How Many Feet Of Septic Tank Domes Are Needed? (Question)

  • The maximum length of a trench is typically about 150 feet but we have found installations that were three times that length. Some writers opine that the maximum septic trench line is 100 feet. A realistic answer is, it depends – on site and soil conditions.

How many feet of septic chamber do I need?

The minimum linear footage of the leaching chamber system should be determined by dividing the total trench bottom area by 1.2 meters (4 feet), when used in a conventional drainfield trench. No reduction area is allowed for leaching chamber systems installed in bed or fill systems.

How many infiltrators do I need?

As a general rule, trenches ‘fingers’ should be no longer than fifty feet ( 12 or 13 Infiltrators long ) for best function and most even effluent distribution. Unless you are installing as a “bed” system (where the chambers are right next to each other), leave at least six feet of undisturbed soil between fingers.

How much space is needed for a mound septic system?

Unlike conventional systems the mound system will require two separate tanks. The first will be a standard septic tank buried at a depth of 10 to 16 inches and located a minimum of 10 feet from the foundation of the house. Both tanks need to be level and square.

How deep should septic chambers be?

Drain Field Depth Generally, a finished bed contains 12 inches of gravel below the pipe and another 2 inches on top. The field is then backfilled with 18 to 30 inches of soil to finish the bed and bring it even with the surrounding ground. The result is a drain field about 3 to 4 feet deep.

How do I calculate the size of my septic drain field?

Drainfield Size

  1. The size of the drainfield is based on the number of bedrooms and soil characteristics, and is given as square feet.
  2. For example, the minimum required for a three bedroom house with a mid range percolation rate of 25 minutes per inch is 750 square feet.

How many feet is a leach line?

The leach field is a series of trenches that may be up to 100-feet long and 1 foot to 3 feet in width, separated by six feet or more, depending on local requirements, and sometimes constructed leaving space between the original lines to install replacement leach lines when needed.

Can you drive over leach field chambers?

In sum, driving over the leach field in any vehicle larger than a child’s bicycle is a bad idea. Heavy vehicles may actually crush buried leach field lines, or they may compress the soils around the leach field, either of which leads to failure. Driving on or parking on leach fields will destroy them.

Can a mound system be put anywhere?

It costs a great deal of money to install these systems, but they can be placed anywhere. A mound septic system has no container, and digging too far gets you too close to the water table. This means instead of digging down you have to dig out.

Should you mow a septic mound?

To prevent compaction, do not allow any vehicles or heavy equipment on the mound. When mowing the lawn, use a hand mower, rather than a riding mower. This will also help protect the mound from losing soil to erosion. The slope of the mound makes it more susceptible to erosion than a conventional drain field.

Can you walk on a septic mound?

Low-maintenance perennial plants that minimize the need to walk on the mound are ideal. Walking compacts the soil and may interfere with the evaporation of effluents. Do as little digging as possible when planting to avoid disturbing the mound and be sure to wear gloves to minimize your physical contact with the soil.

How deep are drain fields buried?

A typical drainfield trench is 18 to 30 inches in depth, with a maximum soil cover over the disposal field of 36 inches.

What can you put on top of a septic field?

Put plastic sheets, bark, gravel or other fill over the drainfield. Reshape or fill the ground surface over the drainfield and reserve area. However, just adding topsoil is generally OK if it isn’t more than a couple of inches. Make ponds on or near the septic system and the reserve area.

How much fall should a leach line have?

In a conventional gravity system, the pipe from the house to the septic tank, and the outlet pipe from the tank to the distribution box or leach field, should both slope downward with a minimum slope of 1/4 in. per ft. (1/8 in. per ft.

How Deep Should a Septic Leach Field Be?

Photograph courtesy of Valerie Loiseleux/E+/Getty Images.

In This Article

  • Drain Field Operation
  • Drain Field Depth
  • Drain Field Width and Length
  • How the Drain Field Works

It is critical to appropriately size a septic system’s drain or leach field, as an inadequately sized field might result in serious complications. Waste puddles appearing on your lawn are just one of the issues that might arise, therefore it’s crucial to grasp the fundamentals of how a drain field works. Although you are not required to become an expert in septic systems, a little information may go a long way toward ensuring that your drain field is in good operating condition.

Tip

The final depth of a septic system’s drain field is determined by a variety of factors. Drain fields, on the other hand, are typically between 2 and 5 feet deep.

How the Drain Field Works

The final depth of a septic system’s drain field is determined by a variety of factors. Drain fields, on the other hand, are typically 2 to 5 feet deep.

Drain Field Width and Length

If you have more than one bedroom in your house, your septic system designer will figure out what size drain field you’ll need based on the number of bedrooms you have. In addition, the designer will take into consideration the zoning regulations, soil conditions, and the peculiarities of your lot while designing your home. According to many towns’ regulations, for example, your drain field must be at least a set distance away from your property line. The setbacks from streams, marshes, water supply lines (including local water wells), and other possible barriers are also defined by municipal construction standards.

In addition, pipes are frequently spaced 6 feet apart from one another.

The fact that they are spaced 6 feet apart, on the other hand, provides for the addition of more pipes at a 3-foot spacing if necessary in the future without enlarging the total footprint of the drain field.

It is then decided how this pipe should be laid out in relation to the amount of land available for the leach field to be used.

Septic Solutions – Installation

There are four primary types of septic systems to consider. The availability of all four types may not be available to every homeowner due to the fact that municipal rules may prohibit the installation of traditional systems in areas where soil absorbtion or drainfield space is restricted. Furthermore, each has its own set of benefits and drawbacks to consider. The majority of municipalities need an engineer to do a site review. The outcomes of this examination will decide the alternatives available to the homeowners.

Installation prices also differ depending on the system type, so there is a lot to consider when deciding which system is ideal for you.

Conventional Systems

Septic systems may be divided into four categories. Homeowners may not be able to select from all four options since municipal rules may prohibit the installation of traditional systems in areas with limited soil absorbtion or drainfield space. Furthermore, each has its own set of benefits and drawbacks to offer. The majority of municipalities need an engineer to do a site assessment. Depending on the outcome of this examination, the homeowners’ options will be narrowed down. The owner must pay more or less attention to different systems on a regular basis, and certain systems require more frequent maintenance by septic system specialists.

Low-Pressure Dose Systems

Low-pressure dosing systems (also known as low-pressure pipe systems) may be a viable option in situations when soil and topographical factors do not allow for the installation of a typical septic system, such as urban areas. Particularly relevant in situations where geography dictates that the drainfield be positioned up-hill from the septic tanks or where there is uneven terrain that would otherwise prevent the installation of a traditional system. Low-Pressure Dose Systems (LPDs) are designed to function in the following ways: A pumping chamber is placed in addition to the typical septic tank, which is a type of holding tank.

  1. The drainfield for an LPD application is made up of tiny perforated pipes laid in shallow, gravel-lined trenches that range in depth from 10″ to 18″ and in width from 12″ to 18″.
  2. After then, the field is allowed to drain.
  3. Shallow placement also encourages evapo-transpiration, which is the process by which evaporation and grass and other shallow-rooted vegetation serve to remove waste.
  4. Alarms will be activated if there is a significant increase in flow.
  5. Whenever a drainfield is not placed on a slope, the system will be constructed in such a manner that effluent does not exit the pumping chamber after the pump has been switched off.
  6. Furthermore, because of the employment of a low-pressure pump, the whole drainfield will be utilized in a consistent manner.
  7. However, there are several disadvantages to LPDs, including the possibility of root penetration and the blockage of drain holes by particles that leave the pumping chamber.

Finally, LPDs must be serviced on a regular basis. Electricity, a pump, and a smaller drainfield all raise the likelihood of system failure. As a result, most regulatory agencies now mandate septic system inspections by qualified septic specialists on a yearly or semi-annual basis.

Evapotranspiration Systems

The use of Evapotraspiration Systems (ETs) is often only practicable in arid and semi-arid environments. To put it simply, we are interested in climates where evaporation surpasses rainfall by at least 24 inches per year. The EP system is based on the natural evaporation of wastewater via a sand barrier, as well as the simultaneous transpiration of water through the leaves of plants and grasses grown above the drainfield, to remove pollutants. In contrast to the methods mentioned above, an ET system consists of a trench lined with an impervious barrier that drains to a collection basin below ground.

  1. Above the gravel is a layer of sand that is raised above the level of the surrounding ground.
  2. Naturally, this sort of system performs best during the spring, summer, and fall seasons, when heat and sunlight combine to deliver the most effective wastewater treatment.
  3. Applications in places with short soil depths and impermeable rock or hardpanlayers beneath the surface are recommended.
  4. Additionally, after the system has been in operation for an extended length of time, there is the possibility of salt accumulation near the surface.
  5. This is essentially the same system as an ET system, with the difference that the drainfield is not enclosed in this configuration.
  6. Generally speaking, wastewater must be able to flow through at least 2 to 4 feet of unsaturated soil before reaching the ground water table in order to be effective.
  7. In North Texas, most permitting authorities demand the construction of two fields, with the owner physically switching the wastewater flow between the fields once a month, as well as the building of two fields.
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Aerobic Wastewater Treatment Systems

At this point, aerobic septic systems stand out as the only system that can be used in virtually all case where septic systems are needed. In essence, when you own an aerobic system, you are the owner of a miniature version of a municipal sewage treatment facility. As a result, your aerobic system closely resembles many of the stages and operations carried out by a municipal solid waste treatment facility. Aerobic systems and septic systems are similar in that they both treat wastewater via the use of natural processes.

  1. The increase in oxygen promotes the natural bacterial consumption of waste inside the system as a result of the increase in oxygen.
  2. Upon completion of this process, the resultant discharge water is clean and pure enough to be released directly over the absorption field using sprinklers.
  3. The installation of aerobic systems is currently mandated by many regulatory authorities, including those in North Texas, for both new house construction and the replacement of failing conventional, LPD, and Evapotranspiration systems.
  4. A low-cost maintenance contract will lessen the need for intervention and care on the part of the homeowner.
  5. There is less solid waste entering the aerobic chamber as a result of this method.
  6. Following that, the wastewater enters the aerobic chamber, where air is compressed and pumped into the wastewater in order to promote the development of good bacteria that eat the particles in the wastewater.
  7. After that, the treated water is pumped into a pumping chamber, where it undergoes a last treatment with unstabilized chlorine before being discharged.

The pump will discharge the water into the absorption field when a float valve within the pump chamber detects the presence of water.

In most cases, aerobic systems are not significantly more expensive to build and operate than traditional septic systems.

Typically, they are less expensive to build than LPDs or Evapotranspiration systems since they do not require the use of sand and/or gravel to prepare a drainfield prior to installation.

This maintenance contract will provide you with the assurance that your plant will operate in accordance with specifications at all times.

If your maintenance contract expires before the end of this period, you will be required to either renew it or seek a new one from another waste water treatment specialist.

For further information, please see this link.

You will not be able to acquire a building permit till this study is completed. Septic Solutions of Texas retains ownership of the copyright and reserves all rights.

Leaching Chamber – On-Site Sewage Facilities (OSSF)

Leaching chamber systems operate in a similar fashion to typical gravel-filled drainfield systems in that they manage wastewater. The most significant variation is in the manner in which the trench is created. A leaching chamber system consists of the following components: The term “treatment device” refers to a device that treats waste, usually an aseptic tank, although it can also refer to a more complex pretreatment component. An example of a leaching chamber is a dome-shaped plastic chamber that is readily accessible from commercial sources.

The top of the chamber is solid so that it can support the soil above it, while the sides and bottom are louvered to enable water to depart.

Trenches for leaching chambers are limited to a maximum length of 150 feet.

The leaching chambers are used to hold effluent until it can be absorbed by the soil.

Related Resources:

Chambers for Leaching (and inSpanish)

ADS ARC 36 Leachfield Chamber

PlumbersStock has a great deal on theADS ARC 36 Leachfield Chamber. You will also require the end cap (ADS 3603BD3, which is offered separately) to complete your purchase of this tank. Septic leaching chambers such as the ADS ARC 36 Septic Leaching Chamber (ADS 3613BD2) are intended to replace the inefficient and labor-intensive gravel and leach systems that are usually found in most septic waste water installations. High-density polyethylene is used to construct each 63″ (60″ repeat length) corrugated segment, which is 34,5 inches wide.

  1. Each of these parts is easily interlocked with the use of an incorporated modified post and dome joint, which enables for both straight line installation and somewhat radial applications to be accomplished.
  2. This ADS Arc 36 Septic Leaching Chamber weighs only 16 lbs and can be easily installed by one person.
  3. The Arc 36’s corrugated chamber design reduces flat surfaces and boosts load-bearing capacities to a rating of H-10 (16,000 lbs.
  4. The size of this leaching chamber is 8 cubic feet, and the overall minimum trench depth is 14 inches.
  5. For further information, please refer to the Installation Manual that has been included.
  6. You’ll need how many feet of line you need.
  7. The installation and design of your septic system are also influenced by state and local regulations.

It is important to note that this leaching chamber is an ADS unique product (Advanced Drainage System).

Septic Leach Chambers

In order to meet the needs of Leachfield Applications, Plastic-Mart is happy to provide the top manufacturer:

The leach field, also known as the drain field, is the underground area on your property where your leach field pipes filter the wastewater from the tank into the soil. The wastewater sinks into the soil, where it is broken down by natural bacteria. Most septic system failures are caused by issues with the leach field.

In addition, the ARC Chambers’ unique structural design allows it to manage any traditional leachfield system issue without degrading its overall effectiveness. An infiltrative surface area and storage capacity that are optimized in the septic leaching chamber are achieved through the use of a robust, lightweight polyethylene plastic unit. As a result of this combination, effluent dispersion performance is improved, while structural integrity is also enhanced.

  • Lightweight and durable design made possible by injection molding using high density polyethylene (HDPE). An integrated articulating joint with a 20–degree angle of rotation that is suited for straight or contoured septic leachfield applications
  • False corrugated chamber design eliminates flat surfaces and increases the load bearing capacity of the trench by many times. The “Lock and Drop” joint provides a more secure connection during the installation and backfill process. An inlet/outlet end cap that is universal
  • The inspection vent openings on each unit include easy–to–remove knockouts, allowing for the greatest amount of job site flexibility. Convenient five-foot lengths make it simple to transport
  • When installed properly, the diamond plate texture increases slide resistance while also improving simplicity of installation. The Side Port Coupler snaps into position to allow for side access at any juncture along the trench line’s length.
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How many feet of line do you need?There are many different factors that could play a role in choosing the correct amount of measurements for your leach field required for a home. This woulf include estimated water usage, number of and even soil type. Installing and designing your septic leach field system also depends on your State and Local Codes. It would be best for you to contact a local septic system contractor who could do a site inspection and would be able to give you a better assesssment of what it would take to build an efficient septic leach field system.

A Beginner’s Guide to Septic Systems

  • Septic systems are used to dispose of waste from homes and buildings. Identifying the location of the septic tank and drainfield
  • What a Septic System Is and How It Works Keeping a Septic System in Good Condition
  • Signs that a septic system is failing include:

Septic systems, also known as on-site wastewater management systems, are installed in a large number of buildings and houses. It is easy to lose sight of septic systems, which operate quietly, gracefully, and efficiently to protect human and environmental health due to their burying location. Septic systems are the norm in rural regions, but they may also be found in a lot of metropolitan places, especially in older buildings. It is critical to understand whether or not your building is on a septic system.

Is Your Home or Building on a Septic System?

It is possible that the solution to this question will not be evident. If a structure looks to be connected to a sewage system, it may instead be connected to a septic system. It is fairly unusual for tenants to be unaware of the final destination of the wastewater generated by their residence. Some of the hints or signs listed below will assist in determining whether the facility is served by a septic system or whether it is supplied by a sewer system:

  • Sewer service will be provided at a cost by the city or municipality. Pay close attention to the water bill to see whether there is a cost labeled “sewer” or “sewer charge” on it. If there is a fee for this service, it is most likely because the facility is connected to a sewage system. Look up and down the street for sewage access ports or manholes, which can be found in any location. If a sewage system runs in front of a property, it is probable that the house is connected to it in some way. Inquire with your neighbors to see if they are connected to a sewer or septic system. The likelihood that your home is on a sewer system is increased if the properties on each side of you are on one as well. Keep in mind, however, that even if a sewage line runs in front of the structure and the nearby residences are connected to a sewer system, your home or building may not be connected to one. If the structure is older than the sewer system, it is possible that it is still on the original septic system. Consult with your local health agency for further information. This agency conducts final inspections of septic systems to ensure that they comply with applicable laws and regulations. There is a possibility that they have an archived record and/or a map of the system and will supply this information upon request

All property owners should be aware of whether or not their property is equipped with an on-site wastewater treatment system. Georgia law mandates that the property owner is responsible for the correct operation of a septic system, as well as any necessary maintenance and repairs.

Locating the Septic Tank and Drainfield

Finding a septic system may be a difficult process. They can be buried anywhere in the yard, including the front, back, and side yards. After a few years, the soil may begin to resemble the surrounding soil, making it impossible to distinguish the system from the surrounding soil. It is possible that in dry weather, the grass will be dryer in the shallow soil over the tank and greener over the drainfield, where the cleansed water will be released, but this is not always the case, especially in hot weather.

  1. The contractor who built the house should have presented the initial owner with a map showing the tank and drainfield locations, according to the building code.
  2. The installation of the system, as well as any modifications made to it, would have been examined by your local health authority.
  3. Unfortunately, if the system is very old, any records related with it may be insufficient or nonexistent, depending on the situation.
  4. Look for the point at where the wastewater pipes join together if the building is on a crawlspace or has an unfinished basement.
  5. The sewer line that runs through the structure is referred to as the building sewer.
  6. To “feel” for the tank, use a piece of re-bar or a similar metal probe.
  7. If you use this free service, you may avoid accidentally putting a rod through your gas or water line.

Try to locate the tank after a rainstorm, when the metal probe will be more easily maneuvered through moist dirt.

This should be done with care; extreme caution should be exercised to avoid puncturing the building sewer.

A tank is normally 5 by 8 feet in size, however the dimensions might vary.

Be aware that there may be rocks, pipes, and other debris in the area that “feels” like the tank but is not in fact part of the tank.

However, it is possible to have the lid or access port positioned on a riser in addition to being on the same level as the top of the tank in some cases.

Once the tank has been identified, make a rough drawing of its placement in relation to the house so that it will not be misplaced again!

It may be easier to discover the drainage lines now that the tank has been identified, particularly if the area has been subjected to prolonged periods of drought.

How a Septic System Works

Typical sewage treatment system (figure 1). It is composed of three components (Figure 1): the tank, the drain lines or discharge lines, and the soil treatment area (also known as the soil treatment area) (sometimes called a drainfield or leach field). The size of the tank varies according to the size of the structure. The normal home (three bedrooms, two bathrooms) will often include a 1,000-gallon water storage tank on the premises. Older tanks may only have one chamber, however newer tanks must have two chambers.

  1. The tank functions by settling waste and allowing it to be digested by microbes.
  2. These layers include the bottom sludge layer, the top scum layer, and a “clear” zone in the center.
  3. A typical septic tank is seen in Figure 2.
  4. It is fortunate that many of the bacteria involved are found in high concentrations in the human gastrointestinal tract.
  5. Although the bacteria may break down some of the stuff in the sludge, they are unable to break down all of it, which is why septic tanks must be cleaned out every three to seven years.
  6. In addition, when new water is introduced into the septic tank, an equal volume of water is pushed out the discharge lines and onto the drainfield.
  7. The water trickles out of the perforated drain pipes, down through a layer of gravel, and into the soil below the surface (Figure 3).
  8. A typical drainfield may be found here.
  9. Plants, bacteria, fungus, protozoa, and other microorganisms, as well as bigger critters such as mites, earthworms, and insects, flourish in soil.
  10. Mineralogical and metallic elements attach to soil particles, allowing them to be removed from the waste water.
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Maintaining a Septic System

The most typical reason for a septic system to fail is a lack of proper maintenance. Septic systems that are failing are expensive to repair or replace, and the expense of repairs rests on the shoulders of the property owner (Figure 4). Fortunately, keeping your septic system in good working order and avoiding costly repairs is rather simple. Figure 4. Septic system failure is frequently caused by a lack of proper maintenance. It is in your best interests to be aware of the location of the system, how it operates, and how to maintain it.

  1. You should pump the tank if you aren’t sure when the last time it was pumped.
  2. It is not permissible to drive or park over the tank or drainage field.
  3. No rubbish should be disposed of in the sink or the toilet.
  4. It’s important to remember that garbage disposals enhance the requirement for regular pumping.
  5. When designing a landscape, keep the septic system in mind.
  6. It is also not recommended to consume veggies that have been cultivated above drainfield lines (see Dorn, S.
  7. Ornamental Plantings on Septic Drainfields.

C 1030).

Any water that enters your home through a drain or toilet eventually ends up in your septic system.

Don’t put too much strain on the system by consuming a large amount of water in a short period of time.

Additives should not be used.

Various types of additives are available for purchase as treatment options, cleansers, restorers, rejuvenator and boosters, among other things.

To break up oil and grease and unclog drains, chemical additives are available for purchase.

Pumping out the septic tank is not eliminated or reduced by using one of these systems.

They remain floating in the water and travel into the drainfield, where they may block the pipes. Acids have the potential to damage concrete storage tanks and distribution boxes.

Signs a Septic System is Failing

A failed system manifests itself in the following ways:

  • Sinks and toilets drain at a snail’s pace
  • Plumbing that is backed up
  • The sound of gurgling emanating from the plumbing system House or yard aromas that smell like sewage
  • In the yard, there is wet or squishy dirt
  • Water that is gray in hue that has accumulated
  • An region of the yard where the grass is growing more quickly and is becoming greener
  • Water contaminated by bacteria from a well

If you notice any of these indicators, you should notify your local health department immediately. An environmentalist from the health department can assist in identifying possible hazards. There are also listings of state-certified contractors available from the local health department, who may do repairs. Repairs or alterations to the system must be approved by the health department and examined by an inspector. Keep an eye out for any meetings that may take place between a health department inspector and a contractor to discuss repairs to your system.

  1. Household garbage that has not been properly handled is released into the environment when systems fail.
  2. It has the potential to pollute surrounding wells, groundwater, streams, and other sources of potable water, among other things.
  3. The foul odor emanating from a malfunctioning system can cause property values to plummet.
  4. Briefly stated, broken systems can have an impact on your family, neighbors, community, and the environment.
  5. Septic systems are an effective, attractive, and reasonably priced method of treating and disposing of wastewater.

Figures 2 and 3 reprinted with permission from: CIDWT. 2009. Installation of Wastewater Treatment Systems. Consortium of Institutes for Decentralized Wastewater Treatment. Iowa State University, Midwest Plan Service. Ames, IA.

History of the current status and revisions Published on the 15th of August, 2013. Published on March 28th, 2017 with a full review.

Infiltrator Chambers FAQs

Several installation choices and criteria are controlled by municipal rules that have been established by the health authority in your region. When in doubt, consult with your local health agency for specifics, and then adhere to their code recommendations as best you can. The Technical Services staff at Infiltrator Water Technologies may be reached at 1-800-718-2754, if you have any queries about design or installation that are not addressed here.

In what types of systems can Infiltrator chambers be installed?

It is possible to employ infiltrator chambers in virtually every septic leachfield application. Infiltrator chambers can be utilized in any location where stone and pipe can be put. This comprises trenching, bed construction, and raised mound construction. Using infiltrator chambers, you may achieve higher treatment capabilities in applications like as pressure dosing, level distribution, serial distribution, evapotranspiration, and sand filtering.

When I install Infiltrator chambers, how much can the size of the leachfield be reduced?

Each municipal health department determines the appropriate size of their system.

When Infiltrator chambers are specified, health departments have often permitted size reductions ranging from 25 to 50 percent in most cases. Check your local health codes for information on what is required in your region.

Can chambers be installed under a driveway or paved surface?

It is up to each each municipal health department to establish the appropriate size of their own system. When Infiltrator chambers are specified, health departments have often permitted size reductions ranging from 25 to 50%. Check your local health codes for the specifics of your area’s health standards and regulations.

What is Infiltrator Water Technologies’ specification for minimum and maximum system cover?

Infiltrator Water Technologies suggests that a compacted cover be placed over the chambers to a minimum of 12 inches in height. In a trench system, the maximum cover that may be provided over the chambers is 96 inches. The maximum cover available in bed systems is 48 inches. It is possible to lower the minimum cover to six inches if the drainfield is located in a non-trafficked region. When installing a system at the 6-inch depth, exercise caution when working with the equipment. A series of Shallow Cover (SC) Chambers from Infiltrator Water Technologies allows for six inches of cover with an H-10 comparable loading rate; however, these are only accessible in a few geographic locations.

Can Infiltrator chambers be installed around obstacles?

Yes. For the purpose of accommodating existing obstructions during system installation, the Quick4 Chambers allow for 10 to 15 degree right or left turns.

Can the inspection port opening be used as an inlet?

Yes, there is a knock-out portion on the top of each chamber, which is normally utilized as an inspection port for the chambers. In order to properly intake into the inspection port, a splash plate must be installed beneath the inlet. When backfilling, take care not to displace the input pipe from its position.

What prevents soil from entering the chamber through the sidewall louvers?

Yes, there is a knock-out section on the top of each chamber, which is normally utilized as an inspection port for each chamber. When inleting into the inspection port, a splash plate must be installed beneath the ingress port to prevent contamination. Take care not to dislodge the input pipe when backfilling the tank.

Should filter fabric be used over Infiltrator chamber sidewall louvers?

As a result, no filter fabric is required with Infiltrator MicroLeachingTM sidewall louvers since they are intended to keep soil out. For further information, call 1-800-718-2754, which is the number for Technical Services at Infiltrator Water Technologies.

Do I need to compact the trench base when installing in sandy soils or fill/mound systems?

As a result, no filter fabric is required with Infiltrator MicroLeachingTM sidewall louvers, which are meant to keep soil out. For further information, call 1-800-718-2754, which is the toll-free number for Infiltrator Water Technologies.

Do septic systems freeze in extremely cold conditions?

The installation of onsite wastewater systems (septic systems) has been a long-standing practice in cold-weather climates for many years. Typically, if the systems were developed and deployed according to code, they did not experience a freeze. In order to maintain sufficient septic system performance, it is important to consider factors such as the temperature of the water departing the residence and the right burial depth of your septic system (septic tank(s) and drainfield). Please consult with a professional septic contractor in your region if you want extra assistance.

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