How Big Is The Clean-Out Lid On A Septic Tank? (Question)

Locate The Lid Most septic tanks are rectangular and measure about 5 feet by 8 feet. Probe around the tank to locate its edges and mark the perimeter of the rectangle. A septic tank installed before 1975 will have a single 24-inch concrete lid in the center of the rectangle.

  • A 1000-gallon tank will have the lids at a distance between 6 to 6.5 feet, while a 1250-gallon tank will have lids between 7 to 7.5 feet. A 1500-gallon tank will have a distance of 8.5 to 9 feet between its lids.

How big is an old septic tank lid?

If your septic tank was installed after 1975, it will probably have two polyethylene or fiberglass lids centered at opposite sides of the perimeter. Older tanks will typically have a 24-inch concrete lid right in the center of the tank.

How big is the lid on a 1000 gallon septic tank?

The distance between lids will be different for each sized tank: 1000 gallon tank = 6-6.5 ft.; 1250 gallon = 7-7.5 ft.; 1500 gallon = 8.5-9 ft.. Dig up the outlet chamber access lid.

How many lids are on a septic tank?

A septic tank installed before 1975 will have a single 24-inch concrete lid in the center of the rectangle. A two-compartment tank installed after 1975 will have two lids of either fiberglass or polyethylene, centered at opposite ends of the rectangle.

How thick should a septic tank lid be?

(12) The top, bottom, ends, and sides of the tank must have a minimum thickness of two and one-half inches. (13) A minimum 28-day concrete compressive strength of 3,500 pounds per square inch shall be used in the construction of the septic tank, concrete access riser and riser cover.

How many lids should a concrete septic tank have?

Two or three lids may be included in your system. The average size of a sewage tank is approximately 5 feet by 8 feet. The lid is buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underground in most cases.

How thick is a concrete septic tank lid?

The exterior walls of the septic tank are made of concrete, normally 4 inches thick.

How do I know my septic tank is full?

Here are some of the most common warning signs that you have a full septic tank:

  1. Your Drains Are Taking Forever.
  2. Standing Water Over Your Septic Tank.
  3. Bad Smells Coming From Your Yard.
  4. You Hear Gurgling Water.
  5. You Have A Sewage Backup.
  6. How often should you empty your septic tank?

Why does my septic tank have 1 lid?

But seeing one lid on the ground doesn’t necessarily mean that you have one lid – the other might be buried few feet away from the one you saw and so you will have to dig to access it. Most septic tank lids are made of concrete. Fiberglass and polyethylene lids are not very popular because they break easily.

Where is the second lid on a septic tank?

You can locate the lid of your septic tank by poking the ground every few feet with a metal probe. Lids can be buried up to a foot deep on average, so be sure to investigate any bumps that may indicate something is buried underneath.

How much does a septic tank lid weigh?

The concrete covers also weigh 60 – 80 lbs. Because of the weight, many people are discouraged from removing the cover and doing an inspection. Modern plastic septic tank riser rings typically weigh less than 30 pounds.

What can I use to cover my septic tank?

The Do’s For Hiding Your Septic Tank

  1. Plant tall native grasses with fibrous roots around the opening to conceal the tank lid from view.
  2. Place a light statue, bird bath or potted plant over the septic lid.
  3. Septic tank risers and covers are an alternative to concrete and blend into green grass.

How to Find the Lid on a Septic System

All septic tanks eventually fill with sediments and must be pumped out on a regular basis in order to remain in excellent functioning order. If the tank’s lid is not on a riser at ground level and you are not the home’s original owner, you may be unable to determine where the lid is located. A typical septic tank is 4 inches to 4 feet underground, with all of its components, including the cover, buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underneath. This is true regardless of whether the septic tank is equipped with special risers that keep the lid flush with the surface of the ground.

Consult A Map

First, choose with the most straightforward choice. The installation of septic tanks at all locations is recorded in most counties’ permission records, which are kept on file for future reference. Typically, this will include a schematic indicating the placement of the tank on the land, as well as certain dimensions that will allow you to measure to the precise site of the tank. If your tank was placed before your county made it a requirement to record the location of such tanks, you may find yourself with nothing to show for your efforts.

Search For A Sign

Septic tanks are placed in such a way that they are as unnoticeable as possible on the land. After the grass has grown back after installation and some time has passed, it is possible that just a few visual indications will remain. Pay particular attention to the contours of your yard for any inexplicable high or low points that might suggest the presence of an underground storage tank.

Follow The Pipe

Installation of the septic tank takes place along the sewage line that runs from the house into the front yard. Locate the 4-inch sewage pipe at the point where it exits the home in the basement or crawl space, if it is there. Locate the same spot outside and make a note of it. Insert a thin metal probe into the earth, identify the 4-inch sewage line, and follow it across the yard, probing every 2 feet, until you reach the end of the property. Septic tanks are required to be at least 5 feet apart from the home in all states except Alaska.

Whenever the probe makes contact with flat concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene it indicates that the tank has been located.

Locate The Lid

The majority of septic tanks are rectangular in shape and measure around 5 feet by 8 feet. Investigate the tank’s circumference to determine its boundaries and outline the rectangle’s boundary using a pencil. A septic tank that was built before 1975 will have a single concrete lid that is 24 inches in diameter in the center of the rectangle. If the tank was built after 1975, it will have two covers made of fiberglass or polyethylene, centered at the ends of the rectangle and centered at the ends of the rectangle.

It should be possible to uncover the lid or lids by digging with a spade in specific spots, depending on when year the tank was constructed.

Call A Professional

Opening a septic tank is a job best left to the pros once the lid has been discovered. Concrete septic tank lids are extremely heavy, and many require the use of lifting tools to remove them completely. An open tank has the potential to release toxic gases. Anyone going around on the property who comes into contact with an exposed septic tank might be in risk. Because of the noxious vapors present in an open tank, falling into one can be lethal.

Mark The Spot

Make a note on the ground near where the tank was pumped by a professional and the lid was buried to serve as a reference in the future. In order to keep track of where you are, you should choose a hefty circular patio tile that is embedded in the ground. Additionally, draw your own map of the area and store it with your other important papers.

How to Find Your Septic Tank Lid

Previous PostNext PostWhether you realize it or not, it is critical that you be aware of the position of your septic tank lid and the septic tank itself. Despite the fact that septic tanks are fairly huge, they can be difficult to identify, particularly if they have not been properly maintained over time. Continue reading to find out how to locate your septic tank lid.

Why It’s Good to Know Where to Find Your Septic Tank Lid

Knowing the location of your septic tank is a fantastic approach to spot septic tank problems as soon as they occur. Consider the following scenario: If you saw water near your septic tank lid, you would know right away that you could have a problem with your system being overloaded with waste. Furthermore, by understanding where your septic tank is located, you may avoid parking cars on top of it, which might cause the tank to collapse and create flooding. You’ll also be able to point service personnel in the right direction for septic tank services, which will eventually save them time and money while also saving you money.

How to Find Your Septic Tank Opening

Knowing how critical it is to know where your septic tank lid is located, it’s time to go out and find one for yourself. Keep an eye out for a circular lid that is approximately two feet in diameter during your search. Septic tank lids are typically made of green or black plastic, though they can occasionally be made of concrete. It’s not always easy to find the lid, though, as unkempt grass, dirt, or debris can conceal the septic tank lid. If you live in a region that receives snow, look for a patch of lawn where the snow melts faster than everywhere else.

How to Find Your Septic Tank Lid as a New Homeowner

During the process of purchasing your house, you should have been provided with a map of your property that showed the location of your septic tank. This is normally included as a part of your home inspection service package. All you have to do from there is compare the diagram to your land, find the septic tank location, and potentially dig around it to check whether the lid has been hidden by vegetation or other obstructions.

People have been known to place an object such as a huge rock on top of the septic lid, so be sure to look beneath landscaping stones as well.

How to Find Your Septic Tank Lid as an Existing Homeowner

Still having trouble locating your septic tank lid? There’s a significant probability it’ll end up in the ground. The pipes coming from your basement should be followed, as they will take you in the direction of your septic system, which is what we propose. Then, once you’ve determined the correct direction, check for any high or low points in the yard that might reveal the location of your septic tank. You can find the lid of your septic tank by probing the ground with a metal probe every few feet with the probe.

Because most lids have a metal handle or fastener on them to hold the lid closed, you may also use a metal detector to find them.

The majority of lids are buried up to a foot deep, but some lids might be buried as deep as four feet in extreme cases!

How to Maintain Your Septic Tank Lid

Following the discovery of your septic tank lid, keep it in good condition to avoid damage and ensure simple access for future septic tank maintenance, such as pumping your septic tank every three- to five-year period. Here are some pointers for keeping your septic tank lid in good working order:

  • Keeping the grass around the septic tank lid regularly mowed is important. Remove any dirt or debris that may have accumulated on your septic tank lid
  • Mark the area to ensure that no one parks or constructs structures there. It is possible to do this using a flag, garden décor, or ornamental pebbles.

Professional Septic Tank Services

Is it difficult to find trustworthy septic tank services or septic tank installation? If you are looking for septic tank installation, inspection, and cleaning services, check with your local Mr. Rooter ® Plumbing franchise. Mr. Rooter charges a set amount up front, with no overtime fees or additional expenses. To get started, call us at (855) 982-2028 or fill out our online estimate request form. Is the lid of your septic tank obscured by grass? Inquire with The Grounds Guys about routine lawn care and upkeep.

Rooter, is a member of Neighborly’s network of dependable home service experts, which includes Mr.

By hiring The Grounds Guys to provide trustworthy grass mowing and landscape care services, you can be assured that your septic tank lid will always be simple to locate.

Procedure for Opening Septic Tanks

  • ASK a question or make a comment about how to open a septic tank safely and properly for inspection or cleaning.

InspectAPedia does not allow any form of conflict of interest. The sponsors, goods, and services described on this website are not affiliated with us in any way. Instructions on how to open the septic tank. The location of the septic tank cleanout or cover, as well as the access and opening processes. We discuss some of the things to look for before opening the septic tank, such as subsidence, indications of recent work, and septic tank coverings that are not suitable to use. Then we demonstrate how to remove the septic tank lid or the access port cover from the tank.

For this topic, we also have anARTICLE INDEX available, or you may check the top or bottom of the page. Use the SEARCH BOX to discover the information you’re looking for quickly.

Procedures for Safe Opening of a Septic Tank, Cesspool, or Drywall for Inspection or Cleaning

The following are the contents of the article:

  • How to remove the lid from a septic tank
  • When it comes to pumping out the septic tank, which septic tank entrance should be used? Why

In this septic tank pumpout article series, you’ll learn how to locate, open, pump out, clean, and inspect conventional septic tanks, as well as how to locate, open, pump out, clean, and inspect conventional septic tanks using photos. In addition to septic pumping tank truck operators, this guideline is meant to provide basic information to homeowners and septic service providers that are concerned about septic system maintenance.

  • There is a risk of dangerous, perhaps deadly collapse due to subsidence (depressions or low regions in the earth) near the location of the septic tank. Evidence of recent construction activity that may necessitate further investigation in order to determine the status of the septic system
  • Backup or effluent breakout at the surface of the ground in the septic tank region.
  • Here is an example of a septic tank cover that was discovered atop an unstable home-made collection of concrete blocks that had been piled by the owner to serve as an access well to his septic tank. Because the masonry blocks were misaligned and loose, and because the tank aperture into which the cover opened was bigger than the cover, there was a serious collapse risk that may have resulted in a deadly hazard. We covered the area with plywood and roped it off, and we quickly informed the residents and the property owner of the situation, both verbally and in writing
See also:  Where To Find Out If There Is A Septic Tank? (Solved)

Procedure for Opening the Septic Tank Pumping Access Port

It is necessary to clean the septic tank using a cleanout port, which is normally positioned in the center of the tank. A small access opening, such as one over an intake or outlet baffle, does not provide enough space for adequate sludge removal from the septic tank bottom, and it increases the likelihood of future clogging of the tank’s inlet or outlet due to partially removed floating scum that has not been completely removed from the tank bottom. In this particular scenario, we already had the measurements to the exact placement of the septic tank cleanout cover due to previous work.

A wrecking bar is set to be used to remove the cover from the vehicle.

Reader CommentsQ A

@Ron, In order for a concrete septic tank lid to be correctly erected, it must feature both access openings and cast in iron loops to which a hoist may be attached. Alternatively, if your septic tank cover does not have those points of purchase for lifting, you will require a flat bar and a larger wrecking bar to pry up the excavated lid from the septic tank sufficiently to allow you to put a chain around the lid, most likely two Chainz, and lift the lid with a hoist and tripod mechanism or you will use an on-site motorized hoist.

  1. 1/2 x 27/4 removing the top of a septic tank @Phil, Although what you describe is theoretically doable, it may be less expensive and more rational to do so in a different way.
  2. This is due to the fact that just stitching a circular hole does not ensure that I am creating a hole through which the lid will not be dropped.
  3. Edge My concrete septic tank, which was constructed when the home was built in 1979 and does not have any manholes or openings for pumping out, is in poor condition.
  4. Is it feasible to cut two manholes using a concrete saw that are 20″/24″ in diameter and then build risers and a cover on top of them?
  5. Could you please share a picture of the tank top?
  6. It is common for the concrete top to be tapered; nevertheless, it may just be trapped by effloresent salts and filth.
  7. I have a feeling that simply tugging will not be effective.

This would have stopped leaks but would have made it extremely difficult to open the tank for the next person who needed to open the tank.

Repeat this process many times all around the cover’s perimeter.

For me, this has worked almost every time in the past.

It is recommended that you build a septic tank riser that is sealed to the tank top, as well as a new secure cover on top of the riser if your septic tank lid is not near to the ground level.

Never work on your own.

I’ve erected two wood 4x4s on top of the lifting ring to provide additional support.

All I’ve done three times is shattered those 4x4s.

Do you have any recommendations?

A septic tank pumping provider can remove plastic bags, tiny pebbles, and other debris from your tank, as well as the sediments, scum, and sludge that has accumulated there.

What is the best way to get them out?

When the septic tank is drained out, would it make sense to place a plastic bag over the top hole of the tank to keep the odors contained?

Gerard A plastic bag as a sewer line cap doesn’t seem right to me – it’s not durable, it’s the incorrect material if a cover is required, and if it’s a vent rather than an access pipe, the vent must be open to the atmosphere and protected from animal intrusion.

What is the function of this item?

A typical septic tank is equipped with clean out access covers that are strategically placed.

Maybe something as basic as a flat piece of concrete or stone will be sufficient, or maybe something more complex.

To be quite honest, I would have expected the contractor who dug the hole to be accountable for ensuring that the system was repaired and safe.

What should I do to solve it?

What store would I go to in order to acquire septic tank covers?

A few years ago, I had a beautiful new house built for me.

I have three plastic polylok lids, one of which is above ground and is for the pump.

I’d like to purchase risers so that I may build all three at a depth of around 6 inches below ground level.

What are the advantages and disadvantages.

Do you have any other suggestions?

I apologize for the lengthy post.

Sorry, but “True Bolt” isn’t a phrase I’m familiar with or associate with septic tank lids in any way.

Although this is not always the case, Mary, as the pumper may be able to access the entire tank bottom from a single opening depending on the tank’s size and shape; however, if your pumper is unable to do so from a single opening, you may want both openings opened to inspect the condition of the tank baffles.

There are two holes in my septic tank. Is it necessary to open both doors for a pump out?

Question:cannot find the manhole cover of the septic tank

(8th of August, 2014) “We’ve located the cesspool concrete lid (about 12 foot diameter), but after digging a 2 foot perimeter, we were unable to locate the manhole cover, which was required for an inspection.” vicki levin stated Help? My husband is becoming increasingly upset with the digging!

Reply:

If it’s a cesspool, rather than a septic tank, and it’s spherical, the access lid is normally located in the center of the container.

Question: how do i remove septic tank lid that is stuck

The entrance lid would normally be in the center of the cesspool, if it is in fact a cesspool rather than a septic tank, and it is spherical.

Reply:

Anon:WARNING: If the septic tank cover, lid, or access aperture has partially caved in or sank into the tank, the condition is extremely dangerous – an unsecure cover implies that someone might fall into the tank, which is generally lethal very quickly. Please keep everyone away from the septic tank area until such time as you have had the tank inspected and opened for additional inspection by a professional. Depending on the tank type and condition, lifting the lid may necessitate the use of a pry bar or wrecking bar, as well as a small portable winch (which is unusual).

Alternatively, consider the following:

Septic Pumping ProcedurePumper Truck Operation Articles

  • PROCEDURE FOR SEPTIC TANK INSPECTION
  • MISTAKES MADE IN SEPTIC TANK PUMPING
  • PROCEDURE FOR SEPTIC TANK PUMPING
  • HOW TO CLEAN A SEPTIC TANK
  • WHEN TO CLEAN A SEPTIC TANK
  • WHEN NOT TO PUMP A SEPTIC TANK
  • HOW TO FIND A SEPTIC TANK
  • HOW TO OPEN A SEPTIC TANK
  • INSPECT THE SEPTIC TANK BEFORE PUMPING
  • SEPTIC TANK INSPECTION PROCEDURE
  • SEPTIC TANK LEVELS OF SEWAGE
  • PUMPER TRU

Suggested citation for this web page

HOW TO OPEN A SEPTIC TANK at Inspect a Tank An online encyclopedia of building environmental inspection, testing, diagnosis, repair, and issue preventive information is available at Apedia.com. Alternatively, have a look at this.

INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES:ARTICLE INDEX to SEPTIC SYSTEMS

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Septic Tank Clean-Out 101

Septic tanks of various shapes and sizes are pumped out by John Kline Septic Services. From residential to commercial to municipal work, there is something for everyone. Maintaining your septic tank is essential, whether you’re in need of a clean-out or you simply want to understand more about the procedure. To learn more, continue reading or contact us now to arrange service. We provide same-day service for emergencies, and our technicians are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Always In order to ensure that your septic tank gets cleaned out through the largest available opening, Your septic tank or system may have more than one entry point, depending on the type of tank or system you have installed.

  • This is normally covered with a cement lid or manhole cover that is 18-24 inches in diameter and is often raised to grade with an extension.
  • It also makes it difficult to completely clean out the tank, therefore it’s critical to ensure that your tank is well cleaned from the primary entry.
  • In spite of the fact that we recommend that you have your tank pumped out every two to three years, depending on the size of your tank and the number of people living in your home, you may be able to extend the period between clean-outs without suffering any difficulties.
  • When it comes to septic tank cleaning, we recommend that you never go more than FIVE years between cleanings to ensure everything is operating correctly and that your tank is filtering out waste in the appropriate manner.
  • Ensure that your septic tank is easily accessible before scheduling your septic clean-out.
  • Make a notation on your manhole cover or access port if it is hidden by your landscaping so that your technician can easily locate the cleanout when he or she arrives on site.
  • Simply inquire or contact us in advance to inquire about the possibility of installing a riser at the time of your septic pumping.

Are you prepared to get your septic tank cleaned? We provide business and residential septic pumping services in Lancaster, Pennsylvania and the adjacent areas, including York, Lebanon, Berks, Chester, and Dauphin counties, as well as the surrounding areas. Make a call right now at 717-898-2333.

COMMON PROBLEMS — JT’s SEPTIC

You should examine the sewer cleanout on the exterior of the home if you are hearing gurgling and all of the house fixtures are clogged. This is often a black 3-4 in color “inch ABS pipe with a threaded cap is available. Remove the cap (WARNING: BE CAREFUL! (WARNING: IT MAY CONTAIN SOME PRESSURE!) : Assuming the sewage line is completely dry, you will have a clog inside the home plumbing, directly in front of the cleanout valve. Make a phone call to a plumber and have them rooter the line. Sewer line cameras are available from several rooter/plumbing businesses.

  • You have two options at this point: call your preferred septic provider or pull up the tank lids yourself and check the water level and solids content in the tank yourself.
  • Most tanks erected after January 2001 include a filter that has to be cleaned at least once a year (we clean filters—please call us).
  • We’ll even notify you once a year when it’s time to clean your filters!).
  • It’s likely that you have a blockage in your sewage system.

GURGLES

Whenever you flush the toilet, the water gurgles, the toilet takes an unusually long time to flush, or the water in the shower turns brownish after you have done the laundry, you are receiving a subtle indication that trouble is brewing. In order to determine when the tank was last pumped, look through your records and then contact your preferred septic provider for assistance.

ODORS

If you are experiencing unpleasant odors within your home, such as rotten eggs, it is likely that a trap or vent inside your home is not venting correctly. Call your plumber right away since these gases are harmful to both people and animals!

ODORS OUTSIDE IN THE YARD

At times, the smells emanating from the roof vents will seep into the yard due to meteorological conditions. Make use of a plumber to elevate the roof vents and/or to place a charcoal filter in the vents, as needed. It’s important to remember that your septic tank is vented via the roof.

SURFACING IN THE YARD

If you notice effluent appearing in your yard, contact your septic service provider immediately. If you see this, it indicates that your leach line has failed and you should get help right away.

HEAVY SOLIDS- OVERDUE FOR PUMPING

Contrary to common perception, you DO need to have your septic tank pumped on a regular basis. Pumping maintenance should be performed on a regular basis, otherwise your system will get overwhelmed with solid waste and eventually cause damage to your leach lines.

DON’T MAKE THIS HAPPEN TO YOU! This is an extreme example of a tank that is overflowing. There is sewage flowing from the tank access holes and into the yard!

grease build up in sewer pipes

Fats and grease should never be flushed down the toilet or sink. They have the potential to harden the lines and cause failure; they have the potential to generate an excessive buildup of the floating scum layer in the septic tank; and they have the potential to go into the disposal regions and adjacent soils and completely block the system off. A shattered lid can pose a serious threat to both animals and children. It is conceivable that they will fall through the cracked or broken lids and will not be noticed until it is too late to save themselves.

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crushed or settled pipe

This is the second most prevalent problem we notice in septic systems that are less than 10 years old. In addition to blocking flow, loose fill soil surrounding the tank is causing a backup into the house since it is pulling the pipe with it as it settles. We have even observed instances when contractors installing new systems do not correctly pack the fill earth below the pipe, resulting in pipe settlement on systems that have not been utilized or have only been used for a short length of time (see below for an example).

SEWER OUTLET PROGRESSION

When it comes to modern septic systems, this is the most typical issue we encounter. Take note of the fact that the unsupported outlet pipe is being driven down by settling dirt. Watch as the water level in the tank rises, forcing the flow of water in the inflow sewage line to slow. This will eventually result in a clog in the inflow sewer line at some point. The solids flowing down from the house will not be able to enter the tank correctly because of the high water level.

examples of settled sewer pipes:

INSTALLATION OF A TANK AND/OR REPAIR OF SEWER PIPESTHE “POLY” PIPEIMAGES BELOW PROVIDE AN EXAMPLE OF WHAT PIPENOTTO USES WHEN INSTALLING A TANK AND/OR REPAIR OF SEWER PIPES However, despite the fact that this grade of sewer pipe is less expensive at the time of purchase, it might end up costing you a lot of money in the long run!

settled inlet sewer pipe on unused system:

Even if the septic system has not been utilized in some time, it is conceivable that problems will be discovered during the inspection process. Pipes might settle on unoccupied ground and in yards as a result of faulty installation and/or automobiles and/or ATVs running over the pipes without realizing they are there. It may be beneficial to all parties to have a skilled inspector take a look at the system and diagnose any concerns, even though the County does not require an examination on an underused system before transferring ownership.

Roots growing in and around the septic tank:

In addition to disrupting the system by clogging or destroying drainage and distribution lines, tree roots can also enter the tank, causing it to leak. Foul odors, poor drainage, and patches of vegetation in the leach field are just a few of the signs that you may have a root problem.

ERODED BAFFLES

Solids are kept in the septic tank and away from the disposal area with the use of concrete baffles. Using baffles to reduce agitation of wastewater entering the septic tank and prevent particles from escaping the tank and entering the drainfield, baffles can assist avoid drainfield damage and extend the life of the drainfield.

If the baffles are broken, missing, or have never been placed, the drainfield’s life expectancy will be reduced significantly. Baffle repair normally entails the placement of a plastic tee at the end of the sewer pipes to prevent them from clogging.

orangeburg sewer pipes

Orangeburg pipe was made in Orangeburg, New York, from 1860 to 1970, and was utilized to plumb numerous septic and wastewater systems throughout Yavapai County during that time period. Orangeburg pipe is produced from rolled tar paper (wood pulp that has been sealed with hot pitch) and was considered a low-cost alternative to metal, particularly after World War II, because of its flexibility and durability. In fact, the pipe itself is so soft that professionals might cut it with a knife during the installation process!

Orangeburg, on the other hand, is known for degrading over time (it has a 50-year lifespan at the most) and deforming when subjected to pressure.

If the septic system is approved, Orangeburg will normally be stated on the permits as the material for the inlet and/or outflow pipe material, respectively.

Septic Tank Risers, Lids, and Covers

Septic tank risers are intended to replace existing concrete, fiberglass, or metal septic tank lids by lowering the entrance to the ground level and allowing for better drainage. Want to stop digging up your yard every time you need to have your septic system cleaned, repaired, or re-filled with water? Do you despise having to lift and carry incredibly big concrete lids on your shoulders? It appears that you require septic tank risers to raise your access to ground level, as well as a lightweight, easily removable access cover.

  1. With the Polylok risers and lids from Septic Solutions, septic tank maintenance will be a breeze!
  2. Want to stop digging up your yard every time you need to have your septic system cleaned, repaired, or re-filled with water?
  3. It appears that you require septic tank risers to raise your access to ground level, as well as a lightweight, easily removable access cover.
  4. With the Polylok risers and lids from Septic Solutions, septic tank maintenance will be a breeze!

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

The following are some of the most commonly asked inquiries that our customer support representatives are asked. Take a peek below; it’s possible that the queries you have have been answered! Would the POLYLOK SEPTIC TANK LID fit directly on the ADAPTER RING, or will I need to use a RISER to ensure a proper fit on the tank? With the exception of the 24″ Heavy Duty Lid, the lid will often fit straight onto the adapter rings in the majority of cases. The underside of the 24″ Heavy Duty Lid is strengthened for added strength.

  1. Therefore, the 24″ Heavy Duty Lid will only be able to be used without using an adapter when the opening is at least 24″ in diameter.
  2. ALL other Polylok lids will attach straight to the adapter ring, eliminating the need for a riser or any other adaptor.
  3. No.
  4. Cutting the riser will result in the lid not being adequately secured on the riser that has been cut down.
  5. It is entirely up to you whether you want to bring the riser system up to grade, raise it above grade, or leave it slightly below grade.
  6. IS IT BETTER TO USE THE STANDARD LID OR THE HEAVY DUTY LID?
  7. If the riser system is located in a high traffic location or is going to be run over by lawn equipment on a frequent basis, the heavy duty lid is recommended.
  8. Yes.

IS IT INCLUDED WITH THE POLYLOK SEPTIC TANK RISERS AND LIDS TO USE SCREWS? Yes. The Polylok Septic Tank Risers are assembled using stainless steel screws that allow them to be connected to one another. If you have any more queries, please contact us at 1-877-925-5132 or [email protected]

THE POLYLOK SEPTIC TANK RISER ADVANTAGE

Riser systems are available in a variety of shapes, sizes, and designs on the market today. The Polylok septic tank risers are, without a doubt, the best money can buy in this category. There are several causes for this, but the following are the most significant:

FACTORY INSTALLED GASKETS

The Polylok brand is the only one on the market that is sent to you from the factory with gaskets already in place, making it unique. This means that there is no further work necessary to ensure that the riser system is air and water tight! Keep ground water out of your tank, wastewater in your tank, and potentially hazardous gases out of your yard! In contrast to most other products, our Polylok septic tank risers do not require you to purchase or use any other type of sealant between each riser part.

INTERNAL STRUCTURAL RIBS

The Polylok risers are reinforced with structural ribs that run internally around each riser segment, providing them with exceptional strength and allowing them to maintain their shape even after the hole is backfilled with dirt. As a result of the freezing and thawing of the ground in many parts of the country, it is necessary to have a smooth surface on the outside of the riser’s exterior. It is possible for items that have structural support on the outside of the riser to actually be lifted from the tank, causing damage to both the riser and seal, during periods of freezing and thawing.

LOW PROFILE RISER LIDS WITH HANDLES

The septic tank access lid on a riser system is one of the most significant components since it is the part of the system that is visible from the outside and that must be removed every time the system is pumped or otherwise serviced. The Polylok lids are pre-installed with handles, which make it simple to remove the lid whenever you need to get access to the system or to replace it. The bottom of the lids is structurally supported, which allows them to remain relatively flat rather than domed in shape, as is the case with many other items on the market.

LARGE TANK ADAPTER RING

It is necessary to use an adapter ring in order to attach risers to your septic tank. We have one of the largest adapter rings available on the market, allowing you to cover up to a 25″ square or 27″ circular aperture with a Polylok adapter ring. This ring fits both 20″ and 24″ risers, allowing you to have a great deal of versatility no matter what size your opening happens to be!

STAINLESS STEEL SCREWS INCLUDED

At Septic Solutions, we strive to make the buying and installation process as simple as possible for our customers. All of our Polylok risers and lids are delivered with all of the stainless steel screws required for installation in one package.

Common Septic Tank Facts

Septic systems are a low-cost and frequently successful alternative to conventional sewer systems. Concrete tanks have been the most frequent since the 1940s, with 3 – 500lids for a 1000 gallon tank and 4 – 500lids for a 1500 gallon tank being the most typical. Tanks began to be equipped with 16″ square concrete plugs with a lifting bail in the late 1990s, allowing for easier access to both sides of the tank. Many tanks today are made of fiberglass or plastic. Over time, the concrete might degrade, and the lids may develop cracks or possibly shatter completely due to the pressure.

  1. Even broken lids should be replaced for the sake of the public’s safety.
  2. They get access to your septic tank by removing green covers that are 20 inches in diameter.
  3. This is done in order to prevent anyone, especially children, from removing a lid and falling into the container.
  4. A typical water level for a tank should be 6″ below the top of the tank, and the tank should be kept completely filled at all times.
  5. The level of the water is often a good sign of potential problems.
  6. Additionally, it might suggest a clogged intake line, which could be caused by roots, a damaged pipe, or a loose joint.
  7. If there has been a lot of rain, the earth may get saturated, making it impossible for any additional water to seep through the soil to the surface.
  8. If your tank has allowed particles to enter the field lines, this might cause the openings in the corrugated pipe to get clogged, preventing water from percolating through the soil as effectively as it should be.

An output filter may be placed to prevent particulates from entering the field lines, but it would need to be cleaned on an annual basis to ensure that this does not happen. Nonetheless, it is far less expensive than rebuilding field lines.

How to Find Your Septic Tank

Over time, all septic tanks become clogged with sediments and must be pumped out in order to continue functioning properly. Septic tank lids are frequently located at ground level. The majority of the time, they have been buried anywhere between four inches and four feet underground. In the event that you have recently purchased a property and are unsure as to where your septic tank is located, this article will give instructions on how to identify your septic tank. Noteworthy: While every property is unique, septic tanks are usually typically huge and difficult to build.

5 Ways to Find Your Septic Tank

1. Check with the municipal records. The most straightforward method of locating your septic tank is to review the building plans for your home that were approved by the local government. You should have received an application from the business that installed the septic tank, which should contain schematics and specifications that will help you to locate the precise location where the septic tank was installed. 2. Look for highs and lows in your data. The majority of septic tanks are constructed in such a way that they are barely noticeable.

  • 3.
  • Almost usually, your septic tank will be constructed near where the main sewage line exits your property.
  • Septic tanks are typically positioned between ten and twenty-five feet away from a home’s foundation.
  • When you do, that’s when your septic tank comes into play!
  • Look for the Lid.
  • You will most likely find two polyethylene or fiberglass covers positioned on opposing sides of the perimeter of your septic tank if it was built after 1975 and installed after 1975.
  • Those areas should be excavated in order to disclose the lids.
  • Get in touch with the pros.
  • Lifting concrete lids will necessitate the use of specialized equipment.
  • A fall into an unprotected septic tank has the potential to be lethal.
  • Produce your own diagram of your yard, which you may file away with your other important house paperwork.

That’s all there is to it! If you’ve been wondering where your septic tank is, you now have five alternatives to choose from, which should make finding it easier than ever. To book a plumbing service in Bastrop County, please contact us now!

How Much Does It Cost To Clean Out a Septic Tank? See Breakdown

When it comes time to have your septic tank cleaned out, there is one very crucial thing to consider.

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“How much does it cost to pump a septic tank?”

The solution is not as straightforward as you may expect, but it is also not going to need the completion of a four-year degree to figure out. In order to wipe away years of buildup from your laundry, toilet, shower, sink, and jacuzzi, there are a few things that influence the amount you may have to spend for the “Mega Flush.”

Let’s get started.

First and foremost, you should be aware that septic tanks are analogous to individuals. They are available in a variety of forms and sizes, and their ages range from recent to ancient. Their health problems are also quite diverse, as are their demeanors and dispositions. Some are fearful and prefer to remain concealed from view, buried beneath the surface of the earth. People are more forceful, use prominent risers, flashing lights, and even audible alarm systems to alert others to their commanding presence in the room.

  1. The septic tank is still on the table, believe it or not.
  2. Let alone those who behave more like the adolescent who ate too many burritos for lunch and then insisted on releasing his farts in the center of your kitchen while you were attempting to cook supper!
  3. The clinical research “Various Personality Disorders Common to Septic Tanks” has been sponsored by Shankster Bros.
  4. But it is a discussion for another day.

The costs pertaining to the cleaning of a septic tank can be divided, (or multiplied), into 4-5 categories:

1.) The size of the tank 2.) The tank’s accessibility. 3.) The property’s geographic location in respect to the service area 4.) The frequency with which cleaning is performed 5.) Calculate the volume of the quantity of gallons

Let’s break these costs down:

As previously said, septic tanks are available in a variety of designs and sizes. Some people are surprised to learn that the septic tank sizing requirements for homes are based on the number of bedrooms, that the requirements for churches are based on the seating capacity of the auditorium, that the requirements for factories are based on the number of employees, and that the requirements for campgrounds are based on the number of campsites.

Current septic tank sizing requirement guidelines in Indiana are as follows:

Home has 5 bedrooms and a 1500 gallon tank. 4 bedroom house with a tank of 1250 gallons. a three-bedroom house with a 1000 gallon tank 750 gallon tank for a two-bedroom house 500 gallon tank for a one-bedroom house It’s worth noting that any jetted bathtub, such as a hot tub or jacuzzi, with a capacity greater than 125 gallons qualifies as an additional bedroom. Always keep in mind that many of the systems being installed today are equipped with a secondary tank that serves as a pump station, pumping your sewage out to the leach field or sand mound, where it is distributed through piping and receives its final treatment before being leached away into the earth.

As a result, you may have to clean two tanks at the same time.

2.) Accessibility of tank

Unfortunately, some septic tanks have been constructed in difficult-to-access locations. Consider the possibilities: beneath the deck, beneath the garage floor, beneath the new living room that was constructed a few years ago, beneath that enormous pine tree that I planted 40 years ago, and so on. Yes, we have witnessed each and every one of those scenarios, as well as countless more. The presence or absence of a Riser in your tank is another factor that affects accessibility. This is a pipe that is attached to the lid of your septic tank and extends to the surface of the earth below the tank.

This may necessitate digging in order to expose the tank’s access lid, which may incur additional costs.

Some service providers will charge you an additional fee if they have to use more than one length of pipe to reach your storage tank.

does not share this sentiment!

3.) Distance from the service area

According on the location of the client in relation to the service provider’s service area, many service providers charge on a sliding scale. Take, for example, Shankster Bros., which has its headquarters in Northern Indiana. A client in Kentucky will be charged more than a customer in Kosciusko, Whitley, Wabash, Fulton, Elkhart, or the adjacent counties if we get a call from that client.

4.) Frequency of cleaning

Some of our clients, particularly those who live near lakes, are employing tanks that solely hold septage rather than allowing it to be leached out into the environment. This necessitates the need to pump them out on a regular basis, perhaps as frequently as once each week. Because of the regularity with which the service is provided under these particular circumstances, we are able to provide lower costs.

5.) Volume the amount of gallons

Customers with enormous amounts of garbage to dispose of, such as campers, big business establishments, and even wastewater treatment plants, may be required to do so at certain times. In this situation, it will be necessary to mention special price once more. So, when you phone the office to inquire about price, be prepared to provide the following information so that the receptionist can provide you with an accurate quote as promptly as possible:

  • The location of the property in need of cleaning services
  • The size of the septic tank, if it is known
  • And Whether your tank is equipped with an access riser or not.

Alternately, if you are already a customer, we already have all of that information on file with your name or address, and we can quickly look up your information on file with either Shankster Bros, Strombeck Brothers, North Webster Septic Tank Service, or Shepler septic tank cleaning, and provide you with an instant quote based on the information you have already provided us.

A general average cost to clean out a septic tank in Northern Indiana is as follows, although you can see specific pricing varies according to the parameters I have outlined above:

Cleaning a 1000 gallon tank will cost between $200 and $300.00. Over 1000 gallons, per gallon, there is a 7 cent per gallon charge.

Fee for digging – $75.00 per hour Line cleaning costs between $225 and $300.00. Riser for retrofitting – $190.00 Whenever you want aseptic tank cleaning, pumping, or inspection, please do not hesitate to contact Shankster Bros. at any time of day or night.

Tank Types Express Septic Service

Septic tanks should be cleaned every 3 to 5 years, depending on the size of the household and how much water is used. When the septic tank is pump out on a regular basis, it will help to reduce the buildup of scum and sludge layers in the tank. Ideally, the scum layer should not be more than 24 inches thick. If the material is deeper than 24 inches, it will flow down the outflow pipe and into the drainfield, plugging up the drainfield and resulting in drainfield failure. In order to get your septic tank cleaned, you must first locate the main compartment2nd compartment lid of the septic tank and remove it.

The position of a septic tank lid and the number of lids on a tank varies depending on the year it was placed and the manufacturer.

If you prefer not to find and excavate the Septic Tank lids yourself, or if you are unsure of where the lids are placed, Express Septic Service may assist you with this task.

When looking at an as-built, keep in mind that it will only show the overall placement of the sewage system components, not the actual location of the septic tanks.

Septic Diagrams:

1000 Gallon Septic Tanks: This tank design, which was in use from around 1976 to present, will have one main lid and two smaller baffle covers on either end of the tank, as seen in the diagram below.

Two Compartment

From late 1976 until the present, a septic tank layout of 1125-1200 gallons was erected. It is possible for this tank to have two main 24′′ lids or two main lids and two little baffle lids at both ends of the tank right above the inlet and output baffles, depending on the manufacturer. If there are risers to the surface of the tank, you will be searching for two lids that look like this. If the tank is not risered, you will discover concrete lids with a diameter of 2-24″, as seen in the figure below.

Holding Tank

As an alternative to the traditional on-site sewage system, it is a good option. A holding tank is not the same thing as a septic tank. A holding tank is used to retain household waste and prevents any of its contents from leaking into a drainfield, whereas a septic tank is used to enable waste water to flow into a drain field. Concrete, fiberglass, and polyethylene can all be used to construct holding tanks. Depending on the location, holding tanks can be constructed above or below ground. Holding tanks must be pumped on a regular basis, depending on the amount of water and waste water used, as well as the size of the tank.

Most holding tanks are fitted with alarms that will ring when they are almost full, signaling the need for a pump to be installed as soon as possible. In the event that a holding tank is not properly pumped, waste water will back up into the home or spill onto the ground.

Pump Tank

Some homes may be equipped with a pump tank or a pump basin in addition to a septic tank. Typically, pump tanks are located underground near the septic tank; however, depending on the year the system was established, risers to the surface may be present, allowing for simple access to examine and repair the effluent pump for maintenance or if the pump has stopped operating. Before the effluent is pumped to the drainfield region, it is collected in a pump tank or basin from a septic tank or ATU (Alternative Treatment Unit).

It is necessary to configure the control floats such that a certain volume of effluent is discharged to the drainfield.

The pump then works to bring the level of wastewater back down until it reaches that of the off float setting.

When the alarm goes off, there is enough reserve storage in the pump tank to allow the homeowner to consume only a little amount of water until the problem with the system can be resolved and the alert turned off.

Aerobic Treatment Unit (ATU)

In some cases, an alternate treatment system may be used in place of a typical septic tank and gravel trenched drainfield, such as in cases of poor soil drainage, small lot size, or environmental concerns. The majority of alternative treatment systems are comprised of a multi compartmented tank known as an Aerobic Treatment Unit, or ATU for short. The majority of ATUs are divided into three compartments: a “waste” compartment, an aeration chamber, and a clarifying chamber. The trash compartment contains solids used in the pretreatment and liquification of garbage, as well as non-waste incidental products that are flushed down the toilet and into the drain.

  1. Clearing the effluent further improves its clarity since the leftover particles are allowed to settle in the clarifying chamber.
  2. These components are intended to kill bacteria and pathogens before the effluent is discharged into the drainfield.
  3. All of these models have undergone extensive testing before being certified.
  4. These can range from gravity to pressure distribution to Glendon mounds to sand filters to drip irrigation.
  5. For any routine operation and maintenance inspections or services, a Health Department Certified Operation and Maintenance Specialist will be required, and some manufacturers may require you to be certified by their firm in order to conduct these services.

As previously said, it is important to have these sorts of systems monitored on a regular basis and fixed as needed in order to maintain correct performance and to keep your system free of problems.

Restaurant Grease Trap

Almost every food service facility that serves food and washes dishes, including restaurants, cafés, coffee shops, delicatessens and bakeries (among others), will have an interior grease trap located near the sinks to collect grease from the sinks. They are available in sizes ranging from 20 to 50 gallons. Fatty acids, oils, and grease (FOG) are prevented from entering your drain pipe by a grease trap, which is a chambered compartment. Grease flows into the trap, enabling the grease to solidify and float to the top of the trap while weighted solids fall to the bottom of the trap, allowing the liquid to flow out via the drain pipes and into the septic tank or into the city sewage.

Grease Tank Interceptor Service

A grease interceptor is a huge tank that may be situated outside of the structure on the ground level. They can range in size from a few hundred gallons to several thousand gallons. You will need two tanks if you have an exterior tank. The first tank will be a grease trap (tank), which will hold grease until it is removed. The garbage from the restrooms will be disposed of in a tank that is specifically dedicated for this purpose; if the facility is on sewer, the waste will be disposed of in the city sewage.

In addition to a simple cleaning rooter service utilizing an electric snake, we also provide hydro-jetting, which uses high pressure water to break away hardened grease and keep the drain from backing up.

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