How Do You Know If You Need A New Septic Tank? (TOP 5 Tips)

5 Signs it’s Time to Replace Your Septic System

  1. Age of the System. It’s pretty common for a septic system to last 40 years or longer, which means if you buy a new home, you might never need to replace it.
  2. You’ve Outgrown the System.
  3. Slow Drains.
  4. Standing Water in the Yard.
  5. Nearby Contaminated Water Sources.

How do I know if my septic tank needs replacing?

  • You might also venture into the yard to see if you notice any standing water or puddles in the drain field. This could be a sign that your septic tank is failing to dispose of wastewater properly. When that happens, you need to get your septic tank replaced.

What are signs of septic tank problems?

7 Warning Signs Your Septic System Is Failing

  • Gurgling Pipes. They would occur when you run water in the house (e.g. when using the sink or shower) or flush the toilet.
  • Bad Odours. It’s never a pleasant experience when this occurs.
  • Water At Ground Level.
  • Green Grass.
  • Slow Drainage.
  • Blocked Pipes.

How often does a septic tank need replacing?

Typical lifespan is in excess of 30 years for GRP, PE and concrete tanks. Assuming optimal conditions of install and use, you could expect the following: Steel septic tanks have a life expectancy of 15 to 20 years.

What is the most common cause of septic system failure?

Most septic systems fail because of inappropriate design or poor maintenance. Some soil-based systems (those with a drain field) are installed at sites with inadequate or inappropriate soils, excessive slopes, or high ground water tables.

What are the 3 stages of sepsis?

The three stages of sepsis are: sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock. When your immune system goes into overdrive in response to an infection, sepsis may develop as a result.

Do septic tanks smell?

A properly-maintained septic tank should be odor-free, so if you notice a bad smell inside your home or outside near the leach field, it’s a sign that there’s a problem. Septic odors are caused by gases in the system, including carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, and methane.

What will ruin a septic system?

Any paper products like tissues, paper towels, tampons, or sanitary products, even some heavier toilet paper, will clog your system if you flush enough of it. Wet wipes are another product that you should never flush into a septic system.

How much does it cost to pump a septic tank?

How much does it cost to pump out a septic tank? The average cost is $300, but can run up to $500, depending on your location. The tank should be pumped out every three to five years.

How do you tell if your septic tank is full?

How to tell your septic tank is full and needs emptying

  1. Pooling water.
  2. Slow drains.
  3. Odours.
  4. An overly healthy lawn.
  5. Sewer backup.
  6. Gurgling Pipes.
  7. Trouble Flushing.

What is the average lifespan of a septic system?

Age of the System It’s pretty common for a septic system to last 40 years or longer, which means if you buy a new home, you might never need to replace it. However, you might have an older home whose septic system has been in place for nearly half a century.

How long do septic tanks last?

A septic system’s lifespan should be anywhere from 15 to 40 years. How long the system lasts depends on a number of factors, including construction material, soil acidity, water table, maintenance practices, and several others.

What are the red flags for sepsis?

Severe breathlessness or sleepiness. It feels like you’re going to die or pass out. Skin mottled or discoloured. An extremely high or a very low temperature; repeated vomiting; seizures; and a rash which doesn’t fade when you press a glass against it are also possible ‘red flags’.

What does the beginning of sepsis feel like?

Early symptoms include fever and feeling unwell, faint, weak, or confused. You may notice your heart rate and breathing are faster than usual. If it’s not treated, sepsis can harm your organs, make it hard to breathe, give you diarrhea and nausea, and mess up your thinking.

What does sepsis look like?

People with sepsis often develop a hemorrhagic rash—a cluster of tiny blood spots that look like pinpricks in the skin. If untreated, these gradually get bigger and begin to look like fresh bruises. These bruises then join together to form larger areas of purple skin damage and discoloration.

5 Signs it’s Time to Replace Your Septic System — BL3 Plumbing & Drain Cleaning

Nobody wants sewage backing up into their yard, and there are a number of things you can do to keep your septic system from malfunctioning in the first place. But there are times when it is necessary to throw up the towel on an old system and make the investment in a new one. Because it is a costly option, you will want to be certain that it is absolutely essential. In an ideal world, efficient maintenance would preclude the need for replacement for decades, if not generations. However, years of poor maintenance may lead to the conclusion that a replacement is the best solution.

1. Age of the System

If you buy a new house, it’s possible that your septic system may endure for 40 years or longer, meaning you won’t have to replace it for a lengthy period of time. You may, on the other hand, have an older home with a septic system that has been in place for more than half a century. If you begin to notice difficulties with the system, and if you find yourself pumping it more regularly in order to maintain it operating correctly, it may be time to start planning for a new septic system installation.

2. You’ve Outgrown the System

Septic systems are designed to have a limited carrying capacity. In most cases, the size of a house is determined by the number of rooms and square footage it has. However, if you’ve increased the size of your home or your water usage, you may find that you’ve outgrown the capacity of your septic tank. If your tank is inadequate for your needs, it may be necessary to improve the system in order to better serve your family and your way of life.

3. Slow Drains

Having a septic problem might be indicated by the fact that your sinks or bathtub take an unusually lengthy time to empty. Because this is a tiny sign, it is possible that you are only suffering from a blockage. If, on the other hand, all of your sinks are draining slowly, it is possible that you have a more major problem. Due to sludge accumulation at the bottom of the septic tank, it is possible that the water is going more slowly through the septic tank.

4. Standing Water in the Yard

Any standing water in your yard due to a clogged septic system is a bad omen. However, it is possible that you are only in need of a repair and not a complete replacement. It’s possible that there is a problem with your drain field. It is critical that you do not disregard standing water since the problem will not go away; rather, it will only worsen. It’s possible that your septic tank isn’t the source of your difficulties. Standing water can be caused by a clogged drain field in some cases.

It is desirable to have grass and plants growing over your drain field because organisms aid in the breakdown of the liquid and prevent it from accumulating.

Aeration through mechanical means is the second option.

Your final choice is to seek a replacement. It is possible to repair the drain field without having to replace the septic tank in some situations. You should, however, plan on replacing the tank as well if you find that the majority of the difficulties you are experiencing are connected to age.

5. Nearby Contaminated Water Sources

If nitrate, nitrite, or coliform bacteria are detected in neighboring water sources, this is a strong indication that there is a problem with your septic system. If you notice contamination in water sources, it is critical that you analyze the situation as soon as possible.

Other Septic Systems Issues

The replacement of the septic tank is the most extreme circumstance. A number of these indicators might be symptomatic of simpler problems that only require little correction. If you have obstructions in your septic tank, you may need to have it pumped or have the system cleaned. If you’re concerned about a septic tank problem, the best course of action is to contact a professional for assistance. At BL3, we provide a wide range of sewage line-related services. In order to speak with a plumber, please call (405) 895-6640 in North OKC or (405) 237-1414 in South OKC.

5 Signs You May Need a New Septic Tank

A high-quality septic tank that is correctly constructed may help you save money while also reducing your environmental effect on the environment. It is an excellent option for circumstances in which connecting to municipal sewer systems is neither economically feasible or desirable. A septic tank, on the other hand, is a fragile system that has to be drained out every three years. Your septic tank’s failure to function correctly can cause substantial damage to your house and property, as well as pose a health risk to you and your loved ones.

  1. A septic tank that is broken or overfilled will allow waste to overflow into the septic lines, resulting in a variety of difficulties (similar to the signs of a clogged sewer line).
  2. No matter what sort of septic system you have, you should never disregard any of the five warning indications listed below.
  3. You have a pool of water in your yard for no apparent reason.
  4. The presence of these pools or puddles indicates that the water exiting the septic tank has been unable to be absorbed into the soil.
  5. This situation should be treated as soon as possible in order to prevent future damage and to safeguard your own health and well-being.
  6. There’s something off about the smell.
  7. Besides being incredibly unpleasant for you and your visitors, this rotting stench is also a warning indication that there is a problem with your septic system.

3.

If you have a septic tank, all of the drains in your home are connected to it.

Alternatively, if only one drain is sluggish, it is probable that the problem is with a different drain.

4.

Sewage backup into your toilets, sinks, showers, or tubs is one of the most typical symptoms that you have a septic tank that is overflowing and that you should have your septic system inspected by a professional.

If you discover a sewage backlog, you should contact a plumber quickly because the situation is unlikely to improve on its own.

5.

If you notice unusual areas of grass that are a darker shade of green than the rest of your lawn, you should get your septic system inspected immediately.

Your septic tank may need to be changed or pumped if any of the following five indicators are present.

When you do require pumping or repairs, however, you should always contact a qualified technician with experience. Contact The Pink Plumbertoday for experienced advice on septic system concerns as well as solutions to all of your plumbing inquiries. OUR EXPERT PLUMBERS ARE AVAILABLE TO HELP YOU.

How To Tell If Your Septic System Needs Repair Or Replacement

In most cases, homeowners and business owners who utilize a septic system do not consider about their system until there is a problem. Jones PlumbingSeptic Tank Service specializes in the installation, maintenance, and repair of septic systems of the highest quality. In order to discover whether or not you will need to replace your current system, contact us immediately to arrange septic tank services.

Common Indicators Of Septic System Repair

It is inevitable that a septic system will require repairs, and it is critical to schedule these repairs as soon as the problem first manifests itself. Hopefully, by taking preventive measures, you will be able to extend the life of your sewage treatment system.

Slow Drains

If your drains begin to slow down or clog, it’s likely that you have a problem with your septic system. Keep in mind that a septic system relies on clear pipes and plumbing to work correctly, and that neglecting a sluggish drain might set off a series of events that would necessitate a costly repair down the road.

Sewage Backups

Because the goal of drains is to transport waste away, if the waste returns in the form of backed-up sewage, you will want emergency septic service. Even while frequent tank pump-outs are normally helpful in avoiding this predicament, a sudden backup indicates that there is an issue.

Putrid Odors

When there is an accumulation of waste — both solid and liquid — in the septic tank, the scents associated with it become more obvious. However, if the scents suddenly arise, it is possible that there is a blockage in the plumbing system, which will impact the entire plumbing system.

Common Types Of Septic Tank Repairs

The distribution box is the name given to the location where the drain field pipes link to the tank in most septic systems. The distribution box is responsible for uniformly spreading liquid waste into the pipes. If it collapses or is somehow damaged, too much or too little liquid might reach the drain field, resulting in clogging of the pipes. Depending on the age of the system, the box may be constructed of concrete, which is susceptible to deterioration by the gases that circulate inside the septic tank during operation.

Defective Septic Tank Seal

In order to prevent the escape of waste and byproducts, such as hazardous gases, all septic tanks are completely sealed. However, the seal may begin to fracture over time, whether as a result of physical damage to the tank or natural weathering damage to the tank. Every septic system maintenance check-up should involve a comprehensive assessment of the seal and, if necessary, the implementation of suitable repairs.

Damaged Pipes

An animal burrowing deep enough to reach and destroy septic tank pipes, or a vehicle driving or parking over a septic tank system, can both cause damage to septic tank pipes. Additional harm to a septic system might result from tree roots growing too close to the system.

Warning Signs Of Septic Tank Replacement

Septic tank businesses such as Jones PlumbingSeptic Tank Service know how to detect when it is time to replace a system, despite the fact that most systems endure for several decades on average.

The following are the most prevalent signals that a system needs to be replaced that we encounter.

Puddles Form In The Yard Overnight

Overnight appearances of puddles or marshy spots in the yard are classic indicators that it is time to rebuild the septic system. The most fundamental duty of any system is to transport wastewater via the drain field, where it subsequently percolates into the surrounding soil to be treated. Clogs or cracks in the pipe, as well as a damaged tank, prevent water from passing through and instead cause it to slowly rise to the top of the water.

Household Size Has Increased

The size of the tank is determined by the number of persons that routinely contribute to the septic system. If the size of your household has changed — or if you’re purchasing a property with a tank that is smaller than suggested — your system should be modified to accommodate the increasing needs.

System Needs Frequent Repairs

Just as with any other type of maintenance, there comes a point at which the expense of regular repairs outweighs the cost of replacing the system. Furthermore, a system that requires recurrent maintenance is likely to be a deteriorating system that will require replacement in the near future.

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Well Water Is Contaminated

Water quality testing for wells and other potable water sources is included in the majority of septic system examinations. It is likely that if impurities such as bacteria and/or nitrates are discovered and a septic system is close, the attention would move to inspecting the system for leaks and repairing any damage. It is critical to address any pollution as soon as possible in order to minimize or lessen environmental and health consequences.

Inspection Reveals An Incorrect Tank

An examination is the only method to determine whether or not your present septic tank is acceptable for your location. Unless the tank is situated at a sufficient soil depth, gravity will be unable to properly transfer waste in the majority of situations. According to other parameters such as soil structure, our professionals can decide which type of septic tank would be most appropriate for the site and your requirements. A commitment to providing high-quality service is shared by Jones PlumbingSeptic Tank Services.

We can help you restore the functionality of your septic system if it has stopped working.

6 Telltale Signs Your Septic System Is in Trouble (and You Need to Call in the Pros)

A well-designed septic system should provide you with years of trouble-free service as long as you utilize and maintain it appropriately. Yours might live as long as 30 years if you take good care of it. With that said, given the fact that it is underground, you might be wondering: How can you know when something is wrong with something? Here are the indicators that your septic system is having problems and that it is time to call in the professionals.

1. Water (or sewage) is backing up inside your home

It is possible for water—or a foul-smelling black liquid—to gurgle up into the drains in your kitchen or sink for a variety of reasons:

Your tank or drain field are too full

In your septic tank, as soon as unclean water and waste are introduced, the solids are separated from the liquids. The wastewater is finally forced out into a drain field, which is a network of subterranean tunnels or chambers where it may be collected and treated. Once there, any hazardous bacteria is either absorbed by the soil or digested by naturally occurring microorganisms in the environment. However, if your tank gets a large amount of water in a short period of time (for example, because of heavy rain or because you are using significantly more water than usual), the tank or the drain field may become overwhelmed.

According to Audrey Monell, president of Forrest Anderson Plumbing and AC in Glendale, AZ, the most common reason for consumers to call a plumber concerning their septic tank is “because it is too full,” she explains.

A blocked pipe

The presence of a blocked distribution line somewhere between your house and your septic tank is another possible cause of water backing up into your home. Possibly you have a little child who has joyfully flushed an entire sock down the toilet, or perhaps you have a habit of flushing stuff down the toilet, such as not-so-flushable wipes. Take the initiative: Keep an eye on how much water you’re using. As suggested by Glenn Gallas, vice president of operations at Mr. Rooter Plumbing, “take brief showers, install low-flow toilets, and wash clothing over a few days rather than all at once.” Flush diapers, paper towels, tampons, or anything else that is not biodegradable down the toilet.

Indeed, over time, food waste might become clogged in your drain field due to the grinding it undergoes to become little bits.

2. Green, spongy grass around your septic tank

Although it may appear to be a bad sign, dying grass on top of your septic tank is not always the case. (Because the soil on top of your septic tank is typically not as deep as the soil over the rest of your lawn, it is easy for the grass there to become parched.) However, when the grass on top of your septic tank is thriving at a rate that is significantly higher than anywhere else in your yard, this is a red flag. “Even though the area appears to be lush and green, it is a clear indication that you are dealing with a serious problem,” Monell says.

It essentially acts as fertilizer once it has escaped from your septic tank.

This will help you avoid costly repairs later.

3. You’ve got trees or shrubs near your system

Although it is admirable of you to desire to beautify the region, tree roots are naturally attracted to sources of water, which might include faulty pipes or even condensation. As a result of their need to obtain sustenance, they “may split septic tank pipes, enabling dirt to enter, or they can collapse the pipes completely,” according to Gallas. It is not necessarily better to have smaller shrubs because they have the potential to develop deep roots. Take the initiative: In order to plant a tree, first determine how tall it will be when it reaches maturity, and then keep it at least that distance away from your system.

Some trees, such as bamboo, pine, and walnut, have even more aggressive roots and will require you to plant them much further away from your septic system, so talk to your septic professional before you start digging.

Do you already have trees in a high-risk area? Check the pipes every time your system is serviced to ensure they are not affected. Gallas explains that if there is an issue, a camera may be inserted into the pipe to see whether tree roots are to fault.

4. Water’s pooling in your yard

Gallas explains that a high water table or significant rainfall might occasionally fill the drain field, preventing the septic tank from emptying correctly. For those who believe severe rains are to blame for the little lakes in their yard, they might try to allow their septic system more time to catch up by using their water less frequently. (At long last, an excuse not to do the laundry!) However, if this does not eliminate the standing water, a plumber should be contacted. Take the initiative: Rainwater runoff should be directed away from your drain field.

If you have a sprinkler system, be certain that it is equipped with certified backflow devices.

5. A rotten egg smell

Yes, a foul sewage stench might be an indication that your system is malfunctioning. However, this is not always the case. In Monell’s opinion, there are numerous distinct reasons why you could be smelling septic gases: A dried-out wax seal on a toilet (which locks your toilet bowl to the floor) as well as a dry trap in a floor drain are examples of such things as this. (It is frequently filled with water, which prevents sewage gases from entering.) Take the initiative: According to Monell, if you have a chronic stench in your house, “the first course of action should be to examine all exposed fixtures, and if nothing is found, it should be followed up with a smoke test to detect leaks in the lines,” he adds.

6. Slow drains

Generally speaking, “slow drains are an indication that there is a blockage in the pipe itself that goes into the septic,” adds Monell. And, while you might be tempted to reach for the Drano or another drain cleaning, resist the temptation. Chemicals that are harsh on your pipes might cause them to corrode over time. In addition, chemical drain cleaners might destroy the beneficial enzymes and bacteria in your tank that aid in the breakdown of waste, according to Monell. Take the initiative: Make use of a natural product that contains bacteria and enzymes; the crud that has gathered within your pipes is delicious food for these organisms.

How to Care for Your Septic System

Septic system maintenance is neither difficult or expensive, and it does not have to be done frequently. The maintenance of a vehicle is comprised of four major components:

  • Inspect and pump your drainfield on a regular basis
  • Conserve water
  • Dispose of waste properly
  • And keep your drainfield in good condition.

Inspect and Pump Frequently

Inspection of the ordinary residential septic system should be performed by a septic service specialist at least once every three years. Household septic tanks are normally pumped every three to five years, depending on how often they are used. Alternative systems that use electrical float switches, pumps, or mechanical components should be examined more frequently, typically once a year, to ensure that they are in proper working order.

Because alternative systems contain mechanical components, it is essential to have a service contract. The frequency with which a septic tank is pumped is influenced by four key factors:

  • The size of the household
  • The total amount of wastewater produced
  • The amount of solids present in wastewater
  • The size of the septic tank

Service provider coming? Here is what you need to know.

When you contact a septic service provider, he or she will inspect your septic tank for leaks as well as the scum and sludge layers that have built up over time. Maintain detailed records of any maintenance work conducted on your septic system. Because of the T-shaped outlet on the side of your tank, sludge and scum will not be able to escape from the tank and travel to the drainfield region. A pumping is required when the bottom of the scum layer or the top of the sludge layer is within six inches of the bottom of the outlet, or if the top of the sludge layer is within 12 inches of the bottom of the outlet.

In the service report for your system, the service provider should mention the completion of repairs as well as the condition of the tank.

An online septic finder from the National Onsite Wastewater Recycling Association (NOWRA) makes it simple to identify service specialists in your region.

Use Water Efficiently

In a normal single-family house, the average indoor water consumption is about 70 gallons per person, per day, on average. A single leaking or running toilet can waste as much as 200 gallons of water each day, depending on the situation. The septic system is responsible for disposing of all of the water that a residence sends down its pipes. The more water that is conserved in a household, the less water that enters the sewage system. A septic system that is operated efficiently will operate more efficiently and will have a lower chance of failure.

  • Toilets with a high level of efficiency. The usage of toilets accounts for 25 to 30% of total home water use. Many older homes have toilets with reservoirs that hold 3.5 to 5 gallons of water, but contemporary, high-efficiency toilets consume 1.6 gallons or less of water for each flush. Changing out your old toilets for high-efficiency versions is a simple approach to lessen the amount of household water that gets into your septic system. Aerators for faucets and high-efficiency showerheads are also available. Reduce water use and the volume of water entering your septic system by using faucet aerators, high-efficiency showerheads, and shower flow restriction devices. Machines for washing clothes. Water and energy are wasted when little loads of laundry are washed on the large-load cycle of your washing machine. By selecting the appropriate load size, you may limit the amount of water wasted. If you are unable to specify a load size, only complete loads of washing should be performed. Washing machine use should be spread throughout the week if at all possible. Doing all of your household laundry in one day may appear to be a time-saving strategy
  • Nevertheless, it can cause damage to your septic system by denying your septic tank adequate time to handle waste and may even cause your drainfield to overflow. Machines that have earned theENERGY STARlabel consume 35 percent less energy and 50 percent less water than ordinary ones, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Other Energy Star appliances can save you a lot of money on your energy and water bills.

Properly Dispose of Waste

Everything that goes down your drains, whether it’s flushed down the toilet, ground up in the trash disposal, or poured down the sink, shower, or bath, ends up in your septic system, which is where it belongs. What you flush down the toilet has an impact on how effectively your septic system functions.

Toilets aren’t trash cans!

Your septic system is not a garbage disposal system. A simple rule of thumb is to never flush anything other than human waste and toilet paper down the toilet. Never flush a toilet:

  • Cooking grease or oil
  • Wipes that are not flushable, such as baby wipes or other wet wipes
  • Photographic solutions
  • Feminine hygiene items Condoms
  • Medical supplies such as dental floss and disposable diapers, cigarette butts and coffee grounds, cat litter and paper towels, pharmaceuticals, and household chemicals such as gasoline and oil, insecticides, antifreeze, and paint or paint thinners

Toilet Paper Needs to Be Flushed! Check out this video, which demonstrates why the only item you should flush down your toilet are toilet paper rolls.

Think at the sink!

Your septic system is made up of a collection of living organisms that digest and treat the waste generated by your household. Pouring pollutants down your drain can kill these organisms and cause damage to your septic system as well as other things. Whether you’re at the kitchen sink, the bathtub, or the utility sink, remember the following:

  • If you have a clogged drain, avoid using chemical drain openers. To prevent this from happening, use hot water or a drain snake
  • Never dump cooking oil or grease down the sink or toilet. It is never a good idea to flush oil-based paints, solvents, or huge quantities of harmful cleansers down the toilet. Even latex paint waste should be kept to a bare minimum. Disposal of rubbish should be avoided or limited to a minimum. Fats, grease, and particles will be considerably reduced in your septic tank, reducing the likelihood of your drainfield being clogged.

Own a recreational vehicle (RV), boat or mobile home?

If you have ever spent any time in an RV or boat, you are undoubtedly familiar with the issue of aromas emanating from sewage holding tanks.

  • The National Small Flows Clearinghouse’s Septic System Care hotline, which may be reached toll-free at 800-624-8301, has a factsheet on safe wastewater disposal for RV, boat, and mobile home owners and operators.

Maintain Your Drainfield

It is critical that you maintain the integrity of your drainfield, which is a component of your septic system that filters impurities from the liquid that emerges from your septic tank once it has been installed.

Here are some things you should do to keep it in good condition:

  • Parking: Do not park or drive on your drainfield at any time. Plan your tree plantings so that their roots do not grow into your drainfield or septic system. An experienced septic service provider can recommend the appropriate distance for your septic tank and surrounding landscaping, based on your specific situation. Locating Your Drainfield: Keep any roof drains, sump pumps, and other rainfall drainage systems away from the drainfield area. Excess water causes the wastewater treatment process to slow down or halt completely.

5 Signs You Should Have Your Septic Tank Pumped

The majority of households do not devote much effort to thinking about their septic system. After all, who can blame them?! However, if this leads in a lack of attention, it may become a serious problem. When installed and maintained properly, every septic system has the potential to efficiently handle waste for many decades. Were you able to pick out the crucial word “if” in the above sentence? If a septic system is properly maintained, it will continue to operate at peak performance for decades!

  1. There are numerous critical components to developing a successful septic system maintenance plan.
  2. The majority of specialists recommend that you pump your septic tank every 3 to 5 years.
  3. In the event that a septic system is not adequately maintained, there are several tell-tale indicators that suggest the onset of a problem.
  4. Sluggish Drains and/or Flushing are required.
  5. Your sink, tub, or shower will most likely stop draining as soon as they should, and your toilet may not flush as thoroughly as it should if your septic system is beginning to back up.
  6. Take action now before this develops into a far more serious and expensive situation.
  7. Some of these gases may begin to originate from your toilet or drains within your home at certain periods.
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If you begin to detect unpleasant scents in and around your house, contact a septic service right once to get the situation resolved before it becomes much worse.

It should not be the case that the lawn above a septic drain field seems noticeably better than the rest of the yard when the system is operating correctly.

This occurs because the grass is receiving more fertilizer in the form of excessive waste fluids, which is beneficial to the grass.

Water That Isn’t Moving It is possible to detect water gathering in numerous locations across your yard when your septic tank is nearly full.

It is a solid indicator that your septic system needs to be pumped and thoroughly inspected if you notice water collecting in these spots.

Back-up of Sewage Raw sewage backing up into a home is the most obvious symptom of a problem, and it is undoubtedly something that no one wants to encounter at any time in their lives.

If this occurs to you, contact a septic service as soon as possible and avoid the affected area.

The most effective approach to prevent having to deal with any of the unpleasant indicators listed above is to keep a regular pumping and inspection routine in place.

In addition to being a full-service septic maintenance and repair company, Athens Professional SepticDrain is well prepared to manage any sort of septic emergency that may occur.

Even yet, the most effective way to prevent disasters from occurring is to enroll in our regular service plan and ensure that your septic system is in peak operating condition.

5 Signs You Need a New Septic Tank or Repairs – Wilson & Roy Construction

For WilsonRoy Construction, having a functional septic system is extremely vital for homeowners to maintain their property value. If you don’t have it, you might be faced with expensive—and perhaps hazardous—sewage problems. That’s why these septic system repair companies in Pulaski County advise all septic system owners to be aware of when repairs or a new septic tank installation are required. Maintaining a septic system is important, so keep an eye out for these five warning signals that a septic tank repair or replacement is required:

  • Backup of sewage into your house: One of the most obvious symptoms that your septic tank need repair is when sewage backs up into your home. Take a check at the water level in the sewage tank to figure out what has to be done. It’s only necessary to call a septic service to unclog the connection between your tank and your residence if it’s below the outlet. If, on the other hand, the water level is greater, there may be a problem with the tank itself, and it may be necessary to replace it. Strange Patches Of Healthy Grass: If you notice that the vegetation around your septic tank is unusually healthy in some spots, there is a good possibility that you have a leak. Grass that grows quickly as a result of sewage leaks is common. In some cases, you may be required to purchase and install a new septic tank, depending on the amount of the damage. If you notice a bad stench in your house or yard, you should contact a septic service right once to get it addressed. While it is possible that the problem might be resolved with basic fixes, it is also possible that the septic tank is significantly damaged and must be replaced. Septic Tank Puddles: If you notice that sewage is building up around or above your septic tank, it is possible that your sewage is not dispersing correctly. Septic tanks can be crushed by the weight of effluent if they are not addressed promptly. This will result in the need for a new tank. In other circumstances, you may require the installation of a new drain field in order to avoid hazardous germs from contaminating your yard
  • For example, Slow Flushing: If your toilets aren’t flushing as quickly as they used to, it’s probable that your septic tank is experiencing difficulty digesting and spreading waste. It is possible that your system is blocked, damaged, or overflowing in these situations.

The most accurate approach to determine if you require septic tank repairs or a new septic tank installation is to talk with an expert. If you’re in the market for a new tank, WilsonRay Construction has a wide selection of septic tanks for sale in Nancy, Kentucky. These professionals can design and install a bespoke septic tank that is tailored to your precise specs and sewage requirements. They provide 24-hour service and can be reached at (606) 636-6457 for more information on their underground utilities installation services.

Septic Tank Installation and Pricing

To process and dispose of waste, a septic system has an underground septic tank constructed of plastic, concrete, fiberglass, or other material that is located beneath the earth. Designed to provide a customized wastewater treatment solution for business and residential locations, this system may be installed anywhere. Although it is possible to construct a septic tank on your own, we recommend that you hire a professional to do it owing to the amount of skill and specific equipment required.

Who Needs a Septic Tank?

For the most part, in densely populated areas of the nation, a home’s plumbing system is directly connected to the municipal sewer system. Because municipal sewer lines are not readily available in more rural regions, sewage must be treated in a septic tank. If you’re moving into a newly constructed house or onto land that doesn’t already have a septic tank, you’ll be responsible for putting in a septic system on your own.

How to Prepare for Your Septic Tank Installation

Here are a few pointers to keep in mind to make sure your septic tank installation goes as smoothly as possible.

Receive Multiple Estimates

Receiving quotations from licensed septic tank installers and reading reviews about each firm using trustworthy, third-party customer evaluations should be done before any excavation or signing of any paperwork is done. Examine your options for a contractor and make sure they have the appropriate insurance and license, as well as the ability to include critical preparations such as excavation and drain field testing in their quotation.

Test the Soil and Obtain a Permit

For septic systems to function properly, permeable soil surrounding the tank must absorb and naturally handle liquid waste, ensuring that it does not pollute runoff water or seep into the groundwater. The drain or leach field is the name given to this region. Before establishing a septic tank, you are required by law to do a percolation test, sometimes known as a “perc” test. This test indicates that the soil fits the specifications established by the city and the local health agency. In most cases, suitable levels of permeable materials, such as sand or gravel, are necessary in a soil’s composition.

Note: If you wish to install a septic tank on your property, you must first ensure that the ground passes the percolation test. Prior to acquiring the land that you want to utilize for residential purposes, we recommend that you obtain a soil test.

Plan for Excavation

Excavation of the vast quantity of land required for a septic tank necessitates the use of heavy machinery. If you are presently residing on the property, be careful to account for landscaping fees to repair any damage that may have occurred during the excavation process. Plan the excavation for your new home at a period when it will have the least influence on the construction process if you are constructing a new home. Typically, this occurs before to the paving of roads and walkways, but after the basic structure of the home has been constructed and erected.

The Cost of Installing a Septic Tank

There are a few installation charges and additional expenditures connected with constructing a new septic system, ranging from a percolation test to emptying the septic tank and everything in between.

Percolation Test

A percolation test can range in price from $250 to $1,000, depending on the area of the property and the soil characteristics that are being tested. Ordinarily, specialists will only excavate a small number of holes in the intended leach field region; however, if a land study is required to identify where to excavate, the cost of your test may rise.

Building Permit Application

A permit will be required if you want to install a septic tank on your property. State-by-state variations in permit prices exist, however they are normally priced around $200 and must be renewed every few years on average.

Excavation and Installation

When you have passed a percolation test and obtained a building permit, your septic tank is ready to be professionally placed. The cost of a new septic system is determined by the size of your home, the kind of system you choose, and the material used in your septic tank. The following is a list of the many treatment methods and storage tanks that are now available, as well as the normal pricing associated with each.

Types of Septic Tank Systems

Septic system that is used in the traditional sense Traditionally, a septic system relies on gravity to transport waste from the home into the septic tank. Solid trash settles at the bottom of the sewage treatment plant, while liquid sewage rises to the top. Whenever the amount of liquid sewage increases over the outflow pipe, the liquid waste is discharged into the drain field, where it continues to disintegrate. This type of traditional septic system is generally the most economical, with an average cost of roughly $3,000 on the market today.

Drain fields for alternative systems require less land than conventional systems and discharge cleaner effluent.

Septic system that has been engineered A poorly developed soil or a property placed on an uphill slope need the installation of an engineered septic system, which is the most difficult to install.

It is necessary to pump the liquid waste onto a leach field, rather than depending on gravity to drain it, in order to ensure that it is equally dispersed across the land. The average cost of these systems is roughly $8,000.

Types of Septic Tanks

  • Concrete septic tanks are long-lasting and rust-proof, but they are difficult to repair if they are damaged. It is possible that concrete tanks will cost up to $2,000 depending on their size. Plastic —While plastic tanks are cost-effective, they are also susceptible to damage. They are around $1,200 in price. Fiberglass —While fiberglass septic tanks are more durable than their plastic counterparts, they are susceptible to shifting or displacement if the water table rises to an excessive level. Depending on the model, these tanks may cost up to $2,000

More information may be found at: Septic Warranty Coverage and Costs.

Using Your Septic Tank

It is important to maintain the land around your new septic tank’s leach field and to regularly inspect your tank using the lids provided with it. Never use a garbage disposal in conjunction with your septic tank because it can cause the system to clog. Additionally, avoid driving over the ground where your septic tank is located or putting heavy machinery on top of your septic tank or drain field to prevent damage. Most of the time, after five years of septic system use, you’ll need to schedule a cleaning and pumping of the system.

Send an email to our Reviews Team [email protected] if you have any comments or questions about this article.

How do you know if you need a new septic tank?

Asked in the following category: General The most recent update was made on April 23, 2020. If you notice that any of your toilets are flushing slowly, it’s probable that your septic tank requires repair or replacement. Sewage backup into your toilets, sinks, showers, or tubs is one of the most typical symptoms that you have a septic tank that is overflowing and that you should have your septic system inspected by a qualified specialist. Here are five indicators that you may be in the market for a replacement.

  1. The System Has Reached Its End of Life. If you buy a new home, it’s likely that you won’t have to replace your septic system for 40 years or more. If you buy an older property, you may have to repair it sooner. You’ve outgrown the system
  2. You’ve outgrown the system. Drains that are slow to drain
  3. Standing Water in the Yard
  4. Contaminated Water Sources in the Neighborhood

Is it necessary to rebuild septic tanks at any point in the future? Your septic system will need to be flushed at least once every few years, and ultimately it will need to be completely replaced. After a few decades of wear and tear, your system will begin to show signs of failure. As a result, what are the indicators of a septic tank that is completely full? The following are five indicators that your septic tank is approaching or has reached capacity and requires care.

  • Water that has accumulated. If you notice pools of water on your grass surrounding your septic system’s drain field, it’s possible that your septic tank is overflowing. Drains that are slow to drain
  • Odors
  • A lawn that is extremely healthy
  • Sewer backup

What is the best way to tell whether you have a faulty septic system? A deteriorating septic system may show indicators such as sluggish draining toilets and sinks, gurgling noises inside the plumbing, sewage smells inside, recurring drainage backups, or germs in the well water as the initial signs. The presence of sewage odor on the property is a strong indicator that there is a problem.

Septic System Frequently Asked Questions

A septic system, sometimes known as a septic tank, is an underground system that processes the sewage that flows from your house before disposing of the treated, cleaner water. Septic systems are typically seen in residential areas. The treated water is subsequently re-introduced into the environment through filtration. This is critical because untreated sewage may harm nearby streams and water systems, as well as the soil around the perimeter of your septic system. Because your septic system is designed to cleanse and filter sewage, it is critical that it is in proper operating order.

What is a Drainfield?

The drainfield, also known as the leach field, is the area where the water from your septic system is sent after it has been cleansed and filtered.

It is necessary to construct a drainfield in order to ensure that water is distributed uniformly back into the soil.

How do I find my septic system?

If you’re fortunate enough to have a contemporary septic system in your yard, it may be equipped with an access lid that is visible from the ground floor. If this is the situation at your residence, locating your septic system is as simple as taking a few steps into your backyard. It’s unfortunate that this isn’t true for older septic systems. It’s possible that you may locate an older system in your home by checking for greener, faster-growing grass or even an area with less growth than the rest of your yard if you live in an older home.

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This will show you exactly where your septic system is located in your yard, if you have one.

You’ll need to look for the location where your septic system’s sanitary line exits your home and follow that line until you find your septic tank, which will take some time.

If you are unable to discover your septic system, your yard may need to be dug up by a septic system installation in order to locate your septic tank as a last option.

How long do septic systems last?

Septic systems are not designed to endure for a specific number of years, thus there is no defined time frame. In the event of adequate maintenance, you may expect your septic system to last several decades before it has to be replaced; but, if your system fails or deteriorates as a result of bad care, its lifespan will be drastically diminished. In order to obtain an accurate estimate of how much longer the life of your septic system may be extended, you must first have it checked thoroughly by an experienced septic system installation or repairer.

What’s the advantage of installing a newer septic system rather than an older system?

Although it is not required to install a new system, there are advantages to having a modern septic tank rather than an older one. For starters, when you get a new septic tank, you can be confident that it will serve you for decades if it is properly maintained, and you will not have to worry about it being “too old.” Additionally, newer systems have been modified to reduce the likelihood of your system becoming clogged, and if something does go wrong with a new system or when it comes time to have your septic system pumped, a new system will likely be easier to locate because they are frequently constructed with ground-level lids.

New septic systems also provide a further treatment for your waste water, allowing it to be cleaner before it is released into the surrounding environment.

All of that being said, if your property currently has an older septic system installed, it should not need to be updated as long as it complies with the standards of your local health department and is in excellent operating order.

How much does a new septic system cost?

Installation of new septic systems may be a significant financial commitment, with costs typically reaching tens of thousands of dollars. Whenever you have to replace an outdated septic system, you should look into financing alternatives that will make it simpler for you to pay for a new septic system in the long run. Purchase further information from a septic system installation business on how to obtain septic systems at the most competitive prices while also taking advantage of low-interest financing options.

How big is my septic tank?

Septic tank capacity is determined by the amount of water consumed in your property as well as local codes and requirements. Check with your local health agency to find out how big your tank is before installing it.

Why should my septic system be pumped out?

Without regular pumping, the gases emitted by human waste accumulate in your septic system, increasing the risk of septic tank damage and the need for more frequent pumping. The regular pumping of your septic system will allow you to limit the rate at which your tank deteriorates and save money in the process. It’s crucial to remember, though, that degeneration is unavoidable in the long run. It is only via regular maintenance, such as pumping your tank, that your septic system will survive longer.

Does my tank need to be dug up to know if it needs to be pumped?

Risers are commonly found in newer septic systems, which allow you to access your tank from the ground level through a lid. It is straightforward for any septic system professional to determine whether or not your yard has risers placed, and whether or not it is necessary to pump it. If, on the other hand, your tank cannot be accessible from the ground level, it will need to be dug up in order to determine whether it has to be drained. Instead of inspecting your septic system to see whether it needs to be pumped on a regular basis, set a timetable for having your system pumped every 2-3 years.

Why should I have risers and lids installed on my septic system?

As a result, when it comes time to find, pump, or repair your septic system, risers are the best choice since they provide ground-level access to your system. Having a septic system lid will allow you to mow your grass while still being able to find your system with no difficulty. Lids and risers also have the advantage of being accessible all year round, as opposed to earlier septic systems that could only be accessed by digging a trench through your yard. If your septic system has to be pumped or repaired for any reason during the winter months, getting beneath layers of frozen earth can be difficult, if not impossible, and you may be forced to wait until the spring to have access to your tank again.

How often should my septic system be pumped out?

A typical septic system contains a 1,500-gallon tank, which needs to be pumped around every 2-3 years for a household of four, according to industry standards. If you have less than four people living in your house, you will most likely be able to pump your septic system every five years rather than every three.

You should speak with your local health agency to determine the exact size of your tank, and you should consult a septic system business to determine how frequently your tank should be pumped based on the size of your family and the size of your septic tank.

Do I need to have the septic tank pumped if I’m selling my house?

Consult with your local health department to learn about the restrictions that apply to your region of residence. Generally speaking, as long as your septic system has been pumped on a regular basis by a licensed septic system company and recently enough for the new homeowners to be able to live there for a year or two without having to pump the septic system, you should not be required to have it pumped again in the near future.

How do I find someone to pump my septic system?

It is important to be aware that not all septic system businesses are licensed and that not all firms properly dispose of or recycle the waste they pump from your septic system when you are looking for one to pump it. Finding a firm that complies with EPA standards should be your first concern, and then you should look at price, how pricing is split down, and which company is delivering the most honest, economical, and dependable service should be your next consideration. Investigate business evaluations, and when you select a septic system provider to pump your septic tank, be certain that they do the work properly, leaving enough water and waste to keep the sewage decomposing while leaving no visible trace more than a few inches of waste behind.

How much does it cost to have my septic system pumped?

It is recommended that you call many pumpers before making a selection, and that you ask as many questions as possible to ensure that you are receiving the best service for your money. Pumping may cost upwards of $200, so it is always wise to shop around before making a decision. You should not consider it a waste of money to have your septic system pumped when the time comes. By correctly maintaining your septic system, you may avoid spending tens of thousands of dollars to replace your septic system long before it should have been replaced in the first place.

What happens if I don’t have my septic system pumped?

The sediments will pile up in your septic tank if you don’t pump it out regularly, ultimately overflowing into the drain field and clogging the drain field. Backups can occur, causing damage to your property and even necessitating the replacement of your drain field, which can be a very expensive error.

I just had my septic system pumped. Why is it full already?

Septic systems are designed to refill rapidly since the purpose of pumping is not to remove water but rather to remove non-biodegradable waste, and the water itself is not the aim of pumping. Once your septic system has been pumped and you begin to use the water in your house, your tank will quickly refill in order to maintain good operation of the system. If the water level rises to a point where it is above the outlet line, contact your septic system service provider for assistance immediately.

What do you look for when inspecting my septic system?

When we do an inspection, we make certain that your septic system is in good operating condition and that it satisfies the standards for receiving a Certificate of Compliance. If you’re planning to sell your home, you should have your septic system checked out by a professional who is certified by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency. This will allow you to sell your home faster and for more money, if you can prove that your system has been checked out by an accredited professional. The level of liquid in your septic tank will be checked, and we’ll make sure there is no surface-level discharge.

We’ll also note whether the level of solid waste in your septic tank indicates that it should be pumped, and whether any repairs are required to improve the overall functionality of the system.

The drains in my home aren’t draining as quickly as they normally do. Does this have to do with my septic system?

Drains that are clogged and that empty slowly are not necessarily a big source of concern. Before presuming that there is an issue with your septic system, check sure that there isn’t anything obstructing your drain first. In the case of one plumbing fixture in your house that is draining slowly, it is likely due to clogging; however, if all of the drains in your home are slow or leave waste backed up, it is probable that your septic system requires inspection and may even require pumping.

What happens when my septic system fails?

Symptoms of a failing septic system may include minor issues such as drain breaks or pipes that have been stopped, which can be caused by tree roots intersecting with the system. Septic system failure, on the other hand, might indicate that your septic tank has degraded to the point that it cannot be repaired and must be replaced. A blocked drainfield will hopefully not become your problem because it is the most expensive component of your system to replace; nevertheless, if it does, you must act quickly to make the necessary repairs or else your waste will continue to back up, perhaps causing damage to your property.

You’ll need to replace the drainfield as soon as possible to avoid further pollution of drinking water sources.

How do I prevent my septic system from failing? How can I properly maintain my septic system?

Your septic system should degrade at a normal rate over the course of several decades if you maintain it on a regular basis. Maintenance normally consists of getting your septic system pumped on a regular basis and making certain that you do not flush or wash anything down the drain that might block your septic system.

What shouldn’t I flush down the toilet?

As a general rule, only human waste and toilet paper should be flushed. There are several reasons why flushing medicine down the toilet is not a good idea. First, medication might kill some of the bacteria in your septic tank, which is necessary to break down solid waste. Second, drugs can pollute adjacent well water. In addition, you should avoid flushing feminine hygiene items, paper towels, tissues, hair, cat litter (even if it is flushable), diapers, wipes, condoms, cigarettes, and anything else that seems to be inorganic and shouldn’t be flushed down the toilet.

What shouldn’t I pour down the drain?

Grease from the kitchen, motor oil, anti-freeze, gasoline, paint, and food should not be flushed down the toilet or drain. You should avoid flushing anything down your drain other than soap and water, and you should especially avoid flushing any form of chemical down your drain that should not be recycled back into the environment, such as fertilizer.

Is using a garbage disposal bad for my septic system?

Using a trash disposal will result in the requirement to pump your septic system more frequently than you would otherwise need to do if you avoided flushing food particles down your drains.

Too much food collection in your tank might cause your drainfield to clog since the microorganisms in your tank are not capable to digesting it. When using a trash disposal, check with your septic system company to find out how frequently the disposal should be serviced.

Should I add bacteria to my septic system?

Aside from being completely useless, introducing bacteria to your septic tank is also highly discouraged. The bacteria produced by human waste is sufficient to break down the solid sewage in your tank without the need of bacteria supplements or other methods. If, on the other hand, multiple members of your home are using pharmaceuticals, they will enter your septic system through human waste and kill some of the beneficial bacteria in your tank, causing it to malfunction. Please contact the firm who installed your septic system to see whether or not you should be worried about the amount of bacteria-killing compounds entering the system.

There’s a strong sewer odor outside of my house. Could this be my septic tank?

Strong sewage stench coming from your yard might be coming from your septic system, but it could also be coming from someplace else completely. Identifying the source of the smell is important. Check for propane or gas leaks in your home before concluding that your septic system is at fault; however, if your gas or propane lines are not leaking, determine how long it has been since you had your tank pumped, and whether there is any sewage waste in your yard or other signs of septic system failure before making your final decision.

Can my septic system contaminate nearby water?

It is possible for your septic system to pollute surrounding water sources if it is not properly managed or fails completely. In the event that you suspect that your septic system is failing, make sure that it is routinely pumped and inspected by an expert.

My gutters’ downspouts drain into my yard above my septic system. Is this a bad thing?

The drainage of your gutters into your yard above your septic system, and particularly into your drainfield, can be hazardous to your septic system. All water should be diverted away from your septic system in order to minimize flooding and damage to your septic system’s tank or drain field.

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