How Can I Relieve My Septic Tank? (Solved)

  • Mix 2 tablespoons of lemon or lemon extract, ¼ cup of baking soda, and ½ cup of vinegar to naturally clean your septic tank. Flush the solution down the drains or use it to clean your plumbing fixtures and it will reach the tank. Put 3-4 rotten tomatoes down the garbage disposal everything 4 months to keep your septic tank naturally clean.

What can you put in a septic tank to break down solids?

Yeast helps actively breaks down waste solids when added to your septic system. Flush ½ cup of dry baking yeast down the toilet, the first time. Add ¼ cup of instant yeast every 4 months, after the initial addition.

What breaks down sewage in a septic tank?

The septic tank has microbes, especially bacteria, which break down and liquefy the organic waste. In phase one, the wastewater is introduced into the septic system where solids settle down to form the sludge and scum layers as the anaerobic bacteria digest the organic waste.

How do you clear a blocked septic tank?

Bring a pot of hot water just to the boiling point and then pour it down the clogged drain. The hot water will help to loosen any grease or soap causing the clog, while the rush of water can help to loosen hair clogs. If hot water does not work, the next method you can try is a mixture of baking soda and vinegar.

What are the signs that your septic tank is full?

Here are some of the most common warning signs that you have a full septic tank:

  • Your Drains Are Taking Forever.
  • Standing Water Over Your Septic Tank.
  • Bad Smells Coming From Your Yard.
  • You Hear Gurgling Water.
  • You Have A Sewage Backup.
  • How often should you empty your septic tank?

How do I clean my septic tank naturally?

You can mix about a 1/4 cup of baking soda with 1/2 cup of vinegar and 2 tablespoons lemon to make your own natural cleaning agent. The baking soda will fizz up to help get the dirt and grime in your tub and drains. It’s a great cleaner and your septic system will thank you!

What eats sludge in septic tank?

One example of a homemade remedy is to flush ¼-½ a cup of instant yeast down your toilet. The yeast eats away at the sludge and helps loosen it, breaking it down so that wastewater can get through.

How do you break up sludge in a septic tank?

How to Reduce Sludge in a Septic Tank Without Pumping

  1. Install an aeration system with diffused air in your septic tank.
  2. Break up any compacted sludge.
  3. Add a bio-activator or microbe blend.
  4. Maintain the aeration system.
  5. Add additional Microbes as required.

Is Epsom salt okay for septic?

While Epsom salt doesn’t cause damage to your septic tank, this doesn’t necessarily mean you should go flushing it into your tank. Many individuals think flushing Epsom salt in their septic tanks will break down waste. While salts can unclog a toilet, the effect Epsom salt has on your septic system will be minimal.

Do I need to add enzymes to my septic tank?

But septic tanks don’t really need help from extra additives. As long as you are only putting wastewater and toilet paper down the pipes, the tank can take care of its job on its own. Putting anything extra in can cause more harm than good and it’s best to stick to the tanks natural ecosystem when possible.

How can you tell if your septic tank is clogged?

Signs of Septic System Clogging: Water and sewage from toilets, drains and sinks backing up into your home. Bathtubs, showers, and sinks draining slowly. Gurgling sounds present in the plumbing system. Bad odors coming from the septic tank or drain field.

Can I shower if my septic tank is full?

Only the water would get out into the leach field in a proper system unless you run too much water too fast. The thing to do is to run your shower water outside into it’s own drain area, but it may not be allowed where you are. Used to be called gray water system.

Will a flooded septic tank fix itself?

Most septic tanks are not damaged by flooding since they are below ground and completely covered. However, septic tanks and pump chambers can fill with silt and debris, and must be professionally cleaned. If the soil absorption field is clogged with silt, a new system may have to be installed.

How do I check my septic tanks sludge level?

To measure the sludge layer:

  1. Slowly lower the tube into the septic tank until it touches the bottom of the tank.
  2. As the device is slowly pulled out of the water, the check valve closes capturing a liquid/solid profile of the septic tank water. The thickness of the sludge layer can be measured.

What to do after septic is pumped?

After you have had your septic tank pumped by a trusted septic company, there are some things you can and should do as the septic system owner.

  1. 1) Get on a Schedule.
  2. 2) Take Care of the System.
  3. 3) Know the Parts of Your System.
  4. 4) Check Other Possible Issues.

How often should you pump your septic tank?

Inspect and Pump Frequently The average household septic system should be inspected at least every three years by a septic service professional. Household septic tanks are typically pumped every three to five years.

How to Care for Your Septic System

Septic system maintenance is neither difficult or expensive, and it does not have to be done frequently. The maintenance of a vehicle is comprised of four major components:

  • It is not necessary to spend a lot of money on septic system maintenance because it is not difficult. There are four main components to upkeep:

Inspect and Pump Frequently

Inspection of the ordinary residential septic system should be performed by a septic service specialist at least once every three years. Household septic tanks are normally pumped every three to five years, depending on how often they are used. Alternative systems that use electrical float switches, pumps, or mechanical components should be examined more frequently, typically once a year, to ensure that they are in proper working order. Because alternative systems contain mechanical components, it is essential to have a service contract.

  • The size of the household
  • The total amount of wastewater produced
  • The amount of solids present in wastewater
  • The size of the septic tank

Service provider coming? Here is what you need to know.

When you contact a septic service provider, he or she will inspect your septic tank for leaks as well as the scum and sludge layers that have built up over time. Maintain detailed records of any maintenance work conducted on your septic system. Because of the T-shaped outlet on the side of your tank, sludge and scum will not be able to escape from the tank and travel to the drainfield region. A pumping is required when the bottom of the scum layer or the top of the sludge layer is within six inches of the bottom of the outlet, or if the top of the sludge layer is within 12 inches of the bottom of the outlet.

In the service report for your system, the service provider should mention the completion of repairs as well as the condition of the tank.

An online septic finder from the National Onsite Wastewater Recycling Association (NOWRA) makes it simple to identify service specialists in your region.

Use Water Efficiently

In a normal single-family house, the average indoor water consumption is about 70 gallons per person, per day, on average. A single leaking or running toilet can waste as much as 200 gallons of water each day, depending on the situation. The septic system is responsible for disposing of all of the water that a residence sends down its pipes. The more water that is conserved in a household, the less water that enters the sewage system. A septic system that is operated efficiently will operate more efficiently and will have a lower chance of failure.

  • Toilets with a high level of efficiency. The usage of toilets accounts for 25 to 30% of total home water use. Many older homes have toilets with reservoirs that hold 3.5 to 5 gallons of water, but contemporary, high-efficiency toilets consume 1.6 gallons or less of water for each flush. Changing out your old toilets for high-efficiency versions is a simple approach to lessen the amount of household water that gets into your septic system. Aerators for faucets and high-efficiency showerheads are also available. Reduce water use and the volume of water entering your septic system by using faucet aerators, high-efficiency showerheads, and shower flow restriction devices. Machines for washing clothes. Water and energy are wasted when little loads of laundry are washed on the large-load cycle of your washing machine. By selecting the appropriate load size, you may limit the amount of water wasted. If you are unable to specify a load size, only complete loads of washing should be performed. Washing machine use should be spread throughout the week if at all possible. Doing all of your household laundry in one day may appear to be a time-saving strategy
  • Nevertheless, it can cause damage to your septic system by denying your septic tank adequate time to handle waste and may even cause your drainfield to overflow. Machines that have earned theENERGY STARlabel consume 35 percent less energy and 50 percent less water than ordinary ones, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Other Energy Star appliances can save you a lot of money on your energy and water bills.

Properly Dispose of Waste

Everything that goes down your drains, whether it’s flushed down the toilet, ground up in the trash disposal, or poured down the sink, shower, or bath, ends up in your septic system, which is where it belongs. What you flush down the toilet has an impact on how effectively your septic system functions.

Toilets aren’t trash cans!

Your septic system is not a garbage disposal system.

A simple rule of thumb is to never flush anything other than human waste and toilet paper down the toilet. Never flush a toilet:

  • Cooking grease or oil
  • Wipes that are not flushable, such as baby wipes or other wet wipes
  • Photographic solutions
  • Feminine hygiene items Condoms
  • Medical supplies such as dental floss and disposable diapers, cigarette butts and coffee grounds, cat litter and paper towels, pharmaceuticals, and household chemicals such as gasoline and oil, insecticides, antifreeze, and paint or paint thinners

Toilet Paper Needs to Be Flushed! Check out this video, which demonstrates why the only item you should flush down your toilet are toilet paper rolls.

Think at the sink!

Your septic system is made up of a collection of living organisms that digest and treat the waste generated by your household. Pouring pollutants down your drain can kill these organisms and cause damage to your septic system as well as other things. Whether you’re at the kitchen sink, the bathtub, or the utility sink, remember the following:

  • If you have a clogged drain, avoid using chemical drain openers. To prevent this from happening, use hot water or a drain snake
  • Never dump cooking oil or grease down the sink or toilet. It is never a good idea to flush oil-based paints, solvents, or huge quantities of harmful cleansers down the toilet. Even latex paint waste should be kept to a bare minimum. Disposal of rubbish should be avoided or limited to a minimum. Fats, grease, and particles will be considerably reduced in your septic tank, reducing the likelihood of your drainfield being clogged.

Own a recreational vehicle (RV), boat or mobile home?

If you have ever spent any time in an RV or boat, you are undoubtedly familiar with the issue of aromas emanating from sewage holding tanks.

  • The National Small Flows Clearinghouse’s Septic System Care hotline, which may be reached toll-free at 800-624-8301, has a factsheet on safe wastewater disposal for RV, boat, and mobile home owners and operators.

Maintain Your Drainfield

It is critical that you maintain the integrity of your drainfield, which is a component of your septic system that filters impurities from the liquid that emerges from your septic tank once it has been installed. Here are some things you should do to keep it in good condition:

  • Parking: Do not park or drive on your drainfield at any time. Plan your tree plantings so that their roots do not grow into your drainfield or septic system. An experienced septic service provider can recommend the appropriate distance for your septic tank and surrounding landscaping, based on your specific situation. Locating Your Drainfield: Keep any roof drains, sump pumps, and other rainfall drainage systems away from the drainfield area. Excess water causes the wastewater treatment process to slow down or halt completely.

Best septic tank treatments for rural homeowners

If you reside in a rural area of the United States, the chances are good that you will not be linked to a municipal water and sewer system. This means that your water will come from a well, and your body waste will be disposed of in a septic tank. It is the latter that we will be discussing in this article. After all, while septic tanks are capable of decomposing human waste on their own, they occasionally require assistance, and it is at this point that we as homeowners turn to the internet for information on the finest septic tank treatments available.

  • Consider it to be akin to re-digesting the solids before sending them to a distribution box (D-box) and then out onto a leaching field to break them down.
  • If anything isn’t operating properly, you may find yourself stuck with obstructions and a buildup of gasses.
  • After all, septic repairs are not inexpensive – I had to have my leaching field replaced a few years ago, which resulted in a bill of several thousand dollars.
  • In all likelihood, it will require pumping, however we have been able to go even longer without the need for pumping.

Here are 5 of the greatest septic tank treatments that we’ve come across that you may use if you need to give your septic system a little more TLC:

Green Gobbler Septic Saver Pacs

A septic saver that is designed to digest grease and fats while also breaking down paper and organic debris in order to keep your sewage line and septic tank free of blockages. It also aids in the reduction of smells, no matter how offensive they may be! To use Septic Saver, simply drop one pack into your downstairs bathroom toilet and flush it once a month for preventive septic tank maintenance. Each bag of Septic Saver contains six water-soluble packs; to use, simply drop and flush one pack into your downstairs bathroom toilet once a month for preventive septic tank maintenance.

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Rid-X Septic Tank Treatment Enzymes

This is the brand that you’ll see the most advertisements for on television, and in our experience, these enzyme pacs are really effective! Septic backups are prevented by continually breaking down household waste – the natural bacteria and sophisticated enzymes begin working instantly to target paper, protein, oils, and grease. Rid-X is available in a variety of sizes. One packet of provides a one-month treatment for septic tanks ranging in capacity from 700 to 1,500 gallons. To use, simply insert a pouch in your toilet and flush it down the toilet.

Instant Power 1868 Septic Shock

Septic Shock unclogs and deodorizes blocked, foul-smelling septic systems while also aiding in the digestion of soap, paper and grease. Pouring two liters (one container) of bleach directly into the toilet and flushing it will introduce millions of helpful bacteria to the system. This product comprises bacterial/enzyme strains of lipase (grease), protease (protein), cellulose (paper), and alpha amylase, which work together to breakdown system-clogging waste and debris.

Bio-Tab for Septic Systems

Using this ecologically friendly septic tank treatment will not affect your plumbing or septic system because it is non-corrosive and non-poisonous. Each container has a year’s worth of supplies (14 no-mess pills), as well as a calendar on the lid to keep track of your monthly use. Bio-Tab is made up of organisms that have been considered safe by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and is non-toxic to people and animals.

Walex Bio-Active Drop-Ins Septic Additive

Each month, you’ll receive a box that is safe for all types of plumbing and environmentally friendly – just put it in the toilet and flush it. With each dose, billions of bacteria and septic-specific enzymes are released, assisting in the prevention of blockages and the dissolution of solid materials. The use of Bio-Active helps to replenish the biological population of beneficial worker bacteria and enzymes, which are responsible for solids reduction. Each package contains 12 packets, which is enough for a year’s supply.

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7 Tips to Take Care of Your Septic System

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Maintaining a home’s septic system may seem like a daunting and stinky task, but it’s really not. Being mindful of what you’re doing inside the home will keep the system healthy.

Preventing and treating problems with your septic system is not difficult and does not have to be expensive. Failure to maintain your septic system, on the other hand, might result in significant financial loss, since digging up and rebuilding a septic system can cost tens of thousands of dollars.

What Is a Septic System?

Because it handles all of the wastewater that comes from your home, including the water from the bathrooms, kitchen, and laundry room, if your home is not connected to a municipal water and sewer system, your septic system is essential. Septic systems are generally comprised of a tank, into which wastewater is channeled for treatment and the particles are separated from the liquid. Microorganisms break down the organic stuff in wastewater, allowing it to be recycled. A perforated pipe system transports wastewater from there to a drain or leach field, which collects the effluent.

Get Familiar With Your Septic System

Understanding how your septic tank works, what sort of system it is, and where it is placed are all important first steps in proper maintenance. The county or town should keep a record of the permit, as well as a chart showing the tank’s layout and placement, because state rules demand a permit for septic system installation. Visual clues, such as sewage covers, or the direction in which the sewer pipe, which is located in the basement, runs out of the home, may be able to assist you in your search.

Have It Pumped Routinely

Every three to five years, the ordinary residential septic system should be pumped (that is, the sediments should be removed). According on the size of the tank, the typical price of pumping a residential septic tank is between $300 and $600. When you contact a septic service company, they will also inspect your septic tank for leaks and evaluate the sludge layers in your tank for any problems. Remember to save a copy of any maintenance paperwork pertaining to work performed on your septic tank.

Spread Your Washing Machine/Dishwasher Usage Throughout the Week

You may believe that scheduling a “laundry day,” during which you wash all of your clothing and possibly even run your dishwasher, would save you time. However, it puts a great deal of strain on your septic system. If you don’t allow your septic system enough time to process the wastewater, you risk overloading the system and flooding your drainfield with wastewater. Replace this with doing a full load of laundry (to ensure that you are not wasting water) a couple of times a week.

Don’t Treat Your Toilet Like a Trash Can

The only item that should be flushed down the toilet that does not come out of your body is toilet paper. Everything else should be discarded. This implies that there will be no tissues, diapers, feminine items, hair, dental floss, or anything else. Toilet paper is supposed to decompose in the septic tank after it has been used. Any additional materials are not permitted; they will clog and cause harm to your septic tank.

Make sure you use toilet paper that is safe for use with your septic system. Some of the luxurious, pricey ones that include lotions and additional plys may clog your system or introduce unwelcome substances into it.

Think About What You Dump Down the Kitchen Sink Drain

We flush a variety of items down the kitchen sink that might cause serious damage to a septic system. Never flush objects down the sink drain, including coffee grounds, eggshells, medicine, produce stickers, flour, and other such items. All of these things can clog pipes and cause screens to get obstructed. Do not dispose of any oil, including cooking oils and paint, grease, and fat since these substances will block your sewer line and cause it to back up into your home. Even dairy products such as milk, cream, and butter are harmful if they are flushed down the toilet.

When you use a garbage disposal in conjunction with a septic tank, the ground-up food particles contribute to the layer of solids that accumulates at the bottom of the tank’s bottom.

Be Careful With Cleaning Chemicals

Cleaning agents that homeowners use can be harmful to the beneficial microorganisms in their septic systems. When washing textiles, avoid using harsh chemicals such as bleach. If you absolutely must, use only a little quantity of the product. Use of drain cleaners is discouraged since, in addition to destroying beneficial bacteria, they can cause harm to the tank itself. Alternatively, if a plunger does not work, a toilet drain snake, which is also effective on clogged kitchen and bathroom sinks, may be used.

Quaternary ammonia is also present in antibacterial soaps and disinfectants, which should be avoided.

Protect Your Drainfield

As previously said, proper management of your drainfield begins with careful monitoring of water consumption and the materials that enter your septic system. Never drive or park a vehicle on top of your drainage system. Make certain that gutters and sump pumps discharge water far enough away from the drainfield to prevent flooding. Avoid growing trees and bushes in close proximity to the drainfield since the roots of these plants might interfere with the pipes.

Tips For Keeping Your Septic Tank Running

The septic tank is a septic tank. It’s one of the most important pieces of equipment in your house — yet it’s also one of the most mysterious. Even though it might be tough to comprehend something that cannot be seen, understanding your septic tank and how it works is essential. The septic tank is where all of the wastewater from your house, including that from your kitchen, bathrooms, and even laundry rooms, is dumped. We’ve included a quick description of the operation of your septic system, as well as some suggestions for maintaining it in good operating order.

  1. The tank itself, as well as the drain field, are the two primary components of the septic system.
  2. Upon entering, solid components are classified as either scum or sludge, depending on how much of them there are in total.
  3. Within the tank, bacteria break down scum and sludge, and the separated water is sent through filters before entering the drain field.
  4. Tips for keeping your septic system in good working order Reduce your water consumption to a bare minimum.
  5. When there is an excessive amount of water flowing into the system, polluted water might escape from the tank and into the drain field.
  6. Water use by a single person every day amounts to 70 gallons, which may be surprising, but is an accurate reflection of the situation.

When trying to fathom how one person can use a total of 70 gallons of water every day, it might be difficult to accept, but when we look at where this consumption is coming from, it can seem more understandable.

  • Toilets: toilets account for 25-30 percent of the total amount of water consumed by a home. Toilets that are more recent in design consume less water than older models. Give us a call right now if your home is equipped with out-of-date toilets! In the long run, your septic system will be grateful to you.
  • Sinks: Consider all of the water that goes down your sink every day that isn’t being used. When cleaning dishes, washing their hands, or brushing their teeth, it is usual for homes to leave their water running unattended. Take the initiative and make a change! Make use of the water in your sink just when you need it.

Keep an eye on what you dump down your drains. It is critical to consider what goes down your drains before flushing it. If you find yourself second-guessing an item, it is likely that it is not intended to be flushed down the toilet.

  • Grease: While putting grease down your drain may seem like a reasonable choice, it is not recommended. Using grease to clean your pipes and drain field has the potential to clog them! It sounds like something out of a nightmare
  • Due to our familiarity with flushing toilet paper down our toilets, we have a propensity to believe that comparable goods such as tissues or wet wipes are also safe to flush. This is because the microorganisms in your septic tank are unable to break down these materials, and they will most likely continue floating in your tank.

Make an appointment for a standard checkup. Septic tanks holding 1,000 gallons or fewer need to be serviced every five years or less. For septic tank maintenance, call us at 804-758-4314 to schedule an appointment with a Miller’s specialist.

How to Break Down Solids in A Septic Tank [6 Quick Hacks]

Your septic tank is one of the last things you want to have to think about when you’re trying to relax. Many people are intimidated and perplexed when it comes to understanding how to properly break down solid waste in a septic tank. For those who live in homes equipped with sewage systems, however, there are several things you should be aware of in order to avoid worse difficulties down the road.

How Do I Know If I Have a Septic Tank?

This information would have been provided to you as part of the inspection process when you purchased your house. If it’s been a while and you’re not sure where you reside, take a look around your surroundings. Homes in rural regions are frequently equipped with a septic system and septic tank. You can also do the following:

  • Take a glance around your yard and see if there are any strange peaks in the horizon
  • Find out if any of your neighbors have one and where it is positioned in their yard by speaking with them. Consider looking at your water bill
  • If you don’t have one from the county, you’re very certainly on a septic system. If you want a copy of your property records, you should contact your local government.

In this blog post, you will learn more about how to determine if you have a septic tank.

How Do I Take Care of My Septic System?

Following your discovery of the presence of a septic tank and its location, you’re undoubtedly asking how to properly maintain the tank. The naturally present bacteria in your septic tank are responsible for dissolving and consuming the solid waste in your tank. This is the type of beneficial bacteria that you require to keep your septic tank system operating correctly. Once this happens, the liquid in your tank flows into your drain field through small holes in the pipes. An examination of your septic tank will be one of the first things you’ll want to conduct after you’ve moved in.

  • You’ll also want to make certain that you’re utilizing goods that are safe for your system to utilize.
  • This toilet paper has been specially engineered to break down quickly and efficiently in your septic system.
  • You should avoid flushing any inorganic items down the toilet, regardless of how little they are.
  • Things like diapers, feminine hygiene items, and excessive toilet paper can cause a septic backlog if they are flushed down the toilet.

It is effective at destroying bacteria on your hands, but if you flush too much of it down the toilet, it can kill the beneficial bacteria in your septic system. Septic systems rely on a healthy population of bacteria to break down the solid waste that is introduced into the tank.

How Do I Break Down the Solids in My Septic Tank?

In order to properly size a septic tank, you must first determine its capacity. It is important to know the size of your tank in order to ensure that you are utilizing the proper quantity of septic tank treatment for your septic tanks. It is possible to damage the healthy bacterial environment that is necessary for your septic system to work efficiently when you use dangerous chemicals for septic tank treatment in bigger septic tanks. Additionally, employing a treatment that is intended for smaller septic tanks will not produce the results you are looking for.

  1. The majority of septic tank treatments are recommended to be performed once a month.
  2. Please keep in mind that we are not discussing drain cleaners here, but rather treatments.
  3. When it comes to keeping the amount of solids in your septic tank stable, the bacteria that live in your septic tanks are critical.
  4. It can also cause problems with your pipes, drain field, scum layer, and the entire septic system if not handled properly.
  5. Some things you may do to assist in the breakdown of solid waste in your septic tank are as follows:
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Active Yeast

Using your toilet bowl as a vessel, add 14 to 12 cup of active dry yeast and flush it down the toilet. It is important for your pipe yeast to have time to sit in order for it to function properly, so avoid doing things like running your dishwasher or having a shower that will wash the yeast down too soon. Yeast is beneficial in septic systems since it helps to keep the bacteria and enzymes happy.

Rotten Tomatoes

It may sound a little unusual, but they contain proteins called pectinase that help them digest food. These substances degrade pectin and the cell walls of plants. All of this contributes to the breakdown of solid waste and the recycling of waste plant components, which are all beneficial to your septic system. Reduce the size of your rotting tomatoes to little bits and flush them via your waste disposal. Make careful to run some water down the drain as well to avoid clogging your pipes with debris.

Hydrogen Peroxide

This used to be a typical tip for helping to break down the particles in your septic tank, but it is no longer recommended. It takes some time to ensure that the solution is suitably diluted before using it. This isn’t something you see recommended very frequently anymore because it may be quite detrimental to the soil and cause problems with your drain field.

Inorganic Acids

While they are quite effective at clearing obstructions, they can be detrimental to your septic tank’s health.

The bacteria in your tank can be killed by them, resulting in raw sewage leaks and a far more serious issue down the road. It is also possible that these strong chemicals will cause damage to the pipes and walls of your sewage system.

Chemicals

If you want to aid in the breakdown of solid waste in your septic tank, you can purchase chemicals to add to your tank. Make sure you follow the instructions on the label to avoid causing any harm to your septic system.

Pumping

One approach to ensure that the particles in your septic tank are being removed is to have a professional come pump your septic tank. Pumping your septic tank can be a time-consuming task that should be done as part of your overall septic tank maintenance plan. Prepare for the possibility of having your septic tank pumped. During the process of extracting the garbage and sludge, there is an unpleasant odor. In order to maintain your septic tank operating effectively, periodic pumping can be an excellent component of your septic tank treatment strategy.

What Happens When My Septic Tank is Full?

Due to the inability to view your septic tank, you may be wondering how you will be able to tell when your septic tank is full. It’s not one of those things that you can just put behind you and forget about. Plan to have your septic tank cleaned out every three to five years, as recommended by the EPA. This reduces the likelihood of a sewage backlog occurring. The Environmental Protection Agency has also issued a similar rule in this regard. It’s critical to cooperate with certified specialists to ensure that your septic tank, drainage field, or septic system is not damaged in the process.

As disgusting as it may sound, this is a standard technique of keeping your septic system in good working order.

In addition, our staff will come out to empty your septic tank.

We can also plan your septic tank pumping in the Atlanta region to ensure that your septic system is operating correctly at all times.

Aeration Septic – Fresh Lemon Blue – Septic Tank Treatment

It is possible that if you do not maintain and clean your septic tank system on a regular basis, you will significantly increase your chances of something going wrong, which might result in you losing thousands of dollars. Backups and overflows of your septic tank into your home through sinks and toilets are just a few examples of these problems. It might also cause sewage sludge to overflow into your yard, which could be dangerous.

Why Fresh Lemon Blue?

  • To avoid waste accumulation in septic tanks, this septic treatment employs a combination of friendly bacteria and strong, hardworking enzymes to break down and digest the organic elements that block pipes, tanks, and drains. A mix of strong enzymes that prevent sludge from building up in your system, including Lipase to liquefy fats, Cellulase to break down paper and fibers, Amylase to degrade starch, Pectinase to liquefy pectin and gums, and Protease to blast away proteins. Specialized strains of beneficial bacteria: It also contains strains of beneficial bacteria that reproduce at a rate of one million to one billion per minute. These beneficial microbes break down waste, allowing your system to function cleaner than ever before. Many plumbing problems may be avoided by using this product: sluggish drains, sludge building in your septic tank, drain flies, water backups, and blockages can all be avoided without causing damage to your pipes and fittings. The ingredients in this septic tank cleanser are all natural and safe for the environment: Because it does not include any harsh chemicals, you won’t have to worry about contaminating the environment. Additionally, it has a lovely, fresh lemon aroma about it.

How does Fresh Lemon Blue work?

A uniquely formulated combination of natural enzymes and beneficial bacteria, Fresh Lemon Blue increases the sludge and solids digesting capacity of your septic system, allowing it to perform better. When a living thing produces a material that functions as a catalyst to bring about a certain biochemical reaction, such substance is referred to as an enzyme. Because each enzyme has a highly unique purpose and capacity, it is required to use a combination of enzymes in order to successfully treat waste in a septic system.

Because the bacterial colonies within a septic system are responsible for eating and digesting waste, bacteria are vitally crucial to a septic system’s overall performance.

Fresh Lemon Blue is packed with bacteria that are both hungry and beneficial, ensuring that your septic system remains healthy for years to come.

Fresh Lemon Blue Benefits

  • Increasing the sludge and solids-eating capacity of your septic system is recommended. Save money by having your septic tank pumped less frequently. Getting rid of damp soil and surface puddles caused by obstruction of the drain field is essential. Fresh Lemon Scent can be used to mask scents that aren’t desirable. Maintain the health and seamless operation of your complete plumbing system. Treatment that is completely natural and won’t affect the environment

How does FLB compare to other septic tank maintenance products?

“Excellent stuff! This is something I use once a month to assist keep our drain pipes in good condition. It does not cause damage to your plumbing, as some products do. Eco-friendly. It is completely safe for your septic system! This product comes highly recommended by me.” — Barry R., Ph.D. 2/25/2015 “I am quite satisfied with your goods. This is the second time we have ordered, which speaks volumes about our happiness with the product. Your product does exactly what it says it will. Every instruction you give us is carried out to the letter.” – A.B.S.

  • “It really works!” — John O.
  • This has shown to be effective in keeping our vintage septic system (built in the 1960s) working smoothly.
  • 10/26/2016 “It’s simple to use.
  • 10/6/2017

Maintaining your septic system FAQ’s

1.) Water conservation is important. It is possible to increase the lifespan of your septic system by conserving water. Septic tank systems are put under a lot of stress, which may be eased by reducing the quantity of wastewater you generate. Not only will this increase the life of the system, but it will also reduce the likelihood of system failure. (2)Make certain that you are working with a qualified septic service business In the event that a problem arises with your septic system, you want to be able to contact a dependable and licensed septic provider that will be able to come to your home as quickly as possible to assist you.

  1. If you consistently pump out your septic tank, you can be confident that you are lowering the likelihood of a problem happening.
  2. FLB makes it easier for your septic system to break down waste and reduces the amount of accumulation in your septic system.
  3. Septic inspections are necessary in order to detect any potential problems before they manifest themselves.
  4. 5.)Be aware of what you should and should not put into your septic systemIt is critical to understand what should and should not be placed into your septic system.
  • Fats or grease
  • Motor oils or fuels
  • And other substances Diapers that are disposable
  • Coffee grounds, egg shells, and nut shells are examples of waste materials. Cigarettes with a filter tip
  • Napkins, tampons, or condoms for personal hygiene
  • A roll of paper towels or a rag
  • Paints or chemicals, for example.

However, while baking soda and vinegar may be used as a DIY septic tank treatment, we strongly urge that you choose a product that has been tested and confirmed to provide the best results in terms of keeping your septic system healthy and functioning correctly instead. Fresh Lemon Blue is a septic tank treatment that may be applied once a month in two simple steps: 1.) Remove the easy-open packet from the refrigerator. Pour the liquid down any drain or toilet in your house. 2.) In order to guarantee that Fresh Lemon Blue is beneficial to your whole plumbing system, we propose that you use a new drain once a month.

While you sleep, Fresh Lemon Blue will begin to work for you. Despite the fact that septic tank treatments are not always required, they have a number of significant advantages in terms of keeping your sewage system healthy and functioning effectively. Some of these advantages are as follows:

  • In order to increase the sludge and solids-eating capacity of your septic system, Saving money by reducing the amount of septic tank pumping required
  • Getting rid of damp soil and surface puddles caused by obstruction of the drain field
  • Using a Fresh Lemon Scent to replace any unpleasant scents
  • Keeping your complete plumbing system in good working order and running freely
  • Using an all-natural procedure that will have no negative impact on the environment

Biological septic tank treatments work by utilizing bacteria and natural enzymes to assist in the elimination of waste from your septic system.

CLR® Healthy Septic System

  • The only septic system treatment to be paired with thePart of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safer Choice Program, which recognizes the product as a safer alternative to typical chemicals. It works instantaneously, can be used at any time of day, and its revolutionary stabilization method allows live, active bacteria to be put into the septic system. It is available in seven different treatments for systems up to 2000 gallons in capacity. Unlike rivals’ products, this revolutionary composition does not contain any detergents, preservatives, or inactive “carriers” that germs might adhere to while in use
  • Instead, it contains only natural ingredients. In comparison to dry septic system treatments, which can only be flushed down toilets, this product may be put down any drain and contains more environmentally friendly components. The precise stability of good bacteria required to help maintain your system working at peak efficiency is restored by this treatment. Solid organic waste such as detergents, soaps, grease, and paper may pile up in your septic tank and must be broken down before it can be securely disposed of into the earth. All of the components of the CLR Healthy Septic System are ecologically friendly. Safe for use on all types of pipes, drains, and porcelain

Look for CLR Healthy Septic System in these sizes

  • Directly into any toilet or drain pipe, pour 4 ounces of the solution. Do not combine with any other type of chemical drain cleaning solution. It is most effective when taken during periods of low water consumption.

In accordance with the California Cleaning Products Right to Know Act, it was found that this product did not need to be disclosed.

Water CAS7732-18-5 Meets EPA Safer Choice Criteria
CAS7732-18-5. Reverse Osmosis (RO) is a water treatment process that removes contaminants from water by passing the water through a membrane, (filter), where contaminants are filtered out yielding more pure quality water.
Sodium Nitrate CAS7631-99-4 Meets EPA Safer Choice Criteria
CAS7631-99-4. It can be used as an additive in industrial greases, as an aqueous solution in closed loop cooling systems, and in a molten state as a heat transfer medium. It is also a common food preservative.
Pseudomonas Putida CAS68332-91-2 Meets EPA Safer Choice Criteria
Monoammonium Phosphate CAS7722-76-1 Meets EPA Safer Choice Criteria
Sodium Thiosulfate CAS10102-17-7 Meets EPA Safer Choice Criteria

This product may include one or more of the following ingredients:

Red No. 40 CAS25956-17-6 Meets EPA Safer Choice Criteria
YellowNo. 5 CAS1934-21-0 Meets EPA Safer Choice Criteria
CAS1934-21-0. A synthetic lemon yellow dye used all over the world, primarily as food coloring.As part of theEPA Safer Choice Program, it has been evaluated and determined to be safer than traditional chemical ingredients.
Acid Blue No.1 CAS3844-45-9 Meets EPA Safer Choice Criteria
CAS3844-45-9. A blue dye used for foods and other substances.As part of theEPA Safer Choice Program, it has been evaluated and determined to be safer than traditional chemical ingredients.

How do I use CLR Healthy Septic System?

In addition to being safe on pipes and porcelain, CLR Healthy Septic System is effective on fats, oils, grease, and other difficult organic debris. A septic system is a type of subterranean wastewater treatment system that is self-contained. A septic tank and a leach/absorption area are the two main components of a septic system.

See also:  How Much Water Will A 10000 Gallons Septic Tank Hold? (Solved)

What is a septic system’s purpose in the household?

The tank’s primary function is to handle waste generated in the home. When the waste is placed in the tank, the water drains to the bottom, the lighter solids rise to the top, and the heavier waste/sludge sinks to the bottom, resulting in effective waste treatment. The sludge/solids that settle to the bottom of the tank must be treated with a septic system treatment in order to transform these materials into liquids, which will then flow to the drain field below.

Dos & Donts

DosDontsniftyadmin2022-02-01T18:18:38+00:00 Make an appointment for a free on-site quote now!

Do’sDon’ts for a Healthy Septic System

Deceased bacteria = non-operational septic system = PROBLEMS = RENOVATIONS

  1. Use your waste disposal only when absolutely necessary. Because it has not been digested by the body, ground-up food is particularly difficult on the septic system to deal with it. The usage of your garbage disposal on a regular basis puts a strain on the system’s ability to digest particles and causes your septic tank to fill with sludge. Your system will suffer as a result of this, both physiologically and chemically. Food waste should be disposed of in a rubbish can or compost pit. Roof drainage, basement drainage, footing drainage, and surface water must all be kept out of the system in order for it to function properly. Unless otherwise specified, this drainage water can be dumped directly to the ground surface without treatment
  2. However, it should be directed away from your sewage treatment system. There should be no drainage of roof downspouts into the drain field. While it is not typically required to connect your laundry wastes to a separate waste system (dry well or seepage pit), doing so will lower the strain on the regular system and allow a mediocre system to survive. Keep swimming pools (above-ground or in-ground) away from the absorption field to avoid contamination. When washing garments, make sure you use the appropriate load size. Try to avoid washing all of your laundry in one sitting. This will aid in preventing sediments from being pushed out into the drain field by flow spikes. Always avoid allowing large pieces of equipment to travel through the absorption field. Installation of a ditch or berm to capture surface water from higher terrain that is running into your absorption field is recommended. Have your septic tank pumped out every 3-5 years (depending on the number of people living in the home) to avoid sludge buildup that can lead to drain field collapse and other problems. It is recommended by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that homeowners have their septic system inspected by a qualified professional at least once every three years, and that a 1000 gallon septic tank should be pumped once every 3.7 years in a household of three people and once every 1.5 years in a household of six people
  3. To ensure that you have a valid septic permit, contact your local health district (link to district health). Locate and identify the location of your septic tank (drain field and tank). Keep a sketch of it with your maintenance records in case a service technician has to see it. Keep your replacement area to a minimum. Each drain field has a position where it may be changed if the situation calls for it. If you build on or too near to this region, it may cause problems if the original drain field needs to be rebuilt later on. Consider the fact that a properly built and maintained drain field has an average lifespan of around 20 years. Maintain your septic system on a regular basis by introducing the appropriate sort of bacteria/enzyme product to your septic system through your toilet or kitchen sink drain. Including a product such as “BioClean” in your cleaning routine helps to replenish the bacteria that has been killed by your typical household cleaning chemicals. ABC Pumping Services may be contacted at (208) 954-5339 for more information.
  1. Planting trees or bushes over or near the septic system or over the drain field is not recommended since the roots will grow into the system and interfere with the correct operation of the system. When washing dishes, do not allow food waste or organic waste to run down the drain. If you want to “feed” your septic system, don’t flush meat, buttermilk, yeast, veggies, beer, or anything else down the drain. This is incorrect information, and it will cause your septic system to overwork. Keep faucets and toilets from dripping or running. Leaving excess water running continuously might cause your drain field to become overloaded, or “waterlogged.” You should avoid flooding the drain field with extra irrigation water. Drain-O, Red Devil, and Liquid Plumber, among other caustic drain openers, should not be used to unclog a clogged drain. This will cause the healthy bacteria in your septic system to be killed out. Drain openers such as a snake or bacterial enzyme drain openers should be used instead of items that claim to sanitize, sterilize, disinfect, destroy germs, or be antibacterial. Antibiotics, sanitizing soaps, disinfection and antimicrobial cleaning solutions such as Lysol and Clorox, to mention a few examples, are included in this category. Antimicrobial compounds are now found in many body and hand soaps
  2. Do not flush harmful chemicals down the toilet, such as home chemicals, paints, gasoline, acids, or pesticides
  3. And do not flush down the toilet antimicrobial chemicals. When treated on a regular basis with an enzyme/bacterial stimulant product such as BioClean, detergents, kitchen wastes, laundry wastes, and home chemicals in modest amounts have no effect on the correct operation of domestic sewage treatment systems. Excessive doses of any of these, on the other hand, can be dangerous
  4. Please do not flush fats, oils, or grease down the toilet. Toilet tank pills or liquids should not be used to clean your toilet since they can harden and cause clogging over time
  5. Instead, use a toilet plunger to clean your toilet. Diapers, kitty litter, cigarettes, plastic-rubber items, dental floss, baby/hand wipes, cotton products, paper towels, or feminine hygiene products should not be flushed down the toilet since these harsh chemicals destroy beneficial bacteria in your septic system
  6. Instead, use a garbage disposal. These items are indestructible
  7. They never need to be replaced.

We feel it is critical to support organizations and businesses who are striving to make a good difference in our industry and community at large. We take great satisfaction in growing as a company by utilizing the greatest products, from reliable vendors, and ethical business procedures in order to provide superior service to our customers. It would not be feasible to deliver the Honest and Ethical Service that we do without the support of our industry partners and the client relationships that we have built across Southern Idaho since 1948.

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DIY Septic Tank Treatment

Septic tank systems are notoriously difficult to maintain and may be quite expensive when they fail. Over the course of almost two decades, we’ve only had to pump our septic tank once. Here’s how we maintain our system running smoothly: DIY Septic Tank Treatment

Natural Enzyme Action

Septic tanks, like your stomach, require the presence of beneficial bacteria and enzymes in order to break down the particles that travel through them. It is possible to obtain these helpful bacteria and enzymes from a variety of sources, but one of our favorites is rotting tomatoes. These naturally occurring enzymes are proteins known as Pectinase or Pectinolytic enzymes, and they break down pectin. Lipase, hydrolyzes, and lyase are all members of the pectinase family of enzymes that are capable of breaking down pectin and plant cell walls in the natural environment, therefore aiding in the decomposition and recycling of waste plant materials.

DIY Septic Tank Treatment

It is simple and inexpensive to treat a septic tank with DIY solutions. We “feed” our septic tank 3-4 rotting tomatoes every 3 months or so, which we do through our garbage disposal. The idea is to make sure that you split up the tomato and pass only half a tomato or so at a time through the water while it is running to ensure that it is properly flushed out. As an alternative, if you don’t have access to a garbage disposal, you may throw two or three large rotting tomatoes in a bag (chances are they’re already packed away in a bag in your refrigerator and starting to liquefy anyway!).

Dump them into a toilet (but don’t use bleach!) and flush them away.

Normally, having rotten tomatoes every few months isn’t a big deal because the garden overproduces in the spring, summer, and fall, and there are always a few extras available.

However, during the winter months, tomatoes have gotten pushed to the back of the fridge and started to liquefy before I realized what was happening. At the very least, they aren’t going to waste completely.

Toilet Paper No-No’s

When we had our septic system pumped for the first time in more than two decades, we were assured that it was totally unnecessary because the system was operating well and looked fantastic. During our conversation, the gentleman shared numerous true horror stories of systems he’d witnessed at his place of employment where the families utilized “fluffy” toilet paper. That one where the cute little bears in the advertisements are pleased of themselves for not having any lint left behind? You know the one I’m talking about.

Image courtesy of Ian Haycoxis (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0).

He especially inquired about the brand of tissue we use, which is Scott Tissue.

Alternatively, if you don’t happen to have any rotting tomatoes on hand, you may use baking or brewing yeast to bring healthy bacteria to your tank as an alternative.

How to Clean Septic Tank Naturally

Yeast and sugar are excellent natural septic tank cleaners, and here’s an easy method for using them.

Septic Tank Cleaner

2 cups granulated sugar 5 cups of hot water (optional) 3 tbsp. active dry yeast Sugar and yeast should be dissolved in water. Pour the mixture into a toilet (that does not contain bleach!) and flush it. This is best done at night so that the yeast may continue to work throughout the night; do not flush for at least 3 hours after completion.

Additional Tips:

1Avoid flushing raw or cooked meat down the toilet, down the garbage disposal, or any other form of introducing meat into your septic system; meat is NEVER a helpful bacterium. 2. Never add oils, grease, or fat in any form (solid or liquid) to your tank. This includes, but is not limited to, cooking oils, bacon grease, meat grease from draining ground beef/turkey, and other fat-containing foods. 3Avoid flushing anything other than garbage and toilet paper down the toilet; this means that feminine products should be disposed of in the trash, baby diapers and wipes should be disposed of in the trashcan, and so on.

Have you tried the rotten tomato technique yet?

Love this DIY Septic Tank Treatment Idea? Pin it!

When municipal sewer service is not available, a septic system that has been properly constructed and maintained is an excellent option for treating wastewater and protecting groundwater quality. A typical septic system is comprised of two key components: the septic tank and the drainfield (or leach field). Waste from toilets, sinks, washing machines, and showers is channeled into a septic tank, which is a holding tank that is typically constructed of pre-cast concrete or fiberglass and is proportioned according to the projected wastewater flow from a given-sized house or commercial establishment.

  1. In the first stage of wastewater treatment, anaerobic bacteria (bacteria that can survive in an oxygen-free environment) break down solids into liquids and generate gas that is vented through the building’s plumbing vent stack.
  2. The lack of oxygen inside the septic tank also has the added benefit of deactivating some of the disease bacteria that are prevalent in sewage.
  3. Because it allows aerobic (oxygen-using) bacteria to continue deactivating the disease germs that remain in the wastewater, the drainfield serves as a secondary treatment facility for sewage.
  4. Evaporation of water also occurs through the layer of soil that surrounds the drainfield.
  5. That way, enough permeable or unsaturated soil is available to filter the wastewater before the remainder of it gets into the groundwater table and underlying aquifer.
  6. In certain instances, modern wastewater treatment systems that “aerate,” or add oxygen to the wastewater, may be necessary to treat the effluent.

Others are equipped with chlorinating chambers or peat moss-based filtering chambers, which kill disease germs before they may infiltrate into groundwater supplies.

Septic System Care

Don’t flush cigarette butts, tampons, condoms, or any other indigestible things down the toilet or down the sink drain. Consequently, the exit filter or drainfield will become clogged. Never throw grease down the drain since grease cannot be digested by the septic system and will cause it to become clogged! rather than dumping it in the garbage, pour it into an empty container or bottle and throw it away. Make sure you don’t use excessive amounts of bleach or other cleaning agents in your septic tank since doing so will interfere with the bacterial operation inside the tank.

Instead of doing numerous loads of laundry back-to-back, stretch your wash loads out over the course of the week to reduce the amount of water that the septic system has to treat (a normal wash load consumes between 60 and 90 gallons each load!).

Roots from trees and plants will grow into the drainlines and cause them to get obstructed.

Driving over your drainfield can cause the pipes to become crushed or the dirt surrounding them to become compacted, and driving over your septic tank can cause the lid to fracture or even fall apart!

Consider the installation of water-saving showerheads, toilets, and other water-saving appliances in your home.

Septic tanks should be pumped out every four to five years, according to the Florida Department of Health, in order to prevent the buildup of sludge in the tank over time.

Stoppages and overcrowded drainfields are caused by leaking toilet flapper valves, which can allow hundreds of thousands of gallons of waste water to enter your septic system each day.

In addition to providing you with many useful suggestions and information, our Environmental Health Professionals can also assist you extend the life of your existing septic system.

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