How Can I Locate Where My Concrete Septic Tank Is? (Solution)

Your septic tank will most certainly be installed along the main sewer line that runs out of your home. Look for the 4-inch sewer that exits the crawl space or basement, and locate the same spot outside the home. Septic tanks are usually located between ten to 25 feet away from the home.

How do I find the septic tank in my yard?

  • Follow the pipe by sticking a thin metal probe into the ground near the sewer line. Probe about every two feet. Most septic tanks are around 10-25 feet away from your home, and cannot be closer than 5ft. Once you feel the probe striking flat concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene you will have located your tank.

How do I find out where my septic tank is located?

Follow the Main Sewer Line Look for a pipe that’s roughly four inches in diameter that leads away from your house. Remember the location of the sewer pipe and where the pipe leaves your home so you can find it outside. The sewer pipes will lead to where your septic tank is located.

Are septic tank locations public record?

Contact your local health department for public records. These permits should come with a diagram of the location where the septic system is buried. Depending on the age of your septic system, you may be able to find information regarding the location of your septic system by making a public records request.

How do I find a concrete septic tank lid?

You can locate the lid of your septic tank by poking the ground every few feet with a metal probe. Lids can be buried up to a foot deep on average, so be sure to investigate any bumps that may indicate something is buried underneath.

Can a metal detector find a septic tank?

If it’s Concrete or Steel, Use a Metal Detector. Based on your conclusions in Step 3, if your septic tank is likely made from concrete or steel, a metal detector can make the task of locating it much easier. But not just any metal detector will do.

Where are most septic tanks located?

Toe the Line. Your septic tank will most certainly be installed along the main sewer line that runs out of your home. Look for the 4-inch sewer that exits the crawl space or basement, and locate the same spot outside the home. Septic tanks are usually located between ten to 25 feet away from the home.

What are the signs that your septic tank is full?

Here are some of the most common warning signs that you have a full septic tank:

  • Your Drains Are Taking Forever.
  • Standing Water Over Your Septic Tank.
  • Bad Smells Coming From Your Yard.
  • You Hear Gurgling Water.
  • You Have A Sewage Backup.
  • How often should you empty your septic tank?

How do I find my septic lateral lines?

Call your local electric utility provider or gas company to locate buried gas or utility lines before digging. A septic tank probe can also help you find the location. Stick the long, thin metal probe into the ground until you feel it hit the tank and feel the edges of the tank.

Do I have to change my septic tank?

Under the new rules, if you have a specific septic tank that discharges to surface water (river, stream, ditch, etc.) you are required to upgrade or replace your septic tank treatment system to a full sewage treatment plant by 2020, or when you sell a property, if it’s prior to this date.

How big is a concrete septic tank lid?

Locate The Lid Most septic tanks are rectangular and measure about 5 feet by 8 feet. Probe around the tank to locate its edges and mark the perimeter of the rectangle. A septic tank installed before 1975 will have a single 24-inch concrete lid in the center of the rectangle.

Can I drive over my leach field?

Can You Drive on a Septic Drain Field? No, driving over your septic drain field is similarly never ever recommended. As much as you are able to help it, prevent cars or heavy equipment (such as oil delivery trucks, swimming pool water trucks, cement mixers, and also the like) to drive straight over the field.

How much does a pump for a septic tank cost?

Average Cost To Pump A Septic Tank The national average cost to clean and pump a septic tank is between $295 and $610 with most people spending around $375. Depending on the size of your septic tank, pumping could cost as low as $250 for a 750-gallon tank, or as high as $895 for a 1,250-gallon tank.

Can you use a metal detector to find sewer lines?

Using a Plumbing Pipe Detector to Locate Underground Pipes. As a property owner there will be times when, for a variety of reasons, you will need to locate underground metal objects. For example, using a pipe locator metal detector you can easily pinpoint leaking underground pipes quickly.

How to Find the Lid on a Septic System

All septic tanks eventually fill with sediments and must be pumped out on a regular basis in order to remain in excellent functioning order. If the tank’s lid is not on a riser at ground level and you are not the home’s original owner, you may be unable to determine where the lid is located. A typical septic tank is 4 inches to 4 feet underground, with all of its components, including the cover, buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underneath. This is true regardless of whether the septic tank is equipped with special risers that keep the lid flush with the surface of the ground.

Consult A Map

First, choose with the most straightforward choice. The installation of septic tanks at all locations is recorded in most counties’ permission records, which are kept on file for future reference. Typically, this will include a schematic indicating the placement of the tank on the land, as well as certain dimensions that will allow you to measure to the precise site of the tank. If your tank was placed before your county made it a requirement to record the location of such tanks, you may find yourself with nothing to show for your efforts.

Search For A Sign

Septic tanks are placed in such a way that they are as unnoticeable as possible on the land. After the grass has grown back after installation and some time has passed, it is possible that just a few visual indications will remain. Pay particular attention to the contours of your yard for any inexplicable high or low points that might suggest the presence of an underground storage tank.

Follow The Pipe

Installation of the septic tank takes place along the sewage line that runs from the house into the front yard. Locate the 4-inch sewage pipe at the point where it exits the home in the basement or crawl space, if it is there. Locate the same spot outside and make a note of it. Insert a thin metal probe into the earth, identify the 4-inch sewage line, and follow it across the yard, probing every 2 feet, until you reach the end of the property. Septic tanks are required to be at least 5 feet apart from the home in all states except Alaska.

Whenever the probe makes contact with flat concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene it indicates that the tank has been located.

Locate The Lid

The majority of septic tanks are rectangular in shape and measure around 5 feet by 8 feet. Investigate the tank’s circumference to determine its boundaries and outline the rectangle’s boundary using a pencil. A septic tank that was built before 1975 will have a single concrete lid that is 24 inches in diameter in the center of the rectangle. If the tank was built after 1975, it will have two covers made of fiberglass or polyethylene, centered at the ends of the rectangle and centered at the ends of the rectangle.

It should be possible to uncover the lid or lids by digging with a spade in specific spots, depending on when year the tank was constructed.

Call A Professional

Opening a septic tank is a job best left to the pros once the lid has been discovered. Concrete septic tank lids are extremely heavy, and many require the use of lifting tools to remove them completely. An open tank has the potential to release toxic gases. Anyone going around on the property who comes into contact with an exposed septic tank might be in risk. Because of the noxious vapors present in an open tank, falling into one can be lethal.

Mark The Spot

Make a note on the ground near where the tank was pumped by a professional and the lid was buried to serve as a reference in the future. In order to keep track of where you are, you should choose a hefty circular patio tile that is embedded in the ground. Additionally, draw your own map of the area and store it with your other important papers.

How to Find Your Septic Tank Lid

Previous PostNext PostWhether you realize it or not, it is critical that you be aware of the position of your septic tank lid and the septic tank itself. Despite the fact that septic tanks are fairly huge, they can be difficult to identify, particularly if they have not been properly maintained over time. Continue reading to find out how to locate your septic tank lid.

Why It’s Good to Know Where to Find Your Septic Tank Lid

Knowing the location of your septic tank is a fantastic approach to spot septic tank problems as soon as they occur. Consider the following scenario: If you saw water near your septic tank lid, you would know right away that you could have a problem with your system being overloaded with waste. Furthermore, by understanding where your septic tank is located, you may avoid parking cars on top of it, which might cause the tank to collapse and create flooding. You’ll also be able to point service personnel in the right direction for septic tank services, which will eventually save them time and money while also saving you money.

How to Find Your Septic Tank Opening

Knowing how critical it is to know where your septic tank lid is located, it’s time to go out and find one for yourself. Keep an eye out for a circular lid that is roughly two feet in diameter during your quest. Septic tank lids are normally constructed of green or black plastic, however they can occasionally be made of concrete. It is not always simple to locate the septic tank lid, however, because untidy vegetation, mud, or debris might obscure the lid’s location. If you live in a snowy climate, seek for a spot of lawn where the snow melts more quickly than it does anywhere else on the property.

How to Find Your Septic Tank Lid as a New Homeowner

During the process of purchasing your house, you should have been provided with a map of your property that showed the location of your septic tank. This is normally included as a part of your home inspection service package. All you have to do from there is compare the diagram to your land, find the septic tank location, and potentially dig around it to check whether the lid has been hidden by vegetation or other obstructions.

People have been known to place an object such as a huge rock on top of the septic lid, so be sure to look beneath landscaping stones as well.

How to Find Your Septic Tank Lid as an Existing Homeowner

Still having trouble locating your septic tank lid? There’s a significant probability it’ll end up in the ground. The pipes coming from your basement should be followed, as they will take you in the direction of your septic system, which is what we propose. Then, once you’ve determined the correct direction, check for any high or low points in the yard that might reveal the location of your septic tank. You can find the lid of your septic tank by probing the ground with a metal probe every few feet with the probe.

Because most lids have a metal handle or fastener on them to hold the lid closed, you may also use a metal detector to find them.

The majority of lids are buried up to a foot deep, but some lids might be buried as deep as four feet in extreme cases!

How to Maintain Your Septic Tank Lid

Following the discovery of your septic tank lid, keep it in good condition to avoid damage and ensure simple access for future septic tank maintenance, such as pumping your septic tank every three- to five-year period. Here are some pointers for keeping your septic tank lid in good working order:

  • Keeping the grass around the septic tank lid regularly mowed is important. Remove any dirt or debris that may have accumulated on your septic tank lid
  • Mark the area to ensure that no one parks or constructs structures there. It is possible to do this using a flag, garden décor, or ornamental pebbles.

Professional Septic Tank Services

Is it difficult to find trustworthy septic tank services or septic tank installation? If you are looking for septic tank installation, inspection, and cleaning services, check with your local Mr. Rooter ® Plumbing franchise. Mr. Rooter charges a set amount up front, with no overtime fees or additional expenses. To get started, call us at (855) 982-2028 or fill out our online estimate request form. Is the lid of your septic tank obscured by grass? Inquire with The Grounds Guys about routine lawn care and upkeep.

Rooter, is a member of Neighborly’s network of dependable home service experts, which includes Mr.

By hiring The Grounds Guys to provide trustworthy grass mowing and landscape care services, you can be assured that your septic tank lid will always be simple to locate.

How To Find My Septic Tank

  1. What is a septic tank
  2. How do I know if I have a septic tank
  3. And how do I know if I have a septic tank Identifying the location of your septic tank is critical for several reasons. The Best Way to Find a Septic Tank
  4. What to Do Once You’ve Discovered Your Septic Tank

You may have fallen in love with your new house because of its appealing good looks and characteristics, but there is almost certainly more to your new home than meets the eye. In many cases, the characteristics that make your house run more effectively and allow you to live a pleasant, contemporary life are not readily apparent. Septic tanks, for example, are an important part of your home’s infrastructure. A septic system is responsible for regulating and managing the wastewater generated by your home.

“How can I locate my septic tank?” is one of the most often requested inquiries we receive.

When your tank’s lid is difficult to locate – especially if you are not the original homeowner – you may be at a loss for what to do or where to look for the lid when you need it.

The majority of the time, all of the components of the septic tank are buried between four inches and four feet below ground level.

In order to do so, it is necessary to first comprehend the functions of septic tanks and septic systems and why it is important to know where yours is located.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank

Your septic tank’s location is not a closely guarded secret. There will be a method for you to locate it and make a note of its position for future reference, and below are a few examples of such methods.

See also:  How To Cover Up An Old Septic Tank? (Perfect answer)

What Is a Septic Tank?

Having a functioning septic tank is an important aspect of having an effective septic system. In the United States, around 20% of households utilize a septic system to handle their wastewater. Houses in rural parts of New England are the most likely to have a septic system, with residences in the Eastern United States being the most prevalent location for septic systems. When there are few and far between residences, it is typically more efficient and cost-effective to employ a septic system to manage wastewater rather than relying on a public sewage system to handle waste water.

  1. Typically, a septic tank is a container that is waterproof and composed of a material such as concrete, polyethylene, fiberglass, or a combination of these.
  2. An important function of a septic tank is to hold on to wastewater until any particulates in the water separate themselves from the water.
  3. Any liquid that remains in the tank eventually drains into a leach field or a drainfield, where it is known as “effluent.” The dirt in the leach field aids in the filtering of the water and the removal of bacteria, viruses, and other pollutants that may be present in it.
  4. Septic tanks erected in Onondaga County must contain input and outlet baffles, as well as an effluent filter or sanitary tees, in order to effectively separate particles from liquids during the treatment process.

How Do I Know If I Have a Septic Tank?

What is the best way to tell if your home has a septic tank? There are generally a few of different methods to tell. Examining your water bill might help you identify whether or not your house is served by a septic system or is part of the public sewage system in your neighborhood. If you have a septic system for wastewater management, you are likely to receive a charge from the utility provider for wastewater or sewer services of zero dollars. In the case of those who are fortunate enough to have a septic system, it is likely that they may not receive any water bills at all.

  1. A lack of a meter on the water line that enters your property is typically indicative of the fact that you are utilizing well water rather than public utility water, according to the National Association of Realtors.
  2. A septic system is likely to be installed in your home if you reside in a rather rural location.
  3. Septic systems are likely to be installed in all of these buildings, which means your home is likely to be as well.
  4. When a septic tank is present, it is common to find a mound or tiny hill on the property that is not a natural structure.

Checking your property records is a foolproof method of determining whether or not your home is equipped with a septic system. Your home’s building permit and drawings will almost certainly include details concerning the existence (or absence) of a septic tank on your site.

Why It’s Important to Know the Location of Your Septic Tank

You might wonder why you should bother trying to discover out where your septic tank is. There are several important reasons for this:

1. To Be Able to Care for It Properly

The first reason you should try to locate your septic tank is that knowing where it is will help you to properly repair and care for it in the future. The standard guideline is to avoid erecting structures or placing heavy objects on top of the septic tank. It’s possible that you don’t want to park your car or truck on top of it, and you don’t want visitors to your house to park their cars on top of it, either. Due to the weight of the automobiles, there is a possibility that the tank would collapse due to excessive pressure.

2. If You Want to Landscape or Remodel Your Property

If you want to build an addition to your home or perform some landscaping around your property, you will need to know where your septic tank is located. Nothing with deep or lengthy roots should be planted on top of or in the area of your tank, since this can cause problems. If roots are allowed to grow into the pipes of your septic system, it is conceivable that your system will get clogged. When you know where the tank is going to be, you may arrange your landscaping such that only shallow-rooted plants, such as grass, are in close proximity to the tank.

For starters, the tank’s weight might lead it to collapse due to the weight of the construction.

3. If a Problem With Your Tank Occurs

Knowing where your tank is buried might also assist you in identifying problems as soon as they arise. Consider the following scenario: you wake up one morning and see that there is flooding or ponding water in the region surrounding your septic tank – a sign that your system is overwhelmed and that an excessive amount of water is being utilized all at once.

4. Ease of Getting It Fixed

Once you have determined the location of your sewer system, you can quickly send a plumber to it in the event that something goes wrong with the system, saving everyone both time and money. Get in Touch With A Plumber Right Away

1. Use a Septic Tank Map

First and foremost, make use of a road map. Using a map is frequently the quickest and most convenient alternative. Most counties keep records of the installation of septic tanks at all of their residents’ residences. These maps should include schematics that illustrate the specific placement of the tank on the land, as well as measurements that allow you to measure and locate the tank’s exact location on the property. Never mind that landmarks may shift over time depending on when the tank was built, so if there are a few more shrubs or a tree nearby, don’t rule out that location as a possibility.

  1. If you are unable to locate a map or other paperwork that identifies the location of your septic tank, there are a few locations to try to see if you can obtain a map of the area.
  2. The county health department is responsible for keeping track of septic systems.
  3. A septic tank’s position could be depicted on a survey map, for example.
  4. The creation of your own map and documentation may be worthwhile if you cannot locate a map or blueprint of your property and nothing appears to be on file regarding it at the county health department or another municipal agency.

In this way, if you ever decide to sell your property, you will be able to supply the new owner with everything they will need to locate the tank and properly manage their septic system.

2. Follow the Pipes to Find Your Septic Tank

Whether or not there is an existing map of your septic tank on file, or whether or not you choose to develop one for future reference or for future homeowners, you will still need to track down and find the tank. One method of accomplishing this is to follow the sewer lines that lead away from your residence. The septic tank is situated along the sewage line that goes from your home and into the yard, as we’re sure you’re aware. Find a four-inch sewer pipe in your basement or crawl space. This is the line that will lead to your septic system and should be accessible from the ground level.

  1. In general, though, you’re searching for a pipe with a diameter of four inches or more that leaves your home via a basement wall or ceiling.
  2. By inserting a thin metal probe (also known as a soil probe) into the earth near the sewage line, you can track the pipe’s location.
  3. The majority of septic tanks are located between 10 and 25 feet away from your home, and they cannot be any closer than five feet.
  4. Going via the sewage line itself is another method of locating the septic tank utilizing it.
  5. Drain snakes are typically used to unclog clogs in toilets and drains, and they may be used to do the same thing.
  6. When the snake comes to a complete halt, it has almost certainly reached the tank.
  7. While drawing the snake back, make a note of how far it has been extended and whether it has made any bends or turns.
  8. When looking for your septic tank, you may use a transmitter that you flush down the toilet and it will direct you straight to the tank.

3. Inspect Your Yard

Septic tanks are designed to be as unobtrusive as possible when they are erected. With the passage of time, and the growth of the grass, it might be difficult to discern the visual indications that indicated the exact location of your septic tank’s installation.

However, this does not rule out the possibility of finding evidence that will take you to the location of your septic tank in the future. First and foremost, you want to rule out any potential locations for your septic tank, such as:

  • Under a road or similar paved surface, for example. Right up against the house (the tank must be at least five feet away)
  • Directly in front of the home Immediately adjacent to your well (if you have one)
  • In close proximity to trees or densely planted regions
  • In the shadow of a patio, deck, or other building

Once you’ve ruled out any potential locations for your tank, it’s time to start hunting for indications as to where it may be hiding in plain sight. Keep your eyes peeled as you go about your property, looking for any inexplicable high or low points that might suggest the presence of an underground tank. When looking at your property, you could see a hill or mound on the ground, which is frequently an indication that there is a septic tank nearby. One further item to consider while searching for the right septic tank for your home is the amount of grass or other foliage in your yard.

Alternatively, if the tank was not adequately buried, you may observe a “bald patch,” which is an area where the grass is struggling to grow in the vicinity.

4. Talk to Your Neighbors

If your neighbors have septic systems as well, they may be able to assist you in locating your tank. Inquire of your neighbors about the location of their septic tanks in relation to their residences. Having a polite conversation with your neighbors regarding septic systems not only provides you with a means to figure out where yours is, but it may also serve as a friendly introduction to the other residents of your community.

5. Look for Your Septic Tank Lid

It is only the first step in the process to discover where your septic tank is located. After you’ve located your tank, the following step is to locate the lid. You can locate it with the help of your soil probe. The majority of septic tanks are rectangular in shape and measure around five feet by eight feet. The perimeter of the tank should be marked with a probe once it has been probed around. A shallow excavation with a shovel within the tank’s perimeter and near the center (or broken into halves for a two compartment tank) should show the position of the lid or lids if you are unable to feel them by probing.

The tank itself is likely to be filled with foul-smelling vapors, if not potentially hazardous ones.

What to Do After You Find Your Septic Tank

Once you’ve determined where your tank is, it’s time to bring in the specialists. Trust us when we say that opening a septic tank is not something that just anybody wants to undertake. Concrete septic tank lids are extremely heavy and must be lifted using special lifting gear in order to be removed. Since the vapors are potentially dangerous due to the contents of the tank, please respect our advice and refrain from attempting to open the tank yourself. An exposed septic tank can be hazardous to anybody wandering around your property’s perimeter, and if someone were to fall into it, it might be lethal owing to the toxicity of the sewage in the tank.

However, before you send in a team of experienced plumbers, there are a few things you can do to ensure that others do not experience the same difficulty locating the tank and to make locating the tank in the future easier.

1. Mark Its Location

The likelihood is that you will not want to post a large sign in your yard that reads “Septic Tank Here!” but you will want to leave some sort of marking so that you can quickly locate the tank and lid when you need them. In an ideal situation, the marker will be substantial enough that it will not blow away in the wind and will not be readily moved by children who are playing in the yard. A patio paver, a potted plant, or a decorative gnome or rock are just a few of the possibilities. In addition to putting a physical sign beside the septic tank, you may draw a map or layout of the area around it to illustrate its position.

2. Take Care of Your Septic Tank

Taking proper care of your tank may save you hundreds of dollars over the course of its lifetime. The expense of maintaining your system could be a few hundred dollars every few years, but that’s a lot less than the thousands of dollars it might cost to repair or replace a damaged tank or a malfunctioning septic system. Two strategies to take better care of your septic tank and system are to avoid utilizing your drain pipes or toilets as garbage cans and to use less water overall. Things like paper towels, face wipes, and cat litter should not be flushed down the toilet since they are not designed to be flushed.

In addition, installing low-flow faucets and high-efficiency toilets can help you reduce the amount of water used in your home.

For example, you don’t want to be washing load after load of laundry or running your clothes washer at the same time as your dishwasher all at the same time.

Call a Professional Plumber

Maintenance of a septic system is not normally considered a do-it-yourself activity. In the Greater Syracuse region, whether your septic tank requires pumping out or cleaning, or if you want to replace your tank, you should use the services of a reputable plumbing firm to do the job right. If you’ve attempted to locate your septic tank on your own and are still unsure of its position, it may be necessary to enlist the assistance of a professional local plumber. Our team at Mr. Rooter Plumbing of Greater Syracuse can assist you with locating, maintaining, or replacing your home’s sewage tank.

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How to Find Your Septic Tank

Over time, all septic tanks become clogged with sediments and must be pumped out in order to continue functioning properly. Septic tank lids are frequently located at ground level. The majority of the time, they have been buried anywhere between four inches and four feet underground. In the event that you have recently purchased a property and are unsure as to where your septic tank is located, this article will give instructions on how to identify your septic tank.

Noteworthy: While every property is unique, septic tanks are usually typically huge and difficult to build. As a result, and due to the fact that it requires constant pumping, you’re very certain to discover it in a location that can be reached by a huge truck while looking for it.

5 Ways to Find Your Septic Tank

1. Check with the municipal records. The most straightforward method of locating your septic tank is to review the building plans for your home that were approved by the local government. You should have received an application from the business that installed the septic tank, which should contain schematics and specifications that will help you to locate the precise location where the septic tank was installed. 2. Look for highs and lows in your data. The majority of septic tanks are constructed in such a way that they are barely noticeable.

  1. 3.
  2. Almost certainly, your septic tank will be installed near where the main sewer line exits your home.
  3. Septic tanks are typically positioned between ten and twenty-five feet away from a home’s foundation.
  4. When you do, that’s when your septic tank comes into play!
  5. Look for the Lid.
  6. You will most likely find two polyethylene or fiberglass covers positioned on opposing sides of the perimeter of your septic tank if it was built after 1975 and installed after 1975.
  7. Those areas should be excavated in order to disclose the lids.

Get in touch with the pros.

Lifting concrete lids will necessitate the use of specialized equipment.

A fall into an unprotected septic tank has the potential to be lethal.

Produce your own diagram of your yard, which you may file away with your other important house paperwork.

That’s all there is to it!

To schedule a plumbing service in Bastrop County, please contact us today!

How to Find a Septic Tank With a Metal Detector

For sewage treatment in the United States, around 48% of households in rural and outlying regions depend on septic tanks or septic systems. Many of these systems have been operating without regular maintenance for many years.

It is necessary to locate your septic tank in the event that sewage is backing up into your home or if your main drain line has become obstructed. Throughout this post, we’ll go over the basics of how septic systems function before showing you how to identify your septic tank in six simple stages.

How do septic systems work?

A septic system is made up of two parts: the septic tank and the drain field (or leach field).

Septic Tank

Waste from toilets, sinks, and showers is sent down a main sewage line and into a holding tank known as the septic tank. A septic tank is a large, subterranean container that acts as the initial stage of a home’s sewage treatment system by collecting and treating sewage. Watertight containers such as concrete, steel, plastic, and fiberglass are used to construct the tank. Until the particles and liquids separate into three different layers, sewage is allowed to remain in the septic tank. This picture shows how sewage from the home drains into a two-compartment underground septic tank.

The liquid wastes are subsequently discharged into the drain field.

The bacteria produce a sludge that is “digested” and stays in the tank until it is drained.

This stratum is referred to as effluent in most circles.

Drain Field

Drain fields are composed of layers of gravel and dirt that allow liquid sewage to flow down. It eventually becomes part of the groundwater supply. Aerobic bacteria (bacteria that require oxygen to survive) and other microbes decompose the organic debris that remains.

What happens if a septic tank gets too full?

In the event that your septic tank becomes overflowing, sewage may back up into your home. It is more difficult to breakdown sludge than it is to collect it. If the sludge isn’t cleaned, the solids will build up until they overflow into the drain field, causing the drain to back up. This has the potential to clog pipes and produce a backup. The sludge must be cleared on a regular basis in order to avoid this. Many households only get their tanks emptied after the system malfunctions. Waiting until that stage can result in repair expenses in the tens of thousands of dollars.

6 Steps to Locate a Septic Tank

Water from your toilets, sinks, and showers is collected in a main drain pipe and disposed of properly. This line departs your home and enters your septic tank through the basement or crawl area where it was installed. Find the line in question. Afterwards, walk outside and look for the identical location on the opposite side of the wall. Make a note of this spot since you’ll need it in a moment.

2. Check Permits and Public Records

The majority of county health agencies keep public records of septic system installation permits on their websites. These permits must be accompanied by a schematic or design depicting the proposed location of the septic tank and drainage field systems. They also give a description of the tank’s dimensions and construction material. Having this information can be quite beneficial when trying to locate a submerged tank lid. In some cases, depending on the age of your septic system and the digitization efforts of your county’s health department, you may be able to do a public records search online.

Alternatively, you can make a public records request for a modest charge with the appropriate authorities. If you live in Colorado, we’ve provided links below that will allow you to check septic records in a few different areas.

  • Colorado’s counties of Adams, Arapahoe, and Douglas Colorado Septic Records Search
  • Colorado Permits Search
  • El Paso County Records Search
  • Jefferson County Septic Records Search
  • Jefferson County Records Search
  • Mesa County Septic Systems Search
  • Pueblo County Records Search. Colorado Septic Records Search
  • Pueblo County Records Search

3. Determine Septic Tank Material

If you’ve located your septic permit, you’ll find information about the size, shape, and material of your septic tank there as well. But don’t be concerned if your septic data aren’t readily available. We can perform some basic detective work to determine what material your septic system is built of. Let’s start with a look at the materials.

Types of Septic Tank Materials

Construction of septic tanks is mostly done using four types of materials: concrete, steel, fiberglass, and polyethylene plastic. Until the 1880s, the most extensively used septic tank material was concrete, which was then replaced by steel. These tanks have a lifespan of around 40 years and are built to last. They are susceptible to cracking, however, in locations where temperature variations are strong and frequent. Concrete tanks are frequently required by municipalities that have strict requirements on septic system construction.

  1. Steel septic tanks begin to corrode within 20 to 25 years of installation in most regions.
  2. If a human or animal walks across the weakened tank, it may collapse under the weight of the person or animal.
  3. They will not break or corrode, however, in contrast to concrete or steel tanks.
  4. PlasticSeptic tanks made of polyethylene have been in use since the 1980s.
  5. They are not susceptible to rusting and are less prone to break when compared to concrete.
  6. Because of the weight of the earth above them, or because a vehicle passes over the area where they are buried, plastic tanks are susceptible to collapse.

How Old is Your House?

Next, let’s determine the approximate age of your home. In some cases, all you need to do is take a glance at the house’s façade to get an idea of how old it really is. However, you may examine the tax assessor’s records in your county to get a more precise assessment. Similarly to searching for septic records, your mileage may vary depending on which county’s digitized records you are searching for. Let’s go over an example search utilizing Boulder County’s Property Search tool so that you can have a better sense of what you should be looking for.

  1. Look up your home address on the internet. When searching for a home, some programs provide separate areas for your address and street name, while others (such as Boulder County) merge the two into a single search box. Look for information on Deeds and/or Sales Records in the public domain. You’ll find a list of transactions here, with dates showing when the property was purchased and sold. Find the transaction that occurred on the earliest possible date. This is most likely the year in which your home was constructed.

This information allows you to make an informed guess regarding the sort of material that your septic tank is built of.

4A. If it’s Concrete or Steel, Use a Metal Detector

After coming to the conclusion that the tank is most likely built of concrete or steel in Step 3, a metal detector may be used to make the work of locating it much simpler. But not just any metal detector will do. It must be the right one. Standard metal detectors have a depth range of 6 – 8″ (15 – 20 cm) below the surface of the ground. As previously stated, the majority of septic tanks are placed 1′ to 3′ (0.3 m to 1 m) underground, putting them outside of the acceptable range. An advanced sort of metal detector known as a Magnetic Locator, which can detect objects as deep as 16′ (4.8 m), is available for purchase.

Due to the fact that it exclusively detects iron and steel, it is perfect for finding the iron handles and reinforcing bars in concrete septic tanks, as well as the walls of steel tanks.

How to Use a Metal Detector to Search for a Septic Tank

If you have a septic permit record, you may refer to it to figure out how far you need to go to install a septic tank. Start at the point where the drain line meets the home and work your way out to where the septic tank is shown on the diagram. Keep in mind that this graphic depicts the proposed installation area and may not accurately depict the actual ground conditions on the site. We’ll take a look at the illustration below. One inch (2.5 centimeters) is equivalent to fifty feet (50 meters).

By using a ruler to measure the design, we’ve determined that the septic tank should be roughly 13′ (3.96 m) away from the home.

  1. To begin, start at the location you highlighted in Step 1 where the sewage drain line leaves the home. From here, you may switch on the locator and adjust the gain to a high setting. Walking over the search area, sweep the locator from left to right, as if looking for anything. As you go, make a note of the regions with the strongest signal strength. It is most likely that the tank-iron lid’s handles will be located in one of these positions
  2. As soon as you’ve exhausted the search region in one direction, sweep over it perpendicularly and make note of the spots with the strongest signal strength. Continue on to Step 5

4B. If it’s Plastic or Fiberglass, Probe Gently

Septic tanks made of plastic or fiberglass are typically buried one to two feet (0.3 to 0.91 m) below ground level. They feature circular covers made of green or black plastic that are roughly two feet (0.91 m) wide and have a diameter of around two feet (0.91 m). Due to the fact that these tanks are totally made of plastic, a metal detector will not be of use in locating them. In this situation, a soil probe is really useful. An inexpensive soil sampling instrument, soil probes are comprised of a 4′ (1.2 m) metal rod with a pointed tip on one end and are used for soil sample.

Gently poke the earth with a soil probe every 2 to 3 feet, using a light touch (0.61 to 0.91 m).

The use of a soft touch is essential here, since the metal tip of the probe can cause damage to plastic septic tanks (and sewage lines) if too much force is used.

5. Time to Dig

Following the placement of an amagnetic locator (or the probing of the ground) to record the places with the highest signal strength, you are ready to begin digging. Septic tank lids can be located anywhere from 4″ (10 cm) to 4′ (1.2 m) below the surface of the ground.

6. Mark the Location for Future Maintenance

Having discovered your septic tank, you’ll want to ensure that it can be readily detected and accessed in the event that it has to be repaired or replaced. You may accomplish this by installing a septic tank riser. Sewage Tank Risers are devices that provide for easy access to the septic tank from the ground. They are shafts made of plastic or concrete that link the top of the tank to the surface of the ground below the tank. The tank lid will no longer require you to dig to access it whenever maintenance is required.

How to Find a Septic Tank Lid

Septic tanks are installed on certain properties, and it is a good idea to be aware of where your tank is located. The first stage will be to locate the septic tank lid, whether it is to prevent damage to the tank and drain field from heavy equipment, to locate the tank for excavating reasons, or to conduct a self-inspection of the septic tank.

We generally give this service to our customers while doing inspections or septic tank pumping, however we understand that some homeowners may prefer to discover it on their own. How to locate a septic tank lid on your own is outlined below.

Use the septic system plans if you have them.

The quickest and most straightforward method of locating a septic tank lid is to consult the original septic system drawings. The septic system drawings will include the position and dimensions of the tank in relation to the house. Simply measure the measurements of the septic tank lid using a measuring tape to determine where it is located. When it comes to septic system plans, it’s likely that your local board of health will have a copy if for some reason you don’t have access to them. It is common for the lid to be buried beneath the grass, necessitating some probing and digging.

The sewer pipe can be your guide to finding the septic tank lid.

Sometimes it’s difficult to locate septic tanks when using these blueprints, or you may not have a copy of your septic plans on hand. The sewer pipe in your basement is your next best chance if you can’t locate it. This is the pipe that transports all of the waste water from your home to the sewer. Take note of the location of the pipe in relation to the ground level. this will give you an idea of how deep your tank will be buried under the earth. In addition, you will need to determine how many feet the pipe is away from the inner corner of your residence.

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Make your way to the location where you believe the drain pipe is exiting the building.

Use caution when opening a septic tank lid.

Opening the septic cover is the first step in checking the levels of your septic tank on your own if you’ve managed to discover it. Sitting septic tank covers, particularly the older concrete ones, are extremely heavy and difficult to shift. The cover may feature hooks or grips that make it simpler to raise, or you may need to use a tool such as a shovel as a lever to open it. Older septic tanks should be handled with caution since the lids of older septic tanks can grow unstable over time and are more prone to breaking.

A anyone falling into this tank, especially a child or a pet, would be in grave danger.

Because the exposed hole in the ground might be easily missed, never leave the open tank alone, even for a little moment of reflection.

Measure the Levels of Your Septic Tank Yourself

While we provide a handy service to check the levels in your septic tank, you may also do so by yourself if you choose. To measure the amount of sludge, as we discussed in our previous piece, you can use a long stick or a two by four with an adhesive strip attached to one end, or you can acquire a special measuring equipment known as a “sludge judge.” Because the average septic tank contains 4-5 feet of water, it’s preferable to use a measuring stick that’s at least 7 feet long. If necessary, lower your handmade measuring stick or sludge judge down into the septic tank after you’ve opened the lid and maintained perfect verticality of the stick.

As soon as you feel the measuring stick make contact with the bottom of the tank, you may bring it back up and measure the amount of sludge by counting the number of inches of black material that is staining the stick.

As soon as you have an understanding of the levels in your septic tank, you can assess whether or not your septic tank requires pumping.

Make careful to cover the tank promptly and never leave the open tank alone, even for a minute, to avoid uninvited animals or humans from falling in to protect them from drowning.

Need help? Call Grant Septic Tech.

We are well aware that doing things oneself is not always simple or straightforward. But that is precisely why we are here! Our family has been in the septic system business for more than 60 years, and we’ve seen just about everything. Alternatively, if you’ve had difficulties with any of these processes (or simply want to avoid the mess), simply give us a call – we know where to look for a septic tank lid and can complete a comprehensive check for $127. There will be no fee for the inspection if we discover that your septic tank requires pumping while we are there; you will only be responsible for the cost of the septic tank pumping while we are there.

We provide service in a wide range of places around Massachusetts.

How to Locate a Septic Tank

A surprising number of homeowners have had to figure out how to find the location of a septic tank on their premises. If you’re purchasing a home with a septic system or discover that your property’s tank hasn’t been maintained in years, you’ll want to know where the tank is located because all septic tanks must be pumped at some point in time. In the course of a real estate transaction, the property owners or real estate agent may be aware of the location of the tank. Inquire about the “as-built,” which is a schematic of the septic system and the specifics of its installation.

Unfortunately, locating the septic tank may not be as simple as it appears.

Because septic system permits have only been needed in Oregon since 1972, you may have to depend on visual indicators to determine whether your system is working properly.

1.Follow the Outgoing Sewer Pipe

Look for the four-inch sewage pipe that runs through the structure and the location where it exits the building in the basement or crawl space. Locate the location outside the building where the pipe exits the building or the location of an access cover over the pipe. It is required that septic tanks be at least five feet away from the structure, although they are usually between 10 and 25 feet away. You may follow the pipe all the way to the tank using a metal probe. It is important to note that sewage lines may curve and run around the corner of a building rather than following a straight path to the holding tank.

2.Search for Septic Tank Risers and Lids

Depending on their age, septic tanks are either one- or two-compartment structures. Each compartment has a cover, with two additional lids for dual-compartment tanks that were added later. If the tank includes an access point known as a riser, the lid may be readily visible from outside. Look for round, plastic discs that are about a foot or two in diameter.

Due to the fact that the lids might be flush with the ground or just a few inches above it, they can get overrun with grass and other plants over time. You can also come upon a large concrete lid. Tanks without risers are likewise equipped with lids, however they are located underground.

3.Find the Drain Field First

In the absence of a riser and lid, search for indicators of a drain field, such as an area of grass that grows more quickly or more slowly than the rest of the yard, grass that is a different color from the rest of the yard, or areas where snow melts more quickly than in other parts of the yard. Spots of high or low ground in the yard might possibly indicate the presence of a subterranean tank or drain field. You will be able to discover the tank if you probe these regions.

Reasons to Hire a Contractor for Help

Attempting to locate a septic tank on your own can be risky, and in some cases, lethal, if the septic system is old and in danger of collapse. In the event that you fall into a cesspool, dry well, or septic tank, you will die. Removing septic tank lids on your own might potentially put you at risk of contracting bacterial or virus diseases. If you detect any of the following issues, please contact a contractor to assist you in locating or inspecting your septic tank:

  • Soil that is sinking around the tank or drain field. Drainage backup into the home’s sewer system, or toilet backup
  • A foul odor in the area where you assume the tank and drain field are located
  • When there is no rain, pooling water, muddy soil, or spongy grass might occur. Septic tank covers that are rusted, cracked, or have been replaced with improvised lids are prohibited.

Even though you may be ashamed about forgetting where your septic tank is, it is a very frequent problem among homeowners. A contractor may assist you in locating it, and he or she may do it as part of the pumping service. If you need assistance locating your tank or if you have any other questions, please contact us at 503-630-7802. We are available to assist you!

How To Find Septic Tank Location: A Guide for Property Owners

The majority of individuals prefer to relax on their back patio or porch and take in the scenery rather than worrying about where their septic tank could be. When you know exactly where your septic tank is, it will be much easier to schedule routine sewer line cleanouts and repair appointments. Continue reading to find out more about how to locate your septic tank.

Follow the Main Sewer Line

Purchase a soil probe that you may use to probe into the earth in order to locate the underground sewage line and septic tank in your property. Find the main sewage line that leads to your septic tank by going to your basement or crawl space and digging about down there. Look for a pipe with a diameter of around four inches that is leading away from your home or building. Keep a note of the position of the sewer pipe and the point at which the line exits your home so that you can locate it outdoors.

If you have a drain snake, you may use it to try to follow the approximate course of the pipes in your home.

Since the majority of states require at least five feet between a home’s septic tank and its foundation, with many tanks located between 10 and 25 feet away, you may have to probe a bit further out before striking the tank.

Inspect Your Property

Purchase a soil probe that you may use to probe into the earth in order to locate the underground sewage line and septic tank in your yard. Find the main sewage line that leads to your septic tank by going to your basement or crawl space and digging about in it. Look for a pipe with a diameter of around four inches that is leading away from your home or business. Recall where your sewer pipe is located, as well as where it exits your home, in order to locate it while you are out in the field.

If you have a drain snake, you may use it to try to follow the approximate course of the pipes in your house.

Since the majority of states require at least five feet between a home’s septic tank and its foundation, with many tanks located between 10 and 25 feet away, you may need to probe a bit further out before striking the tank.

  • Paved surfaces
  • Unique landscaping
  • Your water well, if you have one
  • And other features.

If you are still having trouble locating your septic system, you might inquire of your neighbors about the location of their septic tank on their land. Finding out how far away their septic systems are will help you figure out where yours might be hidden in your yard or garden.

Check the Property Records

Are you unsure about how to obtain this? Simply contact your county’s health department for further information. Check with your local health agency to see if they have a property survey map and a septic tank map that you can borrow. Perhaps you will be shocked to learn that there are a variety of options to obtain information about your property without ever leaving the comfort of your own residence. Building permits, for example, are frequently found in county records, and they may provide schematics with specifications on how far away from a septic tank a home should be, as well as other important information such as the size of the tank.

Most counties, on the other hand, keep records of septic tank installations for every address.

Don’t Try to Fix Septic Tank Issues Yourself

Having trouble getting this? We can help. Simply contact your county’s health department for further information. Check with your local health agency to see if they have a property survey map and a septic tank map that you can use. – Perhaps you will be shocked to learn that there are several ways to obtain information on your property without ever leaving the comfort of your own residence. Structure permits, for example, are frequently found in county records, and they may include schematics with specifications on how far away from a septic tank a building should be, as well as other valuable information such as the size of the tank.

Yet the majority of counties continue to keep track of septic tank installations at all locations.

Schedule Septic Tank Maintenance

The maintenance of your septic tank on a regular basis helps to avoid sewer backups and costly repairs to your sewer system. You should plan to have your septic tank pumped out every three to five years, depending on the size of your tank and the number of people that reside in your home. The Original Plumber offers skilled septic tank and drain field maintenance and repair services at competitive prices. While it is useful to know where the septic tank is located, it is not required. Our team of skilled plumbers is equipped with all of the tools and equipment necessary to locate your tank, even if you have a vast property.

Metropolitan Atlanta and the neighboring areas receive high-quality service from us. We are open seven days a week, twenty-four hours a day. When you require emergency sewer services, we are here to assist you.

Frequently Asked Questions

A septic system is a system for the management of wastewater. Simply said, wastewater will exit your home through pipes until it reaches your septic tank, which is located outside your home. Septic tanks are normally located beneath the surface of the earth. Solids and liquids will separate in the septic tank as a result of the separation process. Eventually, the solids will fall to the bottom of the tank and the liquids will run out onto your leach field.

How do I know if I have a septic tank?

Even if there are no obvious signs of a septic tank in your yard – such as uneven landscaping – there are a few techniques to assess whether or not your home is equipped with an onsite sewage system. Checking your property records is the most reliable technique to ensure that you are utilizing the correct system. When you acquired your house, you should have received a copy of the septic system map with the property documents as well. Checking your electricity statement is another way to determine this.

If you’re also using well water, it’s possible that you won’t receive one at all.

What do I do once I locate my septic tank?

Once you’ve discovered where your septic tank is, there are a few things you should do. It is critical to clearly mark the position of your septic tank. With our inspection, pumping, and repair services, you can save time whether you need a sewer line cleanout or a septic tank maintenance job completed quickly. Make a note of the location of your tank so that you can find it again if necessary. It should be heavy enough so that it does not fly away in windy conditions. A creative approach to accomplish this without having an unattractive flag or marking in your yard is to use garden décor or a potted plant.

This way, you’ll have it for future reference and will be able to quickly locate the exact position if necessary.

Then contact The Original Plumber to have your septic system maintained on a regular basis.

All of the heavy lifting has been delegated to our team of professionals.

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