How Close To A Septic Tank Can I Build In Ny? (Solution found)

NYC Department of Environmental Protection The DEP Watershed Rules Regulations that affect new development the most include: No septic systems allowed within 100 feet of a watercourse or wetland, or 300 feet of a reservoir, or reservoir stem.

What are the general requirements for a septic tank?

  • (1) General Requirements. The following applies to all septic tanks regardless of material. (i) A minimum liquid depth of 30 inches. The maximum depth for determining the allowable design volume of a tank shall be 60 inches.

How close can you build to a septic tank?

Septic tanks should be at least 7 metres away from any habitable parts of the building. They should also be located within 30 metres of an access point so that the tank can be emptied.

How close to a septic tank can I build a garage?

– A full foundation must be 10 feet from the septic tank and 20 feet from the leaching area. – A slab foundation such as a garage must be 10 feet from the septic tank and 10 feet from the leaching area.

How far should a septic system be from the house?

Local codes and regulations that stipulate the distance of the septic tank from the house vary depending on the locale, but the typical minimum distance is 10 feet.

Do you need planning permission for a septic tank?

The short answer is yes. You will need planning permission from a local authority in order to have a septic tank installed, no matter if it’s at your own home or on a business site.

Can I build a deck over septic tank?

You should never build a deck over a septic field; doing so will prevent the natural draining and dissipation of the effluent. This can ruin the septic system, not to mention releasing foul smells into the air all around your deck. The dissipating effluent can also rot the deck from underneath.

How far from a leach field can you build?

Common guidelines require at least 50′ clearance distance between a well and a septic system tank or 150′ between a well and a septic drainfield or leaching bed but you will see that different authorities may recommend different distances. Local soil and rock conditions can make these “rules of thumb” unreliable.

Can you pour concrete over a septic tank?

Paving Over Your Septic Tank You should never pave over your septic tank. Although soil compaction is not a major issue for septic tanks, there are other dangers presented by placing an insecure septic tank underneath concrete and heavy vehicles. This is particularly the case for old, reused septic tanks.

Can you put a garden over a septic field?

Planting over a septic leach field (drain field) is possible if it is done with care. If you have limited space on your property where you can garden, the leach field may be the only spot for landscaping. Vegetable gardening over a leach field is not recommended.

How do I decide where to put my septic tank?

Ideally, a septic tank should be placed on level ground. If possible, the tank should be placed on high ground in order to avoid flooding and seeping. It will be important that you look around and avoid steep slopes or areas of dense tree roots that can damage your entire system.

How deep is the septic tank outlet pipe?

After the solids settle out, effluent leaves the septic tank through the outlet pipe and flows to the drain field. The outlet pipe should be approximately 3 inches below the inlet pipe.

How far can a septic tank truck pump?

Usually the pump truck sits out in the driveway or street and a hose is used to vacuum out the septic tank. Most trucks, however, cannot pump more than 100 feet under normal flat conditions.

Are septic tanks still legal?

Septic Tanks Explained… Septic tanks cannot discharge to surface water drains, rivers, canals, ditches, streams or any other type of waterway. you are required to upgrade or replace your septic tank treatment system to a full sewage treatment plant by 2020, or when you sell a property, if it’s prior to this date.

How close to a house can a sewage treatment plant be?

The Sewage Treatment Plant must be sited more than 7m from habitable property. The soakaway must be a minimum of 10 metres from a watercourse, 15 metres from a building and 50 metres from a borehole or spring.

Do you need planning permission for a water tank?

Planning permission is not usually required for systems as they are covered by ‘permitted development’ rights, though it is always a good idea to check with your local planning officer before proceeding with an installation.

Septic System Design & Build Regulations & Specifications: Examples based on New York State Regulations

  • Send us a question or comment regarding septic system design requirements and regulations by filling out the form below.

InspectAPedia does not allow any form of conflict of interest. The sponsors, goods, and services described on this website are not affiliated with us in any way. Septic system design requirements and regulations include the following: In this article series, we will use the New York State wastewater treatment standard for individual household septic systems (Appendix 75-A) to demonstrate how to design and install state-regulated septic systems, including conventional tank and leach field systems as well as alternative septic system designs such as raised septic systems, septic mound systems, intermittent sand filter septic systems, and evaportion-transpiration septic systems.

The following section provides an overview of the complete septic system design specificationsregulations process, with hyperlinks to particular specialized subjects.

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Example Septic System Design RegulationsDesign Specifications

BASICS OF SEPTIC SYSTEM DESIGN may be found here. ln order to get a description of the characteristics and attributes of the most typical septic systems, including tank and drainfield designs, soilperc tests, septic tank pumping tables, septic system treatment chemicals, and steep slope system designs. SEPTIC SYSTEM DESIGN ALTERNATIVES provides a description of alternative septic system designers, products, and design specifications, including cesspools, disinfection systems, evaporation/transpiration, filters, fixed film gravelless, greywater, holding tanks, lagoons, media filters, mound septic designs, outhouses, peat filters, pressure dosing, raised beds, sequencing batch, steep slope, toilet alternatives, vegetated submerged beds, and wetland

Septic System Design CodesRegulations Articles

  • SEE PRINCIPLES OF SEPTIC SYSTEM DESIGN ln order to get a description of the characteristics and attributes of the most typical septic systems, including tank and drainfield, soilperc tests, septic tank pumping table, septic system treatment chemicals, and steep slope system designs. See SEPTIC SYSTEM DESIGN ALTERNATIVES for a description of alternative septic system designers, products, and design specifications such as cesspools, disinfection systems, evaporation/transpiration, filters, fixed film gravelless, greywater, holding tanks, lagoons, media filters, mound septic designs, outhouses, peat filters, pressure dosing, raised beds, sequencing batch, steep slope, toilet alternatives, vegetated submerged beds, and wetland
  • THE DESIGN OF SEPTIC SYSTEMS
  • SEPTIC SYSTEM DESIGN: INTRODUCTION
  • SEWAGE FLOW DESIGN FLOW ESTIMATES
  • SOILSITE EVALUATION FOR SEPTIC SYSTEMS
  • SEWER LINE SPECIFICATIONS
  • SEPTIC DELIVERY LINE DESIGN SPECIFICATIONS
  • SEPTIC DISTRIBUTION LINES, BOXES, AND TYPES: GRAVITY, PRESSURE
  • SEPTIC CONSULTANTS, DESIGNERS, AND ENGINEERS
  • SEPTIC DRAWINGS
  • SEPTIC SOILPERC TESTS
  • SEPTIC
  • PERC HOLE SPECIFICATIONS
  • PERC TEST STANDARDS
  • SOAKBED SOIL CONDITIONS
  • SOILSITE EVALUATION FOR SEPTIC SYSTEMS
  • PERC HOLE SPECIFICATIONS
  • PERC
  • ALTERNATIVES TO SEPTIC SYSTEM DESIGN – Home
  • SEPTIC SYSTEM DESIGN BASICS – Home
  • SEPTIC SYSTEM DESIGN GUIDELINES – Online e
  • SEPTIC DESIGN MANUAL – Online e
  • SEPTIC SYSTEM DESIGN GUIDELINES SEPTICREFERENCES
  • ALTERNATIVE DESIGN SEPTIC SYSTEM SUPPLIERS
  • SEPTIC TANK PUMPING SCHEDULE
  • TREATMENT LEVELS, WASTEWATER
  • TYPES OF SEPTIC SYSTEMS-master list
  • WATER QUANTITY USAGE TABLES
  • SEPTICREFERENCES
  • SEPTIC TANK PUMPING SCHE

Reader CommentsQ A

Ken The final legal authority on any code concern is always the local building code compliance officer, whose word is final and conclusive in all matters pertaining to the code. However, in most jurisdictions, new work is performed in accordance with current code; “repair” of a leach field, such as the replacement of a damaged pipe, should not be considered a code violation. However, “repair” of a failing leachfield really entails the installation of a new one, which will have to comply with current requirements.

Agreed On Long Island, New York, we adhere to the International Building Code, which stipulates venting requirements for each fixture in the building (shower sink toilet etc).

These vents can be used separately or in combination to provide a single roof or side wall penetration (attic) Dee Local plumbing rules or building standards, which may or may not be fashioned after the Uniform Mechanical Code, may state fairly precisely the criteria for effective venting of the building drain system, depending on where you reside.

  1. See NOISES FROM PLUMBING VENTS IN THE HOME AND PLUMBING VENT CODES When it comes to venting plumbing in homes such that no SEPTIC GASES infiltrate or vent into the residence, is there a code in place?
  2. However, every time anything drained, we could smell the fumes.
  3. No matter how much I air the house out, everyone in our home suffers from constant uppwr respiratory infections.
  4. I was told that my husband, who has two leukemias, had acquired double pneumonia and was admitted to the hospital in September.
  5. Due to the fact that the older generation does not feel there are any rules or codes that demand specific VENTING of plumbing to the outside of the basement ONLY venting is NO LONGER permissible as a consequence of such health risks as this, there is a conflict between the two generations.
  6. What is the minimum size of a tank IOC for a three-bedroom residence in Erie County, Pennsylvania?
  7. In accordance with Appendix 75-A, is it necessary to treat “grey” water through a home’s septic system, or may that water be routed to a different system entirely?

Continue reading at DESIGN OF SEPTIC SYSTEMS: INTRODUCTION Alternatively, choose a topic from the closely related articles listed below, or browse the entireARTICLE INDEX. Alternatively, consider the following:

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How Far Should You Put the Septic Tank From the House?

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In This Article

  • Amount of distance from the home
  • Basic safety concerns
  • Suggestions for a successful installation

For those who don’t have access to a municipal sewage system, an alternate solution, such as a septic tank and field lines, will be required. The design and operation of these systems are fairly straightforward. When designing a septic system, you must keep in mind the requirements of local construction codes as well as public health concerns.

Tip

Depending on where you live, local ordinances and regulations that specify the distance between the septic tank and the home vary. However, the normal minimum distance is 10 feet between the two structures. Consult your local ordinances and regulations for a detailed answer as to how far your septic tank must be installed from your home. Requirements differ from one location to the next, although the standard minimum distance from the home is 10 feet in most cases. In the case of a private well for drinking water, however, keep in mind that many state departments of health demand a minimum distance of 50 feet between a new septic tank and a well.

It is possible that the septic tank will be placed considerably closer to the structure since it will be easier and require less plumbing in some cases.

Basic Safety Considerations

If you’re the type of person who prefers to do things on their own, there are certain important measures you should take before starting this endeavor. Before you start digging the hole for the tank, call your local utility providers to find out where the service lines are located. A gas line, water line, phone line, or electrical connection that has been severed is not only potentially dangerous, but it may also be extremely expensive to repair. Once you have finished excavating the hole, proceed with caution.

It’s also important to understand that a concrete septic tank can weigh up to 5 tons. Never attempt to place a concrete unit into the hole on your own. Make sure the hole is available when the tank is delivered so that it can be installed straight in the desired location.

Tips for a Successful Installation

Plan ahead of time to get your water supply switched on prior to installing your septic tank. You must fill the tank with water as soon as it is placed in its final position for this to be possible. This has absolutely nothing to do with the septic system itself, but it is a prudent precaution. In the event of a heavy downpour, the groundwater may swell and a septic tank may float out of the ground, even if it has been buried. If this occurs, contact a qualified professional immediately. Repairing any damage done to the lines or to the tank itself, as well as putting the tank back in its original location, may be a costly and time-consuming endeavor.

Initially, you may be confident that you will remember the exact location of the marker when it is time to top up the tank — which is generally every three to five years — but your memory may fade over time.

SUFFOLK HEALTH OFFICIALS OUTLINE CHANGES TO WASTEWATER PRACTICES TO TAKE EFFECT ON JULY 1, 2019

Cesspools, which have been prohibited in new construction since 1973, will no longer be permitted as a replacement for old cesspools in the future. The replacement of old systems is not mandatory, but any voluntary replacements must satisfy the 1973 criteria for new systems in order to qualify. Replace existing cesspools or septic systems will need the submission of new registrations with the local health authority, marking the first time this has happened. The Suffolk County Department of Health Services is preparing to implement changes to the Suffolk County Sanitary Code that were approved in 2017 and will take effect on July 1, 2019, according to Suffolk County Health Commissioner Dr.

  • The changes are part of a broad, multi-pronged effort to combat nitrogen pollution of groundwater and local bays.
  • Replaced cesspools and septic systems will now be required to be registered with the Department of Health and Human Services, marking the first time that this has been done in the United States.
  • Nevertheless, because the laws did not address replacement systems, owners of cesspools had been free to just swap out an ineffective one for a working one, instead of having to install a septic tank in order to comply with the code requirements for new systems.
  • Obtaining approval can be accomplished by the submission of an electronic registration form completed by a licensed liquid waste contractor hired by a homeowner to replace a cesspool or septic system that is already in existence.
  • The amendments are codified in Article 6 of the Suffolk County Sanitary Code, which is available online.
  • Registered liquid waste contractors can inform the department of their intention to replace or upgrade a property owner’s existing cesspool or septic system using a specialized county web portal, which can be found at.
  • Staff from the Department of Health and Human Services will be on hand to help licensed liquid waste contractors with any concerns that may arise during the installation of a replacement or retrofit system.
See also:  How Llong Can You Survive In A Septic Tank? (Question)

In the past decade, it has been shown that cesspools and septic systems are the principal source of nitrogen pollution, which contributes to toxic algal blooms, beach closures, and fish deaths, all of which have grown increasingly widespread.

Cesspools account for around 250,000 of these systems, which dump raw, untreated human waste into the environment.

Installation of a complete conventional septic system, which includes a septic tank and a leaching structure, can cost anywhere between $6,000 and $8,000 per installation, depending on the situation.

Incentives of up to $30,000 are being offered by Suffolk County to homeowners who choose to replace their existing wastewater systems with innovative advanced treatment systems.

“Over the past few years, the county has made historic progress in the effort to address longstanding concerns about the environmental impacts that result from the reliance on cesspools and septic systems,” said Dr.

“The county has made historic progress in the effort to address longstanding concerns about the environmental impacts that result from the reliance on cesspools and septic systems,” he added.

A homeowner may opt to improve their system if their old system is in need of replacement or if they need to replace their existing system.” Homeowners can contact the Department of Health Services Office of Ecology by email at [email protected] or by phone at (631)852-5811 for additional information about the new standards and the County’s Septic Improvement Program.

The new criteria are effective immediately. Detailed explanation of the 2017 Article 6 Amendments pertaining to the elimination of in-kind cesspool replacement Keep up with us suffolkcountyny.gov Facebook.com/SuffolkCountyHealth Twitter.com/SuffolkCoHealth

Building in the NYC Watershed

Property owners in Greene County should be aware of the following: If you own land inside the New York City water supply watershed and want to construct a structure on it, you should get familiar with the material on this page.

What Are the Rules and Regulations?

The implementation of laws and regulations regarding stormwater, soil erosion, septic system location, and streamwetland effects is the responsibility of a variety of authorities. Whether you’re building a single family house, a company, or a big lot subdivision, development activities are closely regulated to ensure that they have the least possible impact on water, air, and wildlife, all of which have an influence on human populations.

Regulatory Agencies

The implementation of stormwater restrictions, soil erosion regulations, septic system placement requirements, and streamwetland effects is overseen by a variety of authorities. Whether you’re building a single family house, a company, or a big lot subdivision, development activities are closely monitored to ensure that they have the least possible impact on water, air, and wildlife, all of which have an influence on the human community in the long term.

NYC Department of Environmental Protection

The Department of Environmental Protection Watershed Rules The following are the regulations that have the greatest impact on new development:

  • It is not permitted to install a septic system within 100 feet of a stream or wetland, or within 300 feet of a reservoir or reservoir stem. It is not permissible to construct new impervious surfaces (roofs, pavement) within 100 feet of a watercourse or within 300 feet of a reservoir or reservoir stem. Access roads to developments are permitted inside the 100-foot buffer zone, provided that a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan has been approved by the DEP (SWPPP). Individual residential dwellings, as well as designated hamlets and village districts, are free from some requirements. Building new individual houses within 100 feet of a perennial stream requires an Individual Residential Stormwater Permit (IRSP) from the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP).

The Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) mandates that a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) be established for the following activities:

  • Development or disturbance of land with a total land area more than 5 acres (which does not have to be continuous) is prohibited. Clearing or grading property containing two or more acres that is within 100 feet of a watercourse or that has a slope greater than 15%
  • Subdivisions consisting of 5 or more lots each with a land area of 5 acres or less
  • Construction of a new facility that will have an impervious surface area of more than 40,000 square feet
  • Building an impermeable surface in a village, hamlet, or commercially designated area is a permitted use.

NYS Department of Environmental Conservation

The Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) enforces regulations affecting streams, stormwater runoff, and wetlands with an area more than 12.4 acres or of local significance. An SPDES General Permit for Stormwater Discharges from Construction Activity is necessary for any soil disturbance of one acre or more, as determined by the State Pollution Discharge Elimination System (SPDES). It is necessary for the developer to have a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan in order to receive this permit (SWPPP).

Disturbing stream beds and banks of some classed streams necessitates the acquisition of a Permit for the Protection of Waters.

In nature, disturbances can be either transitory or permanent in their duration.

Prior to engaging in any of the following actions, please contact us:

  • Structures in or over a stream (such as bridges, culverts, or pipelines) are placed in this manner. Installation of fill for bank stabilization or to isolate a construction site (for example, the placement of rip-rap or coffer dams)
  • Gravel excavation
  • Lowering stream banks to facilitate the construction of a stream bridge
  • In-stream construction or the use of machinery in a stream to clear waste or aid with in-stream construction

Construction activities must be pre-approved by the DEC before any work can commence.

A Notice of Intent (NOI) must be submitted with the DEC stating that an SWPPP has been established and is being implemented. It is possible that you will be liable to a fine of up to $37,500 per violation per day if you begin building before submitting a NOI and acquiring insurance.

United States Army Corps of Engineers

The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) controls effects to all streams and wetlands. Projects that normally necessitate the use of a USACE permit involve the discharge of dredged or fill material into bodies of water (including wetlands).

NYS Department of Health

In addition to water well site, building, and design criteria, the NYS Department of Health (in collaboration with the DEP) enforces rules for individual residential water treatment systems (septic placement).

Local Building Code Rules

A code enforcement officer (CEO), who is employed by each municipality, is responsible for enforcing the Uniform Building Code. The New York State Uniform Building Code controls the construction of structures as well as the influence on adjacent lots. The responsibility for ensuring that facilities are in place to manage water run-off and erosion during building or demolition operations falls on the shoulders of property owners and CEOs. List of Common Activities that need the acquisition of a permit

Contact Information

Permits for stream disruption, stormwater prevention, and wetlands of 12.4 acres or greater in size or of local significance are subject to the following requirements: Division of Environmental Permits, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, 65561 State Highway 10, Stamford, NY 12167 In order to see this message, you must have JavaScript enabled on your computer.Kent Sanders, Deputy Regional Administrator,This email address is being protected from spambots.

Permits affecting rivers and wetlands less than 12.4 acres in size that may be impacted by development are subject to the following requirements: Albany Field Office, United States Army Corps of Engineers, 1 Bond Street, Troy, New York 12180 (518) 270-0589 The Enforcement Officer, Amy Gitchell, For permits relating to septic placement approval, stormwater prevention plans, individual residential stormwater permits, and watercourse identification, contact the New York City Department of Environmental Protection’s Water Supply Bureau at 71 Smith Avenue in Kingston, New York 12401.

This email address is being protected from spambots because it is associated with Joe Damrath, Stormwater Program Supervisor, (845) 340-7234.

Christopher Costello, (845) 340-7235, This email address is being protected from spambots because it contains information about septic system approval.

Greene County SoilWater Conservation District 907 County Office Building Cairo, NY 12413 (518) 622-3620 For stream restoration, riparian planting advice, soil studies, wetland identification, and aerial maps: Greene County SoilWater Conservation District Contact the New York State Department of Health’s Bureau of Water Supply Protection at 547 River Street, Troy, NY 12180 (518) 402-7650 or (800) 458-1158 for guidelines related to water well location, construction, and protection, as well as wastewater treatment.

DEP Septic and Well Regulations

Skip to the main content DEP Septic and Well Regulationshighknob2019-01-24T16:19:12-05:00DEP Septic and Well Regulations

DEP SEPTICWELL WATERSHED REGULATIONS

NatashaFred Ruckel contributed to this article. There have been numerous difficulties and tribulations associated with our Septic system, which have proven to be more complex and expensive than we had anticipated! Let us offer our extensive knowledge and expertise in this area. Our property is situated inside the New York watershed*. Simply explained, the water in this area supplies the drinking water for millions of New Yorkers who live in the surrounding area (ourselves included). This implies that any water found on your property is subject to extremely tight regulations.

If you prefer the definition provided by the Commissioner of Health under Section 201(1)(I) of the Public Health Law, Appendix 75-A of Part 75 of the Administrative Rules and Regulations contained in Chapter II of Title 10 of the Official Compilation of Codes, Rules, and Regulations of New York states: “An area of drainage for a body of water that serves as a source of drinking water and for which watershed rules and regulations have been adopted by the commissioner.” More definitions can be found in the free PDF document titled “Wastewater Treatment Standards,” section 75-A.1 (b).

Many of us are fascinated by the prospect of owning a river, stream, or other body of water.

When selecting a piece of property for purchase, be certain that it is not dotted with watercourses or other obstacles.

As defined by the Commissioner of Health, a watercourse is “a visible channel through which surface water is transported on a regular basis.” It is not acceptable to regard drainage basins that contain water just during and soon after a thunderstorm to be a watercourse.” After all, we do appear to have a number of spots of water run-off on our property that, to the untrained eye, do not appear to be part of a defined “watercourse.” We recommend that you contact your local Department of Environmental Protection so that they can clearly define what they regard to be ‘official watercourses.’ They have personnel who have been trained and understand what they are searching for.

There is nothing more frustrating than constructing a structure beside what appears to be a water ‘run-off,’ only to discover later that it is much more than that.

Anyway, returning to your land purchase, once you have determined that it is located within the watershed area and that your post-storm dribbles are in fact ‘defined watercourses,’ and that you are not permitted to build within one hundred feet of those, do you still have enough space to construct your home on it?

  • This requires more space (which we shall discuss in greater detail later).
  • Let’s add one more variable to our calculation for the total amount of land needed to build your home: the well must be more than one hundred fifty feet away from your septic system.
  • It doesn’t stop there, though.
  • Your septic system (also known as the on-site wastewater treatment system) is comprised of a pipe that transports waste from your property to a septic tank.

Our home will have three bedrooms, so our tank’s minimum capacity will be one thousand gallons and its minimum liquid area will be twenty-seven square feet (refer to Table 3 from the Commissioner of Health by Section 201(1)(I) of the Public Health Law, Appendix 75-A of Part 75 of the Administrative Rules and Regulations contained in Chapter II of Title 10 of the Official Compilation of Codes, Rules, and Regulations of the State of New York).

We will have a total of three bedrooms Downloadable PDF ‘Wastewater Treatment Standards’ is an abbreviation for Wastewater Treatment Standards.

Solids settle to the bottom and produce a layer of’sludge,’ while oil and grease rise to the surface and form a layer of’scum.’ While the sludge and scum stay in the tank, the partially digested waste and wastewater are transported out of the tank through a pipe to a distribution box.

(Be sure to keep the phrase DRAINAGE FIELD in mind since we will be discussing them in greater detail shortly, especially given the fact that they take up a significant amount of space).

Additional dirt is necessary at the drainage field; the amount required is determined by the pace at which the soil drains (as established during the percolation test), as well as the amount of permeable soil type present at your site in comparison to rock and less permeable soil types (if any).

  • Maintaining your septic field in an area with “standing water” or “wetland” is another important consideration to bear in mind.
  • The soil cleanses wastewater by draining/filtering out any dangerous bacteria, nutrients, chemicals, and viruses that may have gotten into the system.
  • This will help to facilitate the transfer of wastewater from the septic tank to the drainage field.
  • The fact that you must utilize your septic system if you have a suitable space on your property (i.e., one that is large enough with at least nineteen inches of permeable soil) that is at least two hundred and fifty feet away from a watercourse has just been revealed.

And this one isn’t in the Commissioner of Health’s office, according to Section 201(1)(I) of the Public Health Law, Appendix 75-A of Part 75 of the Administrative Rules and Regulations contained in Chapter II of Title 10 of the Official Compilation of Codes, Rules, and Regulations of the State of New York, Appendix 75-A of Part 75 of the Administrative Rules and Regulations (See ‘Wastewater Treatment Standards’, a downloadable PDF document.) To put our drainage field in the ‘designated preferred location,’ we will have to build a trench that is more than eight hundred feet long, which will be an inconvenience.

  • What is the estimated cost of this?
  • The fact is that we have discovered that we may use the same trench that was previously used to run our electrical line.
  • Okay, so there are various costs piling up right now, and the buildable amount of land is reducing, but it doesn’t end there.
  • Can you recall how we talked about the size of the drainage field earlier in the discussion?
  • The principal septic field will be the first of these locations.
  • The reserve field serves as a failsafe in the event that your primary field fails in the future.
  • In this case, the true question is: how much room do you require for your drainage fields to operate?

We will use the following project as an example: It was determined that our soil percolation rate was five minutes per inch, which is sufficient for us to build three bedrooms.

A minimum of eighty by eighty feet is required for our drainage field, and a similar minimum size is required for our reserve field.

We understand your concerns.

In addition, it is crucial to highlight that the selected primary and reserve fields must not be more than fifteen percent higher or lower than the ten-year flood level, among other things.

For the same reason, getting estimates and shopping about is important; budget for this early in the planning phase.

To be certain, obtain a thorough estimate.

There is one more important lesson to be learned!

If you, like us, require the distribution of your home and septic system over one or more of your plots, you will be required to seek for an easement from the landowner to do this.

(Please keep in mind that you will need to budget for the filing and legal expenses associated with this.) Another six hundred dollars was required for this.

You will require the services of a licensed engineer to design and plan your system based on the size of your home, the soil type, and the permeability rates in your area.

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BEFORE PURCHASING YOUR PLOT, they must be able to prove that you have at least nineteen inches of workable soil and a percolation rate more than or equal to thirty minutes per inch – all of which must be verified (so as to avoid disappointment at a later date).

We were advised by our land seller that we may clear one acre each plot for a home site, driveway, garden, septic field, and other improvements such as a pond.

The fact that we were not in the watershed region was also revealed to us; however, it is a story for another day.

If you disturb more than two acres of land that is on a slope of fifteen percent or higher, or if you disturb more than one hundred feet from a watercourse, you must produce a comprehensive storm water management plan (SWMP) and submit it to the DEP’s Storm Water Design Review Section for approval.

Our best recommendation is to call local DEP agent and work closely with them; they will assist you and advise you on the most effective ways to pass your septic application through the system.

Also, ask for suggestions for a skilled engineer and surveyor to confirm that your provided plans are to scale, well annotated, and well-designed before submitting them. WISHING YOU THE BEST OF LUCK! a link to the page’s load

Seven Things You Should Know About Septic Systems in Erie County, NY

Ruckel’s daughter, Natasha, contributed to this article. Many trials and tribulations were experienced in the approval of our septic system, which proved to be more difficult and costly than we had anticipated! In this regard, let us share our first-hand knowledge and experience. In the New York watershed*, our land is located. Put another way, the water from this area is used to supply drinking water to millions of people in New York City (ourselves included). Water on your property is subject to extremely strict regulations as a result of this regulation.

If you prefer the definition provided by the Commissioner of Health under Section 201(1)(I) of the Public Health Law, Appendix 75-A of Part 75 of the Administrative Rules and Regulations contained in Chapter II of Title 10 of the Official Compilation of Codes, Rules, and Regulations of New York states: “An area of drainage for a body of water that serves as a source of drinking water and for which watershed rules and regulations have been adopted by the commissioner.”.

  • To learn more about these terms, see Section 75-A.1 (b) of the downloadable PDF titled “Wastewater Treatment Standards.” Having ownership of a river, stream, or other watercourse is something that many of us fantasize about.
  • Ensure that the land you are considering purchasing does not have any watercourses running through it before making a decision.
  • As defined by the Commissioner of Health, a watercourse is “a visible path through which surface water travels on a regular basis.” It is not acceptable to consider drainage areas that contain water only during and immediately after a rainstorm to be a watercourse.
  • In their employ are professionals who have been trained in the areas in which they are interested.
  • A slap on the wrist will not be enough punishment; you could face fines, be ordered to demolish the structure, and who knows what else could be thrown at your head?
  • That is not so fast; I forgot to mention that you may require a well and an underground septic system as well (that is of course, if like us, you have chosen to build away from the municipal water and sewage lines).
  • Keep in mind that these cannot be located within one hundred feet of a watercourse, as we mentioned earlier.
  • Are you running out of farmland?
  • It continues.
  • Your septic system (also known as the on-site wastewater treatment system) is comprised of a pipe that transports wastewater from your home to a septic tank.

We will have three bedrooms, so our tank’s minimum capacity will be one thousand gallons and its minimum liquid area will be twenty-seven square feet (refer to Table 3 from the Commissioner of Health, pursuant to Section 201(1)(I) of the Public Health Law, Appendix 75-A of Part 75 of the Administrative Rules and Regulations contained in Chapter II of Title 10 of the Official Compilation of the Codes, Rules and Regulations of the State of New York).

Downloadable PDF Wastewater Treatment Standards are a set of guidelines that govern how wastewater is treated after it has been discharged.

The wastewater is held there until it separates into layers.

Sludge and scum are retained in the tank, whereas partially decomposed waste and wastewater are discharged from the tank through a pipe to a distribution box for disposal.

“DRAINAGE FIELD” is a term that you should keep in mind because we will be discussing it in greater detail shortly, especially because they take up a significant amount of space.” Whenever new wastewater is introduced into the septic tank, the older wastewater is released into the drainage field, also known as the leech field.

  1. If your site appears to have more rock than soil and foliage, are you beginning to be concerned about the situation?
  2. The drainage field plays an important role in the absorption and percolation of wastewater from your home or business.
  3. It is possible that you will need to purchase an additional pump or float switch in addition to the pipes, septic tank, distribution box, drainage field, and additional soil that will be required.
  4. Using a pump or float switch will undoubtedly be necessary.
  5. If we mentioned that your septic field needed to be at least one hundred feet away from the ‘designated watercourse,’ that’s OK; there are rules that take precedence over other requirements.
  6. Unfortunately, this means that we will have to build a trench that is more than eight hundred feet long in order to be able to position our drainage field in the ‘designated preferred location.’ What is the estimated cost of this?
  7. Our research has revealed that we can reuse the trench that was previously utilized to run our electricity line.

To be sure, a slew of expenses are piling up right now, and the amount of buildable land is dwindling, but the problems don’t end there.

In order for the DEP/DOH to approve your septic plan, you must submit two locations for inspection.

The reserve field is the second position on the map.

Although you cannot disrupt your secondary field, you are prohibited from placing anything on it or altering it in any kind.

In addition to the soil percolation rate, the amount of useable soil, and the number of bedrooms you intend to have in your home, as previously said, there are other factors to consider.

The amount of workable dirt we had was at least nineteen inches, if not greater.

For more information on percolation rates and absorption trench sizes, see Table 4A and 4B of the Commissioner of Health by Section 201(1)(I) of the Public Health Law, Appendix 75-A of Part 75 of the Administrative Rules and Regulations contained in Chapter II of Title 10 of the Official Compilation of Codes, Rules and Regulations of New York, downloadable PDF entitled ‘Wastewater Treatment Standards,’ or Appendix 75-A of Part 75 of the Administrative Rules and Regulations contained in Consequently, you must be quite concerned about having enough area to build your home and septic system while still being able to appreciate and benefit from those ‘beautiful defined’ water streams on your property.

Table 2 of the PDF ‘Wastewater Treatment Standards’ is a table listing the required separation lengths between wastewater system components.

Specifically, as stated in SECTION 75-A.4 point (1) of the PDF document titled ‘Wastewater Treatment Standards,’ As a result, we discovered that our engineer had failed to include exact contours at two-foot intervals (as established by a New York certified surveyor) on the drawings and layout when submitting our ‘Septic Application’ the first time.

  1. For the same reason, getting estimates and shopping about is important; budget for this early in the planning phase.
  2. If you want to be certain, get a thorough estimate.
  3. We should also mention one more important lesson: We acquired three parcels of land that were next to one another.
  4. We came to the conclusion that filing our lots as a single unit would be more convenient.
  5. ‘Wastewater Treatment Standards’ is the name of the PDF document that we have scanned and it is quite tough to interpret.
  6. A precise delineation of your watercourses from the DEP, as well as a ‘pit and perc’ test done in the presence of a DEP official and an engineer, are both highly recommended in this situation.
  7. Except for’storm water management,’ this pretty well covers everything.
  8. We were advised by our land seller that we may clear one acre each plot for a home site, driveway, garden, septic field, and other amenities such as a pond or a gazebo.
  9. The fact that we weren’t in the watershed region was also revealed to us, but that’s a story for another time.
  10. You must design and submit a complete Storm Water Management Plan (SWMP) to the DEP’s Storm Water Design Evaluation Section for review and approval if you disturb more than two acres on slopes of fifteen percent or greater or within one hundred feet of a watercourse.
  11. It is preferable to contact your DEP agent and collaborate with them; they will assist you through the process and advise you on the most effective strategies to pass your septic system application.

Also, ask for suggestions for a skilled engineer and surveyor to confirm that your provided plans are to scale, well annotated, and well-designed before to submitting them. THANK YOU FOR YOUR INTERESTING PARTICIPATION! a link to the page load

  • NatashaFred Ruckel is the author of this article. Our septic system went through many trials and tribulations, and the approvals of our septic system proved to be more difficult and costly than we had anticipated! Let us share our in-depth knowledge of this subject. Our property is located within the New York watershed*. Simply put, the water in this area supplies the drinking water for millions of New Yorkers who live in the surrounding areas (ourselves included). This means that any water found on your property is subject to extremely stringent regulations. Please direct this ink to the following watershed area in New York State: We recommend that you visit the website of your state Department of Environmental Conservation/Protection if you live in another state. If you prefer the definition established by the Commissioner of Health under Section 201(1)(I) of the Public Health Law, Appendix 75-A of Part 75 of the Administrative Rules and Regulations contained in Chapter II of Title 10 of the Official Compilation of Codes, Rules, and Regulations of New York states: “An area of drainage for a body of water that serves as a source of drinking water and for which watershed rules and regulations have been adopted by the commissioner.” More definitions can be found in the downloadable PDF titled “Wastewater Treatment Standards,” section 75-A.1 (b), which can be found here. Having ownership of a river, stream, or other watercourse appeals to a large number of people. Contrary to popular belief, however, these beautiful watercourses located on your property do not grant you the right to do ‘whatever you want’ with them! When selecting a piece of land for purchase, make certain that it is not dotted with watercourses. The restrictions imposed by the DEP clearly state that you are not permitted to construct or disturb (including the use of heavy machinery) any land that is within one hundred feet of any watercourse. As defined by the Commissioner of Health, a watercourse is “a visible path through which surface water is regularly transported.” Drainage areas that contain water only during and immediately after a rainstorm are not considered to be watercourses.” After all, we do appear to have a number of patches of water run-off on our property that, to the untrained eye, do not appear to be part of a defined ‘watercourse.’ We recommend that you contact your local Department of Environmental Protection so that they can clearly identify what they believe to be ‘official watercourses’. They have well-trained personnel who are well-versed in the skills they seek. There is nothing worse than constructing a structure near what appears to be a simple water ‘run-off,’ only to discover later that it is much more than that. A slap on the wrist will not be enough punishment
  • You could face fines, be ordered to demolish the structure, and who knows what else could come your way. Anyway, returning to your land purchase, once you have determined that it is within the watershed area and that your post-storm dribbles are in fact ‘defined watercourses,’ and that you are not permitted to build within one hundred feet of those, do you still have enough space to construct your home? Not so fast, I forgot to mention that you might require a well and a septic system in addition to your home (that is of course, if like us, you have chosen to build away from the municipal water and sewage lines). The well and septic system require space (which we will discuss in more detail later), and they cannot be located within one hundred feet of a watercourse. Let’s add one more variable to our equation for the total amount of land needed to build your home: the well cannot be located within one hundred fifty feet of your septic system. Are you starting to run out of farmland? It doesn’t end there, though. In this section, we will discuss septic systems. If you have an on-site wastewater treatment system, it is comprised of a pipe that runs from your home to the tank and then into the sewer system. According to the number of bedrooms in your home, the size of the tank (which is usually buried underground) should be chosen. Because our home will have three bedrooms, our tank’s minimum capacity will be one thousand gallons and its minimum liquid area will be twenty-seven square feet (refer to Table 3 from the Commissioner of Health by Section 201(1)(I) of the Public Health Law, Appendix 75-A of Part 75 of the Administrative Rules and Regulations contained in Chapter II of Title 10 of the Official Compilation of Codes, Rules, and Regulations of the State of New York). Downloadable PDF ‘Wastewater Treatment Standards’ are a set of guidelines for how wastewater should be treated. A septic tank is a large concrete box (which can also be made of fiberglass or polyethylene) in which your wastewater is stored until it has accumulated in layers. Solids settle to the bottom of the tank and produce a layer of’sludge,’ while oil and grease rise to the surface and form a layer of’scum.’ Sludge and scum stay in the tank, whilst partially digested waste and wastewater are discharged from the tank through a conduit to a distribution box. The liquid is dispersed into the drainage field via the distribution box. (Remember the term DRAINAGE FIELD since we will be discussing them in greater detail shortly, especially given the fact that they take up a significant amount of space.) Whenever new wastewater is introduced into the septic tank, the older wastewater is spread through the drainage system, also known as the leech field. Additional dirt is necessary at the drainage field
  • The amount required is determined by the pace at which the soil drains (as established during the percolation test), as well as the amount of permeable soil type present at your site in comparison to rock and less permeable soil. Are you becoming concerned about the fact that you appear to have more rock on your property than soil or vegetation? Also bear in mind that you are not permitted to locate your septic field in a location with “standing water” or “wetland.” When it comes to absorption and percolation of your wastewater, the drainage field is critical. The soil treats wastewater by draining/filtering out any unwanted bacteria, nutrients, chemicals, and viruses that may have been introduced. In addition to the pipes, septic tank, distribution box, drainage field, and additional soil that will be required, you may also need to purchase a pump or a float switch to aid in the movement of wastewater from the septic tank to the drainage field. Depending on your situation, you may be required to purchase both. A pump or a float switch will very certainly be required. The fact that you must utilize your septic system if you have a suitable space on your property (i.e., one that is large enough with at least nineteen inches of permeable soil) that is at least two hundred and fifty feet away from a watercourse has lately come to our attention. The fact that your septic field must be at least one hundred feet away from the ‘designated watercourse’ is irrelevant
  • There are standards that take precedence over all others. Also, according to Section 201(1)(I) of the Public Health Law, Appendix 75-A of Part 75 of the Administrative Rules and Regulations, contained in Chapter II of Title 10 of the Official Compilation of Codes, Rules, and Regulations of New York, this one is not in the Commissioner of Health’s possession. (See ‘Wastewater Treatment Standards’ for a downloadable PDF.) To put our drainage field in the ‘designated preferred location,’ we will have to build a trench that is over eight hundred feet long, which will be an inconvenience. What is the approximate cost of this? More! Our research has revealed that we may use the same trench that was previously used to run our electricity line. The bad element of this is that we will have to dig a three-foot-wide trench in order to meet the requisite twelve-inch spacing between power wires and sewage pipes. Okay, so there are various prices piling up right now, and the amount of buildable land is dwindling, but the problems don’t end there. Can you recall how we discussed the size of the drainage field earlier? When you submit your septic plan to the DEP/DOH for approval, you must give two sites. The principal septic field will be the first area to be constructed. The reserve field is the second site. The reserve field serves as a fail-safe in the event that your primary field fails in the future. The secondary field, on the other hand, is impenetrable, meaning that nothing can be placed or done on it. In this case, the true question is how much room do you require for your drainage fields. As previously stated, your soil percolation rate, the amount of useable soil, and the number of bedrooms you intend to have in your home all play a role in this. As an illustration, we will utilize our own project: We intend to build three bedrooms, and our soil percolation rate was measured at five minutes per inch of soil depth. If not more, we had at least nineteen inches of useable dirt. Our drainage field, as well as our reserve field, will have to be a minimum of eighty by eighty feet in size. More information on percolation rates and absorption trench sizes can be found in Tables 4A and 4B of the Commissioner of Health by Section 201(1)(I) of the Public Health Law, Appendix 75-A of Part 75 of the Administrative Rules and Regulations contained in Chapter II of Title 10 of the Official Compilation of Codes, Rules, and Regulations of the State of New York, downloadable PDF called ‘Wastewater Treatment Standards’. Consequently, you must be quite concerned about having enough area to build your home and septic system while still being able to access and enjoy those ‘beautiful designated’ water channels on your property. Table 2 of the PDF ‘Wastewater Treatment Standards’ is a table containing the required separation distances from wastewater system components. In addition, it is crucial to highlight that the selected primary and reserve fields must not be more than fifteen percent higher or lower than the ten-year flood level. As stated in SECTION 75-A.4 point (1) of the PDF document titled “Wastewater Treatment Standards,” While submitting our ‘Septic Application,’ we noticed that our engineer had neglected to include exact contours at two-foot intervals (as established by a professional surveyor in New York) on the designs and layout. We had to employ a surveyor to perform and plot extensive elevations from our home, the planned septic field locations, the well, the pump tank, the force lines, and the interceptor drains, as a result of our original application being denied. In addition, this is not inexpensive, so seek estimates and shop about, but budget for it early in the design phase. This will be included in the cost estimate provided by dome engineering companies. To be certain, get a thorough estimate. Our expenditure was approximately one thousand two hundred dollars more than we had anticipated! Another important lesson to remember! We acquired three parcels of land that were next to one another. If you, like us, need to disperse your home and septic system across one or more of your plots, you will be forced to file for an easement. We came to the conclusion that it would be easier to file our lots as a group. (Remember to account for the filing and legal expenses associated with this as well.) This amounted to an extra $600. The PDF document titled ‘Wastewater Treatment Standards’ that we have scanned is quite tough to comprehend. You will need a professional engineer to design and plan your system based on the size of your house, the kind of soil, and the permeability rates in your area. We strongly advise you to have the DEP execute an exact delineation of your watercourses, as well as a ‘pit and perc test’ in the presence of a DEP official and an engineer. BEFORE PURCHASING YOUR PLOT, they must be able to prove that you have at least nineteen inches of suitable soil and a percolation rate more than or equal to thirty minutes per inch – all of which must be confirmed (so as to avoid disappointment at a later date). Except for’storm water management,’ this covers pretty about everything. As a result, we should mention it as well. We were advised by our land seller that we may clear one acre each plot for a home site, driveway, garden, septic field, and other amenities such as a pond. We were, however, misinformed! The fact that we were not in the watershed region was also revealed to us, but that’s a story for another day. For clearing more than one acre (regardless of how many plots you have, according to the NYSDEC), you are required to submit with the NYSDEC and develop a “Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan,” often known as an SWPPP. You must design and submit a complete Storm Water Management Plan (SWMP) to the DEP’s Storm Water Design Evaluation Section for review and approval if you disturb more than two acres that occurs on slopes of fifteen percent or greater or within one hundred feet of a watercourse. Many things may be learned along the road. Our best recommendation is to call local DEP agent and work closely with them
  • They will guide you and advise you on the most effective methods to pass your septic application through the process. Also, get suggestions for a skilled engineer and surveyor to check that your submitted drawings are to scale, well annotated, and well-designed. WISH YOU THE BEST OF LUCK! The link to the page’s loading screen
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Located in Erie County, NY, Macken Services offers almost 50 years of expertise in the installation, repair, and maintenance of septic systems. The key to keeping a septic system in good working order is frequent maintenance. Don’t take the chance of things going wrong in a hurry. Give us a call now and let us inspect your septic system to ensure it is in excellent working order. Septic systems are classified as follows: Writer was the author of this article.

Onsite Wastewater Treatment System

Since July 1, 2012, if you are building a new home in Erie County that will require an onsite wastewater treatment system (OWTS), you must hire a licensed design professional (i.e., a licensed professional engineer, a licensed registered architect, or a licensed land surveyor with an exemption certificate (Section 7208n of New York State Education Law)) to design the appropriate system to serve your home.

The design professional will prepare an engineer’s report and plans, which must be submitted to the Erie County Department of Health (ECDOH) along with anApplication for a Construction Permit for an Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systemfor Residential or Commercial Lots Prepared by a Design Professional and a $300 fee, in order to obtain approval for the project.

  • Staff from the Erie County Department of Health will assess the project to see if it complies with Health Department requirements once the application, fee, engineer’s report, and plans have been received.
  • Design guidelines and standards may be found by clicking here.
  • The well driller is required to provide you with a well log, which details the installation of your well.
  • The well must be adequately disinfected once it has been installed (seeDrinking Water Information), and then a water sample must be collected and submitted to a New York State ELAP approved laboratory for examination.
  • To be considered safe, the sample must be tested for total coliforms/E.Coli and a copy of the test results must be sent to the Erie County Department of Public Health.
  • The Erie County Department of Health recommends that if the results of your water sample show that you have total coliform or E.coli, you re-disinfect your well and call them to have another sample taken.
  • coli, you must ensure that your water supply is properly disinfected by installing an adequate disinfection system (Seewell disinfection procedures).

This must be performed prior to the Onsite Wastewater Treatment System receiving a Completed Works Approval from the Department of Environmental Protection.

New Onsite Wastewater Treatment System Installation

You are responsible for selecting a contractor to construct your onsite wastewater treatment system in accordance with the specifications authorized by the Erie County Department of Health and planned by the design professional you retained. As part of the installation of your septic system, your design professional will conduct one or more inspections to check that the system being built complies with the standards that have been set out. Based on the inspection(s), the engineer will provide a construction compliance certificate declaring that the system was implemented in accordance with the plans and specifications.

After your design expert submits a construction compliance form to this Department indicating that the system was correctly installed, a Completed Works Approval will be granted.

Residential Repair/Replacement

Choosing a contractor to build your on-site wastewater treatment system according to the Erie County Department of Health authorized requirements created by the design specialist you engaged is your responsibility. If you have a septic system in the works, your design professional will conduct one or more inspections to make sure that the system being constructed is in compliance with the requirements. Upon completion of the inspection(s), the engineer will provide a construction compliance certificate certifying that the system was implemented in accordance with the designs.

Following receipt of a construction compliance form from your design professional confirming that the system was correctly installed, this Department will issue a completed works approval.

Onsite Wastewater Treatment System Installation

It is your responsibility to hire a contractor to construct your onsite wastewater treatment system in accordance with the requirements established by the ECDOH. When your onsite wastewater treatment system is being built, a public health sanitarian will conduct one or more inspections to check that the system being built follows the criteria that have been established. When the work is finished to the satisfaction of all parties, a Certificate of Construction Compliance will be provided.

Operation and Maintenance of your Septic System

Several steps may be taken now that your new onsite wastewater treatment system has been built to ensure that it is protected and that it is operating effectively.

  • Keep a written note of where your system is located. We encourage you to call us at 961-6800 if you do not have this information. We will look into it for you and if it is accessible, we will send you a copy of your system’s location. Make sure you have your septic tank drained out every every three to five years. Maintain a record of all maintenance and repairs that have been performed on your equipment. Avoid parking or driving heavy equipment over the area where your septic system is located. Building constructions such as decks, patios, and pools over any of your system’s components is not recommended. Your toilet does not serve as a garbage can. Use a trash can instead of your toilet to dispose of goods such as paper towels, personal hygiene products, baby wipes, diapers, cat litter, or tissues. It is best to use toilet paper that has been specially labeled as safe for use with septic systems. Do not flush or use harsh chemicals on your skin. Septic tank bacteria are killed by chemical cleansers and chemicals, such as bleach or chemical drain cleaners, that are used in the tank. The bacteria in your septic tank are essential for the breakdown of solid waste and the overall operation of your system. It is possible that if the solid matter is not broken down and digested, it will run through your septic tank and into the rest of your system, producing a clog that will eventually lead to system failure. Water should be conserved. Examine your house for signs of plumbing leaks. Every 30 seconds, a toilet that is running consumes one gallon of water. Water is wasted by a leaky toilet at the rate of 200 gallons each day.

For further information on the operation and maintenance of your onsite wastewater treatment system, please see the following links:

  • Maintaining Your Septic System
  • Septic System Operation and Maintenance
  • Septic System Operation and Maintenance What Your Septic System Is and How It Works How to Take Care of It
  • The Top 10 Septic System Operation and Maintenance Tips to Keep in Mind
Difficult Sites for Repair or Replacement

If your property has several construction obstacles (such as streams, ravines, steep slopes, a lack of drainage, and so on), you may be forced to employ a design specialist to build an onsite wastewater treatment system for your lot in order to proceed with construction. As a result, once your engineer has completed the design of a septic system for your property, you must submit the plans to the ECDOH along with an Application for a Construction Permit for an Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systemfor Residential or Commercial Lots Prepared by a Design Professional and a $300 fee in order for the permit to be considered and approved.

For a list of design experts, please visit this page (a complete list can be found in the phone book).

As part of the installation of your septic system, your design professional will conduct one or more inspections to check that the system being built complies with the standards that have been set out.

The construction certification must be filed to the ECDOH prior to the issuance of a Completed Works Approval for the project.

If your house is supplied by a well, you must additionally provide a copy of the well log from a licensed well driller, as well as the results of a bacteria sample and proof of the installation of a disinfection system (if necessary) in your home.

Commercial

All commercial buildings must have a design expert create designs for the onsite wastewater treatment system that will be necessary for the building’s operation. Design guidelines and standards may be found by clicking here. In addition to the requiredApplication for a Construction Permit for an Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systemfor Residential or Commercial Lots Prepared by a Design Professional and a $300 fee for review and approval, the design drawings must be submitted to the ECDOH. One or more inspections of the onsite wastewater treatment system are required to be completed by your design expert throughout the construction phase of the system.

Before a Completed Works Approval may be obtained, the ECDOH must be notified that the construction is in line with the regulations.

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