friendly (depending on the property’s situation and local restrictions). It is possible that these systems will be more expensive than a traditional choice, but they may provide you with additional possibilities to deal with
  • Keep in mind that soil types might range from one piece of land to the next (and the topography of the lot can also make a big difference). Make sure to instruct your excavator to test a couple different locations – you may be pleased you did
  • In addition, keep in mind that if you wait long enough, municipal water and sewer may become accessible in some places. If your intention is to purchase land and hang onto it for a period of time, it may still be worthwhile.

Further, when a property fails a perc test, it does not always imply that you will be unable to construct anything on the property in question. If you’re prepared to spend extra money on an engineered system and/or install a raised sand bed to alleviate the drainage problem, you can usually get around this problem (depending on what the Health Department is willing to allow). And don’t forget that there are a variety of alternate uses for properties that do not even necessitate the installation of a septic system.

  • Storage Units
  • Pole Barns
  • Horse Stable
  • Grazing Fields
  • CropsFarming
  • Orchard
  • Camping
  • Hunting
  • Lumber
  • Mining
  • Drilling
  • Crop

Almost any piece of land may be put to excellent use with a little imagination (as well as conformity to zoning regulations and mineral rights). In the event that you’ve reached the point where you’re ready to hire a professional to evaluate your property, all you have to do is contact your county Health Department (you can find their phone number by searching for the county name followed by “Health Department” on Google) and inquire about the requirements for conducting a proper perc test. According to certain counties, the Health Department will be responsible for the entire project.

Whatever the scenario, keep in mind that the rules and regulations might change significantly depending on where your property is located, so before taking any major moves forward, make sure you discover exactly how it is intended to be done from the source.

For further information, please see the website.

Learn how much it costs to Clean Septic Tank.

Almost any piece of land may be put to excellent use with a little imagination (and strict respect to zoning regulations and mineral rights). In the event that you’ve reached the point where you’re ready to hire a professional to evaluate your property, all you have to do is contact your county Health Department (you can find their phone number by searching for the county name followed by “Health Department” on Google) and inquire about the requirements for conducting a proper perc test on your property.

It may be necessary in some cases to hire an experienced excavating company to complete all of the preparation work in advance.

You should be up and running in no time if you have the proper knowledge. Complete details may be found here.

Average Cost to Pump a Septic Tank

Almost any piece of property may be put to excellent use with a little imagination (and strict respect to zoning regulations and mineral rights). In the event that you’ve reached the point where you’re ready to hire a professional to evaluate your property, all you have to do is contact your county Health Department (you can find their phone number by searching for the county name and then “Health Department” on Google) and inquire about the requirements for conducting a proper perc test. In certain counties, the Health Department will be tasked with the entirety of the task.

Whatever the scenario, keep in mind that the rules and regulations might change significantly depending on where your property is located, so before taking any major moves forward, make sure you discover exactly how it is intended to be done straight from the source.

See also:  What Happens If No Money To Replace Septic Tank In Gwinnett County? (TOP 5 Tips)

For further details, please see our website.

National Average $410
Typical Range $287 – $545
Low End – High End $200 – $1,150

The cost information in this report is based on real project costs provided by 5,764 HomeAdvisor users.

Septic Tank Pumping Cost Near You

The cost information in this report is based on real project costs reported by 5,764 HomeAdvisor members.

Septic Tank Maintenance Cost

The cost information in this report is based on real project costs submitted by 5,764 HomeAdvisor members.

Septic System Inspection Cost

An checkup of a septic system might cost anything from $100 to $900. Your technician will do a visual examination of the system. If you want a camera check of the lines, it will cost an additional $250 to $900, but it is only essential if your drains are running slowly and you are unable to detect the problem.

  • Initial inspection costs between $250 and $500
  • Annual inspection costs between $100 and $150
  • And camera inspection costs between $250 and $900.

How often do you need to pump a septic tank?

If your septic tank is older than three or five years, it will need to be pumped more frequently. You may, on the other hand, find yourself cleaning it out every year or every 20 years. It is mostly determined by two factors: The following table outlines the most usual inspection intervals, although it is recommended that you have a professional evaluate your home once a year just in case.

Talk To Local Pros To Get Septic Tank Pumping Quotes

What makes the difference between spending $400 every two years and spending $600 every five years might be as simple as how you handle your septic tank and leach field. Some things you’ll want to think about and perhaps adjust are as follows:

  • Using a garbage disposal system. If you want to save time, avoid using a garbage disposal. Take into consideration recycling or composting. Coffee grounds are a waste product. Make sure you don’t toss this away. Entertainment. If you host a lot of dinner parties, plan to do a lot of upkeep. Grease. Don’t pour grease down the sink or toilet. This clogs the drain and can cause the septic tank to clog as well. Laundry. Washing clothes in small batches, diverting wastewater to a separate system, and never using dry laundry soap are all good ideas. Parking. Keep autos off your leach field and away from your leach field. As a result, the soil will be compressed, reducing its effectiveness. Buildings. A leach field should not have any buildings, whether temporary or permanent in nature.

Aerobic Septic System Maintenance Cost

Aerating an aerobic system can cost anywhere from $50 to $500 depending on the size, type of bacteria being used, and whether or not any preparation work is required. Most homes pay between $100 and $200, however you may be able to get a better deal if you combine this service with other services such as pumping or cleaning.

Cost to Empty a Septic Tank

Most of the time, you’ll only need to empty it if you’re removing something, transferring something, or changing something else.

Fees for emptying your septic tank prior to removal are included in the replacement expenses. The cost of replacing a septic tank ranges from $3,200 to $10,300. Pumping out a tank does not always imply totally draining it; it may just imply eliminating the majority of the muck.

Septic Tank Cleaning Cost

If you’re removing something, relocating something, or changing something, most of the time you won’t need to empty it. Fees to empty your septic tank prior to removal are included in the replacement expenses. It costs $3,200 to $10,300 to replace a septic tank. Tank pumping is not usually synonymous with entirely draining the tank, but rather with removing the majority of the sludge and sludge particles.

Cleaning Methods

Cleaning methods include the following:

  • Pumping: This procedure removes wastewater from the septic tank. Jetting: This method removes accumulated buildup from the pipes.

The majority of septic system repairs cost between $650 and $2,900. The most common causes of system failure are clogged filters and a failure to pump and examine the system on a regular basis.

Compare Quotes From Local Septic Tank Pumping Pros

Pumping your own septic system is not recommended. In order to move sludge from the tank, it must be stored in proper containers, and it must be disposed of in accordance with crucial safety precautions. Septic tank pumping is often considered to be more convenient and cost-effective when performed by a professional who has access to specialized equipment, such as specialized tools and storage containers, to securely manage the waste and scum for disposal. It’s always safer, faster, and more cost efficient to just employ a local septic pumping specialist rather than trying to do it yourself.

FAQs

In contrast to a municipal sewage system, where waste is channeled through a central drainage system that is managed by the municipality, your septic tank is unique to your home or business. Wastewater from your house, including that from showers, toilets, sink drains, and washing machines, is sent into your septic tank for treatment. In the event that wastewater makes its way into your septic tank, it is naturally separated into three parts:

  • Instead of being part of a municipal sewage system, where waste is sent via a central drainage system that is managed by the municipality, your septic tank is separate from your home or business. Your septic tank collects and treats wastewater from your house, including that generated by your showers, toilets, sink drains, and washing machines Water entering your septic tank is naturally separated into three parts: sewage, sludge, and sediment.

The placement of the outlet and inlet pipes, as well as baffles, prevent sludge and scum from exiting the tank. Wastewater, also known as effluent, is channeled through pipes to a drain field.

What are the signs that your septic tank is full?

The following are signs that your septic tank is full:

  • The smell of drain field, tank, or drains within the house
  • Sewage that has backed up in your home or leach field

What happens if a septic tank is not pumped?

odors emanating from the drain field, tank, or drains in the home; Drainage problems at home or on a leach field.

  • The smell of drain field, tank, or drains in the residence
  • Sewage backing up in your home or leach field

What’s the difference between a septic tank and a cesspool?

It is the way in which they work to disseminate waste that distinguishes a cesspool from a septic tank, and The expenses of pumping them are the same as before.

  • Uncomplicated in design, a cesspool is just a walled hole with perforated sides into which wastewater runs and slowly dissipates into the earth around it. Once the surrounding earth has become saturated, you’ll need to dig a new cesspool to replace the old one. Cesspools are not permitted in many parts of the United States, and you will be required to construct a septic system instead. A septic system works in the same way as a cesspool, but it has two independent components: the septic tank and the septic system. The septic tank and drain field are both required.
  • A cesspool is essentially a walled hole with perforated walls into which wastewater runs and slowly dissipates into the surrounding soil. Cesspools are common in urban areas. You’ll need to dig a new cesspool after the surrounding dirt has been saturated. Cesspools are not authorized in many parts of the United States, and you will be required to construct a septic system in their place instead. It functions in the same way as a cesspool, but it has two different components: the septic tank and the septic tank pumping system. The septic tank and drain field are two examples.

How do I keep my septic system healthy?

A cesspool is basically a walled hole with perforated sides into which wastewater runs and slowly dissipates into the surrounding soil. Once the surrounding soil has become saturated, you’ll need to build a new cesspool to accommodate the increased water flow. Cesspools are not permitted in many parts of the United States, and you will be required to construct a septic system instead; A septic system functions in the same way as a cesspool, but it has two independent components: the septic tank and the septic system.

  • A variety of anti-bacterial hand washing soaps, certain toilet bowl cleansers, bath and body oils, as well as a variety of dishwashing detergents are available for purchase. In regions where separate systems are now permitted, laundry detergents and bleach are permitted. a few types of water softeners

Important to note is that while biological additions are unlikely to be dangerous, many chemical additives that are touted as a way to save you money by not having to pump your septic tank may actually cause damage to your septic system.

Hire a Local Septic Cleaning Pro In Your Area

Due to the fact that sanitary sewers are not accessible in all regions of the county, many inhabitants of Kanawha County have installed individual house sewage disposal systems. The KCHD’s personnel works tirelessly to ensure that sewage disposal systems are properly maintained and do not damage the purity of drinking and ground water. An evaluation of the soil on the site is required prior to the issuance of a sewage permit in order to establish whether or not the soil is suitable for the installation of a septic tank/soil absorption field sewage system.

  • In order to establish if a site is suitable for receiving wastewater discharge from a septic system, perk tests are carried out on it.
  • A meeting will be scheduled on the site to review the perc test and six foot hole, which will be conducted by a sanitarian.
  • Following the installation of the system, an examination is carried out to ensure that the system was correctly installed before the sewage system is covered.
  • Before a septic system may be certified on a lot that is not accessible to a public sewage system, the lot must be inspected and determined to be suitable for private sewage disposal before a septic system can be permitted.
  • Home aeration systems, low-pressure dosing systems, holding tanks, and re-circulating sand filters are examples of non-conventional wastewater treatment technologies.
  • In the case of new development on properties bigger than two acres, “alternative systems” may be explored.
  • All septic systems require adequate care and maintenance on a regular basis in order to optimize their useful life and avoid premature failure.

On the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources Public Health Sanitation website, you may find a list of class I and II certified septic installers.

Resources

  • The following are guidelines for evaluating water and sewage for home loan purposes: The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection, the United States Environmental Protection Agency, the Small Flows Clearinghouse, and the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources are all resources.

Hampshire County Health Department – Sewage and Water

REQUEST FOR SEPTIC AND WELL RECORDSIf you want copies of a property’s current septic and well records, please fill out the form on the following page. In order to do record lookups, the following information must be provided: Subdivision and lot number are provided. If the property is not located in a subdivision, please supply the full name of the person who has the septic/well permit. **Record look-ups will not be able to be conducted without this precise information. Please wait 2-3 business days for the lookup of your records.

You can also obtain records by faxing them to 304-496-9650 if you choose.

Wells for water: Individual water wells were the subject of new legislation passed in West Virginia in 2008.

  1. The State of West Virginia requires that a well driller be certified before working. Permits are required for both homeowners and well drillers before drilling a well. It is mandatory that all wells be constructed in accordance with the minimal Design Standards.

Water samples from specific water sources (wells, springs, etc.) can be collected and sent to the West Virginia State lab for examination to detect if coliforms are present. This service is available upon request by physicians. In order for their water supply to be tested, homeowners must complete a Request for Water Analysisform and send it to the Hampshire Health Department. Well Disinfection Instructions may be found by clicking here. For further information about wells, springs, cisterns, and other similar structures, please see our Applications and Formstab to the right.

Click here for information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on what to do if you receive a boil water advisory.

The criteria have been designed in order to safeguard those members of the public who will rely on ground water sources for their drinking water needs.

  1. The State of West Virginia requires that a sewage system installer be accredited before working on a project. Permits are required for the installation of an Individual Sewage System by both homeowners and sewage system installers. An application for a septic permit must be submitted before any building permits may be awarded. The minimal design criteria for all Individual Sewage Systems must be met during the construction process.

For Residents

The State of West Virginia requires that a sewage system installer be accredited. Permits are required for the installation of an Individual Sewage System by both homeowners and sewer system installers. Before any building permits may be awarded, a septic permission must be secured first. In order to comply with the minimal design criteria, all Individual Sewage Systems must be established.

Fees For Services

For services such as conducting evaluations on septic systems and wells for the purpose of obtaining financing; selling or purchasing property with an individual on-site sewage system or well; or for other requests that are not required to be covered by law, regulation, or the Marshall County Health Department free of charge, fees will be charged to offset the cost of providing such services to offset the cost of providing such services.

The fees for these services have been established in compliance with 64 CSR 51 and have been officially submitted with the County Clerk of Marshall County, as required by state law.

Fees are to be paid at the time of application for home loan evaluation in order to commence service. The following are the fees:

  • Septic system evaluation costs $250.00, while a water well inspection costs $136.00.

Mobile Home Parking

  • Sewage Tank Cleaning Permit Application (PDF)
  • Application for Surface Discharge Permit (PDF)
  • Ground Water Protection and Your Septic System (PDF)
  • IndividualOnsite Septic System (PDF)
  • Installer Certification Renewal Application (PDF)
  • Septic System Ownership Brochure (PDF)
  • Sewage System Well Permit Application (PDF)
  • Sewage System Permit Application (PDF)
  • Sewage System Registration Form for DEP (DOC)
  • Sewage Tank Cleaning Permit Application (PDF)
  • Standards for Sewage Tank Cleaning

Associated Sites

Nuisance Investigation Report Form

Sites that are related to

Water Collection Protocol

For water samples collected from private wells, springs, or cisterns that are to be processed by the Office of Laboratory Services for bacteriological testing, a fee of $136 will be charged to the individual who requests them. This price will cover the cost of man-hours, mileage, and shipping expenses, among other things. In the case of a water collection request made in connection with the sale or purchase of a residence, this cost is not applicable. For pricing information, please see the Home Loan Evaluation charge schedule.) Fees are collected prior to service delivery, and a completed Water Analysis Request Form must be submitted with the fee collection.

  1. In addition, the West Virginia Office of Laboratory Services levies a fee, which must be paid separately by check or money order made payable to WVOLS and sent with the water sample.
  2. Samples will be collected from Monday through Wednesday in order to ensure that they get at the lab in a timely manner.
  3. When a sample tests positive for coliform bacteria, e-coli, or both, the Marshall County Health Department will give advice on how to proceed with treatment if it is necessary.
  4. If you need to get tested again, there will be an extra price.

What to Do If Your Septic System Fails

The majority of septic systems fail as a result of faulty design or inadequate maintenance practices. On certain locations with inadequate or unsuitable soils, excessive slopes, or high ground water tables, soil-based systems (those with a drain field) are erected whereas others (those without) are not. Hydraulic failures and pollution of neighboring water sources are possible outcomes of these situations. Regular maintenance, such as pumping the septic tank on a regular basis (usually every three to five years), can prevent sediments in the tank from migrating into the drain field and clogging the system.

See also:  How Much To Pump Septic Tank In 35180? (Question)

Whom to contact if you have problems with your septic system

Contact a local septic system service provider, your local health department, or the regulatory agency in charge of onsite wastewater treatment systems. You may look up the phone number for your local health department online or in your phone book to find out more information. Find a professional in your region by searching online searchable databases of installers and septic system service providers:

  • The National Onsite Wastewater Recycling Association’s Septic Locator
  • The National Association of Wastewater Technicians
  • And the National Association of Onsite Wastewater Recycling Association

What to do if your home floods

It is important not to come into direct touch with sewage if it has backed up into your home from your plumbing fittings or onsite system since it may contain hazardous bacteria. For further information, speak with your local health department or regulatory body. Personnel involved in cleanup should be outfitted in safety gear (e.g., long rubber gloves, face splash shields). Immediately following the completion of the cleanup, carefully wash all of the equipment, tools, and clothing that were used during the cleanup, as well as the flooded area.

All goods or locations that have been exposed should be disinfected with a combination of 90 percent water and 10 percent household bleach. The area should be totally dried out and not utilized for at least 24 hours after it has been entirely dried off. For further details, please see:

  • Visit the Environmental Protection Agency’s website. Flooding and Septic Systems: What to Do After the Flood
  • See also The Following Questions and Answers Regarding Septic Systems: What to Do After a Flood

In the event that you have a private drinking water well, find out what to do with it after a flood.

Whom to contact for information on septic systems

Those seeking technical support can contact the National Environmental Services Center’s technical assistance hotline at (800) 624-8301 or (304) 293-4191, which is available toll-free.

Home Buyers Guide

Important Information to Consider Before Purchasing A Septic-System-Served Home I. OBJECTIVES Prospective homebuyers of single-family dwellings frequently have several questions about the septic system that serves the residence, including the following: What exactly is the structure of the present septic system? Is it up and running properly? How long do you think it will last? What will the cost of a replacement system be if this one fails? Our goal is to provide purchasers with information that will alleviate their fears.

  • II.
  • This is accomplished through the use of septic tanks.
  • A well running septic tank will lower pollutant levels and create effluent that is of a relatively consistent chemical composition.
  • The new tanks (which have been in service since January 1991) are divided into two compartments in order to achieve the aforementioned goal in an even more efficient manner.
  • In most cases, “gravity” systems are used to transport sewage via pipelines and distribution boxes without the need of any mechanical devices like as pumps or siphons; and 4) a drainage (leaching) system to distribute sewage effluent into the surrounding natural soils.
  • The precise type of concrete that is used on a particular property is typically determined by the soil conditions that present on the land.

The majority of residential installations make use of stone-filled leaching trenches, but galleries, pits, and beds have all been employed in the past. In order for a drainage system to work correctly, it must meet the following requirements:

  1. Provide a sufficient amount of application space. The application area is defined as the amount of soil surface area given by a specific drainage system (sides and bottom area of leaching units) where sewage effluent is applied to a specific location (referred to as “wetted” area). An individual house’s application area need is determined by the soil properties of the site as well as the daily flow rates (measured in gallons) generated by the house’s plumbing system. Ordinarily, the projected flow from a property is determined by the number of bedrooms in the residence. Natural soil conditions must surround the septic tank so that the effluent discharge may be dissipated and dispersed without getting over saturated. Provide sufficient capacity to hold effluent during periods of abnormally high usage or when rainfall or subsurface flooding impairs the system’s ability to disseminate the liquid
  2. And

Ensure that there is enough surface area for the application. A sewage effluent application area is the amount of soil surface area offered by a certain drainage system (including the sides and bottom area of leaching units) where sewage effluent is applied (referred to as “wetted” area). An individual home’s application area need is determined by the soil properties of the site as well as the daily flow rates (measured in gallons) generated by the house in question. Ordinarily, the projected flow from a property is determined by the number of bedrooms in the residence; Be surrounded by natural soil conditions that will allow the septic tank effluent discharge to evaporate and spread without getting oversaturated; Provide sufficient capacity to retain effluent during periods of abnormally high consumption, or when rainfall or subsurface flooding impairs the system’s ability to disseminate the liquid; and

  1. It is possible that plumbing fittings will have trouble discharging their contents (slow draining, bubbling, backups, etc.). This condition might be indicative of a systemic problem, but it could simply be caused by a blockage in the inner plumbing or sewage line. Before starting with an assessment of the sewage disposal system, you should have the inside piping examined. Large-volume discharges (such as those from washing machines, dishwashers, and bathtubs) can result in either a backlog, as described above, or an overflow of sewage above the septic tank or leaching field, depending on the situation. It is most common for this condition to be at its worst after and/or immediately following a severe rain storm. It is possible that foul septic odors are coming from storm drainage piping, catch basins, footing drain pipe, or curtain drain discharges, indicating that sewage from your home or a nearby property is getting into these groundwater systems.

SOURCES OF INFORMATION (PART III) What can a prospective home buyer do to ensure that they have as much information as possible about the current state of the septic system and any potential future expenditures related with it? Here are some ideas to get you started: 1. Obtain information from the current owner of the property.

  • Inquire about any drawings that show the exact position of the existing septic system (also known as a “as-built” drawing). Alternatively, the health department of the town (see Paragraph 3 below) might be consulted. Inquire about the documents pertaining to the system’s maintenance. Has the septic tank been drained at least three to five times in the last five years? What type of pumping contractor was employed
  • If the system is equipped with a pump, how frequently has it been serviced? If extensive repairs have been completed, when and to what degree have they been completed
  • Inquire about the system’s prior performance by calling the company. Have any of the symptoms listed in Section II showed themselves during the course of the system’s operation?

Make a site inspection of the property before purchasing it.

  • As soon as you’ve determined the position of the septic tank and drainage fields, take a stroll around the entire area and look for any signs of a sewage overflow situation. It is possible that greener grass in the drainage region does not always imply a problem with the system. If the region, on the other hand, is entirely soaked and odorous, you should be really worried. It is most likely indicative of a failure in progress. Try to obtain a feel of how the natural environment is affecting the property’s ability to distribute water by walking about it. It is possible that the sewage disposal facility is positioned in a depression that has the potential to absorb runoff from rainwater. Is the property level? Is there a watercourse or wetland (swamp) near the drainage system, and is the drainage system and the watercourse or wetland (swamp) at nearly the same elevation? Are there any steep slopes and/or ledge outcrops that would limit the amount of usable area for leaching? If so, what are they? Everything mentioned above might point to difficulties with the present system, as well as a lack of suitable extra land for sewage disposal on the property in the event that it becomes necessary in the future.

3. Visit the Town Health Department to have the property’s file reviewed.

  • Inviting the local sanitarian to review the paperwork with you is a good idea. If so, does it contain enough information for him or her to offer you an opinion on whether the existing system and/or lot complies with current health code requirements? Your objective is to validate and complement information provided by the property owner. Find out how to properly maintain a subterranean sewage disposal system by reading the following: If you are considering building an addition to your house or refurbishing an unfinished basement, consult with a sanitarian about the options and the processes you would need to follow in order to complete your project. Occasionally, it will not be able to “additionally expand” an existing home. Question the general neighborhood, such as the frequency of repairs, capacity to build appropriate-sized repair systems, and average life of systems in the region, among other things.

4. Obtain further information from non-governmental organizations.

  • At the moment, many house transactions are conditional on the completion of a home inspection. Opening up and checking essential components of an existing sewage disposal system is the most reliable method of determining the current status of the system, depending on whether or not the current owner of the land will allow it. It is possible that an inspection of the inside of a septic tank(s) and distribution boxes will reveal that the system is having difficulty spreading the volume of sewage generated by a residence. When access to an existing system is not possible, home inspectors may resort to other techniques of determining the condition of a system that is already in place. Unfortunately, some of the individuals responsible for conducting these tests do not have a thorough grasp of how a system operates. As a result, the findings made as a result of these tests may be incorrect. As an example, testing a system during the summer months may suggest that the system is operational while the system is really submerged in groundwater during the spring months and unable to work as intended.

The following are three frequent tests that are done during a house inspection:

  1. Septic tank effluent is traced into the leaching system with the use of the Dye-Test method of analysis. A common belief is that when dye “surfaces” to the ground or emerges in a stream or catch basin, the system is in peril. However, even while this is true, the opposite outcome does not always imply that the system is operating well or that it will continue to function effectively in the future. It is necessary for the dye to pass through the septic tank and leaching fields before reaching the breakout point in order for it to become visible. This would normally necessitate a significant amount of water and a significant amount of time, and most house inspections do not last long enough to meet this criterion. The Probe-Test is a procedure in which the inspector attempts to locate the “key” elements of the system (septic tank and drainage fields) and determine if they are experiencing overflow conditions. This type of test would only detect severely failed systems (those that have a direct discharge of sewage into the environment)
  2. (meaning the septic tank and fields are flooded). As a result, this test is essentially incorrect since it just takes a single “snapshot” of the system’s current state. A Flooding Test (also known as a “push test”) is actually the process of discharging a substantial quantity of water into an existing septic system in order to simulate a typical “peak” use of water by the homeowner. It may be a “good” day for the system (very little water was used by the homeowner that day
  3. The house may have been empty for some time
  4. It may be the middle of the summer when soil conditions are at their best)
  5. And a judgment is being made with very little Aiming to identify systems that have lost their capacity to spread “peak” flows and, as a result, may not be suitable to meet the expectations of prospective purchasers, the test is designed to reveal such systems. A particular quantity of water has been “flushed” down sinks, tubs, and toilets, and the inspector investigates the leaching area to see if there are any symptoms of a “overflow” situation. An “overflow” indicates that the system is not operating properly, and the inspector comes to the conclusion that the system is not operating properly. But it should be remembered that simply passing the test does not necessarily imply that the system is operating effectively. Many inspectors do this sort of test because they believe it would be a disservice to their clients if they did not gather information on the current state of an existing system. But we are concerned that if this test is not carried out in a responsible and site-specific manner, it might cause damage to the present system or result in incorrect results. If this test is done, we recommend that the following considerations be taken into consideration before reaching any conclusions:
  • Occupancy of the house at the time of writing
  • The possibility of water consumption by the inhabitants within the previous 24 hours prior to completing the tests
  • Soil conditions in the leaching region, including the degree of saturation caused by groundwater levels, rainfall events, and the time of year
  • And Water should be applied to the system in a gradual, consistent way (for example, by flowing water through the plumbing fittings) to avoid a “slug” of water entering the septic tank and disrupting the contents. In light of the information provided above, the process should restrict the amount of water used for the test, although it should not exceed 50 gallons per bedroom in a fully inhabited (two persons per bedroom) residence.

To reiterate, the above-mentioned testing is intended to identify septic systems that are clearly in need of repair. None of the tests mentioned above can provide an assurance that a home’s present sewage disposal system will continue to function effectively in the future. You can use County Maps from the Soil Conservation Service (which you can get from the local sanitarian) to try to identify what type of soil is most likely present on the site and forecast the feasibility of future repairs to the existing leaching system by looking at them.

However, this is only recommended for people who are “comfortable” with approaching this issue with “strangers” and who are aware that the information received may not be completely factual for a variety of reasons, as previously stated (devaluation of their own property; not wanting to “spoil” the sale of a friendly neighbor, etc.).

They can provide you with information on the soil and septic system conditions in the area, as well as what may be expected (particularly in terms of expenditures) if you have difficulties with the existing system.

Afterwards, you may compare the results to what your family is currently utilizing.

4.

Assuming that proper soil test data is not accessible through the local health department, the only way to definitively answer this issue is to actually undertake all of the deep hole testing and percolation tests that are mandated by code.

Consequently, the more information a buyer can gather, the better equipped he or she will be to assess the suitability of the present system and to determine what will most likely be required to fix the system if and when it becomes necessary.

So that the buyer is not taken off guard when that day occurs, because it was included in the financial evaluation that determined the property’s current market worth at the time of purchase.

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