How Do I Find My Septic Tank And Lateral Lines? (TOP 5 Tips)

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  • A septic tank probe can also help you find the location. Trace the plumbing drain lines to the septic tank, which is usually installed 10 to 20 feet from the home’s exterior. Septic tank lateral lines are also known as percolation pipes. The drain field will be near the septic tank and so will the lateral lines.

How do I find out where my septic tank is located?

Follow the Main Sewer Line Look for a pipe that’s roughly four inches in diameter that leads away from your house. Remember the location of the sewer pipe and where the pipe leaves your home so you can find it outside. The sewer pipes will lead to where your septic tank is located.

Are septic tank locations public record?

Contact your local health department for public records. These permits should come with a diagram of the location where the septic system is buried. Depending on the age of your septic system, you may be able to find information regarding the location of your septic system by making a public records request.

Do all septic systems have lateral lines?

The lateral lines form an important part of any septic system. They are used for both domestic septic systems and commercial septic systems. Properly functioning lateral lines are an essential element of any septic system.

Will metal detector find septic tank?

If it’s Concrete or Steel, Use a Metal Detector. Based on your conclusions in Step 3, if your septic tank is likely made from concrete or steel, a metal detector can make the task of locating it much easier. But not just any metal detector will do.

How do you tell if your septic tank is full?

Here are some of the most common warning signs that you have a full septic tank:

  1. Your Drains Are Taking Forever.
  2. Standing Water Over Your Septic Tank.
  3. Bad Smells Coming From Your Yard.
  4. You Hear Gurgling Water.
  5. You Have A Sewage Backup.
  6. How often should you empty your septic tank?

How do you find a septic tank in an old house?

Look for the 4-inch sewer that exits the crawl space or basement, and locate the same spot outside the home. Septic tanks are usually located between ten to 25 feet away from the home. Insert a thin metal probe into the ground every few feet, until you strike polyethylene, fiberglass or flat concrete.

Do I have to change my septic tank?

Under the new rules, if you have a specific septic tank that discharges to surface water (river, stream, ditch, etc.) you are required to upgrade or replace your septic tank treatment system to a full sewage treatment plant by 2020, or when you sell a property, if it’s prior to this date.

What does lateral lines look like?

Lateral lines are usually visible as faint lines of pores running lengthwise down each side, from the vicinity of the gill covers to the base of the tail. Most amphibian larvae and some fully aquatic adult amphibians possess mechanosensitive systems comparable to the lateral line.

What do you use for lateral lines?

The most common replacement pipe is polyvinyl chloride (PVC plastic). Historically, the water service line was typically buried with the sewer lateral in the same trench.

How do I know if my leach field is failing?

The following are a few common signs of leach field failure: Grass over leach field is greener than the rest of the yard. The surrounding area is wet, mushy, or even has standing water. Sewage odors around drains, tank, or leach field.

How to Find My Septic Tank Lines

Credit: Petegar/E+/Getty Images for the image

In This Article

  • Septic System Fundamentals
  • Identifying and Locating a Septic Tank on Your Property
  • Conducting Regular Inspections
  • Checking for Clean-Outs
  • Identifying Natural Indicators
  • Viewing System Diagrams
  • Seek Professional Assistance
  • Check the distribution box
  • Understand the size and scope of the project.

Are you curious about the location of your septic lines? It is critical to know where the septic tank is located on a property in order to properly manage and preserve the system. For example, you don’t want to pave over the ground or grow trees too close together in a forest. It is possible to obtain a copy of the septic tank diagram of the drain field, which will give you a fair sense of where the pipes will go. If this is not the case, you may need to attempt some other methods of locating septic drain lines.

The solids and liquids are separated within the tank by a baffle or wall that is built inside the tank.

When pipes get clogged or when drain fields become too saturated with fluids, problems arise.

Locating a Septic Tank on Your Property

Begin your search for the septic tank lines at the residence first. Drain lines from the home’s plumbing should be traced to the septic tank, which is typically located 10 to 20 feet from the home’s exterior. The drain line connects the tank’s end, which is located opposite the house, to the leach field. Check the natural slope of the ground to see whether the leach field may be found there. It is never a good idea to look for drain lines using heavy gear, wrecking bars, or jackhammers. Before excavating, contact your local electric utility provider or gas company to determine the location of underground gas or utility lines.

Plunge the long, thin metal probe into the earth until you can feel it strike the tank and feel the tank’s edges.

Perform Regular Inspection

According to industry experts, you should examine your septic tanks and, if required, pump them out once every three years. If you are experiencing gurgling sounds in your house or water backing up after your system has been repaired, a saturated drain field might be the source of the problem. Drain fields that have been clogged or damaged are unable to be rectified. In order for the septic system to function properly again, you’ll need to have a new drain field installed. Find capped clean-outs that are a few inches vertically above the ground in the leach field itself, or check behind a wall or in a closet in the basement for capped clean-outs.

  • You can visually trace the orientation of the pipe from the clean-out if there is no other information available.
  • Credit: Kyryl Gorlov/iStock/Getty Images for the image.
  • When you are looking for the lines, look for grass or vegetation that greens in stripes when the grass surrounding it browns.
  • Putting hot water into your system might cause snow or ice to melt above the drain pipes if the system is not properly insulated.
  • If you have a deep system, as is the case for homes with basements, you will most likely not be able to observe natural signs since the drain field is too deep to be seen from above.
  • Unless the system was built without a permit, the blueprints or designs for septic system installations are kept on file with the local health authority until the system is operational.
  • If your search does not provide any relevant results, you can request a record search based on your street address or the tax account number associated with the property.
  • If the agency has a copy of the record, they will mail it to you.
  • If you don’t have a drawing of the septic system, you need enlist the assistance of a disposal system contractor or a certified liquid waste transporter to find it.

Another option is to purchase a flushable transmitter from a plumbing or rental business, or you may contract with a tank cleaning firm. The signal from the transmitter is picked up by a hand-held receiver after it has been flushed down the toilet.

Check the Distribution Box

There are certain septic tanks that feature an extra distribution box that is located a few feet from the tank on the tank’s downstream side. Water is channeled into the trenches by ports and pipes in the box. It is recommended that, if your system includes a distribution box, the box’s top be designed to expose the orientation of the ports that connect to the drain field lines. It is feasible to locate the box with a probe, but extreme caution should be exercised. Avoid applying excessive force to the probe, since this may result in damage to the box.

In most cases, individual drain lines run perpendicular to the intake line, but they may also branch into an H-pattern or other patterns that are appropriate for the terrain.

Find the location of your septic drain lines so that you can safeguard the area in and around them with a little detective work.

How do I find my septic lateral lines?

Begin your search for the septic tank lines at your residence. To locate a septic tank, follow the drain lines from the house to the tank, which is typically 10 to 20 feet from the house’s façade. The drainline from the tank’s end, which is directly across from the house, runs to the leach field. Check the natural slope of the ground to determine the location of the leach field. If you need your lateral lines pumped, the cost will vary depending on where you live and the size of your tank. The starting point is around 200 USD.

  1. What is also important to know is how deep the septic lateral lines are buried.
  2. In a similar vein, the question “what are septic lateral lines?” is raised.
  3. These are the perforated pipes that stretch from the septictank’s outflow below ground into the earth, and they are made of plastic.
  4. What is the best way to locate my drain field?
  1. Take a look around your yard. In spite of the fact that it is usual for there to be no visible indicators of the drainfield’s presence, search for lines of green grass, dead grass, or depressed regions
  2. Inquire about septic records with the permitting authority (often the county), the installer, or the designer
  3. And Check your yard for gravel by digging about in it.

How to find your lateral lines

It is the intention of this brief post to assist readers in resolving the age-old topic of how to identify your lateral lines. A nice living space is distinguished by the use of high-quality materials in its construction and upkeep. This was something you made a point of ensuring when you had your new home constructed. We knew how vital it was for you to have a secure place to call home. Rain, snow, and high heat were all experienced at your chosen location. Hopefully, everything will remain in fine shape for many years to come.

  1. Of course, you had to confer with your septic expert about the many factors that you needed to take into consideration.
  2. But you were well aware that you would have to cope with it.
  3. Not every homeowner is well-versed in the specifics of their individual leach field.
  4. They are often compensated more for locating lateral lines, but your septic expert believed that it would be beneficial to him as well if you were aware of their location.
  5. In a normal septic system, the drain field is present.
  6. These lines are perforated to ensure that the effluent is distributed evenly.
  7. The septic showed you how to locate your lateral lines because he needed to engage the clients he served in the process of care for their own systems.

In most cases, the lateral lines are laid 12-15 inches below the surface of the ground.

If you look at your yard with your naked eye, you will see that the lateral lines are present in areas where the grass is significantly greener.

However, this would indicate that there is already something wrong with the system in question.

Your septic expert, on the other hand, stated that, with the exception of lawn grass, there should be no plants over lateral lines.

Perennial plants, annual plants, shallow-rooted plants, and herbaceous plants should all be avoided while gardening.

The presence of a vegetable or fruit garden above your lateral lines is not recommended because of the significant danger of bacterial and virus contamination.

There should be no other plants planted over lateral lines except lawn grass.

After your septic specialist had departed, you got a fresh vision of the lateral lines of your system.

Remember to take responsibility for the upkeep of your septic system; this will ensure that the system will take care of you in the long run. If you’ve been wondering how to identify your lateral lines, we hope this post has been of assistance.

About The Author

How to locate your lateral lines is an age-old topic, and the purpose of this brief article is to attempt to answer it. A nice living space is distinguished by the use of high-quality materials in its creation and upkeep. While having your new house built, you made certain that this was the case. Having a secure place to live was vital to you, and you got it. Rain, snow, and extremely high temperatures were experienced in your chosen location. Hopefully, everything will remain in fine working order for decades to come.

  • Unquestionably, the items that needed to be considered required consultation with your septic professional.
  • The reality was that you would have to face it.
  • Some homeowners are unfamiliar with the specifics of their particular leach field.
  • They are often compensated more for locating lateral lines, but your septic expert believed that knowing where they were would be beneficial to him as well.
  • A drain field is part of the traditional septic system.
  • They are perforated to ensure that the effluent is distributed evenly.
  • The septic showed you how to locate your lateral lines because he needed to include the clients he served in the maintenance of their own systems.
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Sidelines are constructed 12-15 inches below the surface of the ground.

It is possible to see the lateral lines with your naked eye if you look in areas of your yard where the grass is significantly greener.

However, this would indicate that there is already something wrong with the system in this case.

Except for lawn grass, however, according to your septic expert, no vegetation should be grown over lateral lines in the first place.

Perennial plants, annual plants, shallow-rooted plants, and herbaceous plants should all be avoided in your garden or landscape.

The presence of a vegetable or fruit garden above your lateral lines is not recommended because of the high possibility of bacterial and virus contamination.

After lateral lines are installed, they should be left alone with just lawn grass covering them.

After your septic expert had departed, you got a fresh perspective of the lateral lines in your system.

Maintaining your septic system requires you to accept responsibility for your actions, and the system will take care of the rest. If this post was helpful in answering the topic of how to discover your lateral lines, please let us know.

An Essential Part of a Standard Septic System

The lateral lines of a septic system are critical components of the system. They can be found in both home and commercial septic systems, depending on the application. The proper operation of lateral lines is critical to the proper operation of any septic system. Septic tank effluent has nowhere to go when they are obstructed or not functioning correctly, resulting in a backup of sewage and the failure of the system.

UK 2020 Septic Tank Guidelines

Beginning in 2020, every basic septic tank system in the United Kingdom will be required to have septic tank lateral lines or a percolation area constructed. Stream and watercourse discharges will not be authorized directly into the environment. In order to comply with the regulations between now and 2020, everyone who has a septic tank that discharges directly into a stream or watercourse is required to create a soakaway or percolation area. A percolation area or soakaway following a septic tank installation in an existing landscape is not usually straightforward.

Installing a household sewage treatment system might be a viable alternative approach.

Compared to the installation of a huge percolation area, it is significantly more cost-effective to replace a septic tank with a sewage treatment plant instead.

When purchasing a sewage treatment plant, it is important to search for exceptional value in conjunction with a system that is certified to EN12566-3 specifications.

How to Install Lateral Lines Correctly

septic tank lateral lines, or the installation of a percolation area, will be required for all basic wastewater treatment systems erected in the United Kingdom from the year 2020. Stream and watercourse discharges will not be tolerated under any circumstances. In order to comply with the regulations between now and 2020, everyone who has a septic tank that discharges directly into a stream or watercourse must build a soakaway or a percolation area. A percolation area or soakaway following a septic tank installation in an existing landscape is not usually a simple task to complete.

Installing a household sewage treatment system might be a viable alternative.

Septic tanks should be replaced with sewage treatment plants rather than vast percolation areas since they are far more cost-effective.

When purchasing a sewage treatment plant, it is important to seek for exceptional value in conjunction with a system that is certified to EN12566-3 requirements.

  • The number of people living in the house or structure
  • The kind of soil in the region
  • And the quantity of groundwater are all factors to consider.

How to Install a System Without Septic Tank Lateral Lines

Due to the fact that septic tank effluent is not treated to a high level of quality, lateral lines for septic tanks are typically necessary. A standard septic tank has a treatment level of roughly 30%, which is not very effective. A contemporary sewage treatment plant or aerobic sewage system, according to the contract, has a treatment efficiency of 95 percent or more. Systems such as the Biocell QuickOne achieve an even higher treatment level of 98 percent, resulting in effluent that is clean and transparent.

In other words, while an advanced sewage treatment system is more expensive than a standard septic tank, you save a significant amount of money by not having to add lateral connections.

5 Signs Your Septic Drainfield Has Stopped Working

Due to the fact that septic tank effluent is not treated to a high level of quality, lateral lines for septic tanks are commonly necessary. A normal septic tank only has a treatment level of roughly 30%, which is not sufficient for most applications. A contemporary sewage treatment plant or aerobic sewage system, according to the contract, has a treatment efficiency of 95 percent or above. Clean and transparent effluent is produced by systems such as the Biocell QuickOne which achieve an even higher treatment level of 98 percent.

As a result, while a sewage treatment system is more expensive than a conventional septic tank, you save a significant amount of money by not having to construct lateral connections.

How Your Septic System Works

Underground wastewater treatment facilities, known as septic systems, are often employed in rural regions where there are no centralized sewage lines. They clean wastewater from residential plumbing, such as that produced by bathrooms, kitchen drains, and laundry, by combining natural processes with well-established technology. A conventional septic system is comprised of two components: a septic tank and a drainfield, often known as a soil absorption field. It is the septic tank’s job to decompose organic matter and to remove floatable stuff (such as oils and grease) and solids from wastewater.

Alternate treatment systems rely on pumps or gravity to assist septic tank effluent in trickling through a variety of media such as sand, organic matter (e.g., peat and sawdust), constructed wetlands, or other media to remove or neutralize pollutants such as pathogens that cause disease, nitrogen, phosphorus, and other contaminants.

Prior to discharging wastewater into the environment, several alternative systems are designed to evaporate or disinfect the effluent.

Specifically, this is how a typical conventional septic system works:

  1. All of the water that leaves your home drains down a single main drainage pipe and into a septic tank. An underground, water-tight container, often composed of concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene, serves as a septic system’s holding tank. Its function is to retain wastewater for a long enough period of time to allow particles to sink to the bottom and form sludge, while oil and grease float to the surface and produce scum. Sludge and scum are prevented from exiting the tank and moving into the drainfield region by compartments and a T-shaped outlet. After that, the liquid wastewater (effluent) exits the tank and flows into the drainfield. The drainfield is a shallow, covered hole dug in unsaturated soil that serves as a drainage system. Porous surfaces are used to release pretreated wastewater because they allow the wastewater to pass through the soil and into the groundwater. In the process of percolating through the soil, wastewater is accepted, treated, and dispersed by the soil, finally discharging into groundwater. Finally, if the drainfield becomes overburdened with too much liquid, it can flood, causing sewage to flow to the ground surface or resulting in toilet backups and sink backups. Finally, wastewater percolates into the soil, where it is naturally removed of harmful coliform bacteria, viruses, and nutrients. Coliform bacteria are a kind of bacteria that may be found in the intestines of humans and other warm-blooded animals, with humans being the most common host. As a result of human fecal contamination, it is a sign of this.

The Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority has built an animated, interactive model of how a residential septic system works, which you can view here.

Do you have a septic system?

It’s possible that you’re already aware that you have a septic system. If you are not sure, here are some tell-tale symptoms that you most likely are:

  • If you have a septic system, you may already be aware of this fact. Here are some tell-tale indicators that you most likely do, if you don’t already know:

How to find your septic system

You can locate your septic system once you have confirmed that you have one by following these steps:

  • Taking a look at the “as constructed” drawing of your house
  • Making a visual inspection of your yard for lids and manhole covers
  • Getting in touch with a septic system service provider for assistance in locating it

Failure symptoms: Mind the signs!

A bad odor is not necessarily the first indicator of a septic system that is failing to work properly. Any of the following signs should prompt you to seek expert assistance:

  • Water backing up into the drains of homes and businesses
  • It is especially noticeable in dry weather that the drainfield grass is bright green and spongy. The presence of standing water or muddy soil near your septic system or in your basement
  • A strong stench emanating from the area surrounding the septic tank and drainfield

How to Flush Your Drain Field Lines

Drain field lines should be flushed at least once a year, if not more frequently. This is something that you can achieve on your own by following these eight steps! (Do you require further assistance? Alternatively, you may watch our instructional video.)

‍1.Locate your drain field lines.

A little, round cap will be placed at the end of each line (normally green).

2. Remove the green cap.

There will be a little, circular cap at the end of each of the lines (normally green).

5.Run the pump in step 4 until the water runs clear, approximately 10-20 seconds, then return the pump to auto.

Home-Diy It is critical to the overall operation of a septic system that the installation of lateral lines be done correctly. Approximately one-quarter inch per foot should be applied to the pitch of the lines. Pitch is important because it ensures that waste materials flow correctly through the pipes without clogging them. Even a pipe that is sloping downwards at an excessive rate might cause issues. if (sources.length) then this.parentNode.removeChild(sources); else this.onerror = null; this.src = fallback; if (sources.length) then this.parentNode.removeChild(sources); else if (sources.length) then this.parentNode.removeChild(sources); else if (sources.length) then this.parentNode.remove ‘/public/images/logo-fallback.png’) is a fallback logo image.

  • 4-inch PVC perforated pipe
  • A shovel
  • A backhoe
  • A bubble level
  • Rosin paper
  • And a tape measure

Tip

Dump the dirt onto the rosin paper slowly so that the rosin paper does not shift while you’re doing it.

Warning

Townships are in charge of enforcing their own building regulations. Check with your local building inspector to see whether or not a permit is required.

  1. Each lateral line should be inserted into one of the intake holes in the junction box. A quarter inch overhang into the junction box is required at each end of the pipes
  2. Otherwise, they must be flush with the side of the junction box
  3. The height of the pipes should be checked by measuring the distance from the bottom of the box to each input pipe’s bottom. Placing cement around the exterior of each pipe will help to keep the pipes connected to the junction box. Build a wall of stones around all four sides of the junction box until there are 10 to 12 inches of stone beneath the pipes. Gradually lower the stones until the slope is sloping down one-quarter inch per foot
  4. Install perforated pipes from the junction box to the absorption field, extending them in a parallel fashion across the absorption field. A quarter inch per foot of pipe spacing is required, with the pipes sloping down away from the junction box at a rate of one-quarter inch per foot of pipe spacing. Your township may be able to provide you with particular lengths based on your local construction rules. Fill the area surrounding the pipe and on top of it with stones to ensure that the pipe does not move. The pipe should be covered at least two inches above the top of the pipe. Placing red rosin paper on top of the stones will prevent dirt from being incorporated into the stones. Fill in the remaining earth into the drain field on top of the rosin paper to complete the drainage system.

The Drip Cap

  • It is critical to the overall operation of a septic system that the lateral lines be properly installed. Shovel stones around outside of the junction box until there is 10 to 12 inches of stone beneath the pipes. A quarter inch per foot of pipe spacing is required, with the pipes sloping down away from the junction box.

Home Performance Group LLC

Do you require services for septic system installation or repair? When it comes to garbage disposal, having a well-maintained system is critical! Septic tanks and drain fields are cleaned, repaired, and installed on a regular basis by our professionals. Call (816) 744-8033 to speak with a member of our skilled and professional staff who will get the work done perfectly the first time. The following are some of the services we provide for septic systems:

  • Lagoon installation and repair as well as Septic System design and repair, Septic tank installation, Aeration Treatment Unit installation, Lateral installation and repair as well as Lagoon installation and repair Installation of low-pressure pipes
  • Repair of low-pressure pipes
  • Installation of high-pressure drip lines
  • Repair of high-pressure drip lines

Providing an essential service by collecting, treating, and disposing of wastewater is the septic system’s primary role in the home. It is critical to provide proper care and maintenance on a regular basis. For the most part, septic systems are comprised of two parts: an inlet septic tank for solid wastes and a disposal field for liquid wastes. Lateral lines or pipes carry the effluent to the drain field, where it is discharged into the environment.

Tanks should be properly examined at least once every two years, and they should be cleaned every three to five years, according to the manufacturer. Effective and long-term performance are dependent on the use of preventative measures.

Professional Septic System Services

Home Performance Group LLC provides the services required to keep septic systems in the greater Kansas City region operating safely and reliably over the long haul. Contact us now. In order to detect tanks and laterals, diagnose failures, pump out tanks, safeguard the environment from water contamination, and manage difficulties with outdated septic systems that weren’t built to handle current demand, our trained workers combine expertise, experience, and tools. We adhere to all applicable codes, make every attempt to cause the least amount of inconvenience to your property, and provide unsurpassed quality of workmanship.

See also:  How To Stop A Septic Tank From Back Flowing? (Solution)

For septic tank and lateral line maintenance or repair, call Home Performance Group LLC!

Home Performance Group LLC provides timely service to help you extend the life of your septic system and laterals, prevent issues from occurring, and fix any sort of malfunction. We may be reached at (816) 744-8033 to arrange a time that is suitable for you. We have deals and financing available to make everyday living more reasonable for you. You can count on us to take care of all of your plumbing requirements in Kearney and the surrounding areas, including Liberty and Excelsior Springs. Smithville and Pleasant Valley.

  • Weatherby Lake and Gladstone, MO.
  • Each of these statements is theoretically valid, however there are more than eight different types and configurations of OWTS to choose from.
  • A soils morphology test is required in order to correctly design an OWTS system and submit a system permit application for the system.
  • When designing an OWTS system, soil conditions are critical since the soil serves as a filter, exchanger, and absorber in addition to other functions.
  • A septic tank offers initial treatment by separating particles from wastewater, ensuring that effluent entering the soil is purified before it is released into the environment.
  • In soils that are unable of supporting a simple OWTS system, a septic tank and surface lagoon can be used as an alternate solution.
  • Lagoons are a more cost-effective alternative to more complicated systems because of their size.
  • The system is comprised of a septic tank, a pumping chamber for pressure dosing, and a soil distribution piping system with a small diameter pipe diameter.
  • a few quick facts According to the Environmental Protection Agency, private on-site waste treatment systems are used by 20 percent of all houses in the United States to handle their garbage.

Septic or decentralized treatment systems are used to service about one-third of all new developments and single-family dwellings. Septic systems provide service to more than 60 million people in the United States.

LEARN MORE about Septic System Installation:

  • Septic System Installation | Why Do I Need a Soil Morphology Test
  • Do I Need an Alternative Septic System
  • What is the Purpose of a Septic Tank
  • Why Should I Get a Septic Inspection
  • Septic System Installation | Why Do I Need a Soil Morphology Test
  • Septic System Installation | Why Should I Get a Septic Inspection

5 Things Homeowners Should Know About Their Septic Drain Field

There are certain distinctions in care, usage, and budgeting that you should be aware of, whether you’re a new homeowner with an existing septic system or considering about purchasing or building a home without sewer hookups. This document outlines three ways in which your budget will be affected if your wastewater is treated using a septic system. 1. You will not be required to budget for municipal sewer service. Because the municipal wastewater system normally processes all of the water, the cost of city sewage service is sometimes determined by how much water you purchase from the city.

  • A large number of homes with septic systems also rely on wells for fresh water rather than municipal water, which means you’ll likely save money in that department as well.
  • It is necessary to include septic maintenance in your budget.
  • Although you are not required to pay the city for the usage of your septic system, you will be responsible for the costs of maintenance if you want the system to continue to function properly.
  • It is possible that these maintenance and repair expenditures will build up over time, so you may want to consider setting up an emergency fund to cover any unforeseen repair bills.
  • You’ll also need to budget for the cost of a single inspection and begin saving for the cost of a tank pump.
  • Spreading the expenditures out over several months is the most effective budgeting strategy, even for an expense such as tank pumping that does not occur every year, because it allows you to better estimate the costs ahead of time.
  • You may need to set aside money for septic tank replacement.

The tank and leach field may not need to be replaced if you have a reasonably recent septic system and plan to sell your home within a few years.

If, on the other hand, your home’s septic system is more than a decade old, you’ll want to start looking into how much a new system would cost you as soon as possible.

For example, if the previous owners did not do routine maintenance or if the system was installed on clay soil, the system may need to be replaced.

It is a prudent decision to begin putting money aside in anticipation of this eventuality.

When you have a septic system, you may use these three strategies to budget differently.

Make an appointment with us right away if you’re searching for someone to pump out your septic tank or to complete an annual examination of your septic system. Our experts at C.E. Taylor and Son Inc. would be happy to assist you with any septic system assessment, maintenance, or repair needs.

A Saturated Ground Impacts Your Septic Tank’s Performance – Clayton County Water Authority

The performance of your septic tank is negatively impacted by saturated ground. Authorities from the Clayton County Water Authority (CCWA) are alerting septic tank owners of the impact that wet earth has on the functioning of their septic tanks. The majority of the septic system is sealed and will not be impacted by heavy rain, but one section — the drain field — is not sealed and will be affected by heavy rain. You may be experiencing the signs of a clogged septic system if the earth has been entirely saturated as a result of recent storms.

Ponding can occur around septic tank drain fields as a result of saturated earth.

With worsening conditions, water backs up into the tank, and if you have a transfer pump, it may begin to operate continually as a result of the backflow.

If you have a problem with sluggish draining or poor toilet flushing, you may notice an overflow from floor and shower drains, and in severe cases, overflow from toilets on the ground level.

  • Make sure to spread out your daily washing and to only run full loads of laundry. Reduce the amount of water you use by only washing full loads of dishes. Take short showers instead of extended ones. Prevent yourself from having a bath
  • Only fully loaded dishwashers should be used. While cleaning dishes or brushing your teeth, refrain from running the water continuously. Shower heads with high efficacy should be used. Make use of low-flow toilets. Remove the water from your sprinklers (this may seem like a no-brainer, but many people have theirs on a timer and fail to do so)

Septic tanks are not a component of the sanitary sewer system operated by CCWA. As a result, it is the responsibility of the property owner to keep their septic tanks in good condition. For further information on septic tank care, please see the Clayton County Public Health website. Clayton County Water Authority for the 2018-19 school year. All intellectual property rights are retained.

Can Your Drive a Truck Over a Septic Tank?

Is it possible for you to drive a truck over a septic tank? Is it possible to drive over a septic tank?

Can you drive a truck or vehicle over a septic tank? The answer is you technically can, but you shouldn’t, and you should familiarize yourself with the risks in doing so.

Is it possible to drive over a septic drainage field? There is no official numerical value that specifies the maximum amount of weight that an underground septic tank can withstand. You should be aware, however, that it is strongly advised that you avoid driving or parking vehicles or heavy machinery on or near a septic system system area. Subjecting your septic tank to significant weight from trucks, automobiles, or tractors, among other things, and doing so for an extended length of time, increases the risk of damage to the system.

  1. It brings with it a full slew of pricey septic system issues to deal with.
  2. As a result of the weight of some golf carts, especially those that are filled with people, your septic tank may experience excessive stress.
  3. The act of driving over your septic tank, septic pipe, or drain field can do significant damage to your septic system, not to mention the fact that it is dangerous.
  4. Should You Park Your Car on Top of a Septic Tank?
  5. Under no circumstances should sewage disposal tanks be constructed beneath garages or driveways.
  6. If at all feasible, delineate the region beneath which your septic tank will be installed.

Indeed, parking or driving over a septic tank must be avoided at all costs, and this is especially true during periods of heavy rainfall. It is at this time that your septic tank system is most susceptible to disruption and damage.

What If You Built Structures or Have Existing Structures Built On Your Septic Tank?

access to a septic tank for the purpose of pumping The construction of any form of building over any section of your septic tank is never a wise decision. Due to the restricted access to the septic tank, the most common difficulty this causes is that septic maintenance (such as regular pumping) and repair become more difficult or time-consuming to do. A significant number of homeowners and business owners have their sewage-disposal tanks concealed beneath wood decks, pool patios, driveways, or other construction annexes.

  1. Building over your septic tank may be remedied by installing removable boards or trap doors, which allow for practical access to the septic tank while yet maintaining aesthetic appeal.
  2. While your drain field takes use of the soil surrounding it to purify the flow from the septic tank, your septic tank does not.
  3. The fact that you would be constructing over a large area that includes sewage water, which is exceedingly unsanitary, has not yet been brought up in conversation.
  4. Ensure that you have easy access to the tank since it is required for periodic inspections and upkeep, as well as for emergency repairs.
  5. It is not only impractical, but it is also prohibitively expensive.
  6. It is exceedingly detrimental to the health of humans and animals if harmful gases leak out of the sewage treatment system and into the environment.
  7. Building on top of your drain field condenses the soils and can cause damage to the below-ground system, which can result in a septic tank failure.

No, driving across your septic drain field is also not suggested under any circumstances.

When necessary, you should drive over your septic leach field to ensure that no long-term harm is done.

If you were to drive over it on a regular basis, the fill level in the system would certainly decrease, and the air movement in the system would be compromised.

As a general safety precaution, keep in mind that driving or parking an automobile on a drain field can impair the performance of the drain field due to compaction of the soil and the lack of proper air movement due to the increased surface area.

South End is a neighborhood in the heart of the city.

So keep in mind that we are only a click away.

We also specialize in leak detection; please contact us for more information. South End Plumbing is one of the few organizations that will provide you with a no-obligation quote. To book a visit, please call us at 704-919-1722 or complete the online form.

Septic Systems 101

Whether you’re new to septic systems or have been using them your entire life, there are a few things you should be aware of that can help you operate and treat your septic system more effectively. Due to the fact that each septic system is unique, yours may be a little different based on your specific scenario and requirements. In general, though, having a fundamental grasp of septic systems, plumbing, and everything in between is always beneficial! We’ve compiled a list of some of the most often asked questions concerning septic systems that we receive, as well as some popular themes that people are interested in, in the section below.

Please let us know if there is anything you’d want to see added to this list, or if you require any extra assistance.

We are always more than delighted to assist you!

Contents

  • Why Do Septic Systems Work? What Is a Septic System, and How Does It Work? Describe the many types of septic systems available.
  • Aerobibic septic system
  • Septic tank and field
  • Septic tank and seepage pit
  • Septic tank and lagoon

What is the best way to tell if I am on a septic system? Are there any, and if so, what kind? How to Maintain Your Septic System in a Safe and Effective Manner

  • The Importance of Pumping Your Septic System
  • What Happens If I Don’t Pump My System
  • What is the best way to treat my septic system? Is it even necessary to treat my system? Is It Possible to Damage My Septic System? In what condition will my septic system be in the future
  • Septic Systems in Close Proximity to a Well
  • Do I Need To Pump My System? The Consequences of Failure to Comply
  • Do I Need To Treat My Septic System? My Pumper / Neighbor has informed me that I am not required to do so. Is it possible to damage my septic system? Is it possible to overuse my septic system? Do I need to use special toilet paper for my home while it is on a septic system? Can I plant a garden on top of my septic field? Taking Care of a Gray Water System
See also:  How To Suck Out Sand From A Septic Tank? (Question)

What Is A Septic System?

Essentially, a septic system is a sort of residential wastewater system. Septic systems, in contrast to sewer systems, which feed into a larger wastewater system, are completely self-contained and do not connect to a larger sewer network.

How Does A Septic System Work (Septic Tank + Field)?

A septic system is developed in a straightforward manner. Typically, a septic tank and a lateral line system or leach field are used, although there are a few additional designs available as well. Explore these less common sorts of systems further by touching or clicking on the link provided. The septic tank itself is typically constructed of concrete and has a capacity of around 1,500 gallons on average. Following the flushing of waste down a toilet or the washing of waste down a drain, the septic tank is the first destination for your waste.

  1. A separation of trash into scum and sludge takes place throughout the breakdown process.
  2. However, the sludge layer, on the other hand, is often found toward the bottom of the tank.
  3. Afterwards, when the residual wastewater has been separated from the scum and sludge, it runs out of the septic tank and onto the septic field (or leach field).
  4. The lateral lines are lengthy sections of tubing, often constructed of PVC, that have been perforated with tiny holes to allow for ventilation.
  5. Water from the septic system seeps out via the tiny gaps in these lateral lines and into the surrounding environment.
  6. Aside from bacteria that break down any trash that may be left in the wastewater from your septic tank, Biomat also includes bacteria that help to keep the process going.

As soon as the liquid has exited via the lateral lines and passed through the biomat layer, it seeps (also known as “leaches”) into the soil and ultimately makes its way back into the groundwater as clean water as a result of evaporation.

What Kinds Of Septic Systems are there?

Septic systems are available in a variety of configurations. Understanding the sort of septic system you have will assist you in keeping things clean and running.

Septic Tank + Field

In the United States, septic tank + field systems account for the vast bulk of septic system installations. We’ve been talking about this sort of system for the most of the time so far in this essay. As previously stated, this sort of system works by collecting waste in a massive septic tank, where helpful bacteria break down the waste, dividing it into three distinct components: scum, sludge, and any residual wastewater liquid. Water from the tank collects in the scum and sludge, while wastewater goes out into the septic field, where it is scattered back into the earth as pure water.

Septic Tank + Seepage Pit

This sort of system collects garbage in a big tank, where bacterial activities break down the waste and divide it into three types of waste: scum, sludge, and wastewater. The scum and sludge stay in the tank, while the liquid waste drains into a big seepage hole at the bottom of the tank. This pit is punctured with a series of openings that allow the liquid to drain out and into the surrounding earth. When comparing this system to a typical septic system, the most significant distinction is that a seepage pit allows the liquid to sink deeper into the earth rather than across a vast field as in a traditional septic system.

Septic Tank + Lagoon

Waste from a septic system that discharges into a lagoon is collected in a big septic tank, where microorganisms break down the waste, much as they do in other systems. When the liquid waste departs the tank, it pours out into a lagoon or pond-like body of water, which is a large body of water.

Aerobic System

Waste from a septic system that discharges into a lagoon is collected in a big septic tank, where microorganisms break down the waste, exactly as it does in other systems. In contrast, as the liquid waste departs the tank, it pours out into an area of water that resembles a lagoon or small pond.

How Do I Determine If I Am On A Septic System? And If So, What Type?

In the event that you are unsure whether or not you have a septic system in place, there are a few things to look out for that may suggest that you do in fact have a septic system. Here are a few examples of common indicators:

  • In the event that you are unsure whether or not you have a septic system in place, there are a few things to look out for that might signal that you do in fact have a septic system. Indicators that are frequently seen include:

A septic system can manifest itself in a variety of ways, including the following. Note that contacting a septic inspector and scheduling an examination of the property is generally regarded best practice in this situation. This examination will determine whether or not you have a septic system, as well as the sort of system you have.

How To Care For Your Septic System Safely

Your septic system will eventually become overburdened with waste. Manual removal of this garbage from the system will be required. Pumping is the method through which this solid waste is removed from the environment. We advised that you engage a septic system pumping service to remove the waste from your system. A septic system should be pumped out once every three years on average, however utilizing a product like Unique Septic System Digester can help to lengthen the period between pump outs.

Please keep in mind that the pumping schedule may need to be adjusted based on the amount of water used and the number of people living in your home.

What If I Don’t Pump My System?

Failure to pump a septic tank might result in devastating consequences. For example, foul odors escaping from your house’s drains, drain backups, flooding in your home, and standing water in your septic field are all potential consequences of this situation. In order to avoid this, it is important to keep track of how full your tank is by doing a personal or professional examination on a regular basis!

How Do I Treat My Septic System?

To ensure that your septic system is free of backups and continues to function properly, it is recommended that you treat it on a regular basis. Unique Septic System Digester is a product that we suggest. Septic System Digester is available in a number of various dose techniques; simply touch or clickhereto find out which approach is appropriate for your system’s needs. In the long term, using Septic System Digester on a regular basis will save you a significant amount of money.

Is It Necessary To Treat My System?

In a perfect environment, a septic system treatment would not be required; nonetheless, complications might emerge when a treatment technique is not used, which is sad. If you do not treat your septic system on a regular basis, you may have backups, obstructions, and unpleasant odors.

Can I Damage My Septic System?

A precise bacterial balance is required for septic systems to function properly and break down waste. Hazardous or caustic chemicals can be used to kill off the bacteria and stop the breakdown process, which might result in backlog and smells in the sewer system. Non-stop use of inappropriate chemicals can cause harm to your septic system, but it’s also possible to cause problems by overusing the chemicals you use. Even though overuse might differ depending on your septic system, it’s better to avoid activities that require you to send large amounts of water through your septic system in a 24-hour period.

Damage to the septic tank itself might be caused by tree roots that have spread out.

How Long Will My Septic System Last?

A well constructed and maintained septic system should endure for at least 40 years, if not longer.

Common Questions

If your system is correctly designed, the fact that it is placed near a well should not pose a problem for you. You should, however, call a septic system inspector and schedule a time for your well water to be checked for cross-contamination concerns, leaks, or other problems.

Do I Have To Pump My System? What Happens If I Don’t?

Yes. You do, in fact, need to prime your system. Over time, the trash in your septic system will accumulate. This waste has to be manually removed from the system in order to function properly. A failure to do so will result in sewage backing up into your home, which will stink and necessitate additional costly problems. Pumping is the method through which this solid waste is removed from the environment. We advised that you engage a septic system pumping service to remove the waste from your system.

By utilizing the Unique Septic System Digester, you will be able to increase the time between pump outs significantly. Please keep in mind that the pumping schedule may need to be adjusted based on the amount of water used and the number of people living in your home.

Do I Have To Treat My Septic System? My Pumper / Neighbor Says I Don’t Have To. What Happens If I Don’t?

The treatment of your system is highly suggested for a variety of reasons. First and foremost, treating your system on a regular basis will increase the time between pump outs, allowing you to save money. Second, treating your system provides you with peace of mind, knowing that you will not be subjected to any unpleasant scents or water that moves slowly through your system.

Can I Damage My Septic System?

Septic systems function by utilizing a very delicate balance of bacteria in your tank to break down the waste that is generated by your system. Using harsh or caustic chemicals can kill off the bacteria and prevent the breakdown process from taking place, resulting in blockages and smells in the system. Non-stop use of inappropriate chemicals can cause harm to your septic system, but it’s also possible to cause problems by overusing the chemicals you use. Even though overuse might differ depending on your septic system, it’s better to avoid activities that require you to send large amounts of water through your septic system in a 24-hour period.

Damage to the septic tank itself might be caused by tree roots that have spread out.

Can I Overuse My Septic System?

It is possible to experience problems as a result of excessive usage. It is advisable to avoid activities that require passing large quantities of water through your septic system in a 24-hour period, depending on your septic system’s capabilities.

Do I Need To Use Special Toilet Paper For My Home On A Septic System?

Many people who own septic systems are concerned about the type of toilet paper that should be used in their systems. The answer is straightforward: as long as you are using a Unique Septic System Digester, you may use any toilet paper that you would normally use in a standard sewage system without difficulty. You won’t have to worry about blockages in your septic system because of the bacteria in Septic System Digester, which will break down toilet paper extremely effectively.

Can I Plant A Garden On Top Of My Septic Field?

Many people who have septic systems choose to utilize the water from their sewage system to irrigate their lawn and garden. This may be a highly beneficial use of septic system water, but it is important to exercise caution when selecting the plants to be planted. Anything with a complex or extensive root system should be avoided. Make sure to stay away from anything that needs you to dig deeper than a few inches into the earth, as this might disrupt the delicate balance of your septic system.

According to some sites, it’s safe up to a certain distance, but here at Unique, we recommend that you avoid it entirely, purely for the purpose of being excessively careful.

How Gray Water Systems Work

A grey water system is a collection system for all of the water that is not connected to your septic system. Because this water does not include any typical waste materials, it originates from sources such as bathroom sinks, showers, bathtubs, and laundry lines (NOTE: Kitchen sinks and dish-washing lines are NOT part of the grey water system, as they contain food waste). The water from the grey water pipes is routed through a modest filtering system before being collected in a small holding tank, which is often only large enough to contain a few gallons of water.

The water collected by this grey water system is subsequently utilized to irrigate a garden, a line of trees, or other landscaping project.

Treating A Gray Water System

Keeping your grey water system clean and clear is a good and required habit in order to keep everything running smoothly. To use Unique Septic System Digester, we recommend that you pour 2 oz into the drain located in either your bathtub or shower once a month. Incorporating Septic System Digester into your grey water system will guarantee that your filtration system will last for a longer period of time and will avoid any sluggish flowing water that may arise as a result of accumulation inside the lateral lines.

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