How Many Feet Are We Supposed To Dig For A Septic Tank? (Solution found)

Department of Health in many States requires that new septic tanks or human-waste lagoons to be installed at least 50 feet from a well. Septic tank drain fields must be at least 100 feet from a well.Department of Health in many States requires that new septic tanks or human-waste lagoons to be installed at least 50 feet from a well. Septic tank drain fieldsdrain fieldsThe drain field typically consists of an arrangement of trenches containing perforated pipes and porous material (often gravel) covered by a layer of soil to prevent animals (and surface runoff) from reaching the wastewater distributed within those trenches.https://en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Septic_drain_field

Septic drain field – Wikipedia

must be at least 100 feet from a well.

inspectapedia.com

  • Department of Health in many States dictates that septic tank drain fields must be at least 100 feet from a well. Just like the minimum separation distance between a well and a septic tank, this figure too may vary depending on where you live. Advertisements

How deep underground should a septic tank be?

In most cases, septic tank components including the lid, are buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underground. You can use a metal probe to locate its edges and mark the perimeter. If you do not find the lid by probing, shallow excavation with a shovel along the tank’s perimeter should reveal the lid.

How many feet of septic chamber do I need?

The minimum linear footage of the leaching chamber system should be determined by dividing the total trench bottom area by 1.2 meters (4 feet), when used in a conventional drainfield trench. No reduction area is allowed for leaching chamber systems installed in bed or fill systems.

How deep are drain fields buried?

A typical drainfield trench is 18 to 30 inches in depth, with a maximum soil cover over the disposal field of 36 inches.

How long do septic tanks last?

A septic system’s lifespan should be anywhere from 15 to 40 years. How long the system lasts depends on a number of factors, including construction material, soil acidity, water table, maintenance practices, and several others.

How do I calculate the size of my septic drain field?

Drainfield Size

  1. The size of the drainfield is based on the number of bedrooms and soil characteristics, and is given as square feet.
  2. For example, the minimum required for a three bedroom house with a mid range percolation rate of 25 minutes per inch is 750 square feet.

How many septic infiltrators do I need?

As a general rule, trenches ‘fingers’ should be no longer than fifty feet ( 12 or 13 Infiltrators long ) for best function and most even effluent distribution. Unless you are installing as a “bed” system (where the chambers are right next to each other), leave at least six feet of undisturbed soil between fingers.

What is the slope for septic lines?

A typical septic tank has a 4-inch inlet located at the top. The pipe that connects to it must maintain a 1/4-inch-per-foot slope toward it from the house. This means that for every 10 feet of distance between the tank and the house, the inlet must be 2 1/2 inches below the point at which the pipe exits the house.

How big is a typical septic drain field?

A typical septic drainfield trench is 18 to 30 inches in depth, with a maximum soil cover over the disposal field of 36″; or per the USDA, 2 feet to 5 feet in depth.

Can I put dirt over my drain field?

Never add additional soil over the drain field unless it is a minimal amount used to restore an area that may have been eroded or pulled up by removing another plant. Try not to be overly zealous when tilling the soil for planting. Remember that the drain lines may be as close as 6 inches from the soil surface.

Why is my grass dying over my drain field?

As temperatures increase, grass draws more moisture from the soil beneath it. The soil above leach lines is shallower than the soil in the rest of the lawn, so it holds less water compared to the rest of the lawn, causing grass directly above the lines to dry out and turn yellow.

What is the most common cause of septic system failure?

Most septic systems fail because of inappropriate design or poor maintenance. Some soil-based systems (those with a drain field) are installed at sites with inadequate or inappropriate soils, excessive slopes, or high ground water tables.

What will ruin a septic system?

Any paper products like tissues, paper towels, tampons, or sanitary products, even some heavier toilet paper, will clog your system if you flush enough of it. Wet wipes are another product that you should never flush into a septic system.

How often should you pump your septic tank?

Inspect and Pump Frequently The average household septic system should be inspected at least every three years by a septic service professional. Household septic tanks are typically pumped every three to five years.

How Far Should You Put the Septic Tank From the House?

Image courtesy of Kwangmoozaa/iStock/Getty Images.

In This Article

  • Amount of distance from the home
  • Basic safety concerns
  • Suggestions for a successful installation

For those who don’t have access to a municipal sewage system, an alternate solution, such as a septic tank and field lines, will be required. The design and operation of these systems are fairly straightforward. When designing a septic system, you must keep in mind the requirements of local construction codes as well as public health concerns.

Tip

Depending on where you live, local ordinances and regulations that specify the distance between the septic tank and the home vary. However, the normal minimum distance is 10 feet between the two structures. Consult your local ordinances and regulations for a detailed answer as to how far your septic tank must be installed from your home. Requirements differ from one location to the next, although the standard minimum distance from the home is 10 feet in most cases. In the case of a private well for drinking water, however, keep in mind that many state departments of health demand a minimum distance of 50 feet between a new septic tank and a well.

It is possible that the septic tank will be placed considerably closer to the structure since it will be easier and require less plumbing in some cases.

Basic Safety Considerations

If you’re the type of person who prefers to do things on their own, there are certain important measures you should take before starting this endeavor. Before you start digging the hole for the tank, call your local utility providers to find out where the service lines are located. A gas line, water line, phone line, or electrical connection that has been severed is not only potentially dangerous, but it may also be extremely expensive to repair. Once you have finished excavating the hole, proceed with caution.

It’s also important to understand that a concrete septic tank can weigh up to 5 tons.

Make sure the hole is available when the tank is delivered so that it can be installed straight in the desired location.

Tips for a Successful Installation

Plan ahead of time to get your water supply switched on prior to installing your septic tank. You must fill the tank with water as soon as it is placed in its final position for this to be possible. This has absolutely nothing to do with the septic system itself, but it is a prudent precaution. In the event of a heavy downpour, the groundwater may swell and a septic tank may float out of the ground, even if it has been buried. If this occurs, contact a qualified professional immediately. Repairing any damage done to the lines or to the tank itself, as well as putting the tank back in its original location, may be a costly and time-consuming endeavor.

Initially, you may be confident that you will remember the exact location of the marker when it is time to top up the tank — which is generally every three to five years — but your memory may fade over time.

In the absence of a marker, you may end up digging holes in the wrong place when it is time to service the tank.

How Deep Are Septic Tanks Buried? (And How Do You Find It?)

It is possible that this content contains affiliate links. It is possible that I will receive a commission if you make a purchase after clicking on an affiliate link. In addition, as an Amazon Associate, I receive a commission from qualifying purchases.- Septic tanks, for example, might become a requirement in more remote places where some services are not readily available or easily accessible. After all, we rely on contemporary conveniences such as adequate plumbing to make our lives more comfortable and easy.

Discovering the location of your septic tank in your yard, as well as what may be grown near or on top of it, will help you determine how much of your yard is suitable for regular gardening.

You May Not Know

Despite the fact that it appears to be something that every homeowner should be aware of, understanding how deep a septic tank is buried can be difficult to determine. Perhaps you forgot about the septic tank after it was installed years ago, or perhaps you are moving into a house that already has a septic tank constructed in previously. Whatever the situation, determining the depth of your septic tank can be a challenging task under the circumstances, especially if you are unsure of the location of the lids.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank

Finding out how deep your home’s septic tank is buried may seem like something that should be obvious to you, but you may be surprised. Some people forget that they had their septic tank installed years ago, while others move into a house that already has one installed. Whatever the situation may be, determining the depth of your septic tank can be a challenging task under the conditions, especially if you are unsure of the location of the lids. Septic tanks can be buried anywhere between four inches and four feet underground, according to the common rule of thumb.

Where Should the Septic Tank Be Located?

If your property does not presently have a septic tank, but you are interested in the possibility of installing one, it is critical that you understand where it should be installed. Ordinarily speaking, most septic tanks will be situated between 10 and 25 feet away from the house. You should bear in mind that septic tanks cannot and should not be located any closer than five feet from your residence. Using a probe, you may search for flat concrete to determine whether or not a tank has previously been put on a property that you have recently purchased.

Planting Above a Septic Tank

Even though it may not appear to be the finest idea in the world, putting vegetation over a septic tank may really be perfectly acceptable as long as you choose the appropriate plants to grow. Not only is it perfectly OK to do so, but it may also be rather helpful depending on what you are planting and harvesting. It is possible to avoid erosion in your tank with the correct sort of vegetation, and it is even possible to absorb some of the additional moisture that might accumulate in your drain field.

  1. Perennial plants and grasses (as previously indicated) are the ideal kind of plants to use in and around your drain field and septic tank.
  2. You can use non-woody ground covers for a similar purpose as you do with woody ground covers.
  3. Take, for example, the expanding environment.
  4. If you don’t have access to enough sunshine, you might want to choose a shade garden plant instead.
  5. Keep in mind that the soil that surrounds the septic tank drain field will typically be wetter than the surrounding soil in the rest of the yard.
  6. As a result, choose a perennial such as a hollyhock, wild violet, or bee balm to ensure that you cover all of those bases when planting.
  7. A septic system beneath these plants does not imply that deer will avoid the area because of its presence on your property.

As a result, if you don’t want deer to infest your yard, try planting perennials that are deer-resistant instead. Something like a spring bulb or an attractive grass that the deer aren’t generally interested in eating.

Plants That You Don’t Want to Grow

Just because you have the option of planting over your septic tank does not mean that everything is appropriate for this situation. A few plants should be avoided at all costs while landscaping around your septic tank, particularly huge trees that are known for their rapid growth. On the same vein, shrubs and trees with aggressive root systems are some of the worst plants to grow around your home. These roots will shoot out in quest of water, and they will not be concerned with where they locate it.

See also:  How Many Septic Tank Companies Are In Los Angeles? (Question)

The infiltration of those roots into your septic drain field might result in catastrophic damage to your septic tank and drain field.

It’s possible that you’ll need a complete replacement.

Many other plants have strong root systems that you should avoid growing anywhere near your septic tank or drain field, and there are lots of them.

How Your Septic System Works

It is possible that understanding how your septic system operates may help you better manage, maintain, and care for it. Aside from that, it is just a large tank buried in the ground that collects your waste (which is true, but still). In remote locations, there may be a deficiency in sewage infrastructure. Because not every rural location is the same, it is not a given that septic systems will be required in your local rural area. The septic tank, in any case, serves as a form of wastewater treatment facility when there are no sewage lines available.

  • The tank is designed to be waterproof, ensuring that your wastewater does not leech into the surrounding environment.
  • Solids sink to the bottom of the container, scum rises to the top of the container, and liquids sit in the center of the three levels described above.
  • The wastewater that is being discharged from your home is the cause of the exit.
  • This liquid is carried out of your home through a pipe and into a bigger portion of your sanitary sewer system.
  • Your drain is typically comprised of a network of perforated PVC pipes that are put underground in trenches to collect water and waste.
  • Because the drains are perforated, the wastewater is allowed to seep out into the crushed gravel or stone, and then eventually into the surrounding soil.
  • The natural evaporation process will then take care of any surplus moisture in the soil, unless you do something to prevent the water from flowing out of the pipes.

A septic service will come out to your home around every three years and pump the scum and sludge out of your septic tank, thereby cleaning it and resetting it back to its previous form.

How to Plan a Septic Field

It is possible that understanding how your septic system works may help you manage, maintain, and care for it more effectively. Otherwise, it is simply a large tank buried in the earth that gathers your garbage (which is true, but still). The absence of sewage infrastructure in rural regions is a common occurrence. Because not every rural location is the same, it is not a given that septic systems will be required in your local rural community. In any case, where there are no sewer systems in place, the septic tank serves as a form of wastewater treatment facility.

  • In order to prevent your wastewater from leaching into the ground, the tank is designed to be waterproof.
  • Solids sink to the bottom of the container, scum rises to the top, and liquids float in the middle of the container between the aforementioned layers of solids and liquids.
  • The baffle is constructed in such a way that only liquids may depart through this particular pipe and that no solids can do so.
  • Leach or drain fields are what you’re looking at.
  • In order to increase the durability and lifespan of these trenches, gravel or crushed stone are used to fill them; however, you may cover those drains with drain field cloth to prevent dirt from getting into your drains.
  • After a few days, the wastewater will begin to gently drift over the soil, removing the majority of the hazardous bacteria present in waste before it reaches the groundwater.
  • A septic service will come out to your home approximately every three years and pump the scum and sludge out of your septic tank, thereby cleaning it and resetting it back to its previous condition.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank

It may seem impossible to imagine that one of the largest and most visible elements of your whole plumbing system is also one of the most difficult to locate, but when your property is served by a septic system, this is perfectly true. A strong explanation for this is because septic tanks are huge, unattractive, stink horrible and give off an unwarranted impression of dirt. Not only does burying them underground assist to prevent them from harm, but it also provides you with additional useable space on your property and conceals what would otherwise be a blight on your landscape.

This site is dedicated to assisting you in locating your septic system without the need for any time-consuming digging.

How To Find A Septic Tank: Step By Step

It is critical to maintain the health of your septic tank since it is responsible for securely storing and handling the wastewater that drains from your house. It is necessary to pump your septic tank once every 1-3 years, depending on the number of people living in your household and the size of your tank, in order to avoid septic tank repairs or early failure, which means you must be familiar with the location of your tank. It’s not often simple to identify your septic tank, and many plumbers charge extra for this service, which is especially true if your tank’s lid is buried beneath.

1. Gather Some Helpful Tools

Septic tank location may be made much easier with the use of several simple instruments and techniques. To locate your septic tank, you only need to know the following information: A soil probe is one of the most useful instruments for locating a septic tank. It is a tiny piece of metal that is used to puncture through the earth and detect anything that could be buried underneath. Start at the point where your sewage line exits your home and work your way straight out, inserting your soil probe every two feet along the way.

Using this method, you may also locate the cover for your septic tank.

While we highly advise keeping your cover clean and exposed in the event that you require emergency septic service, we recognize that this is not always the case.

2. Use a Septic Tank Map

If you are a new homeowner who is trying to figure out where your septic tank is, a septic tank map should be included in your inspection documentation. You can use this information to assist you in pinpointing the exact position of your storage tank. If you don’t have access to this map, there are a few of additional strategies you might employ.

3. Start Ruling Areas Out

The location of a septic tank cannot be constructed in specific areas due to the risk of causing major damage to your property or tank, as specified by local rules. Your septic tank will not be affected by the following:

  • Immediately adjacent to your well
  • Beneath your home
  • Directly against your home
  • For example, underneath your driveway
  • Under trees
  • And other locations. Structures like a patio or deck are good examples of this.

4. Inspect Your Property

If you take a hard look around your land, there’s a high possibility you’ll be able to locate your septic tank without having to do any probing whatsoever. In many circumstances, a septic tank may be identified by a slight dip or slope on your land that cannot be explained by any other means. Due to the fact that the hole that your contractors excavated for your septic tank may not have been exactly the proper size, they proceeded to install the tank anyhow. This is a rather regular occurrence.

When there is a minor divot or depression, it indicates that the hole was too large and that your contractors simply did not fill the depression to level the hole.

The likelihood of your septic tank being discovered in a few specific locations is quite high. Because of code issues or just because it doesn’t make sense, it’s highly unlikely that your septic tank will be located near any of the following locations:

  • Your water well, if you have one (for a variety of reasons that are rather clear)
  • Any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a patio, sidewalk, or driveway unless they were added after the home was built and no one performed a proper inspection before it was built)
  • Any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a driveway, sidewalk, or patio unless they were added after the home was built and no one conducted a proper inspection before it was built)
  • Any paved surfaces (it won’t be under a patio, sidewalk, or driveway unless they were added after the home was built If there is any particular landscaping

5. Inspect Your Yard

A comprehensive investigation of your yard may be necessary to discover your septic tank considerably more quickly in some cases. The following are important items to check for in your yard:

  • If your septic tank is overfilled, sewage can leak out into the ground and function as fertilizer for your lawn, resulting in lush green grass. A area of grass that is very lush and green is a good sign that your septic tank is just beneath it
  • Puddles that don’t make sense: If your septic tank is seriously overfilled, it is possible that water will pool on your grass. Another telltale indicator that your septic tank is below ground level is an unexplainable pool of water. Ground that is uneven: When installing septic tanks, it is possible that the contractors will mistakenly create high or low patches on your grass. If you come across any uneven terrain, it’s possible that your septic tank is right there.

The metal soil probe can let you find out for certain whether or not your septic tank is located in a certain area of your yard or not. As soon as your metal soil probe makes contact with the tank, you may use your shovel to dig out the grass surrounding it and discover the septic tank lid.

6. Follow Your Sewer Main/Sewer Pipes

Using your metal soil probe, you can determine whether or not your septic tank is located in a certain area of your yard. As soon as your metal soil probe makes contact with the tank, you may use your shovel to dig up the grass surrounding it and discover the septic tank cover.

7. Check Your Property Records

Lastly, if all else fails, a search of your property’s public records will almost certainly reveal the location of the tank you’re looking for. Your builders most likely secured a permit for your property because septic systems are required to be installed by law in every state. In order to do so, they had to develop a thorough plan that depicted your property as well as the exact location where they intended to construct the tank. This is done to ensure that the local health department is aware of the tank and is prepared to deal with any issues that may arise as a result of its presence.

If you look hard enough, you may be able to locate the original building records for your home without ever having to get in your car or visit your local records center.

What to Do Once You Find Your Septic Tank

If everything else fails, checking the public records for your property will most likely reveal where the tank is located. Your builders most certainly secured a permit for your property because septic systems are required to be installed by law. That means they had to draw out a thorough plan showing your property as well as the exact location where they intended to construct the tank. This is done in order to guarantee that the local health department is aware of the tank and is prepared to deal with any issues that may arise as a result of it being in the neighborhood.

Even without getting in the car or visiting your local records office, you might be able to locate the original building documents for the property you’re looking for.

How Much Distance Should Be Between My Septic Tank and My Well?

EPA and the Department of Housing and Urban Development suggest that a septic tank be located at least 50 feet away from a well that is used to provide drinking water. This is also a requirement for loans sponsored by the Federal Housing Administration, or FHA, however exceptions can be made in certain circumstances.

The Code of Maryland Regulationsrequires specified spacing between septic components and wells, which we discuss in further detail in the next section.

Recommended Distances Between WellsSeptic Components

As a result of local rules or soil conditions, local authorities may mandate greater distances between a well and a septic component than those suggested by the Environmental Protection Agency. When property limitations or elevation changes are involved, components can be brought closer together in other circumstances. The following are the regulations for distances between wells and septic components in the state of Maryland for wells that are intended for water distribution: d) 100 feet from identifiable sources of contamination and designated subsurface sewage disposal areas if the proposed well will utilize an unconfined aquifer as a water supply source; e) 50 feet from identifiable sources of contamination and designated subsurface sewage disposal areas if the proposed well will utilize a confined aquifer as a water supply source; and f) 50 feet from any sewage gravity or force main, except as provided in B(3) of this regulation.

See also:  How Much Does It Cost To Pump A Septic Tank In Ky? (Solution found)

The Maryland Department of the Environment’s Regulation of Water Supply, Sewage Disposal, and Solid Waste, Chapter 04: Well Construction, is the source for this information.

Possible Contaminants from Septic Systems

When a well is located too close to a septic system or other source of wastewater, a range of pollutants, such as the following, might infiltrate your well water:

  • Salmonella and E. coli are examples of bactria. Viruses, such as norovirus or hepatitis A
  • Bacteria
  • And parasites detergents and soaps that include phosphorus. Chemicals derived from paint, drain cleaners, and other common home items
  • Heavy metals, iron, and copper are examples of such materials.

These pollutants, when present in large quantities, can cause illnesses or disorders. If you have reason to believe that your well has been polluted, it is critical that you have your water tested as quickly as possible. If a problem is discovered, water treatment techniques such as chlorination, reverse osmosis, activated charcoal filtration, or ultraviolet light purification may be able to restore your water to a safe drinking temperature. If this is not the case, it may be essential to make repairs to the well or septic system.

Call Water Doctor for Water Testing or Treatment in Maryland

If you are concerned about the quality of your drinking water, our staff at Water Doctor can assist you with this. We provide water quality testing for wells and municipal systems, as well as a number of treatment methods that can assist in the correction of the majority of water quality issues in the area. In collaboration with you, our specialists can evaluate the most appropriate solutions for your demands and budget, whether it is a single system, such as reverse osmosis, or a mix of various systems, such as water softeners, charcoal filtration, and ultraviolet purification.

Since 1979, we have been providing residential and business services to clients throughout Maryland.

When Digging a Pond, How Far From a Septic Field Line Should You Dig?

The installation of a pond in close proximity to a septic system requires some understanding of how septic systems operate as well as your local rules on setbacks. However, the bacteria and nutrients from a drain field can have an impact on even an ornamental garden pond, especially one that is located downstream from the septic system.

According to the construction requirements in your area, a pond and the leach lines of your septic system should be separated by 50 to 100 feet, depending on the size of the pond.

Septic System Setbacks

Setbacks for septic systems are strictly enforced according to industry standards. Your local building permit office is likely to provide a form that not only describes how to apply for a septic system permit, but also specifies the minimum setbacks that must be adhered to. In general, leach fields must be located at least 100 feet away from streams, rivers, water supply wells, seas, lakes, or reservoirs, as well as other bodies of water. In accordance with local construction rules, a pond may be deemed a man-made reservoir for the purposes of water storage.

How a Septic System Works

Sewage treatment systems are comprised of two parts: an underground tank, in which the waste water from your house is divided into solids and fats; and a leach or drain field, in which the waste water gradually seeps into the soil or evaporates. On order to prevent the waste water from reaching the subterranean water that supplies your well, the leach field is constructed in soils that will gently absorb and filter the water, rendering it safe before it reaches the underground water that supplies your well.

How a Septic System Affects a Pond

In contrast to how well your septic system filters and cleans the waste water from your house, having a pond too close to the leach fields can have negative effects on the ecosystem of the pond itself. Extra nitrogen and phosphorus leaching into the pond from the leach field might result in a proliferation of aquatic plants and algae in the water body. It makes no difference whether your pond is meant to support fish farming or koi, the septic system can have an adverse effect on the fish, either by killing them or infecting them with hazardous germs.

Protecting the Septic System

Septic systems are typically low-maintenance systems for properly processing sewage from your house, but there are steps you can do to keep them in good working order as well. It is beneficial to plant an open meadow over a leach field because it encourages waste water to evaporate as the plants absorb surplus nutrients, which prevents them from moving through the soil to neighboring ground water or rivers. Keeping heavy equipment and trucks out of the system helps to maintain the leach field and save costly repairs in the long run.

What is the recommended distance between a private water well and a septic tank?

What should not be flushed through a septic system?
  • Grease, oils, or fats from cooking
  • Pesticides
  • Paints and paint thinners
  • Solvents
  • Disinfectants and other household chemicals
To protect your drinking water quality, locate your septic system and all potential contamination sources as far as possible from your well. Department of Health in many States requires that new septic tanks or human-waste lagoons to be installed at least 50 feet from a well. Septic tank drain fields must be at least 100 feet from a well. However, many health departments have different regulations so check your local health department for requirements applicable to your location. Although an existing septic system closer to a well may be safe, it is important to maintain these systems properly. Additionally, a septic system should also be far away from large trees and shrubs that can cause damage. State health laws also require all household wastewater, including sink, tub, shower, and wash water, to enter the septic system. Discharging household wastewater off your property violates state health laws. Before installing a new septic system, check with your county health department for any additional requirements. As a general guidance, private wells which provide drinking water should have a minimum horizontal distance of 50 to 100 feet from such potential sources of groundwater contamination. It is recommended and sometimes required (depending on the state) that all wells providing drinking water be checked at least once a year for bacteria.If a man’s home is his castle, then the surrounding land is his kingdom. It makes sense for people to care for their environment and nature in order to ensure that future generations will inherit a better world. Our planet is marvelous in its infinite beauty; the least we can do is to become a better caretaker!.

Basic Septic System Rules for Oklahoma – Oklahoma State University

Submitted by Sergio M. Abit Jr. and Emily Hollarn Several of us are interested in building or purchasing homes in the country for a number of reasons. It is possible to be closer to nature by living outside of city limits. It is also possible to cultivate vegetables and raise farm animals, and it is possible to live a simple and calm life in a rural environment by living outside of city limits. One thing to keep in mind is that, while living in the country has many advantages, access to the comforts that towns offer is not always available, especially in rural areas.

The latter requires the installation of an on-site wastewater treatment system, which is more frequently known as a septic system.

This information sheet outlines the requirements that must be followed while obtaining an installation permit, complying with site and soil limits, and installing and maintaining septic systems.

PSS-2914, Keep Your Septic System in Good Working Order, and PSS-2913, On-site Wastewater Treatment Systems Permitted in Oklahoma are two of the state’s most important standards.

Much of this information sheet is prepared in a simplified question and answer style, however there are certain sections that have been taken practically literally from the Code of Federal Regulations.

Site Requirements and Restrictions

Is there a minimum lot size requirement for building a home? With the usage of public water (such as that provided by the city or the rural water district), a minimum lot size of 12 acres is required for the majority of septic systems for a residence that will require one. The use of an individual drinking water well necessitates the usage of a minimum lot size of 344 acres for the majority of systems. What is the definition of a “repair area” requirement? Aside from the space set up for septic system installation, an adequate amount of space should be set aside for repair work.

  • When purchasing a home, inquire as to the location of the authorized repair area.
  • Where is the best location for the septic system to be installed?
  • Keep in mind that there are minimum separation distances between items such as water wells, property boundaries, and buildings, as well as other restrictions to follow when driving.
  • Water Body Protection Places (WBPAs) are those areas that are located within 1,320 feet of water bodies (such as rivers and lakes) that have been identified by the state as being specifically protected against pollution and are classified as such.
  • This indicates that the cost of the septic system in that location will be higher.
  • However, it is important to remember that the requirement for a nitrate-reduction component applies only to new homes or modifications to an existing home’s septic system.
  • It is recommended that at least 10,000 square feet be set aside for the septic system in the region where it will be constructed, but this is not a requirement as a general rule.

The exact amount of the area required for the septic system will initially be determined by the soil and site characteristics of the surrounding region.

The number of bedrooms in the house is taken into consideration once the proper septic system has been selected in order to estimate the real size of the space that must be given for the septic system.

Generally speaking, the more bedrooms in a house and the finer the soil texture in the surrounding region (i.e., the more clay in the soil), the more space is required for a septic system to be installed.

As previously said, the soil and site qualities influence the type of septic system that may be installed as well as the amount of the land space that is required for the installation.

What type of soil testing will be required?

When the results of a percolation test are obtained, they may be used to determine the rate of subsurface water flow at depths where residential wastewater is typically applied.

Either test might be used as a starting point for making judgments about a septic system.

It should also be noted that if the test done is a soil profile description, the amount of land required for the septic system is typically less.

When the choice has already been taken to establish a lagoon system or an aerobic treatment system with spray irrigation, a soil test is no longer necessary, since the system is already in place.

Soil profile descriptions may only be performed by soil profilers who have received state certification.

Testing for percolation can be carried out by professional engineers, certified sanitarians, environmental specialists, or soil scientists.

A note on soil testing: Some communities in Oklahoma require a soil test result before approving a construction permit application.

Permits

What is it that requires a permit? Septic system installations, including the addition of an extra system, on a property must be approved by the local building department prior to proceeding. Permits are also required for modifications to an existing system. It is possible that septic system improvements will be required as a result of the following: a) Septic systems that are not working properly, b) home renovations that result in an increase in the number of beds, c) an increase in water consumption as a result of a change in the usage of a house or building, and d) the movement of any component of a septic system.

Where can I acquire an installation or modification permit, and how do I get one?

To submit an application for a permit, go to DEQ Applications or contact your local DEQ office for help.

Often, the installer will take care of the paperwork for you, including the installation or modification permission application.

Inspections

Inspections are carried out by whom, and when are they necessary? There are two situations in which an inspection by DEQ officials is required. They are as follows: The following are examples of non-certified installations: 1) repairs and system changes made by a non-certified installer; and 2) installation of new systems performed by a non-certified installer Prior to backfilling and/or placing the system into operation, the inspection must be completed to ensure that the installation, modification, or repairs are of satisfactory quality.

The fact that a state-certified installer performs the installation, alteration, or repair eliminates the requirement for DEQ employees to conduct an inspection because qualified installers are permitted to do self-inspection is worth mentioning.

The installer is responsible for notifying the DEQ of any needed inspections relating to an installation, alteration, or repair that may be required.

Installation

Who is qualified to build a septic system? It is essential that you use the services of a septic system installer that is licensed and certified by the state. A list of state-certified installers can be obtained from the local Department of Environmental Quality office. Non-certified installers are only permitted to install a restricted number of systems in the state of Oklahoma. These installations, on the other hand, must be examined and authorized by DEQ staff before they may be backfilled and/or turned on.

Installers are able to charge a fee for their own version of a warranty and maintenance plan that they provide to their clients.

This law requires the installer of an ATU to provide free maintenance for the system for two years from the date of installation, at no additional cost to the homeowner.

Purchasing a home when the ATU in the home is still within the warranty term enables you to continue to get warranty coverage until the two-year period has expired.

Responsibilities of the Owner

Septic systems that are properly maintained will remove dangerous contaminants from home water. Owners, their neighbors, and the environment are all at risk if their systems are not properly maintained and operated. In plain language, the rule mandates that the owner of a system be responsible for ensuring that the system is properly maintained and operated so that: 1) sewage or effluent from the system is properly treated and does not surface, pool, flow across the ground, or worse, discharge to surface waters, 2) all components of the system (including lagoons) are maintained and do not leak or overflow, and 3) the necessary security measures are in place (e.g.

  1. required fences are intact, septic tank lids are intact and properly secured).
  2. Civil and criminal fines may be imposed for violations and carelessness.
  3. Abit Jr., Ph.D., is a researcher at the University of California, Berkeley.
  4. Ms.
Was this information helpful?

If your neighborhood has recently been flooded or has been subjected to strong rains, you may discover that your toilet isn’t flushing properly and that your drains are draining more slowly than usual. It is possible that raw sewage will back up into your tub and sink drains. Drains that are slow or clogged may signal that the water table has risen over the level of your septic field and septic tank. If you believe that your septic system has been flooded, there are four things you should do immediately.

  • Check the level of groundwater in your area.
  • Septic tanks are typically located a few feet below the surface of the earth.
  • If you are aware of the location of your septic tank and drainfield, you should check the water level in the area to ensure that flooding is not a concern.
  • When there isn’t any evident standing water in the area, use a probe to check the water level or an auger to dig deep into the earth to find out how much water is there.
  • If your tests reveal that the water level is higher than the top of the septic tank, you should immediately cease utilizing the tank.
  • 2.
  • Until the Ground Becomes Dry When you believe that your septic system has been flooded, contact a septic pumping specialist immediately; however, you must wait until the earth has become less soggy before having your tank drained.
  • If a septic tank is pumped out when the earth is saturated, it may potentially float out of its location.
  • Following a decrease in the water table level, it is necessary to pump your system as quickly as feasible.
  • 3.
  • Approximately 70 gallons of water are flushed down the toilet per person every day in the average home.

The first step is to check for leaks in all of your fixtures. An inoperable toilet flapper or fill mechanism can leak up to 200 gallons per day, creating a backup of water that your flooded septic system doesn’t have room for. Other suggestions for keeping water out of the drains are as follows:

  • Prepare meals that don’t require cooking, such as sandwiches. Disposable flatware, such as paper plates and paper cups, should be used. Showers are preferable to baths because they are shorter. Save the rinse water and put it to good use on the plants. Only flush the toilet when absolutely essential

If your clothes washing machine drains into your main sewage line, it can cause a significant amount of water to be discharged into your septic system. Wash your garments at the laundry until the water table begins to fall below the surface. In the event that you must use the washing machine, wash only modest loads and wait a few hours between each load of laundry. 4. Make modifications to your septic system to make it more efficient. After your septic tank has been drained and your house drainage system has been restored to working order, you should make certain modifications to your system in order to minimize flooding problems in the future.

During a septic emergency, the backflow preventer prevents waste water from entering your home or building.

Also, check to be that your yard’s storm drainage does not overflow into your septic field and storage tank area.

When your septic system is inundated, call Eckmayer Inc right away.

What you should expect when your septic tank needs pumping

The following are general recommendations: It is advised that you pump your septic tank every two to three years. The frequency with which you pump is determined by the volume of water you utilize. Generally speaking, the more individuals that use your septic system, the greater the increase in water flow. As a result, your septic tank will fill up more quickly, necessitating more regular pumping. It is likely that the septic tank will need to be pumped more frequently than every two to three years.

Choosing a certified pumper

We recommend that you identify your septic tank before contacting a pumping company. Here is a list of questions you should ask the pumper about their services that we recommend you ask:

  1. What is the approximate cost of the pump-out
  2. And Will additional gallons be charged if the septic tank has a capacity more than 1,000 gallons? Is it included in this price the expense of excavating to expose the septic tank lid(s)
  3. If not, do you charge by the foot or by the meter? How much do you charge to dig you out if you don’t have one
  4. Is there a charge for dumping costs included? Was it determined that this fee includes a visual check of the septic tank’s entrance and exit baffles? Do you charge an additional fee for cleaning the filter baffle? If a tank has not been properly maintained, is there an additional price for the additional water and time necessary to pump it out? (for example, pumped on a regular basis)
  5. Please specify the distance and elevation to where the Pumper’s vehicle will be stationed if you have a long distance to pump or if you will be pumping up a steep hill (for example, in your driveway or in the yard). The Pumper will decide whether or not the vehicle is capable of providing this sort of service. Is pumping the pump tank a frequent component of your routine maintenance? What is the cost of providing this service? It is recommended that a pump tank be pumped in addition to the septic tank, cleaned with water, and then dried with a blow dryer. If the pump tank is extremely full, you may be subject to an additional price.

Locating the septic tank

Once you’ve decided on a Pumper, you’ll need to locate the septic tank on your property. Most Pumpers will charge you for the time it takes to locate the tank and open the septic tank lid (s). You can perform the necessary work to expose the septic tank lid(s) prior to the arrival of the Pumper. In order to make septic tank pumping and inspection trips easier and less time-consuming, the Ohio Department of Public Health advises that you install “risers.” With locking gas tight lids linked to both the tank and the riser and access raised to the surface, there is no digging required every time the septic tank needs to be pumped.

The majority of septic system pumpers will be able to do this service for you.

Both compartments must be examined and pumped in order to meet the requirements.

The location of your septic tank will be straightforward if you have an as-built (a map of your septic system) for your system.

Find and download a copy of your as-built drawing from the internet. The following talents will be required by you or your Pumper if an as-built is not available: investigation

  • If there is a crawl space, you may be able to locate the tank by determining where the plumbing exits the foundation wall and then using a probing bar to locate it. If you have a fiberglass or polyethylene tank, a probe bar is not suggested unless extreme caution is exercised when using the probe bar. Probing will only be effective if the tank is not more than 1 to 2 feet below the surface of the ground
  • If there is no crawl space available, you may occasionally discover the tank by looking for the plumbing vents in the roof. A person who is walking behind the home and coming from a restroom can find themselves at the exit point of the sewage line that connects to the septic tank

If there is a crawl space, you may be able to locate the tank by determining where the piping exits the foundation wall and then using a probing bar to locate the tank in the crawl space. Unless extraordinary caution is exercised when working with a probe bar on a fiberglass or polyethylene tank, it is not advised. Probes will only operate if the tank is not more than 1 to 2 feet below the surface of the ground; if there is no crawl space available, you may occasionally discover the tank by looking for plumbing vents in the ceiling.

Pumping the septic tank

Before the Pumper begins the process of pumping out the tank, you may request that he measure the thickness of the scum and sludge layer layers on the inside of the tank. Using this method, you can determine the pace at which the particles collect in the tank, which will assist you in determining when it is necessary to have the septic tank pumped again. Pumping frequency will be in the range of 2 to 3 years for the vast majority of families. It doesn’t matter how often you pump your septic system; frequent inspections will provide you peace of mind that everything is in working order inside those tanks.

The septic tank Pumper should present you with a receipt that details the services that were done to your tank.

  • The company’s name, address, and phone number
  • Pumper’s certification number
  • Number of gallons that were pumped in an approximate manner the number of compartments that have been pumped In good working order, the tank baffles In-tact condition of the septic tank
  • Provide specifics on any work performed on baffles or access lids. This information should be included on the pump receipt if the scum and sludge layers were measured. Any work done on the septic tank or pump tank should be documented. Any additional service work that is completed

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *