How Close Can You Plant Fruit Trees To A Septic Tank? (Solved)

Inspectapedia recommends planting trees at least as far away from a septic system as the maximum height of the mature tree. However, the nutrients from the septic leakage could influence tree roots to grow farther than you’d expect. To get around this, add 25 percent more distance.

  • Keep such trees at least 100 feet from the nearest septic field component. Watch out: even when trees are listed as OK to plant near a drainfield that NEVER means planting right atop the drainfield, and some of these trees must be kept considerable distance away.

Can I plant apple trees on my septic field?

Trees, fruits, and vegetables should not be planted over or around the leach field. Also, avoid placing raised garden beds over the absorption trench as it can hinder the evaporation process and decrease the efficiency of your septic system.

What kind of trees can you plant near a septic tank?

Here are some example of trees and shrubs with shallow root systems that are safe to plant near your septic system:

  • Japanese Maple Trees.
  • Holly Shrubs.
  • Dogwood Trees.
  • Cherry Trees.
  • Boxwood Shrubs.
  • Eastern Redbud Trees.
  • Azalea Shrubs.

How close can you plant next to a septic field?

These estimates should be considered a bare minimum, and to reduce the risk, the trees should be planted even further away from the drain field. Shrubs with less aggressive root systems should never be planted any closer than 10 feet and small less aggressive trees no closer than 20 feet from the drain field.

How close to a septic tank can I plant vegetables?

While there are no specific distance mandates on vegetable gardens and septic fields, staying 10 to 20 feet outside the perimeter of your septic system’s drainage field is a safe bet for clean veggies and an effective septic system.

Can you grow fruit trees in a septic field?

The short answer is it’s better to keep fruits and vegetables away from septic systems, especially septic drainfields but above-ground crops such as fruit trees are less likely to be contaminated. Watch out: do not plant root crops over a drainfield. They may be contaminated with sewage bacteria.

Can you plant blueberries over a septic field?

Septic-Area Crops Are Unsafe for Humans Produce from the area around your septic drain field is hazardous, since the veggies can be contaminated with the harmful microorganisms. If blackberry or other berry plants grow wild over your septic field, don’t eat the berries or allow others to eat the fruit of the plants.

Can tree roots damage septic system?

Trees can cause significant damage to a septic system. Over time, tree roots can wreak havoc on the pipes and drain lines that lead out to the sewer or to your privately installed septic system. As a result, the roots can grow into the walls of the pipes and block the ability to drain water and waste.

How far should a tree be planted from a sewer line?

Trees should be located more than 10 feet from sewer lines to minimize root intrusion.

Can you plant trees near a leach field?

Placing trees or shrubs over or near the leach field is risky. Woody plants have deeper roots that may clog drain pipes in relatively short order. Water-loving species are especially chancy and should be avoided, such as willow, poplar, elm, red and silver maple, birch and beech.

Can you plant a tree over a sewer line?

Select a Safe Planting Distance Keep all trees and shrubs at least 10 feet away from your sewer lateral. This goes for even the smallest, slowest growing species. Trees with spreading roots and species that require large amounts of water should be planted at least 20 feet from any underground pipe or utility line.

Can you grow grass over septic tank?

Grass Benefits Grass planted over a septic drain field prevents soil erosion and improves the exchange of oxygen and the removal of soil moisture. Turfgrass is ideal for planting over a septic drain field because its roots aren’t likely to clog or damage the drain lines.

Is it OK to plant a garden over a septic field?

The most important reason you should not install a vegetable garden on top of, or right next to, a septic system disposal field is because the plants can become contaminated by wastewater that has not yet been renovated by the field. Plants on disposal fields can absorb wastewater pathogens.

Can you plant anything over a septic tank?

Put plastic sheets, bark, gravel or other fill over the drainfield. Reshape or fill the ground surface over the drainfield and reserve area. However, just adding topsoil is generally OK if it isn’t more than a couple of inches. Make ponds on or near the septic system and the reserve area.

Can you put a greenhouse over a septic field?

A greenhouse can be erected on a septic field to grow certain types of plants. The greenhouse should not have permanent foundations, which could easily damage the septic system. Do not plant directly into the ground over a septic field, as the plants could absorb contaminants released by the system.

How far can you plant fruit trees from a septic tank?

Gina Garboon is a model and actress. 1st of July, 2019 My house and garden became infested with tiny gnats, which decimated my fuchsia plant and flew all over the place. I’ve tried everything I’ve read on the internet – soap and oil dishes, sand at the bottom of the tub, etc. More information may be found here. 61Refer to the Answers

Marigolds growing! Should I pinch the buds?

Dianne Kingon is an American actress and singer. 07th of June, 2018 My marigold plants are flourishing. I’m excited. Pinching the buds until Autumn will, according to what I’ve heard, enable them to grow without harming the plant. Is this correct? 50 Answers may be found here.

What’s the best flower/plant to grow in Texas?

Dianne Kingon is a woman who lives in the city of Toronto, Ontario. 07th of June, 2018 – Fortunately, my marigold plants are flourishing! Pinching the buds until Autumn will, according to what I’ve heard, enable them to develop without harming the plant. This appears to be correct. 50 Please refer to the following:

How to care for a dogwood tree?

Check out the answers posted by Ajc43097020 on June 22, 2019.

How to propagate succulents?

Joyceon Dec 16, 2018 0 comments I’m looking for someone who can explain me how to grow succulents. I absolutely adore my succulents, and I recently discovered that I can propagate new succulents from the old ones. That is INCREDIBLY amazing! J. More information may be found here. 26 Answers may be found here.

How far from the house can I plant a Yoshino cherry tree?

Raq24346432on July 21, 20185See the answers to this question

Does anyone know what tree this is?

Terese Connolly Connolly Connolly Connolly Connolly Connolly Connolly Connolly Con Friday, November 6th, 2018 I’m curious as to what sort of tree this is. 34Refer to the Answers

Septic Field and Fruit Trees (homestead forum at permies)

Teresa Connolly is a woman who lives in New York City. She is a former model and actress who has been in a number of films and television shows, including 06.11.2018 (Wednesday) What sort of tree is this, and does anyone know what it is called? 33Consider Your Options

  • 3
  • The total number of slices to be sent is: Optional ‘thank-you’ letter to include:

3; The number of slices to be sent is as follows: Thank-you letter is optional and can be written as follows:

What Trees Are Safe to Plant Near a Septic Tank?

Davey utilizes cookies to make your experience as pleasant as possible by giving us with analytics that allow us to provide you with the most relevant information possible. By continuing to use this site, you acknowledge and agree to our use of third-party cookies. For additional information, please see ourPrivacy Policy. Subscribe to “The Sapling” on the Davey Blog for the most up-to-date information on how to keep your outside area in peak condition throughout the year. Septic systems, which have thick pipes that go deep throughout the yard, raise a lot of problems regarding what you may plant and where you can put it.

Landscaping Ideas Around Septic Tanks: What to Plant Over a Septic Tank

Regardless of what you’ve heard, it’s not impossible that this will happen! It is true that the correct type of plant or tree may assist the system in keeping water flowing smoothly and preventing erosion. Plants that function best have soft, green stems and are well-adapted to the amount of rain that falls in your location.

In other words, we’re talking about annual plants versus perennial plants against wildflowers versus bulbs versus grass. Trees may also be used, as long as you select one with shallow roots and place it a long distance away from the tank.

Can I plant oak trees, Japanese maples or fruit trees near a septic tank?

It is possible, but it is really difficult! The roots of trees are wired to follow the flow of water. As a result, if you plant trees or bushes too close to your irrigation system, they may pry into the pipes and block them, causing harm to the system and the water flow in your home. When it comes to landscaping near the tank, the plants we described above are typically a better choice. In fact, you may cover the system with flowers like those (or even grass) to disguise the system’s presence.

See also:  How Many Gallon Septic Tank Do I Need For 3 Bedrooms? (Correct answer)

Thus, white oaks and crabapples are both good choices for landscaping.

Maple trees are infamous for blocking drains and sewer lines.

Biological or viral contamination of any plants grown in close proximity to your sewage tank may be a concern.

What trees are safe to plant near a septic system?

Getting back to the original reader who sparked this discussion: because of their shallow roots, skyrocket junipers may be planted in a variety of locations. However, there is a caveat to this, as well as to all of the other options listed below. If possible, place the tree as far away from the system as the tree will be when it is completely matured. Consequently, while skyrocket junipers normally grow to be 20 feet tall, it is recommended that they be planted at least 20 feet away from the system.

  1. In zones 3-8, hemlock grows to be a beautiful evergreen that may reach heights of up to 80 feet. (Zones 3-8): An evergreen with wonderfully colored needles that may grow to be 80 feet tall
  2. It can be found in zones 3-8. Boxwood shrub (zones 4-9): An evergreen that is commonly used for hedges and grows to be around 10 feet tall
  3. It is a good choice for small gardens. Dogwood (hardiness zones 5-8): A spring-flowering tree that normally develops to be around 30 feet tall
  4. It blooms in the spring. Stunning blooming trees that grow between 30 and 50 feet tall in zones 5-8, ornamental cherries are a must-have for any garden. An added bonus is that there are several kinds and cultivars to pick from. In zones 5-9. American holly (Acer rubrum): An evergreen with vivid flashes of berries that often grows to reach around 50 feet tall
  5. It is a multi-stemmed palm that develops to be around 6 feet tall in zones 5b-11. The lady palm (zones 8-11) is a distinctive palm that may be grown to seem like a shrub and can grow to be around 10 feet tall. The pygmy date palm (zones 9-11) is a pint-sized palm that grows to approximately 12 feet tall and is extremely easy to grow.

Want a local arborist to plant your tree to keep your septic system safe? Start here.

I am having my septic tank moved to the side of my house where I have fruit trees and other plants, and I am quite excited about it. Can you tell me how far away these trees should be planted from my septic tank? A: There is a plethora of material available on the internet about the topic of the distance between trees and septic systems. I’ve seen distances as little as 20 feet (at the University of Minnesota) and as long as 100 feet (at the University of Minnesota) (North Carolina State University).

  • It is crucial to note that tree roots can develop two to three times the distance between the drip line and the trunk.
  • Let’s imagine one of the fruit tree limbs was ten feet in length, which is not out of the ordinary for fruit tree branches.
  • Those roots have the potential to interfere with the natural processes of the septic tank and cause significant harm.
  • If you need to relocate the fruit trees, do so and then replant them in a new location.
  • When you move them, try to get as much of the root ball as you possibly can.

It is not necessary to alter the new hole where the tree will be planted; instead, it is sufficient to keep the trees properly hydrated. It is advisable to plant them during the dormant season to ensure the health of the tree and the production of future fruit. 0

What Trees Can be Safely Planted Near a Septic Tank?

Your septic tank is connected to your home by heavy pipes that run over and through your property. Because of the requirement of these pipelines, you may be wondering what you may safely grow in the vicinity of this location. It’s unfortunate, but there are some tree types that can cause major harm to a drain field or a septic tank, so you must exercise caution while working around them. However, if you follow the advice and information provided here, you may be certain that you have identified a few viable possibilities.

What to Plant Near or Over Your Septic Tank?

Across and through your property, large pipes carry waste from your septic tank. Since these pipelines are required, it is possible that you may be wondering what you can securely grow in the vicinity of this region. It’s unfortunate, but there are some tree types that can cause major harm to a drain field or a septic tank, so you have to exercise caution when planting trees near these structures. But if you follow the advice and information provided here, you may be certain that you have identified a few viable alternatives.

Fruit Trees, Japanese Maples and Oak Trees

While it is feasible to grow the three trees mentioned above near your sewage tank, doing so can be difficult. Because tree roots are naturally drawn to water sources, it makes sense that they would do so. It follows as a result that if you choose to plant your trees or shrubs in close proximity to your septic system, it is quite possible that they will make their way into the pipes and create difficulties. This will have a negative impact on the water flow in your home as well as the complete septic system.

Crabapples and white oaks are two examples of such trees.

Other varieties of fruit trees are also unlikely to be a good match for this particular variety.

Consider the implications of this.

Safe Trees for Septic Tank Areas

A list of trees that can be planted in and around the septic tank area can be found further down this page. Although it is recommended that you keep them as far away from your system as possible, it is still a good idea. Some plants to consider for these kind of environments are as follows:

  • The boxwood shrub, Hemlock, White oak, White pine, Pygmy date palm, American holly, Ornamental cherry, Lady palm, and Dogwood are some of the plants that grow in the United States.

The boxwood shrub, Hemlock, White oak, White pine, Pygmy date palm, American holly, Ornamental cherry, Lady palm, and Dogwood are some of the trees and shrubs that grow in the Northeast.

Can you plant fruit trees over a septic field?

Asked in the following category: General The most recent update was made on April 12, 2020. The simple answer is that it is preferable to keep fruits and vegetables away from septic systems, particularly septic drainfields, but that above-ground crops such as fruit trees are less likely to be affected. Keep an eye out for root crops that are planted over drainfields. It is possible that they are infected with sewer bacteria. Planting your septic field is typically considered a good idea, but it is not the best location for a vegetable garden.

  • It is possible that leafy vegetables will become polluted by rain splashing dirt onto the plant; thus, either mulch them to prevent soil splashing or don’t grow them.
  • Food cultivated in an overseptic environment is not recommended by some sources, however other research says that fruit treecrops will not have any infections transported from the waste to the fruit (for example, “in underdeveloped nations”) if they are grown in an overseptic environment.
  • As a result, how near can you plant trees to a septic field before they become a problem?
  • As a result, a tree that matures to 30 feet in height must be placed at least 30 feet away from your septic system.
  • Herbaceous plants, such as annuals, perennials, bulbs, and decorative grasses, are typically considered to be the finest alternatives for usage on an asepticdrainfield because of their ability to tolerate high temperatures.

It is also advantageous to use ornamental grasses because they have a fibrous root structure that helps to retain soil in place and because they provide year-round cover.

Septic Tank Care: Which Trees to Plant Near Your Septic System

The addition of trees, bushes, and other plant life may improve the overall look of any landscape, but it is important to exercise caution when planting anything near a septic system. In our last article, we discussed which portions of your septic system are most sensitive to tree-root damage, as well as how far away you should place your trees from the septic system’s perimeter. The moment has come to take a look if you haven’t already done so. The trees, shrubs, and other plants that are safe to plant near your sewage system and the trees and shrubs that you should avoid growing anywhere near your septic system will be discussed today in detail.

See also:  What Is The Average Yearly Salary Septic Tank Truck Driver? (Solved)

Why might it be beneficial to plant vegetation near or over your leach field?

Several homeowners have become so anxious about the prospect of planting trees, bushes, or anything else in their leach field that they avoid doing it entirely. Although it may seem counter-intuitive, growing the appropriate sort of plants may be good to the health of your septic system. This is due to the fact that plants aid in the prevention of erosion by eliminating excess moisture from your leach field.

Which plants are safe to place near or over your leach field?

Planting plants with shallow root systems, such as grasses, annuals, and perennials, is your best hope for preventing soil erosion. Spring bulbs, wild violets, hollyhocks, bee balm, and deer-resistant perennials are all excellent alternatives for planting in the early spring. When it comes to planting trees and shrubs, on the other hand, you need to be a little more cautious. Planting trees and shrubs with shallow root systems near your septic system is quite safe. Here are a few examples of such plants:

  • Japanese Maple Trees, Holly Shrubs, Dogwood Trees, Cherry Trees, Boxwood Shrubs, Eastern Redbud Trees, Azalea Shrubs, and other ornamental plants

Keep in mind that you should avoid planting any plants near your septic system if you intend to eat the produce from it. It is possible that you may have better development, but none of the fruits or vegetables that are grown will be safe to consume.

What plants should you avoid placing near your leach field?

As a general guideline, you should avoid planting any trees or shrubs that are known to develop quickly and become enormous, as well as those that are known to actively seek out water sources. Other trees are more picky about the water sources they will seek out than others, and some species, such as weeping willow trees, will go for the water in the pipes that go through the leach field and into the surrounding fields. In the following list, you will find some examples of trees and plants that you should avoid planting in or near your leach field.

  • Planting trees or shrubs that are known to grow quickly and become enormous is generally discouraged, as is planting trees or shrubs that are known to actively seek out water sources. There are certain trees that are more selective about the water sources they will seek than others, and other species, such as weeping willow trees, will go for the water flowing through the leach field pipes. You should avoid growing the following plants in or near your leach field, since they are known to cause damage to the soil.

As we discussed in our last article, any trees or bushes that you plant should be placed as far away from your septic system as possible, regardless of how large they are. For example, a tree that grows to be 30 feet tall will need to be placed at least 30 feet away from your septic system in order to be effective. Our objective at Septic Remedies is to serve as your one-stop shop for all of your septic tank needs. Please contact us or visit our website for additional information on how to properly maintain your septic system.

Planting Fruit Trees Near Aerobic Septic Sprinklers

Any trees or bushes that you plant should be placed as far away from your septic system as they are tall, as we discussed in our earlier blog post. To avoid having your septic system clogged, you should plant a tree that grows to be at least 30 feet tall and at least 30 feet away from your home.

It is our mission at Septic Remedies to serve as a one-stop shop for all of your septic tank needs. Contact us or visit our website for additional information on how to properly maintain your septic system.

Safe Plants to Grow Over Septic Tanks & Drain Fields

When some trees and bushes are planted near septic tanks and drain fields, their vigorous roots can cause harm to the tanks and drain fields. Find out which plants are the most dangerous to cultivate near a septic system and which ones are the safest.

Plants Safe to Grow Over Septic Tanks and Drain Fields

Several types of plants and shrubs can cause damage to septic tanks and drain fields because of their vigorous roots. What plants should you avoid growing near a septic system and which ones are safer to do so are covered in this article.

  • If the location is sunny, try planting one of these 10 great perennials for sunny locations: However, if the location does not receive much sunlight, you will most likely be pleased with these shadow garden plants. Septic tank drain fields have soil that is sometimes wetter than usual, sometimes saltier than average, and sometimes a combination of the two. Make sure to cover both bases with perennials that can withstand both damp soils and salt, such as bee balm, hollyhocks, and wild violets. When it comes to plants growing over septic systems, deer will not turn their noses up at them
  • Therefore, if you have a problem with this large pest eating your plants in your area, you will want to consider deer-resistant perennials and deer-resistant ground covers, as well as spring bulbs and ornamental grasses that deer do not eat

It is not safe to consume food crops that have been planted in the ground near a drain field since doing so may result in the consumption of hazardous microorganisms. It is preferable to plant shallow-rooted trees and bushes around septic tank drain fields if you must plant trees and plants. The Spruce is an example of a shallow-rooted tree or shrub. K. Dave’s / K. Dave

The Worst Plants to Grow Over Septic Systems

Planting huge, fast-growing trees is often discouraged. However, some of the greatest offenders are trees and shrubs with root systems that are aggressively seeking out sources of water, which makes them particularly difficult to control. They are not picky about the water source from which they draw their water, which means the pipes in your septic tank drain field are completely fair game. Weeping willow trees are a well-known example of this. There are several trees and bushes to avoid, however the following are only a few examples: If you have avoided planting any of the most dangerous plants right over your septic tank drain field, you should still be concerned about the consequences.

  1. Any huge, mature trees that may be growing in close proximity to your septic system continue to pose a threat.
  2. As a result, a mature specimen 50 feet tall should be at least 50 feet distant from the viewer.
  3. The Spruce Tree K.
  4. Dave

The Basics of How Septic Systems Work

Septic systems are used to treat wastewater in rural regions that do not have access to sewer systems. An underground, waterproof container, the septic tank is where wastewater from your toilets, showers, sinks, and clothes washer is stored after it has been removed from your home via a pipe. Solids (sludge) and scum are separated from liquids in a septic tank, which is intended to do this. Solids sink to the bottom of the container. The slime rises to the top of the heap. The liquids create an intermediate layer between the scum and the sludge, separating them from the other two layers.

  1. The introduction of more wastewater from the residence serves as a stimulus for their expulsion.
  2. Upon discharge, liquids are channeled into a much bigger portion of the septic system known as the “drain field,” “leach field,” or “leach pit.” Typically, a drain field is composed of a number of perforated PVC pipes that are installed in subterranean trenches.
  3. Drain field cloth can be used to protect dirt from getting into the holes.
  4. “Percolation” is the term used to describe how wastewater moves through the earth.
  5. The evaporation of excess moisture from the soil will take care of any excess moisture unless you (inadvertently) do something to hinder it.

A septic service must be hired at some time (usually after three years) to pump away the sludge and scum that has accumulated in the septic tank. The Spruce / written by K. Dave

Planning a Septic Field Garden

Sewage treatment facilities (septic systems) are used in rural regions that do not have sewage lines. An underground, waterproof container, the septic tank is where wastewater from your toilets, showers, sinks, and clothes dryer is stored after it has been transported out of your home. Solids (sludge) and scum are separated from liquids in a septic tank, which is intended to do so. Solids are attracted to the bottom of the container. Everything starts from the bottom and works its way up. Between the scum and the sludge, a layer of liquids forms in the center.

  • Increased wastewater from within the house acts as a trigger for their expulsion.
  • Their discharge transports the liquids to a much bigger component of the septic system known as the “drain field” or “leach field,” depending on how they are constructed.
  • Usually, crushed stone or gravel is used to fill the ditches.
  • Water can escape the pipes through perforations in the crushed stone or gravel, and subsequently into the soil below, due to the perforations.
  • The evaporation of excess moisture from the soil will take care of any excess moisture unless you (inadvertently) do something to prevent it.
  • David K.
  • Increasing the amount of soil in the region Using excessive amounts of mulch
  • Providing more water to the plants than is strictly necessary
See also:  What Is A Septic Tank Risers? (Question)

The Worst Plants And Trees To Grow Near Sewer And Drain Lines

Approximately 3 minutes of reading time The overall curb appeal of your property is enhanced by the presence of trees and plants. They add a feeling of natural beauty to any setting and would look great next to any house. A septic tank, on the other hand, is an unattractive but very required component of a well operating home. Having a beautiful landscape is one thing; however, having these trees and plants have an adverse effect on your sewage system is a path you do not want to travel down.

The Best and Worst Trees for Your Sewer System

Trees and bushes that should be avoided when planting around your sewage system include the following species:

  • Trees and shrubs such as Japanese willow bushes and weeping willow trees
  • Elm trees
  • Poplar trees, such as the Lombardy poplar tree
  • Tulip trees
  • Beech trees
  • Aspen and Ash trees
  • The majority of maple trees

Shallow-rooted trees and shrubs are the ideal kind of trees and shrubs to plant near your sewage system.

  • Cherry trees and Japanese maple trees are among the few maple trees that are less prone to inflict damage than other maple trees. Eastern redbud trees, dogwood trees, holly bushes, and boxwood shrubs are some of the most popular ornamental trees in the world.

Tips to Avoid Sewer Damage

You will have the most troubles with large, fast-growing trees in the vicinity of your sewer and drain systems. In their chase of water, these trees and bushes are aggressive, and they will spread wherever they are required to do so.

This is because, although while these tree roots do not develop at a quick pace, they do so under severe strain, which is where they begin to produce problems for your drain pipes and sewage system.

Plan Your Plant

  • Take the time to carefully arrange the landscaping around your drain pipes and sewage lines. If you are unaware of the exact location of your drain lines, this may prove to be a challenging process. Make an appointment with a professional drain service business such as Art Rooter, SewerDrain Cleaning to examine the landscape and aid you in determining the exact location of your drain pipes.

Choose The Right Species

  • All trees and plants represent a hazard to your drain systems since their roots have the ability to penetrate and clog your sewage pipes if given enough time. Only a few species, however, are known to do greater damage than others, and these are listed below: Smaller, slower-growing species are the safest option for beginners. The influence that these trees will have on your sewage line will ultimately be determined by the growth behavior of the species in question.

Planting Distance

  • Planting shrubs or trees at a distance should be done with caution. The plants should be placed at least ten feet away from any sewage lines. This is a general rule that should be followed regardless of the species you pick. In order to avoid instant damage to your wastewater system, trees with big, spreading root systems should be placed at least 100 feet away from your sewer

Monitor and Maintain

  • A possibility exists that tree roots have detoured underground, and despite of your attempts to ensure that they were planted far enough away from your sewer, they may nevertheless manage to block your drain pipes in some way or another. The best method to avoid this is to frequently inspect and repair the trees and plants that are in close proximity to your drain lines. From time to time, call in the pros to conduct a thorough examination of the region to verify that you are still operating inside the safety zone. Art Rooter, SewerDrain Cleaning, and other drain specialists can provide you with advice if your drain lines are at risk of being taken over.

Planting Limit

  • Excessive planting puts stress on the region around your drain pipes, which can lead to clogging. Depending on the goal of your tree planting, there are a few different options that you might consider exploring. As an example, if you want to add height to a certain location because it appears to be a little too flat, try using fences or makeshift walls. You may use hanging plants, potted trees, or hanging baskets packed with plants to create a beautiful arrangement. The use of a trellis might be beneficial if you are attempting to provide shade in an area that is close to your sewage system. Ground covers are a good choice if you want to add some color to your garden.

Interfering with the fundamental operation of your septic system can result in problems for your home that may be easily avoided with a little advice and organization. Adding an excessive amount of soil to the area surrounding your sewer is not a good idea since it will interfere with the regular evaporation process that takes place. In the same way, overwatering the plants and trees in the surrounding region should be avoided. However, even if you exercise extreme caution while planting around your sewer system, you may still be in for a surprise.

If you have reason to believe that your sewerage system is being harmed by your yard surroundings, contact the drain rooter professionals.

How to Plant a Garden in Relation to a Septic System Drain Field

Infringing on the fundamental operation of your septic system can result in problems for your family, problems that may be easily avoided with a little advice and organization. Adding an excessive amount of soil to the area surrounding your sewer is not a good idea since it will interfere with the regular evaporation process that takes place. A same caution should be exercised while watering plants and trees in the vicinity of the area in question. If you plant around your sewer system with great care, you may still be in for a pleasant surprise if it fails.

Immediately contact the drain rooter professionals if you believe your sewerage system is being harmed by your yard surroundings.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *