How Do I Winterize My Boats Septic Tank?

Winterizing Marine Sanitation Systems

  1. To winterize your sanitation system, start by making sure the holding tank is pumped out.
  2. Remove the raw water intake hose from the seacock and place it in a small bucket with antifreeze.
  3. Flush the head to circulate the antifreeze through the lines and to the holding tank.

  • A properly insulated septic tank is a winterized septic tank. You can easily do this by adding a thick layer of mulch directly over the tank itself and any exposed pipes. A good layer should be about eight to 12 inches thick.

Should I put antifreeze in my holding tank?

Car antifreeze (ethylene glycol) should never be used in an RV holding tank and should never be carelessly dumped down a drain or into the environment. Propylene glycol antifreeze and ethanol antifreeze are both okay to dump at a dump station or down your home cleanout port.

How do you drain a freshwater tank on a boat?

It’s pretty straightforward, but be forewarned: it takes time. Drain the water system completely by opening all the faucets (hot and cold), and pump until the tank(s) are empty. Pour five or six gallons of non-toxic (propylene glycol) antifreeze into the tank.

How do you winterize a raw water system?

Turn on fresh water pump to run water through sinks, showers, wash down shower/hoses, etc. until you see the water change from clear water to pink water. Empty the hot water tank and run hot water through all systems until the water changes from clear to pink. Pour antifreeze down the shower drains into the sump pumps.

How do you winterize a boat in the water?

How To Winterize Your Boat

  1. Step 1: Replace engine oil.
  2. Step 2: Flush and drain cooling water.
  3. Step 3: Stabilize fuel.
  4. Step 4: Protect internal engine components.
  5. Step 5: Replace gear oil.
  6. Step 6: Grease and lubricate.
  7. Step 7: Remove valuables.
  8. Step 8: Clean and wax.

How do you keep a GREY and black-water tank from freezing?

Use a combination of these five steps:

  1. Thermostat controlled personal space heater in the wet bay.
  2. Keep fresh water tank as full as possible.
  3. Add antifreeze as necessary to grey and black tanks.
  4. Consider adding a heated water hose.
  5. Keep sewer hose elevated off the ground.

Can you put antifreeze in your black tank?

Clean and flush your black and gray water tanks, drain the fresh water tank completely, then close the drain valves. Pour one quart of special RV antifreeze into the gray and black tanks to protect the drain valves and seals. Do this through all sink and shower drains—you want antifreeze in the pipe traps as well.

How do I add antifreeze to my freshwater tank?

There are several on the market. It can be easier to pump it backwards through a faucet spout using a backflow kit with a hand pump, but it is totally acceptable to pour the antifreeze directly into the fresh tank and use the RV’s water pump to pump it throughout the system as well.

How many gallons of antifreeze do I need to winterize my boat?

To winterize the engine with antifreeze, you’ll need a five-gallon bucket, and enough antifreeze for your engine and related plumbing (at least two gallons). If your engine takes a lot of antifreeze, you might also need a helper to add antifreeze to the bucket as needed.

How do you winterize a closed cooling system on a boat?

Disconnect the hose from the main tank at the filter. Connect the remote tank and run for five minutes at 1,300 rpm. Shut down and replace the oil, filter and fuel filter. Fully drain the raw-water side of a closed-cooled engine, including the manifolds, seawater pump and heat exchanger.

Winterizing Marine Sanitation Systems

It is possible that remaining water in your boat’s sanitation system will freeze and cause expensive damage to system components if there is a strong frost. Protecting marine sanitation systems against freezing damage is a simple process that everyone can do. This article will explain how to complete the task at hand.

Step One:

To prepare your sanitation system for winterization, begin by ensuring that the holding tank has been emptied. Now is the time to give it a thorough cleansing with fresh water so that you may start the season “with a clean slate” next spring.

Step Two:

Using a small bucket filled with antifreeze, remove the raw water intake hose from the seacock and store it somewhere safe.

Step Three:

Flush the head to ensure that the antifreeze is circulated throughout the system and into the holding tank. Then, reattach the hose to the seacock using a double clamp.

Step Four:

Check to see that the raw water strainer has been purged and that it has been filled with antifreeze. Please keep in mind that if you have a waste treatment system, such as Raritan’s Electro Scan, it must also be prepared for winter. The failure of these devices owing to freezing of leftover water is mostly caused by improper winter storage of these devices. Follow the directions provided by the manufacturer. Refer to the Electro Scan handbook for detailed information on how to winterize your Electro Scan machine.

About Antifreeze

Winterizing potable water systems, sanitation systems, air conditioning systems, and engines using non-toxic propylene glycol antifreeze from West Marine is advised. Antifreeze is available in two varieties. The first is ethylene glycol, which is found in typical vehicle antifreeze products such as Prestone. Using this form of antifreeze is extremely hazardous to the environment, and it should not be utilized in boat winterizing applications. Use non-toxic propylene glycol in place of ethylene glycol, such as West Marine Brand Engine and Water System Antifreeze, to keep your engine and water system from freezing.

Why would you use -100°F antifreeze if the temperature never drops below -50°F in your home?

Because there is usually some residual water present, the concentration of antifreeze is reduced, and the resulting freezing point may be significantly higher than the quoted temperature.

Check see Antifreeze_ 101 if you want to learn more about antifreeze compositions.

Best Practice for Antifreeze Disposal

However, even though Pure Oceans propylene glycol antifreeze is non-toxic, it is best practice not to dump it on land, into storm drains, or directly into bodies of water because of the potential for contamination.

After usage, properly dispose of spent antifreeze in accordance with federal, state, and municipal rules and guidelines.

Winterizing – Plumbing, Holding Tank and Sanitation System

“Hi, I just received my order, and I’m getting ready to winterize my boat,” Frank wrote in response. I have a 1999 30′ Cruiser with inboards that I am selling. I tried the Bilge Bath, and it did an excellent job of eliminating all of the smells. Since purchasing this boat and strapping everything down, I have been unable to get rid of the foul stench in the head and sump. It wasn’t a garbage stink, but rather a persistent odor that no one could get rid of on their own. I also noted that some residue remained after the pumping was completed.

  1. The stink has vanished completely!
  2. He stated that he had never seen a secondhand boat with a tank so clean before.
  3. The issue has been resolved.
  4. I have a 40 gallon fresh water tank plus a holding tank for winter storage.
  5. I’m receiving various responses all the time.
  6. If so, how?
  7. More information about the selected product may be obtained by clicking on the links.

We keep track of our progress, and it’s comforting to know that we’re still on track to reach 1,000 hits.

The hot water tank might be a bit difficult to work with.

Open all of the boat’s faucets, including hot and cold, and allow them to run continuously until the water tank is completely depleted.

To use plumbers antifreeze, fill the water tank with non-toxic plumbers antifreeze and fill the tank with water until pink antifreeze flows out of the faucets.

Please do not turn off the faucets.

Make certain that you only use non-toxic antifreeze, often known as plumbers’ antifreeze, to prevent ice from forming.

Ensure that all antifreeze is contained and disposed of properly at a proper disposal facility.

A buddy will be required to hold a bucket at the through hull to capture the antifreeze that will be released when the sink is drained overboard, as is common on most boats.

Some hot water heaters have drains, although the vast majority do not.

If feasible, empty the hot water tank independently from the rest of the system.

If it does not have a drain, simply open the drain while leaving the hot water tap open to avoid a vapor lock.

This should be done prior to putting the antifreeze to the water tank.

You may require the assistance of a companion for this task because water weighs 10 lbs.

Also required is a piece of plastic or copper tubing, which will be inserted into the two ends of the hose so that you may complete the winterization process.

You will need another piece of tubing to bridge this hose if your engine has a heat exchange connection from the motor.

Assuming you are unable to remove or drain your hot water tank, you will need to compensate for the dilute water with more plumbers antifreeze to prevent freezing.

Shut off all of the cold water faucets and continue to run the pump and add antifreeze to the water tank until you see pink antifreeze pouring out of the hot water faucets, at which point turn off the pump and turn on all of the faucets.

In the absence of a hydrometer, you can check the strength of the antifreeze periodically until you have enough antifreeze content to protect your system up to the anticipated maximum temperature; otherwise, continue pumping the antifreeze through until it is the same color as the original in the bottle.

If you are able to remove the hot water tank, you will likely only require one or two gallons to winterize your system; however, if you are unable to remove the hot water tank, you may require four or more gallons.

Use the Fall Lay Up Cocktail to winterize the holding tank and toilet plumbing before leaving the house.

Directions and instructions may be found in the Holding TanksSanitation Systems area of the forum under the heading How can I protect my boat from stinking in the spring? Thank you for submitting your inquiry. Captain Aurora is a fictional character created by the author of the novel Captain Aurora.

The Skipper Recommends:

Plumbing Preparation for the Winter SANITATION SYSTEM:1. Empty the tank and thoroughly rinse it out to eliminate any sludge that may have accumulated there. Remove the toilet intake line from the thru-hull (shut the seacock first if the boat is still in water), place it in a jug of non-toxic potable marine/rv antifreeze, and flush it through the system to empty into the tank. 3. It is not sufficient to just flush antifreeze down the toilet. As a result, just the discharge and the tank will be protected, leaving the remainder of the system vulnerable to freeze damage.

  • The amount of antifreeze that must be added depends on how much liquid is left in the tank and the climate in which it will be used.
  • Pour in enough antifreeze to keep the tank from freezing and then pump the head 50 times to force as much liquid out of the system as you possibly can.
  • Keep them open till the spring.
  • Winterizing all Type I and II MSDs should be done according to the manufacturer’s specifications.
  • If you don’t already have a manual, you may obtain one from the manufacturer’s website by clicking here.
  • Empty and totally drain the water tanks (just turn on all the faucets).
  • Turn off the water heater.
  • Remove both the intake and outlet hoses, and if required, use a shop vac to ensure that all of the water has been removed from the system.
  • Bypass kits for this purpose may be purchased from boat supply stores and RV supply stores, respectively.
  • Make sure there is no pressure in the system by leaving all of the faucets open at the same time.
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Tips to winterize your boat

Winterizing a boat is never a pleasant experience. It typically indicates that summer is on its way out of town, and with it, your enjoyment of the water’s surface. The only thing that might be worse is finding out the following spring that your boat winterization efforts were not adequately done and that your enjoyment of the water will have to be postponed until your boat is repaired. But don’t be concerned! It is not difficult to winterize a boat if you approach the task with a plan. In reality, when it comes to winterizing your boat, there are just two solutions available.

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Pack up the kids and the dog, sell the house, and begin traveling south via the Great Lakes to the Caribbean.

Begin making preparations for the haul-out.

While option number one may appear to be the more romantic choice, option number two is significantly more practical. So let us concentrate on that one. The following are 10 essential factors to consider in order to maintain your sailboat secure throughout the winter months.

Boat Winterizing Step One: One last trip

Take your boat out for (at the very least) one more trip before you begin any other activities. This time, though, instead of admiring the nature and animals, people will be staring at your boat. Make a list of the items you wish to fix, replace, or alter – the out-of-date electronics, the stinking holding tank, the dusty carpets, the sticky winch, and anything else that has prompted you to think, “I should take care of that one of these days.” Make a timetable of the tasks you want to do this fall, this winter, and next spring when you’ve finished your list of ideas.

Boat Winterizing Step Two: Unpacking

Ensure that you remove as much equipment from the boat as you can. Take the pots, pans, plates, and cups home with you and put them through the dishwasher when you get home. Taking the food out of the icebox and bringing it home, or donating it to the local food bank Clean the linens and blankets thoroughly. Allow the cushions and pillows to air out. Take your fire extinguishers out of storage so that they may be examined throughout the winter.

Boat Winterizing Step Three: Cleaning

After you’ve taken everything out of the cabin, give her a thorough cleaning from top to bottom. Clean the inside of the lockers and drawers. Lemon oil should be applied to the wood. Remove all of the hairs from behind the skull using a brush. Clean the carpets and send the curtains to the dry cleaners for cleaning. Get down in the bilge and recover all of the items that have accumulated there through the years of sailing. It is important to remember not to pump bilge water overboard if it has an oily sheen when you are cleaning your bilge!

Boat Winterizing Step Four: Air it Out

Make sure to keep the internal doors and lockers open after cleaning so that air may flow throughout the vessel. Just before you tie up the boat, you might wish to put out some moisture and odor absorbers, such as DampRid or ZoneDry. This is optional.

Boat Winterizing Step Five: On Deck

Pull your anchor out of the water and thoroughly clean the chain and rode. Clean the scuppers of the black sludge and send a young child inside the laundromat with a scrub brush to do the cleaning. Make a pile of your sails and lines on the grass and wash them well with warm soapy water. Check to see that they are completely dry before storing them for the winter. The moment has come to drop off your sails or canvas at the sail loft if they are in need of repair. Cover up the hole on the rear of your boom where the birds like to make their nests each year in the spring.

Boat Winterizing Step Six: Engine System

Pull your anchor out of the water and thoroughly clean the chain and rode to remove any remaining muck. Clean the scuppers of the black sludge and send a young child into the laundromat with a scrub brush to do the job. Lay your sails and lines out on the grass and wash them with warm soapy water. Set them aside for later use.

Before putting them away for the winter, make sure they are completely dry. The moment has come to drop off your sails or canvas to the sail loft if they require repair. Cover up the hole on the rear of your boom where the birds like to construct their nests each year in the spring time.

Boat Winterizing Step Seven: Head to the.well.Head

Remove your anchor and thoroughly clean the chain and rode of any muck. Clean the scuppers of the black sludge and send a young child inside the laundromat with a scrub brush. Lay your sails and lines out on the grass and wash them with warm soapy water. Before putting them away for the winter, make sure they are completely dry. The moment has come to drop off your sails or canvas to the sail loft if they require repair. Cover up the hole on the rear of your boom where the birds construct their nests every spring.

Boat Winterizing Step Eight: Water Tanks

Drain your fresh water tanks as well as your water heater completely (turn it off first). Antifreeze may be added straight to your water tank and then pumped via your hot and cold plumbing (don’t forget about the shower on your transom). Consider, however, adding a siphon hose fitting right before your water pump, as well as a water heater bypass loop, in order to save time and antifreeze.

Boat Winterizing Step Nine: Anti-Freeze

Drain your fresh water tanks and water heater to the brim with no interruption (turn it off first). You may add non-toxic antifreeze straight to your water tank and have it circulated through your hot and cold plumbing (don’t forget about the shower on the transom, either!). Consider, however, adding a siphon hose fitting directly before your water pump, as well as a water heater bypass loop, to save time and antifreeze in the long run.

Boat Winterizing Step Ten: After Hauling

Drain your fresh water tanks and water heater completely (turn it off first). You may add non-toxic antifreeze straight to your water tank and pump it via your hot and cold plumbing (don’t forget about the shower on the transom). Consider, however, adding a siphon hose fitting directly before your water pump, as well as a water heater bypass loop, to save time and antifreeze.

Boat Storage Tips

You should think about how you will keep your boat when you have finished winterizing it after the season is over. There are a few crucial points to keep in mind, as well as 10 “must-dos” in the conclusion. The notion of covering your boat in order to keep the snow off is a sensible one, and there are as many different approaches to this as there are boat owners. Boat owners shrink wrap their vessels, while others erect PVC fortresses with elaborate canvas covers. A few do nothing at all while the majority do everything they can to protect themselves and their vessels.

Winterizing techniques and particular suggestions should be found in your vehicle’s owner’s handbook.

Ten Boat Storage “Must-Dos”

  1. Boats should be stored with the stern down so that rain and melting snow may drain away via the scuppers. All seacocks and drains should be opened to avoid damage from freezing. When winterizing engines and systems, use gasoline stabilizing additives and follow the manufacturer’s instructions. Under boat coverings and tarps, provide structural support for the boat. Never fasten boat coverings or tarps to boat supports using ropes. Trailer boat hulls should be supported in some way so that the weight is not entirely supported by the trailer tires. Remove any devices, food, valuables, canvas, and pillows and store them in your residence. Prepare the cabin and lockers by placing moisture absorbers in them. A portable heater or an auto battery charger should never be used in the bilge. If your boat is blocked, check the stands and blocking on a regular basis while it is in storage.

You should now be aware of how to prepare your boat to withstand the winter and be ready to travel as soon as the first indication of calm seas appears in April! This page is meant solely for the purpose of providing general information about non-insurance-related topics and is not intended to be a source of professional advice.

Winterizing a holding tank.

This year, I was able to complete the installation of my boat’s plastic sanitary holding tank. When I get to the last 3/4″ or so of septage, which is roughly half the diameter of the suction hose, I find that I am unable to pump it out.

Does freezing the liquid cause the tank to expand, causing it to fracture, or are the plastic tanks flexible enough to withstand the stress of the situation? Thanks, Naves Quam Mentes! MarkPluresNaves Quam Mentes! There are more boats than there are brains!

Re: Winterizing a holding tank.

Add a gallon of the pink antifreeze to the mix. What’s the point of taking a chance? In addition to flushing down a gallon or two, I leave the bowl and hose completely filled.

Re: Winterizing a holding tank.

Alternatively, simply don’t worry. Consider the implications of this statement. It’s not an issue.

Re: Winterizing a holding tank.

Yes, as previously said. You can also add water and continue pumping to eliminate any leftover sewage before adding the antifreeze, if you so choose. Kevin There are two types of boaters: those who have run aground and those who make up stories about their misadventures.

Re: Winterizing a holding tank.

I mean, don’t overthink this one at all. Even if the slurry freezes, it will be much softer than saltwater ice and will have plenty of room in the tank to grow without causing harm to the tank walls. Go back to sleep or think about something important that you should be thinking about.

Re: Winterizing a holding tank.

It’s still not a bad idea to throw in a gallon of the pink stuff, Ian. It would be much better if it could be introduced through the flush water supply. puts the information in the mind as well.

Re: Winterizing a holding tank.

I’ll tell you what. This winter, put a wizz in a beer bottle and set it outdoors to chill. It may freeze, but it will not cause the bottle to break. I’m aware of the situation. I was living and drinking in New Hampshire, just north of the notch mountains. Experiments in science become increasingly existential.

Re: Winterizing a holding tank.

So, here’s the deal: This winter, put a wizz in a beer bottle and set it outside to enjoy. Regardless of whether it freezes, the bottle will not be broken. I’m well aware of the situation; New Hampshire’s notch country was where I was living and drinking at the time. It becomes increasingly existential during science investigations.

Re: Winterizing a holding tank.

Perhaps it was because I lived onboard, but despite the fact that the head itself was far below freezing and despite the fact that the rest of the boat was heated, I never experienced even the tiniest hint of a problem. The salt water in a typical head is the most susceptible to freezing. Every piece of human waste, whether solid or liquid, contributes to the reduction in the freezing point. Moreover, even if it freezes, the slurry will still pump through the system. To have a difficulty, you must be in a very cold environment, such as the Great Lakes or Hudson’s Bay.

Re: Winterizing a holding tank.

Addendum to the original text – I just took a look at the locations of some of the advise and the source of the inquiry to see what I could find. It’s still unlikely to cause problems, but I can see why people are recommending that you put some antifreeze in the car. You’re a jerk up there.

Re: Winterizing a holding tank.

Isn’t the low-cost pink antifreeze potentially hazardous? Would it be preferable (albeit more expensive) to use a non-toxic glycol instead?

Re: Winterizing a holding tank.

The non-toxic waste in a holding tank and toilett system is taken care of by someone else.

Re: Winterizing a holding tank.

The non-toxic waste in a holding tank and toilett system is not taken care of by anyone.

Re: Winterizing a holding tank.

For years, I’ve been pumping around a gallon of non-toxic AF through the head and into the tank.

Though maybe unnecessary, who wants to replace any of that equipment unless absolutely necessary?

Re: Winterizing a holding tank.

The term “non-toxic” is significant to me. Folks used to say to pump a quart of cheap booze (vodka/scotch/whatever) into the system since it was more typical for people to just pump it overboard back in the day. That piece of advice may still be relevant today for those who are aware of the negative impact that most anti-freeze may have on wildlife, particularly if they are careless about how much they pump out.

Re: Winterizing a holding tank.

This is really essential to me: “non-toxic.” A quart of cheap booze (vodka/scotch/whatever) into the system was popular advise in the olden days because it was more customary for individuals to just pump their alcohol overboard. People who are aware of the negative impact that most anti-freeze may have on wildlife, especially if they are careless about how they pump out their anti-freeze, may still follow that advise today.

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Freshwater System Winterizing

I believe that the term “non-toxic” is significant. In the olden days, it was standard advise to pump a quart of cheap booze (vodka, scotch, or whatever) into the system since it was more likely for individuals to just pump overboard. That advise may still be applicable today for those who are aware of the negative impact that most anti-freeze may have on wildlife, especially if they are careless about how much they pump out.

COMBUSTIBLE…?

The term “non-toxic” is significant, in my opinion. Back in the day, it was standard advise to pump a quart of cheap booze (vodka, scotch, or whatever) into the system since it was more likely for individuals to just pump overboard. That advise may still be applicable today for those who are aware of the negative impact that most anti-freeze may have on wildlife, particularly if they are careless about how much they pump out.

A Better Product

The term “non-toxic” is significant to me. Folks used to say to pump a quart of cheap booze (vodka/scotch/whatever) into the system since it was more typical for people to just pump it overboard back in the day. That piece of advice may still be relevant today for those who are aware of the negative impact that most anti-freeze may have on wildlife, particularly if they are careless about how much they pump out.

The Water System Manifold

Step 1 – Drain the Water Tanks: In this shot, I’ve used the fresh water pump to drain the port and starboard water tanks, after which I unplugged the tank outputs from the supply manifold. This manifold is made of PEX tube fittings from the ” Shark Bite ” brand. They are simple to connect and unhook, allowing them to drain into the bilge compartment naturally by gravity and the rocking action of the vessel. Despite the fact that this shot was taken only a few hours later, the surface was virtually completely drip-free and dry at this time.

The use of antifreeze in tanks is discouraged due to the difficulty of removing it in the spring through the process of dilution (see below).

It should be noted that not all boats are conducive to the tanks being completely empty using the 12V water pump.

Whenever this occurs, I use a 12V pump and rags to empty the tanks from above, assuming there is a clean out port available. As a last resort, if there is no way to get access to the tank, it is possible that the only choice is to inject antifreeze straight to the tank.

Drill Pump To Drain Water Heater

Many yacht yards will simply open the water heater and allow the water to flow into your bilges as part of the second step. Mold, concealed trapped water, and smells might result as a result of this. Although I am not a fan of this habit of cutting corners, I acknowledge that it saves labor time. If you want to avoid this, you may install a drill mounted pump, such as this one, to keep the bilge dry and to prevent the full contents of the water heater from being discharged into the bilge. These drill pumps are inexpensive and can be purchased at any Wal*Mart.

Disconnect the drill pump and lay a few rags under the spigot to collect any lingering drips once the water heater has been completely depleted of water.

The Water Heater Drain Bucket

I used a bucket to capture the contents of my water heater after it had been pumped dry for demonstration reasons. You may alternatively simply drain the water onto the cockpit floor or into a scupper by connecting the hose straight to the scupper. If you don’t mind having water in your boat’s bilge, you may just empty the water heater into the water tank.

The Drill Pump

Draining the water heater may be accomplished with the help of a drill pump. I believe it cost me around $7.00 at Wal*Mart. Personally, I prefer a 12V DC pump, however they function quite well for the price point.

Water Heater Bypass Hose

Step 3 – Connect the Bypass Hose to the Water Heater: IMPORTANT: Water heaters are routinely emptied and bypassed before being put away for the winter. We strongly advise against attempting to run antifreeze through it as you would have a very high likelihood of freezing and breaking it! This is an example of a water heater bypass hose in operation. It is placed to prevent you from accidentally filling your water heater with antifreeze. You must first remove all of the water from the drain before placing some rags under it.

  1. Winterization of the water heater includes draining it and leaving the faucet open.
  2. Installation is as simple as disconnecting the cold supply and hot return lines for the domestic water side of the tank and connecting them together with a bypass hose on the other side of the tank.
  3. These lines will typically be black in color, similar to a radiator type hose, and will not be the same color as the domestic water side of the system.
  4. If the hoses connect directly to the engine, these are the incorrect hoses to use.

Water Heater Bypass Nipple

The brass nipple that connects the two stainless braided hoses on this IsoTemp water heater serves as abypass valve for the heater. It is possible that the bypass will not be required at all.

However, while installing a manual by-pass is straightforward, some owners are constantly seeking for methods to make the winterization procedure even simpler. In order to accomplish this, we provide a pre-packaged water heater bypass kit. By-Pass Kit for Marine Water Heaters (LINK)

Remove Any Water Filters

The fourth step is to remove the water filter cartridge from your boat. If your boat is equipped with onboard water filters, this is the time to remove them. Simply remove the cartridge from the filter and reassemble the filter without the filter in it to complete the process.

Add a Length Of Hose to Your Water Pump Supply

Water Filter Cartridge Removal: If your yacht has any on-board water filters, now is the time to take them out of service. Simply remove the cartridge from the filter and reassemble the filter without the cartridge in it to complete the process.

Using Turkey Baster To Prime The Pump

Step 4 – Remove the Water Filter Cartridge: If your boat is equipped with any onboard water filters, now is the time to remove them. Simply remove the cartridge and reassemble the filter without the cartridge in it.

Filling theSuckingHose

I’ve filled the turkey baster halfway with antifreeze and am now filling the line that connects to the water pump with it.

Antifreeze Bucket

TIP: I have a Sharpie marker in the 5 gallon bucket that I use for antifreeze and I have graded it at each gallon. This makes it extremely simple for me to stop pumping, take a concentration measurement, and then go on with the rest of the process. At the end of the day, I know precisely how many gallons it took to get the proper concentration into the system, and nothing more or less. The bucket in this illustration contains precisely one gallon of water.

Ready to Protect the Piping

The Antifreeze is sucked via the water system in the seventh step. Use a clean bucket or the sucking hose inserted into a gallon of antifreeze to catch the antifreeze that has collected after the domestic water pump has been primed. You are now ready to turn on the water supply. In turn, turn on the water pump and open each tap in turn until the water runs a color that seems to be the same as the color of the water in the bottle. Experiment with each tap, making sure that the PG concentration corresponds perfectly to what is in the fresh bottle.

When in doubt, suffocate yourself with more antifreeze.

Make Sure You Get Pure Pink

After you have turned on the water pump, open each and every faucet, shower head, and washdown fixture in your house. I recommend doing them one at a time, starting with cold water and working your way up to hot water at each faucet. Doing so will ensure that all of the domestic plumbing receives a pure pink hue that is the same exact shade as the color that came out of the bottle. IMPORTANT:-50F-60F Antifreeze for RVs and boats has already been pre-diluted. Further diluting it is not meant to be done.

At Two Gallons

It is simple to distinguish the changes in color between samples taken from different taps when the samples are substantially diluted.

On the refractometer, there was approximately an 18F spread. NOT A GOOD SITUATION. The often-repeated practice of seeing pinkis not the most effective way to winterize your system, according to experts.

They May Look The Same

This picture depicts an out of the bottle sample and a pigot sample side by side. This was measured after 3.5 gallons had been drawn into the system’s pipework and only after this amount of time. The measurements from the refractometer were still 4 degrees apart, which translates into a potentially deadly burst point for Maine. The values from the refractometer should be completely matched.

Don’t Forget The Sanitation System!

I understand that this essay is about the fresh water system, but I feel compelled to provide a pitch for the sanitation system as well. After doing his own winterizing, one homeowner ended up paying a hefty price. The consequence for failing to adequately winterize the holding tank was the presence of extremely disagreeable scents throughout the boat. When the frozen shiturine thawed in the spring, the leaks began to appear, and this was only one of many such instances. The smell of raw sewage permeated the entire boat.

  • On top of that, he arrived late, which resulted in the leak not being noticed until early June.
  • PG at -50 degrees Fahrenheit had been pumped into his brain.
  • Remember how I stated that -50F-60F PG should not be diluted?
  • One other reason why I don’t like for elcheapoPVC sanitary hose is because of its low quality.
  • Rubber-based hoses may have been able to withstand the conditions, but PVC did not.
  • 2-Effluent should be removed from the pipes leading from the head to the tank by dry pumping.
  • Most tanks are equipped with a clean out port; make advantage of it.
  • Evacuate, fill with clean water, and then evacuate again if necessary.
  • Using a pump, fill a 5 gallon bucket with water and dump it into a land-based toilet.

As a Point Of Reference

This essay is on the fresh water system, however I feel it is necessary to include information regarding the sanitation system. DIY winterization resulted in a significant financial loss for one homeowner. As a result of failing to adequately winterize the holding tank, the boat began to smell horribly. When the frozen shiturine thawed in the spring, the leaks began to appear, and this was only one of many instances of this occurring. A foul smell permeated the entire boat. Everything about it was reprehensible.

  • The scents had permeated everything due to the high temperatures.
  • Despite the fact that his hoses alone carried more than one gallon of liquid, the tank still held at least 3-4 gallons.
  • Well, here’s why: The fact that elcheapoPVC sanitary hose is so inexpensive is another another reason why I dislike it.
  • Repairs to the Sanitation System: When you winterize holding tanks, make sure they are totally empty.
  • Prevent the boat from being towed away by trying to wash empty the holding tank.

Request a flush service from your pump out technician. Re-evacuate after filling the evacuation vessel with safe drinking water. To completely dry the tank, you may need to use a manual pump. Fill a 5-gallon bucket with water and dump it into a toilet on land.

When In Doubt…

I understand that this post is about the fresh water system, but I feel compelled to include the sanitation system. Because one homeowner conducted his own winterizing, he ended up paying a very high amount. The price for failing to adequately winterize the holding tank was a noxious stench that permeated the boat. When the frozen shiturine thawed in the spring, leaks began to appear, and this was only one of them. The filthy sewage odor permeated the entire boat. It was a complete and utter embarrassment.

  • The scents had been baked into everything under the scorching cover.
  • Each of his hoses could hold more than a gallon of water, and the tank still had at least 3-4 gallons of water in it.
  • One further reason why I don’t like for elcheapoPVC sanitary hose is because of the price.
  • PVC hoses, on the other hand, did not fare as well.
  • 2-Effluent should be pre-purged from the heads to the tanks using dry pumping.
  • Most tanks are equipped with a clean out port; take advantage of it.
  • Re-evacuate after filling with clean water.
  • Fill a 5 gallon bucket with water and dump it into a land-based toilet.
See also:  How Far Can I Put A Toilet From My Septic Tank? (Perfect answer)

How to winterize VacuFlush system

  1. What I’m looking for is instructions on how to winterize the vacuflush system and holding tank for the New England winter. This is the first time I’ve done any winterizing on the boat. I depleted the holding tank to its very minimum level, which was around 2″ high. After that, I flushed approximately 2 gallons of pink A/F down the toilet, which ended up in the holding tank of the toilet. After the boat was removed from the water, I macerated the holding tank contents into a bucket that was placed under the boat. Naturally, it wasn’t pink, and it didn’t smell too pleasant either! The thought that I was doing it right makes me shudder! On the waste side of the toilet system (holding tank, vacuum pump, macerator pump), how can I be certain that everything is winterized? Thanks, Joe
  2. I would be concerned till you start seeing a lot of (dirty)pink coming out. Perhaps you should empty the tank once more and refill it with a few more gallons. Basically, just do the same thing you’ve previously done. I sit in the water, so I don’t get the same amount of exposure that you will, and if it isn’t 100 percent pink material, I’m still fine. How long did you run the pink stuff down the water lines and flush it till it came out the other end? I just poured 12 gals of pink into my fresh water holding tank after draining all of the water from the pipes and the water heater. After the bowl began to fill with pink water, I flushed the head several times to clear it. This weekend, I’ll pour another gallon or two through the waste outlet (where we attach the pump out line) to mix with the remaining liquid in the waste holding tank, which should be done by Monday. One advantage of this technique is that you may still utilize the head from time to time if the situation calls for it:smt001
  • What exactly am I missing? Isn’t it simpler to just purchase a low-cost air compressor and blast out all of the fresh water that has accumulated in your boat? There will be no freezing if there is no water. In exchange for the amount of money we spend on antifreeze each year, the cost of a compressor will be recovered in two or three years, and you will have an additional tool to take up space in the garage. I’ve been doing this for the previous five years without encountering any difficulties. Is it possible that I’m just lucky? The notion of having to flush “pink things” through the system, even if the system has to be sterilized in the spring, makes me a little ill at ease. If I am exposing myself to difficulties that I am not aware of.:huh:

sbw1Well-Known Member

  • 10th of October, 2006, West Michigan This is a list of things that I have in my signature. This is a list of things that I have in my signature. I don’t see what the fuss is about if it works for you, Frank. When using a vacuflush, there are just four items that can freeze. Water line that flushes the bowl, sanitary line and pump to the waste holding tank, holding tank, discharge line to the macerator, including pump, and water line that flushes the bowl Some boats are not equipped with a macerator. Getting pink in the fresh water system will take care of the first thing on your list. Pumping the waste tank decreases the capacity to such a degree that anything that freezes will have plenty of room to expand without causing damage to anything else in the system. Once you’ve pumped out all of your energy, load your brain with pink and flush. You have now completed the winterization of the sanitary line and pump. When using a macerator, pour enough pink into the head or pump out fitting to winterize the line you’re working with. It is necessary to run the macerator until you are pleased with the hue, which should be mostly pink. Before putting your boat away, keep cleaning and pumping your holding tank until the water is completely clear of obstructions. A significant improvement is achieved by making the macerator stage more comfortable.

boatrboyWell-Known MemberSILVER Sponsor

  • Orange, Connecticut, October 3, 2006 In search of a 2006-2008 340 Sundancer (formerly a 1999 270 Da7.4 MPI w/B3FWIW). In order to get the final 2 inches or so of water into the bucket, I used the macerator. As previously said, this was not a pleasant task, but it was necessary prior to putting the antifreeze in. When the pump had little more to discharge, I filled the head with the pink stuff, as SBW1 suggested, flushed approximately 1-2 gallons, and then re-started the macerator to complete the process. Eventually, I had enough pink expelled to make me feel at ease. Emptying the bucket is the most enjoyable part: When I pump out the holding tank, I flush it out with fresh water by squirting some fresh water into the pump out hole and then re-pumping it out. After that, I dump around 1/2 gallon of pink liquid down the toilet. That’s all there is to it. The macerator is not used by me in any way. There are no issues
  • I wasn’t sure whether you could pump fresh water via the pump out, but it appears that you can? Peter

Dave SWell-Known MemberTECHNICAL Contributor

  • After reading these postings, I’d want to issue a word of warning. If there is still waste water in the bottom of the holding tank, the pink solution that comes out of your macerator pump may be a diluted solution. As a result, if you dilute the solution too much, you may still not have appropriate freeze protection for the macerator pump, which is a problem. The -100 pink stuff, rather than the conventional -50 blue stuff, would be used to winterize a house in preparation for a northern winter. The -100 solution is the type that must be prepared by hand and provides far greater freeze protection than the premixed -50 solution. Is it possible to flush it out with fresh water by spraying new water into the pump out hole and then pumping it out again in order to clean it as thoroughly as possible? Peter
  • It is possible to wash out a holding tank by injecting new water into it (with a garden hose) and then pumping it out.

sbw1Well-Known Member

  • 10th of October, 2006, West Michigan This is a list of things that I have in my signature. This is a list of things that I have in my signature. The issue concerning the freeze protection is well taken. The most important step is to thoroughly clean the tank. Till the water being pushed out of the waste tank is fully clean, we rinse and pump it until it is clear. It appears to be “drinkable.”:smt101 Add enough pink to the tank such that any debris that makes its way to the macerator will be fine once that task is completed and the tank is as empty as it can be made by pumping it. That water, on the other hand, will be combined with a strong pink from the head, which has either had its water line cut off or has been entirely winterized with the color pink. When storing outside, we go overboard with the pink since it is inexpensive insurance. The macerator’s discharge may be tested with a tester, which ensures that it is appropriately protected.

boatrboyWell-Known MemberSILVER Sponsor

  • Orange, Connecticut, October 3, 2006 We are looking for a 2006-8 340 Sundancer. We previously had a 1999 270 Da7.4 MPI with B3. I agree that I probably should have pumped it out five more times at the dock before pushing the boat out, but there were others who were waiting for the pump out to finish. Anyway, I used the macerator to essentially drain the tank, which was nearly empty at the time. The pink that came out was dark enough for my taste, but I suppose the -100 wouldn’t have made much of a difference for 1-2 gallons. West Marine also has -60-grade products, and I ended up pouring what was left in the tank into a bucket using the macerator to empty it. Then I pumped in another three gallons of pink through the pumpout port. Once more, the bucket was maceratated into the bucket. This time around, it was pink feces water. It appeared to be satisfactory to me! While I was macerating the ingredients into the bucket, I noticed one observation. When the macerator was turned on for the first time after having been idle for a week, it took a few seconds to prime and begin pumping. It is my understanding that the fluid will drain from the macerator pump as a result of gravity. I don’t believe it is left in there all winter with the possibility of freezing. Joe
  • Joe, you really shouldn’t be posting these types of stuff on the board.:smt119. What you do at home is your business, and we respect that. However, you provided a little too much information for me.:lol:
  • It took a few rinses and pumps to get the water coming out of the waste tank fully clear, and then I added -100 to the mix. Thank you for the advice, gentlemen! Peter

boatrboyWell-Known MemberSILVER Sponsor

  • Joe, you really shouldn’t be posting these types of stuff on the board.:smt119: 😆
  • What you do at home is your business and is great with us all
  • However, you provided a little too much information for me. It took a few rinses and pumps to get the water coming out of the waste tank entirely clear, and then I placed -100 in there. Thank you for the advice, gentlemen! I appreciate it. Peter

Alex FWell-Known Member

  1. 14th of November, 2006 2005 420DB with AB 11 DLX Tender, Raymarine Dual E120 MFD/Radar/XMWeather, ST7001 A/P, AIS, SeaLiftT-Cummins 450Cs Straight-Drives, 9KW Onan Generator, 40HP Yamaha for tender, East Coast 2005 420DB with AB 11 DLX Tender boatrboy, Is it necessary to be concerned about this section of line becoming frozen if I don’t use the macerator (and instead always pump out on the station)? I follow your instructions for flushing the pink in the tank down the toilet, so I know that my pipes and tank are in good working order. However, I never touch that macerator (thinking it’s just sitting there collecting dust). Thanks, Alex

14.11.2006 (Wednesday, November 14th) 2005 420DB with AB 11 DLX Tender, Raymarine Dual E120 MFD/Radar/XMWeather, ST7001 A/P, AIS, SeaLiftT-Cummins 450Cs Straight-Drives, 9KW Onan Generator, 40HP Yamaha for tender, East Coast 2005 420DB boatrboy, Is it necessary for me to be concerned about this section of line becoming frozen if I don’t use the macerator (and instead always pump out on the station).

To ensure that my pipes and tank are in excellent working order, I follow your instructions for flushing the pink in the tank into the toilet.

Thanks, Alex;

How do I winterize my boat head?

Preparing Marine Sanitation Systems for the Winter

  1. To prepare your sanitation system for the winter, begin by ensuring that the holding tank has been emptied. Make a small bucket and fill it with antifreeze before removing the raw water intake hose from the sacock. Flush the head in order to circulate the antifreeze through the lines and into the holding tank.

Choosing to use antifreeze in your sanitation system during the winterization process necessitates the completion of the following procedures after draining thetoiletsystem. Drain the potable water tank and fill it with freshwater antifreeze before continuing. Afterwards, flush antifreeze for potable water via the toilet and into the waste holding tank. Furthermore, how can I winterize my boat’s air conditioning? The Winterization and Preparation Process

  1. Starting with an empty one-gallon bleach or antifreeze container, if your boat is in the water, disconnect the hose from the discharge thru hull port and run it into the bottle. To prepare the Engine Winterizing Kit, fill the tank with two litres of antifreeze solution.

In addition, how long does it take to winterize a boat is a valid issue. Approximately 4 hours What is the operation of a VacuFlush head? VacuFlushsystems function with your current fresh water supply and consume just around a pint of water every flush, which is far less than other types of systems.

Because the high vacuum system evacuates both the toilet and the hose while flushing, it helps to reduce the smells associated with hose penetration, which are typical in conventional boat waste systems.

Winterizing Your Boat’s Systems

In addition, how long does it take to winterize a boat is another topic. it will take around 4 hours A VacuFlush head’s operation is explained below. VacuFlushsystems function with your current fresh water supply and consume just around a pint of water every flush, which is far less than other types of systems on the market. In order to reduce hose penetration smells that are typical in other boat waste systems, we have installed a high suction system that evacuates both the toilet and the hose throughout the flushing process.

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