What Can I Use To Help My Septic Tank? (Solution)

Use Septic Safe Products Chose hand soaps and dish soaps made from natural products that are friendlier to the environment than chemical–based soaps. These will be easier on the septic system. Also use pre–moistened tissue paper and soft brands of toilet paper, as these will be easier for the septic system to handle.

What chemicals are in septic tank?

  • Septic tank chemicals consist of caustic chemicals that are either derivatives of acids or alkalis. Chemicals that are commercially available that are used for the wellness of your plumbing contain these same chemicals. Essentially, they are used to unclog the pipes.

What to put in septic tank to break down solids?

Yeast helps actively breaks down waste solids when added to your septic system. Flush ½ cup of dry baking yeast down the toilet, the first time. Add ¼ cup of instant yeast every 4 months, after the initial addition.

How do I keep my septic tank healthy?

Do’s and Don’ts when maintaining your septic system

  1. Regularly inspect and maintain your septic system.
  2. Pump your septic tank as needed.
  3. Keep your septic tank lids closed and secured.
  4. Be water-wise.
  5. Direct water from land and roof drains away from the drainfield.
  6. Landscape with love.
  7. Keep septic tank lids easily accessible.

How do you naturally treat a septic tank?

You can mix about a 1/4 cup of baking soda with 1/2 cup of vinegar and 2 tablespoons lemon to make your own natural cleaning agent. The baking soda will fizz up to help get the dirt and grime in your tub and drains. It’s a great cleaner and your septic system will thank you!

What can you put in your toilet to help your septic tank?

If a clog is still present, you can mix baking soda and vinegar to form a natural drain cleaner that is safe for a septic system. Pour one cup of baking soda into your toilet, trying to get as much as possible in the hole in the center. After that has settled, pour two cups of white vinegar over the baking soda.

What eats waste in septic tank?

Large colonies of bacteria and enzymes in your septic tank keep the tank from backing up or overfilling. Enzymes go to work on the scum, and bacteria goes to work on the sludge. The microbes eat the waste and convert large portions of it into liquids and gases.

What eats sludge in septic tank?

One example of a homemade remedy is to flush ¼-½ a cup of instant yeast down your toilet. The yeast eats away at the sludge and helps loosen it, breaking it down so that wastewater can get through.

What are the signs that your septic tank is full?

Here are some of the most common warning signs that you have a full septic tank:

  • Your Drains Are Taking Forever.
  • Standing Water Over Your Septic Tank.
  • Bad Smells Coming From Your Yard.
  • You Hear Gurgling Water.
  • You Have A Sewage Backup.
  • How often should you empty your septic tank?

Is RIDX good for septic?

How additives, like Rid-x, interfere with your septic system’s eco-system. According to the EPA and the Ohio Department of Health, not only are additives like Rid-X not recommended, but they actually have a detrimental and potentially hazardous effect on your septic system’s waste treatment process.

How do you dissolve sludge in a septic tank?

How to Reduce Sludge in a Septic Tank Without Pumping

  1. Install an aeration system with diffused air in your septic tank.
  2. Break up any compacted sludge.
  3. Add a bio-activator or microbe blend.
  4. Maintain the aeration system.
  5. Add additional Microbes as required.

Is Epsom salt OK for septic systems?

While Epsom salt doesn’t cause damage to your septic tank, this doesn’t necessarily mean you should go flushing it into your tank. Many individuals think flushing Epsom salt in their septic tanks will break down waste. While salts can unclog a toilet, the effect Epsom salt has on your septic system will be minimal.

Will bleach hurt a septic system?

Chlorine bleach in moderate amounts isn’t as bad for a septic system as you may have heard. But even a little drain cleaner may be terrible. One study found that it took nearly two gallons of liquid bleach but only about a teaspoon of chemical drain cleaner to kill the beneficial bacteria in a septic tank.

Is yogurt good for septic tanks?

If you are having trouble with your system, add some helpful bacteria by putting yogurt, activated yeast, or even some beer down the drain. These helper bacteria will only help keep a system healthy, so if you’re still having trouble it’s time to bring in a professional for an inspection, pumping, or possible repair.

Can you use hydrogen peroxide in a septic system?

There are many natural options for say, disinfectants, that exist which will not harm a septic system. For some of the stronger natural disinfectants such as Hydrogen Peroxide and Thyme Oil, their strength will still require them to be diluted with water before being introduced to the system. 3

How to Care for Your Septic System

As an alternative to hooking up your home to a municipal sewer system, you can install a septic system on your property, which is composed of a container buried underground on your property that holds and treats the water and waste that exits your home through plumbing pipes. A septic system should only be installed by qualified professionals, whether you’re building a new home or replacing an old one. Septic tanks should never be installed by amateurs. Because of the project’s complexity and size, heavy machinery, careful digging, and plumbing hookups are required, all of which could be disastrous if not completed correctly.

In areas where the earth floods often, for example, septic issues are likely to occur.

It is next necessary for a contractor to excavate in the area of the tank and drain field in preparation for installation, which includes plumbing connections to the residence.

The installation of a septic system involves meticulous design, the knowledge of a professional, and at the very least a few thousand dollars to be completed correctly.

  1. Do Septic Tanks Have a Fixed Price?
  2. You will incur additional costs when replacing your septic tank or system, on top of whatever repairs you may have already attempted.
  3. When issues progress to the point where a whole septic system must be rebuilt, expenses can vary from $3,000 to $10,000, according to Glenn Gallas, vice president of operations for Mr.
  4. It is possible that you will spend even more depending on the size and location of your property, as well as the size and substance of your tank and the kind of septic system you choose.
  5. Generally speaking, there are four different types of materials that may be used for septic tanks: —Concrete.
  6. It has a long lifespan and is resistant to cracking, however it is prone to cracking.
  7. The lightweight nature of plastic, which is less expensive than steel, can cause structural damage to buildings.

Because of its low weight, fiberglass is susceptible to structural damage and can shift from its original location, although it is less prone to break than other materials like concrete.

Over time, steel can rust and the cover can corrode, creating a danger in your yard that is unsafe to use.

Also necessary is the knowledge of how large your septic tank should be in relation to the size of your home: One or two bedrooms in a home with less than 1,500 square feet with a 750-gallon tank is sufficient.

An approximately 3,500 to 4,500 square foot home with four or five bedrooms will require a 1,250-gallon septic tank.

It requires a variety of criteria, including the weather, soil type, and other considerations, to establish a septic tank.

Due to the difficulty of the terrain, the process might take up to a week or longer to complete.

” Finding Out How Much It Will Cost to Install a New Appliance It is necessary to check with your local government, such as the city or county, to see what is required to secure a permit for the construction of a septic system before you contact a septic system installation professional.

It will then be up to the local governing body to decide whether or not to approve the engineer’s designs, which will take into account the water table, underground water lines, wells, and mandatory setbacks from neighboring properties.

“Once the drawings have been authorized, you can take them and provide them to different septic installers,” he adds.

An estimate will be required in order to determine the exact cost of your installation.

Obtain a couple quotations from many different local septic installation or replacement firms based on the specifics of your property.

Complementary Components of a Septic System If you’re establishing a new septic system or updating an existing one, you may need to consider other components of the system.

Pump for the tank – The top of the tank.

Risers.

In the event that only one or two components of the system appear to be causing the problem, Gallas notes that the sewage line, septic tank, distribution box, and field lines can be replaced independently.

In the case of a residential septic system, according to Gallas, it can survive as long as 25 or 30 years with adequate care.

The regularity with which your septic tank will require pumping, in addition to other maintenance, may vary depending on the size of your home, according to Gallas.

Gallas estimates that the cost of a basic septic pump by a professional will be between $100 and $300.

The issue may just be a clogged pipe, but it might also be a problem with your drain field, a broken or damaged septic tank, excessive water in the tank, or things and chemicals in your septic tank that should not have been flushed down the toilet.

Added information from the United States News & World Report The Smell in My House: What’s the Deal? Designing a Mudroom in Your House Choose Energy-Efficient Windows for Your Home Using These Guidelines Do Septic Tanks Have a Fixed Price? It first posted on the website usnews.com

  • Inspect and pump your drainfield on a regular basis
  • Conserve water
  • Dispose of waste properly
  • And keep your drainfield in good condition.

Inspect and Pump Frequently

Inspection of the ordinary residential septic system should be performed by a septic service specialist at least once every three years. Household septic tanks are normally pumped every three to five years, depending on how often they are used. Alternative systems that use electrical float switches, pumps, or mechanical components should be examined more frequently, typically once a year, to ensure that they are in proper working order. Because alternative systems contain mechanical components, it is essential to have a service contract.

  • Inspection of the average residential septic system by a licensed septic service specialist should be performed at least once every three years. Household septic tanks are normally pumped every three to five years, depending on how much usage they receive. Alternative systems that use electrical float switches, pumps, or mechanical components should be examined more frequently, typically once a year, to ensure that they are in good working order. As an alternate system with automated components, a service contract is critical. The frequency of septic pumping is influenced by four primary factors:

Service provider coming? Here is what you need to know.

When you contact a septic service provider, he or she will inspect your septic tank for leaks as well as the scum and sludge layers that have built up over time. Maintain detailed records of any maintenance work conducted on your septic system. Because of the T-shaped outlet on the side of your tank, sludge and scum will not be able to escape from the tank and travel to the drainfield region. A pumping is required when the bottom of the scum layer or the top of the sludge layer is within six inches of the bottom of the outlet, or if the top of the sludge layer is within 12 inches of the bottom of the outlet.

In the service report for your system, the service provider should mention the completion of repairs as well as the condition of the tank.

An online septic finder from the National Onsite Wastewater Recycling Association (NOWRA) makes it simple to identify service specialists in your region.

Use Water Efficiently

In a normal single-family house, the average indoor water consumption is about 70 gallons per person, per day, on average. A single leaking or running toilet can waste as much as 200 gallons of water each day, depending on the situation. The septic system is responsible for disposing of all of the water that a residence sends down its pipes. The more water that is conserved in a household, the less water that enters the sewage system. A septic system that is operated efficiently will operate more efficiently and will have a lower chance of failure.

  • Toilets with a high level of efficiency. The usage of toilets accounts for 25 to 30% of total home water use. Many older homes have toilets with reservoirs that hold 3.5 to 5 gallons of water, but contemporary, high-efficiency toilets consume 1.6 gallons or less of water for each flush. Changing out your old toilets for high-efficiency versions is a simple approach to lessen the amount of household water that gets into your septic system. Aerators for faucets and high-efficiency showerheads are also available. Reduce water use and the volume of water entering your septic system by using faucet aerators, high-efficiency showerheads, and shower flow restriction devices. Machines for washing clothes. Water and energy are wasted when little loads of laundry are washed on the large-load cycle of your washing machine. By selecting the appropriate load size, you may limit the amount of water wasted. If you are unable to specify a load size, only complete loads of washing should be performed. Washing machine use should be spread throughout the week if at all possible. Doing all of your household laundry in one day may appear to be a time-saving strategy
  • Nevertheless, it can cause damage to your septic system by denying your septic tank adequate time to handle waste and may even cause your drainfield to overflow. Machines that have earned theENERGY STARlabel consume 35 percent less energy and 50 percent less water than ordinary ones, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Other Energy Star appliances can save you a lot of money on your energy and water bills.

Properly Dispose of Waste

Toilets with a high level of efficacy 25 to 30 percent of total home water use is attributed to toilet flushing. Many older homes have toilets with reservoirs that hold 3.5 to 5 gallons of water, but contemporary, high-efficiency toilets consume 1.6 gallons or less of water every flush or less in some instances. Changing out your old toilets for high-efficiency versions is a simple approach to lessen the quantity of household water that gets into your septic system; aerators for faucets and showerheads with high efficiency Reduce water use and the volume of water entering your septic system by using faucet aerators, high-efficiency showerheads, and shower flow restrictions.

Water waste may be reduced by selecting the appropriate load size.

Washing machine use should be spread throughout the week as much as possible.

Machines that have earned theENERGY STARlabel consume 35 percent less energy and 50 percent less water than normal ones. Energy Star appliances and other products may save you a lot of money on energy and water bills.

Toilets aren’t trash cans!

Toilets with high efficacy. The usage of toilets accounts for 25 to 30 percent of total home water use. Many older homes have toilets with reservoirs that hold 3.5 to 5 gallons of water, but contemporary, high-efficiency toilets consume 1.6 gallons or less of water every flush. To limit the quantity of household water entering your septic system, replace older toilets with high-efficiency versions. Aerators for faucets and high-efficiency showerheads are among the options. Aerators on faucets, high-efficiency showerheads, and shower flow restrictors all assist to minimize water use and the volume of water entering your septic system.

  1. Washing small loads of laundry on the large-load cycle of your washing machine wastes both water and electricity.
  2. If you are unable to pick a load size, only whole loads of washing should be done.
  3. Doing all of your household laundry in one day may appear to be a time-saving strategy; nevertheless, it can cause damage to your septic system by denying your septic tank adequate time to handle waste and may even cause your drainfield to overflow.
  4. Other Energy Star appliances can save you a lot of money on energy and water bills.
  • Toilets with high energy efficiency. Toilet flushing accounts for 25 to 30% of total home water use. Many older homes have toilets with 3.5- to 5-gallon reservoirs, but contemporary, high-efficiency toilets consume 1.6 gallons or less of water every flush. Replacing existing toilets with high-efficiency ones is a simple approach to minimize the amount of household water that enters your septic system. Aerators for faucets and high-efficiency showerheads are two examples. Aerators for faucets, high-efficiency showerheads, and shower flow restrictors all assist to minimize water use and the volume of water entering your septic system. Machines to clean clothes. Washing small loads of laundry on your washing machine’s large-load cycle wastes both water and electricity. You may save water by selecting the appropriate load size. If you are unable to pick a load size, you should only run full loads of laundry. Make an effort to spread washing machine use throughout the week. Doing all of your household laundry in one day may appear to be a time-saving strategy, but it can cause damage to your septic system by denying your septic tank adequate time to process waste and flooding your drainfield. Clothes washers that have earned theENERGY STARlabel consume 35 percent less energy and 50 percent less water than ordinary ones. Other Energy Star appliances can save you a lot of money on energy and water.
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Toilet Paper Needs to Be Flushed! Check out this video, which demonstrates why the only item you should flush down your toilet are toilet paper rolls.

Think at the sink!

Your septic system is made up of a collection of living organisms that digest and treat the waste generated by your household. Pouring pollutants down your drain can kill these organisms and cause damage to your septic system as well as other things. Whether you’re at the kitchen sink, the bathtub, or the utility sink, remember the following:

  • If you have a clogged drain, avoid using chemical drain openers. To prevent this from happening, use hot water or a drain snake
  • Never dump cooking oil or grease down the sink or toilet. It is never a good idea to flush oil-based paints, solvents, or huge quantities of harmful cleansers down the toilet. Even latex paint waste should be kept to a bare minimum. Disposal of rubbish should be avoided or limited to a minimum. Fats, grease, and particles will be considerably reduced in your septic tank, reducing the likelihood of your drainfield being clogged.

Own a recreational vehicle (RV), boat or mobile home?

When dealing with a clogged drain, stay away from chemical drain openers if possible. To prevent clogging, use hot water or a drain snake; Don’t ever flush cooking oil or grease down the toilet. It is never a good idea to flush oil-based paints, solvents, or huge amounts of harmful cleansers down the toilet. We should strive to reduce even latex paint waste. Disposal of rubbish should be eliminated or limited to a minimum. In turn, this will dramatically limit the quantity of fats, grease, and sediments that enter your septic tank and eventually block its drainfield; and

  • The National Small Flows Clearinghouse’s Septic System Care hotline, which may be reached toll-free at 800-624-8301, has a factsheet on safe wastewater disposal for RV, boat, and mobile home owners and operators.

Maintain Your Drainfield

The National Small Flows Clearinghouse’s Septic System Care hotline, which may be reached toll-free at 800-624-8301, has a fact sheet on safe wastewater disposal for RV, boat, and mobile home owners and operators.

  • Parking: Do not park or drive on your drainfield at any time. Plan your tree plantings so that their roots do not grow into your drainfield or septic system. An experienced septic service provider can recommend the appropriate distance for your septic tank and surrounding landscaping, based on your specific situation. Locating Your Drainfield: Keep any roof drains, sump pumps, and other rainfall drainage systems away from the drainfield area. Excess water causes the wastewater treatment process to slow down or halt completely.

7 Tips to Take Care of Your Septic System

Do not park or drive on your drainfield; it is illegal to do so. Construction: Plant trees at a proper distance from your drainfield to prevent roots from growing into your septic system. An experienced septic service provider can recommend the appropriate distance for your septic tank and surrounding landscaping, based on your particular situation. Roof drains, sump pumps, and other rainfall drainage systems should be kept away from the drainfield area.

In excess water, the wastewater treatment process will slow down or halt completely;

Maintaining a home’s septic system may seem like a daunting and stinky task, but it’s really not. Being mindful of what you’re doing inside the home will keep the system healthy.

Preventing and treating problems with your septic system is not difficult and does not have to be expensive. Failure to maintain your septic system, on the other hand, might result in significant financial loss, since digging up and rebuilding a septic system can cost tens of thousands of dollars.

What Is a Septic System?

Because it handles all of the wastewater that comes from your home, including the water from the bathrooms, kitchen, and laundry room, if your home is not connected to a municipal water and sewer system, your septic system is essential. Septic systems are generally comprised of a tank, into which wastewater is channeled for treatment and the particles are separated from the liquid. Microorganisms break down the organic stuff in wastewater, allowing it to be recycled. A perforated pipe system transports wastewater from there to a drain or leach field, which collects the effluent.

Get Familiar With Your Septic System

Because it handles all of the wastewater that comes from your home, including the water from the bathrooms, kitchen, and laundry room, if your home is not connected to a municipal water and sewer system, your septic system is critical. Typical septic systems include a tank into which wastewater is channeled for treatment and solid waste is segregated from liquid waste. Microorganisms break down the organic stuff in wastewater, allowing it to be used for other purposes. A perforated pipe system transports wastewater from there to a drain or leach field where it is treated.

Have It Pumped Routinely

Every three to five years, the ordinary residential septic system should be pumped (that is, the sediments should be removed). According on the size of the tank, the typical price of pumping a residential septic tank is between $300 and $600. When you contact a septic service company, they will also inspect your septic tank for leaks and evaluate the sludge layers in your tank for any problems. Remember to save a copy of any maintenance paperwork pertaining to work performed on your septic tank.

Spread Your Washing Machine/Dishwasher Usage Throughout the Week

You may believe that scheduling a “laundry day,” during which you wash all of your clothing and possibly even run your dishwasher, would save you time. However, it puts a great deal of strain on your septic system. If you don’t allow your septic system enough time to process the wastewater, you risk overloading the system and flooding your drainfield with wastewater. Replace this with doing a full load of laundry (to ensure that you are not wasting water) a couple of times a week.

Don’t Treat Your Toilet Like a Trash Can

The only item that should be flushed down the toilet that does not come out of your body is toilet paper. Everything else should be discarded. This implies that there will be no tissues, diapers, feminine items, hair, dental floss, or anything else. Toilet paper is supposed to decompose in the septic tank after it has been used. Any additional materials are not permitted; they will clog and cause harm to your septic tank.

Make sure you use toilet paper that is safe for use with your septic system. Some of the luxurious, pricey ones that include lotions and additional plys may clog your system or introduce unwelcome substances into it.

Think About What You Dump Down the Kitchen Sink Drain

We flush a variety of items down the kitchen sink that might cause serious damage to a septic system. Never flush objects down the sink drain, including coffee grounds, eggshells, medicine, produce stickers, flour, and other such items. All of these things can clog pipes and cause screens to get obstructed. Do not dispose of any oil, including cooking oils and paint, grease, and fat since these substances will block your sewer line and cause it to back up into your home. Even dairy products such as milk, cream, and butter are harmful if they are flushed down the toilet.

When you use a garbage disposal in conjunction with a septic tank, the ground-up food particles contribute to the layer of solids that accumulates at the bottom of the tank’s bottom.

Be Careful With Cleaning Chemicals

Cleaning agents that homeowners use can be harmful to the beneficial microorganisms in their septic systems. When washing textiles, avoid using harsh chemicals such as bleach. If you absolutely must, use only a little quantity of the product. Use of drain cleaners is discouraged since, in addition to destroying beneficial bacteria, they can cause harm to the tank itself. Alternatively, if a plunger does not work, a toilet drain snake, which is also effective on clogged kitchen and bathroom sinks, may be used.

Quaternary ammonia is also present in antibacterial soaps and disinfectants, which should be avoided.

Protect Your Drainfield

As previously said, proper management of your drainfield begins with careful monitoring of water consumption and the materials that enter your septic system. Never drive or park a vehicle on top of your drainage system. Make certain that gutters and sump pumps discharge water far enough away from the drainfield to prevent flooding. Avoid growing trees and bushes in close proximity to the drainfield since the roots of these plants might interfere with the pipes.

Maintain Your Septic System Naturally

On December 5, 2020, the information was updated. However, while this isn’t an enjoyable topic for polite discussion, having your septic system back up into your home is far from pleasant. There are actions that you can do to not only avoid septic issues in the future, but also to guarantee that the process of breaking down flushed waste proceeds as it should.

A Well-Functioning Septic System

The title of this article may be “The Care and Maintenance of the Gut in Your Yard,” which would be more descriptive. Understanding the necessity and advantages of eating dietary fiber, alkaline-forming foods, and taking probiotics for your own gut health will help you recognize the similarities between keeping a healthy septic system and maintaining a healthy digestive system. There are some items that you should avoid putting into any septic system, just as there are certain substances that are favorable to putting into our own digestive systems.

If you wait until there is a problem, you have waited too long and should contact a septic cleaning firm to pump your tank immediately. Slow water drainage, as well as water backing up in the toilet, dishwasher, tub, or sinks, are signs that you may have a septic system problem.

Septic System Care and Maintenance Tips:

  • A family of four living in a house with a 1,000-gallon tank should have their septic system cleaned every four years, according to the EPA. Inquire with your local septic cleaning firm about how frequently you should contact them
  • Avoid using bleach-containing solutions to clean your toilets since it kills the bacteria that are necessary for the breakdown of waste particles in your septic system. Try this all-natural toilet cleanser
  • It works great.
  • When you add yeast to your septic system, it helps to aggressively break down waste particles, which is beneficial. Using the first time, flush a 12-cup package of dried baking yeast down the toilet. After the initial addition, add 14 cup of instant yeast every 4 months for the next 4 months. For those who are planning to install or have their existing septic system pumped, it’s a good idea to know precisely where it is in your yard so that you don’t have to dig up a lot of your lawn when the system is pumped in the future. With a tape measure, measure the precise distance between the septic tank lid and the home, and then snap a photo of the exact distance with your mobile phone to prove you were accurate. Maintain a copy of the snapshot in a home maintenance file on your computer for future reference.
Deborah Tukua

Deborah Tukua is a natural living and healthy lifestyle writer who has written seven non-fiction books, including Naturally Sweet Blender Treats. She lives in Hawaii with her family. Since 2004, she has contributed to the Farmers’ Almanac as a writer.

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Septic tank systems are notoriously difficult to maintain and may be quite expensive when they fail. Over the course of almost two decades, we’ve only had to pump our septic tank once. Here’s how we maintain our system running smoothly: DIY Septic Tank Treatment

Natural Enzyme Action

Septic tanks, like your stomach, require the presence of beneficial bacteria and enzymes in order to break down the particles that travel through them. It is possible to obtain these helpful bacteria and enzymes from a variety of sources, but one of our favorites is rotting tomatoes. These naturally occurring enzymes are proteins known as Pectinase or Pectinolytic enzymes, and they break down pectin. Lipase, hydrolyzes, and lyase are all members of the pectinase family of enzymes that are capable of breaking down pectin and plant cell walls in the natural environment, therefore aiding in the decomposition and recycling of waste plant materials.

DIY Septic Tank Treatment

It is simple and inexpensive to treat a septic tank with DIY solutions. We “feed” our septic tank 3-4 rotting tomatoes every 3 months or so, which we do through our garbage disposal. The idea is to make sure that you split up the tomato and pass only half a tomato or so at a time through the water while it is running to ensure that it is properly flushed out. As an alternative, if you don’t have access to a garbage disposal, you may throw two or three large rotting tomatoes in a bag (chances are they’re already packed away in a bag in your refrigerator and starting to liquefy anyway!).

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Dump them into a toilet (but don’t use bleach!) and flush them away.

Normally, having rotten tomatoes every few months isn’t a big deal because the garden overproduces in the spring, summer, and fall, and there are always a few extras available.

At the very least, they aren’t going to waste completely.

Toilet Paper No-No’s

When we had our septic system pumped for the first time in more than two decades, we were assured that it was totally unnecessary because the system was operating well and looked fantastic. During our conversation, the gentleman shared numerous true horror stories of systems he’d witnessed at his place of employment where the families utilized “fluffy” toilet paper. That one where the cute little bears in the advertisements are pleased of themselves for not having any lint left behind? You know the one I’m talking about.

Image courtesy of Ian Haycoxis (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0).

He especially inquired about the brand of tissue we use, which is Scott Tissue.

It degrades swiftly and does not “glop” into a clog-inducing mass on the lines. Alternatively, if you don’t happen to have any rotting tomatoes on hand, you may use baking or brewing yeast to bring healthy bacteria to your tank as an alternative.

How to Clean Septic Tank Naturally

Yeast and sugar are excellent natural septic tank cleaners, and here’s an easy method for using them.

Septic Tank Cleaner

2 cups granulated sugar 5 cups of hot water (optional) 3 tbsp. active dry yeast Sugar and yeast should be dissolved in water. Pour the mixture into a toilet (that does not contain bleach!) and flush it. This is best done at night so that the yeast may continue to work throughout the night; do not flush for at least 3 hours after completion.

Additional Tips:

sugar (brown): 2 c. Warm water in the amount of 5 cups baker’s yeast (around 3 tablespoons) In a small bowl, combine the sugar and the yeast. Flush the mixture down the toilet (be sure it doesn’t include bleach!) Ideally, do this at night so that the yeast may continue to work overnight. Do not flush for at least 3 hours after completing this step.

Love this DIY Septic Tank Treatment Idea? Pin it!

If you reside in a rural area of the United States, the chances are good that you will not be linked to a municipal water and sewer system. This means that your water will come from a well, and your body waste will be disposed of in a septic tank. It is the latter that we will be discussing in this article. After all, while septic tanks are capable of decomposing human waste on their own, they occasionally require assistance, and it is at this point that we as homeowners turn to the internet for information on the finest septic tank treatments available.

  1. Consider it to be akin to re-digesting the solids before sending them to a distribution box (D-box) and then out onto a leaching field to break them down.
  2. If anything isn’t operating properly, you may find yourself stuck with obstructions and a buildup of gasses.
  3. After all, septic repairs are not inexpensive – I had to have my leaching field replaced a few years ago, which resulted in a bill of several thousand dollars.
  4. In all likelihood, it will require pumping, however we have been able to go even longer without the need for pumping.

Here are 5 of the greatest septic tank treatments that we’ve come across that you may use if you need to give your septic system a little more TLC:

Green Gobbler Septic Saver Pacs

A septic saver that is designed to digest grease and fats while also breaking down paper and organic debris in order to keep your sewage line and septic tank free of blockages. It also aids in the reduction of smells, no matter how offensive they may be! To use Septic Saver, simply drop one pack into your downstairs bathroom toilet and flush it once a month for preventive septic tank maintenance. Each bag of Septic Saver contains six water-soluble packs; to use, simply drop and flush one pack into your downstairs bathroom toilet once a month for preventive septic tank maintenance.

Rid-X Septic Tank Treatment Enzymes

This is the brand that you’ll see the most advertisements for on television, and in our experience, these enzyme pacs are really effective! Septic backups are prevented by continually breaking down household waste – the natural bacteria and sophisticated enzymes begin working instantly to target paper, protein, oils, and grease. Rid-X is available in a variety of sizes. One packet of provides a one-month treatment for septic tanks ranging in capacity from 700 to 1,500 gallons. To use, simply insert a pouch in your toilet and flush it down the toilet.

Instant Power 1868 Septic Shock

We have found that these enzyme pacs are effective and are the brand that is most commonly marketed on television. With Rid-X, you can reduce the likelihood of septic backups by continually breaking down household waste – the natural bacteria and sophisticated enzymes begin working right away to destroy paper, protein, oils, and grease. Contains a one-month dosage for septic tanks ranging from 700 to 1,500 gallons in capacity. Place a pouch in your toilet and flush it down the toilet to get started.

Bio-Tab for Septic Systems

This is the brand that is most frequently shown on television, and in our experience, these enzyme pacs are effective! Rid-X helps to avoid septic backups by continually breaking down household waste – the natural bacteria and sophisticated enzymes begin working instantly to destroy paper, protein, oils, and grease. One packet of provides a one-month treatment for septic tanks ranging in size from 700 to 1,500 gallons. To use, simply insert a pouch in your toilet and flush it down the drain.

Walex Bio-Active Drop-Ins Septic Additive

Each month, you’ll receive a box that is safe for all types of plumbing and environmentally friendly – just put it in the toilet and flush it. With each dose, billions of bacteria and septic-specific enzymes are released, assisting in the prevention of blockages and the dissolution of solid materials. The use of Bio-Active helps to replenish the biological population of beneficial worker bacteria and enzymes, which are responsible for solids reduction. Each package contains 12 packets, which is enough for a year’s supply.

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How to Naturally Clean & Maintain Your Septic System

Without the proper knowledge, septic systems may be difficult to keep up with and manage. If you suspect that your toilets aren’t flushing properly or that your pipes may need some cleaning, you should avoid introducing harsh chemicals into your septic system since they can disturb the naturally existing biome of bacteria that is necessary for the system to work effectively. Our team at Fagone Plumbing was inspired to publish a blog post that would teach readers how to add a natural cleanse to their septic system without endangering the system’s performance.

Simple, Quick Cleanse

This procedure is a quick, mild remedy that is also effective. It is very simple to use. It is necessary to use the power of baking soda, vinegar, and lemon to achieve success with this procedure. Starting with a quarter-cup baking soda and a half-cup vinegar mixture, pour it directly into the toilet. Repeat this process several times. After that, squeeze in two teaspoons of lemon juice. A chemical reaction occurs when the baking soda and vinegar are mixed, resulting in a fizzing sound and the breakdown of grime and debris.

Following a flush, this solution will clean the inside of your toilet bowl and the pipes that run through your system as a result.

Homemade Septic Tank Treatment

As previously stated in this article, healthy bacteria are required to guarantee that your septic system is operating effectively. Because of the bacteria in your system, sediments are broken down more quickly, allowing for simpler movement to the leach field. In addition, it is beneficial when it comes time to have your septic system pumped. The following are the elements that will be necessary for this natural solution: Water, sugar, cornmeal, and dry yeast are the main ingredients. Prepare the combination by first heating around a half gallon of water until it comes to a boil.

  • Because the sugar will function as the initial food source for your bacteria!
  • Allow the cornmeal to absorb the water before mixing everything together until it is well mixed.
  • Once everything has been blended, pour the mixture into the toilet and flush it.
  • That way, you may be certain that the mixture is pushed all the way into your septic tank.

Upon completion of this treatment, your tank should have returned to a healthy bacterial environment. It is recommended to give these cleanses every 6 months or so, but only if you feel that there is a shortage of microorganisms in the system.

Fagone Plumbing Can Help!

If you have any reason to believe your septic system may be performing better, give Fagone Plumbing a call right away! It doesn’t matter if it’s a bacteria problem or something else; we will be able to assess the problem and deliver the most cost-effective solution to get your septic system back up and running correctly!

Tips For Keeping Your Septic Tank Running

The septic tank is a septic tank. It’s one of the most important pieces of equipment in your house — yet it’s also one of the most mysterious. Even though it might be tough to comprehend something that cannot be seen, understanding your septic tank and how it works is essential. The septic tank is where all of the wastewater from your house, including that from your kitchen, bathrooms, and even laundry rooms, is dumped. We’ve included a quick description of the operation of your septic system, as well as some suggestions for maintaining it in good operating order.

  1. The tank itself, as well as the drain field, are the two primary components of the septic system.
  2. Upon entering, solid components are classified as either scum or sludge, depending on how much of them there are in total.
  3. Within the tank, bacteria break down scum and sludge, and the separated water is sent through filters before entering the drain field.
  4. Tips for keeping your septic system in good working order Reduce your water consumption to a bare minimum.
  5. When there is an excessive amount of water flowing into the system, polluted water might escape from the tank and into the drain field.
  6. Water use by a single person every day amounts to 70 gallons, which may be surprising, but is an accurate reflection of the situation.
  • Toilets: toilets account for 25-30 percent of the total amount of water consumed by a home. Toilets that are more recent in design consume less water than older models. Give us a call right now if your home is equipped with out-of-date toilets! In the long run, your septic system will be grateful to you.
  • Tissue boxes: toilets account for 25-30 percent of all the water consumed by a home. In comparison to older models, newer toilets consume less water. To find out whether your home has outdated toilets, give us a call right away! In the long run, your septic system will thank you.

Keep an eye on what you dump down your drains. It is critical to consider what goes down your drains before flushing it. If you find yourself second-guessing an item, it is likely that it is not intended to be flushed down the toilet.

  • Grease: While putting grease down your drain may seem like a reasonable choice, it is not recommended. Using grease to clean your pipes and drain field has the potential to clog them! It sounds like something out of a nightmare
  • Due to our familiarity with flushing toilet paper down our toilets, we have a propensity to believe that comparable goods such as tissues or wet wipes are also safe to flush. This is because the microorganisms in your septic tank are unable to break down these materials, and they will most likely continue floating in your tank.

Make an appointment for a standard checkup.

Septic tanks holding 1,000 gallons or fewer need to be serviced every five years or less. For septic tank maintenance, call us at 804-758-4314 to schedule an appointment with a Miller’s specialist.

How to Make Your Own Septic System Treatment

You may make your own natural septic tank treatment in the comfort of your own home. Featured image courtesy of John Keeble/Moment/Getty Images When it comes to disposing of household waste, many residences throughout the world rely on septic tanks rather than municipal sewage systems. It is critical that you take adequate care of your septic system in order for it to continue to function correctly. However, many people feel that certain septic system treatments are too costly, too inconvenient, and too potentially unpleasant to use on their tanks.

Using naturally occurring bacteria and enzymes to break down household waste, septic tank treatments are effective.

It also contributes to the maintenance of a healthy bacterial level in your septic tank.

Some, on the other hand, believe that these treatments are prohibitively costly and that they might be dangerous if they infiltrate the water system.

Making Homemade Septic System Treatments

Because of the safety issues around treatments such as Rid-X, some septic tank users have resorted to manufacturing their own septic system remedies. They have the potential to be more environmentally friendly while also providing more value for money. The majority of these therapies are based on the presence of active yeast. A way of balancing the bacterial levels inside a septic system, yeast can be used alone or in combination with either sugar or cornmeal, depending on the application. According to Septic Tank Care, combining 3 cups of warm water, 2 cups of sugar, 2 cups of cornmeal, and 2 packets of yeast in a big bucket then, after the mixture begins to bubble, putting it into your toilet and flushing twice is the best way to clean your tank.

According to the Old Farmers’ Almanac, utilizing yeast to maintain a healthy bacterial balance in your septic tank is an excellent method to keep your tank running smoothly.

Within eight hours of flushing, refrain from taking long showers, washing laundry, or flushing your toilets more than once in one day.

Septic Tank Maintenance Tips

In addition to regular monthly septic tank treatments, there are a variety of different methods for keeping your septic system in good operating order. You should get your system pumped out on a regular basis to keep a backup from forming. The Environmental Protection Agency of the United States urges people who use septic tanks to be cautious about what they dump down their drains. While it may seem apparent to keep tampons, menstrual towels, and any wet wipes out of your septic tank, it is also critical to keep oils, grease, and food waste out of your garbage disposal to a bare minimum.

See also:  Where Does Septic Tank Contents Dumped? (Correct answer)

Employing a drain snake or plunger to attempt to remove a clog is preferable than using chemicals to dissolve it if you do discover a clog in a drain pipe.

Septic tanks may be a dependable and safe means of disposing of home waste; nevertheless, they must be managed with care in order to remain safe and effective over time.

Do I Need Enzymes for My Septic Tank

In addition to septic tanks and grease traps, Herring Sanitation recommends the use of an environmentally friendly digestant (additive) for use in drainage fields, ATU systems, home drains, floor drains, dump sites (including lift stations), lagoons (including seepage ditches), vault toilets, seepage ditches, and sewage spills. Our environmentally friendly waste and grease digestant aids in the digestion of waste, the management of smells, the maintenance of free-flowing drains, the maintenance of septic tanks, the maintenance of grease traps, the digestion of grease, and the improvement of percolation.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) about Eco-Friendly Digestant or Additive

1Do I require enzymes and bacteria additions for the treatment of my septic tank? Over time, waste accumulates in your drain lines and septic tank, causing them to back up. It is recommended by Herring Sanitation that you use a unique combination of bacteria that will help you minimize waste. The natural digesting micro-organisms will not destroy your plumbing or septic system in the same way as chemical drain openers can cause damage. By applying our particular mix on a daily basis, you can help to keep the environment safe.

  • A waste and grease digestant that is environmentally safe can assist in the regular operation of waste disposal systems by increasing the capacity for waste elimination and providing natural aid.
  • It aids in the elimination of scents that attract disease-carrying insects.
  • It assists in the elimination of wet soil and surface puddles caused by the obstruction of the drain field.
  • It aids in the breakdown of grease.
  • 3What makes the product you propose superior to the main brands on the market?
  • This well-known commodity is mostly comprised of sawdust and fillers, neither of which contribute significantly to waste degradation.
  • There are several requirements for septic users, including waste breakdown, hair breakdown, and odor reduction.

4) Do I still have to pump out my septic tank if I use products with enzymes and bacteria additives?

The removal of solid waste from your tank is not possible with any product now available on the market.

The pumping of a standard septic/leach field system is required every two to three years.

Nothing will ever be able to eliminate the requirement to pump a septic tank on a regular basis.

The product Herring sells is packaged in 12 tidy envelopes that are about the size of a packet of hot chocolate (see photo).

In a household setting, you just place one in a new drain each month, and the water will continue to flow. 6 I’m not sure what systems I should use an ecologically friendly digestant (or addition) for, but Any of the following systems can be used with it:

  • Each and every family who utilizes a high dose of antibiotics, anti-bacterials, and bleach in their house on a regular basis (monthly maintenance)
  • The use of shock treatment can improve the performance of sluggish septic, drain, and grease trap systems. Regular monthly maintenance of septic, cesspool, mound, and ATU systems
  • Septic tank replacement
  • Drains in the home (which require monthly maintenance on a regular basis)
  • Grease traps (maintenance performed at the end of each business day and on a weekly basis)
  • Sewage ponds, sewage systems, seepage pits, and a dumping station (where needed) are all included in the price.

7 Can I use the ecologically friendly digestant in meat and poultry factories that are subject to federal inspection? Yes. In meat and poultry industries that are subject to federal inspection, our ecologically friendly digestant is approved for use. Each package contains 12 packets, which should be used once a month for normal household upkeep and cleaning. We recommend that you follow the following schedule. To Place an Order for Enzymes, Please Click Here- Take a printout of this enzyme schedule for your own reference and convenience:

CLR® Healthy Septic System

  • The only septic system treatment to be paired with thePart of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safer Choice Program, which recognizes the product as a safer alternative to typical chemicals. It works instantaneously, can be used at any time of day, and its revolutionary stabilization method allows live, active bacteria to be put into the septic system. It is available in seven different treatments for systems up to 2000 gallons in capacity. Unlike rivals’ products, this revolutionary composition does not contain any detergents, preservatives, or inactive “carriers” that germs might adhere to while in use
  • Instead, it contains only natural ingredients. In comparison to dry septic system treatments, which can only be flushed down toilets, this product may be put down any drain and contains more environmentally friendly components. The precise stability of good bacteria required to help maintain your system working at peak efficiency is restored by this treatment. Solid organic waste such as detergents, soaps, grease, and paper may pile up in your septic tank and must be broken down before it can be securely disposed of into the earth. All of the components of the CLR Healthy Septic System are ecologically friendly. Safe for use on all types of pipes, drains, and porcelain

Look for CLR Healthy Septic System in these sizes

  • Directly into any toilet or drain pipe, pour 4 ounces of the solution. Do not combine with any other type of chemical drain cleaning solution. It is most effective when taken during periods of low water consumption.

In accordance with the California Cleaning Products Right to Know Act, it was found that this product did not need to be disclosed.

Water CAS7732-18-5 Meets EPA Safer Choice Criteria
CAS7732-18-5. Reverse Osmosis (RO) is a water treatment process that removes contaminants from water by passing the water through a membrane, (filter), where contaminants are filtered out yielding more pure quality water.
Sodium Nitrate CAS7631-99-4 Meets EPA Safer Choice Criteria
CAS7631-99-4. It can be used as an additive in industrial greases, as an aqueous solution in closed loop cooling systems, and in a molten state as a heat transfer medium. It is also a common food preservative.
Pseudomonas Putida CAS68332-91-2 Meets EPA Safer Choice Criteria
Monoammonium Phosphate CAS7722-76-1 Meets EPA Safer Choice Criteria
Sodium Thiosulfate CAS10102-17-7 Meets EPA Safer Choice Criteria

According to the California Cleaning Products Right to Know Act, this product was ruled not to be subject to disclosure.

Red No. 40 CAS25956-17-6 Meets EPA Safer Choice Criteria
YellowNo. 5 CAS1934-21-0 Meets EPA Safer Choice Criteria
CAS1934-21-0. A synthetic lemon yellow dye used all over the world, primarily as food coloring.As part of theEPA Safer Choice Program, it has been evaluated and determined to be safer than traditional chemical ingredients.
Acid Blue No.1 CAS3844-45-9 Meets EPA Safer Choice Criteria
CAS3844-45-9. A blue dye used for foods and other substances.As part of theEPA Safer Choice Program, it has been evaluated and determined to be safer than traditional chemical ingredients.

How do I use CLR Healthy Septic System?

In addition to being safe on pipes and porcelain, CLR Healthy Septic System is effective on fats, oils, grease, and other difficult organic debris. A septic system is a type of subterranean wastewater treatment system that is self-contained. A septic tank and a leach/absorption area are the two main components of a septic system.

What is a septic system’s purpose in the household?

The tank’s primary function is to handle waste generated in the home. When the waste is placed in the tank, the water drains to the bottom, the lighter solids rise to the top, and the heavier waste/sludge sinks to the bottom, resulting in effective waste treatment. The sludge/solids that settle to the bottom of the tank must be treated with a septic system treatment in order to transform these materials into liquids, which will then flow to the drain field below.

Safe Cleaners For Your Septic System – Crews Environmental

To handle domestic garbage, the tank is being constructed. Using a gravity-based treatment system, the tank processes waste by allowing water to settle at the bottom, lighter particles to float to the top, and heavier waste/sludge to sink to the bottom. All of the sludge/solids that settle to the bottom of the tank must be treated in order for them to be converted into liquids that can subsequently be discharged to the drain field.

  • Some chemical-based cleaning solutions are safe for septic systems to handle in tiny quantities. Don’t go crazy with your enthusiasm. Utilize natural cleaning products instead to be on the safe side
  • When it comes to septic systems, the best choice is to purchase goods that have been labeled as safe for use with them. A number is assigned by the Environmental Protection Agency to chemicals and pesticides, and that number will be used to assess the safety of the substance. Septic systems are not harmed by environmentally friendly chemicals or biodegradable cleansers
  • Nonetheless, When it comes to laundry detergent, the best options are those that are phosphate-free (minimal sudsing), nontoxic, biodegradable, and not chlorinated. These cleansers do not include any strong chemicals that might harm the microorganisms in a septic tank if used improperly. Good bacteria and enzymes are killed by phosphate-based cleaning agents used in sewage treatment plants. When used in tiny volumes, ammonia products are completely safe for use in septic systems. In septic tanks, ammonia does not destroy the germs that grow there. Chemicals, such as bleach, should not be used with ammonia. Generally speaking, most water-based cleansers (those including water as the initial component) are acceptable to use in septic tanks. It is important to use drain cleaning, even septic-tank friendly ones, with caution in order to avoid harm to your septic system. Do not use foam drain cleaners
  • Only liquid drain cleaners should be used
  • Certain household goods that you currently use and have on hand are safe to use in your septic system. Baking soda, vinegar (both white vinegar and apple cider vinegar), Borax, OxiClean, and bleach are some of the items that may be used to clean extremely well while still being safe for septic systems to utilize. As an added bonus, oxidized bleaches are a less dangerous option to chlorine bleach. When you flush your toilet with Epsom salts, it can be good to your septic tank’s drain field, since it increases the amount of magnesium in the soil, which promotes plant development.

4 WAYS TO ENSURE YOUR SEPTIC TANK CLEANING GOES SMOOTHLY

Some chemical-based cleaning solutions can be handled in modest quantities by septic systems. You shouldn’t take things too far.’ Utilize natural cleaning products to stay on the safe side. When it comes to septic systems, the best choice is to purchase goods that have been labeled as safe to use with them. A number is assigned to chemicals and pesticides by the Environmental Protection Agency, and that number will aid in determining their safety. septic systems are not harmed by environmentally friendly chemicals or biodegradable cleansers; nonetheless, Those that are phosphate-free (low sudsing), nontoxic, biodegradable, and non-chlorine-based are the finest to use in laundry detergent.

  • Good bacteria and enzymes are killed by phosphate-based cleaning products used on sewage treatment systems.
  • Bacteria in septic tanks are not killed by ammonia.
  • It is safe to use most water-based cleansers (i.e., those that contain water as the initial ingredient) in septic tanks.
  • Don’t use foam drain cleaners, only liquid drain cleaners; several household goods that you currently use and have on hand are safe to use in your septic tank.
  • As an added benefit, oxidized bleaches are a less dangerous option to chlorine bleach.

Septic Tank Bacteria: What You Need to Know

In the case of a new septic tank owner, or if you’re just not familiar with the way your septic tank operates, you may not be aware of the importance of bacteria and how it affects your septic tank’s operation. Bacteria contributes to the proper operation of your septic tank over time. Your septic tank would most certainly jam up very fast if there were no microorganisms present. By following proper septic tank management procedures, you may encourage the growth of beneficial bacteria. The way you utilize your septic tank, as well as the items you flush down your drains, can have an influence on how well it functions.

Why Is Septic Tank Bacteria Important?

Solid waste is continuously drained down the drain to the septic tank. Whenever solids are introduced into the tank, they sink to the bottom and accumulate there. Over time, such sediments will begin to accumulate in the sewer system. In order to prevent this, the tank must be pumped every three to five years since the solids in the tank always ascend to the top of the tank. If the solids reach the drainfield pipe, which is located towards the top of the septic tank, microscopic particles will be released into the drainage system.

Bacteria reduces the amount of bacteria that accumulates at the bottom of the tank.

Whenever the liquids in the tank reach the drainfield, they are securely discharged into the yard and do not become clogged.

What Can You Do to Promote Septic Tank Bacteria Growth?

Septic tanks inherently contain bacteria that will develop and multiply. By draining more solid waste down into the tank on a consistent basis, you encourage the growth of bacteria. However, there are several things you can do to your septic tank that will help to slow the spread of germs. All of the items meant to kill bacteria such as antibacterial soaps, bleach, antibiotics, and other products designed to kill bacteria have the potential to enter your tank and harm some of the beneficial bacteria in your tank.

It is possible that you may need to alter the way your family operates in order to prevent flushing these items down the toilet.

Before washing soiled garments, soak them in vinegar for a few minutes, and mix baking soda into your laundry detergent before putting it in the machine.

If you require a secure location to dispose of your medication, consult with your doctor to determine where you may properly dispose of your medication waste. It’s possible that your doctor is aware of medicine-recycling activities taking place in your neighborhood.

Do You Need to Put Bacteria In Your Septic Tank?

Some firms manufacture bacteria that may be added to your septic tank in order to support good functioning of the system. However, if you follow the instructions to the letter, microbial additives should not be required. Assuming you keep the amount of bacteria-killing agents and chemicals in your drains to a minimum, your tank should have enough bacteria to perform its functions. Whether or not you decide to employ septic tank bacteria, you should check with your local sanitation authorities to see if any chemicals or other materials are prohibited from being flushed down the toilet.

If you’re not sure which septic tank bacteria firms are the best, ask the specialist who pumps your septic tank for a suggestion.

Al’s Septic Tank Service is delighted to speak with you about septic tank bacteria and other septic tank-related issues.

To learn more, please contact us immediately.

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